History Main / InventoryManagementPuzzle

11th Aug '16 9:22:12 AM htuttle
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* The ''{{X-Com}}'' games gave each soldier a backpack, belt, shoulder and thigh straps, and two hands to hold their gear. Each location had a differently sized grid and varying TU costs to move to other locations. Then you had to factor in equipment weight (armour is curiously weightless) and its effect on stamina. Oh, and programming limitations only allowed you to bring 80 pieces of gear on a mission. This counts guns and magazines separately. The 80 item limit is {{egregious}} on base defense missions, when the available equipment is selected from the base's stores. If you've got a big pile of Earth weapons still, you won't be using your Heavy Plasmas. Or worse, a lot of clips but no weapons!

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* The ''{{X-Com}}'' ''[[{{VideoGame/XCOM}} X-COM]]'' games gave each soldier a backpack, belt, shoulder and thigh straps, and two hands to hold their gear. Each location had a differently sized grid and varying TU costs to move to other locations. Then you had to factor in equipment weight (armour is curiously weightless) and its effect on stamina. Oh, and programming limitations only allowed you to bring 80 pieces of gear on a mission. This counts guns and magazines separately. The 80 item limit is {{egregious}} on base defense missions, when the available equipment is selected from the base's stores. If you've got a big pile of Earth weapons still, you won't be using your Heavy Plasmas. Or worse, [[ItWorksBetterWithBullets a lot of clips but no weapons!weapons!]]
4th Aug '16 1:42:12 AM PaulA
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* They made a whole game almost out of this alone in 2009's ''TheVoid''. Most of the game is about collecting Color, which amounts to food for your soul, without which, you fade out of existence, processing it in your Hearts, turning it into Nerva which is then used to fuel your travel, planting and mining more Color, combat and feeding the NPC Sisters to get them to help you. And surprisingly enough it works, keeping you on edge constantly, because any resource management mistake can be lethal.

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* They made a whole game almost out of this alone in 2009's ''TheVoid''.''VideoGame/TheVoid''. Most of the game is about collecting Color, which amounts to food for your soul, without which, you fade out of existence, processing it in your Hearts, turning it into Nerva which is then used to fuel your travel, planting and mining more Color, combat and feeding the NPC Sisters to get them to help you. And surprisingly enough it works, keeping you on edge constantly, because any resource management mistake can be lethal.
30th Jul '16 3:43:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''UltimaVII'' and ''UltimaVIIPartII'' did this in an interesting way. Besides the standard numerical weight and size limits, the size of an object's sprite factored in. Inventory was not handled as a list or even a grid, but a huge pile of sprites that could be dragged freely around the (2-dimensional) interior of a container. The Inventory Management Puzzle was less Tetris and more Eye Spy.

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* ''UltimaVII'' ''VideoGame/UltimaVII'' and ''UltimaVIIPartII'' ''VideoGame/UltimaVIIPartII'' did this in an interesting way. Besides the standard numerical weight and size limits, the size of an object's sprite factored in. Inventory was not handled as a list or even a grid, but a huge pile of sprites that could be dragged freely around the (2-dimensional) interior of a container. The Inventory Management Puzzle was less Tetris and more Eye Spy.



* In ''{{Everquest}} 2'', not only are you physically limited to the amount of slots you have for inventory, each item has a specific weight and the amount that you can carry is restricted to a factor of your current strength; carrying more slows down your movement speed. Therefore, in the early stages of your character you are severely limited to what you can carry, but after enough levels you'll be able to carry six steel strongboxes and several dozen suits of armor with little difficulty.

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* In ''{{Everquest}} ''VideoGame/{{Everquest}} 2'', not only are you physically limited to the amount of slots you have for inventory, each item has a specific weight and the amount that you can carry is restricted to a factor of your current strength; carrying more slows down your movement speed. Therefore, in the early stages of your character you are severely limited to what you can carry, but after enough levels you'll be able to carry six steel strongboxes and several dozen suits of armor with little difficulty.



* ''DungeonSiege'' doesn't even try to hide how cruel it is with this trope. Rather than giving you any way to expand the inventory of your characters, it lets you sacrifice a party slot for a ''pack mule'' that has a bigger inventory but cannot fight or level up. The expansion alleviated this somewhat with the introduction of inventory-expanding backpacks ([[FridgeLogic then how were you carrying everything before?]]). However the "Transmute" spell alleviates this somewhat - you can transmute most items to gold for a percentage loss in value compared to selling them direct. Unfortunately you are not guaranteed to find the spell before your inventory maxes out.

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* ''DungeonSiege'' ''VideoGame/DungeonSiege'' doesn't even try to hide how cruel it is with this trope. Rather than giving you any way to expand the inventory of your characters, it lets you sacrifice a party slot for a ''pack mule'' that has a bigger inventory but cannot fight or level up. The expansion alleviated this somewhat with the introduction of inventory-expanding backpacks ([[FridgeLogic then how were you carrying everything before?]]). However the "Transmute" spell alleviates this somewhat - you can transmute most items to gold for a percentage loss in value compared to selling them direct. Unfortunately you are not guaranteed to find the spell before your inventory maxes out.
13th Jul '16 11:52:04 AM StFan
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** In the [[VideoGame/HarvestMoonOriginalSeries very first one]], you can only have two tools equipped at a time.. and you can only ever carry ONE item, which made harvesting and gift-giving a real pain in the ass sometimes.

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** In the [[VideoGame/HarvestMoonOriginalSeries [[VideoGame/HarvestMoon1 very first one]], you can only have two tools equipped at a time..time... and you can only ever carry ONE item, which made harvesting and gift-giving a real pain in the ass sometimes.






* Annoyingly used in ''FireEmblem'', where each character can only carry 5 objects, and dropping 1 makes it vanish FOREVER!. However, you can leave items with merchants. The majority of the time items can be sent to the convoy on receiving them if the character doesn't have enough room to hold them, and items only get drop-lost when the character is manually directed to drop them... the uses for which are vanishingly small.
** ''Path of Radiance'' lets you have 4 items and 4 weapons, whereas ''Radiant Dawn'' has a full 7 slots that you can use stuff with. ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' and ''Thracia 776'' had the same system as ''Radiant Dawn'', whereas ''Mystery of the Emblem'' has the same system as ''Path of Radiance''.
* In the Genesis ''ShiningForce'' games, each character is limited to four items. Including their weapon (there's no armor in either game) and their magic ring if they're using one. Fortunately, the first game allows you to store stuff in your Headquarters, and the second game lets you store items in the Caravan once you're about a third of the way into the game.
* ''OgreBattle 64: Person of Lordly Caliber'', a unit could only carry up to ten consumable items. This doesn't seem so bad, except for the fact that units can be made of five characters, which averages to two items per character. To make matters worse, when a unit travels on a stage, a meter that measures fatigue fills up rather quickly. There are special items can be used to lower fatigue, but they take up item slots that could be used for healing items. This is nothing to say about the cost of the items relative to the amount of money you receive in this game.

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* Annoyingly used in ''FireEmblem'', ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'', where each character can only carry 5 objects, and dropping 1 makes it vanish FOREVER!. However, you can leave items with merchants. The majority of the time items can be sent to the convoy on receiving them if the character doesn't have enough room to hold them, and items only get drop-lost when the character is manually directed to drop them... the uses for which are vanishingly small.
**
small. ''Path of Radiance'' lets you have 4 items and 4 weapons, whereas ''Radiant Dawn'' has a full 7 slots that you can use stuff with. ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' and ''Thracia 776'' had the same system as ''Radiant Dawn'', whereas ''Mystery of the Emblem'' has the same system as ''Path of Radiance''.
* In the Genesis ''ShiningForce'' ''VideoGame/ShiningForce'' games, each character is limited to four items. Including their weapon (there's no armor in either game) and their magic ring if they're using one. Fortunately, the first game allows you to store stuff in your Headquarters, and the second game lets you store items in the Caravan once you're about a third of the way into the game.
* ''OgreBattle ''VideoGame/OgreBattle 64: Person of Lordly Caliber'', a unit could only carry up to ten consumable items. This doesn't seem so bad, except for the fact that units can be made of five characters, which averages to two items per character. To make matters worse, when a unit travels on a stage, a meter that measures fatigue fills up rather quickly. There are special items can be used to lower fatigue, but they take up item slots that could be used for healing items. This is nothing to say about the cost of the items relative to the amount of money you receive in this game.



* The system is used in the post-apocalyptic ''Literature/FreewayWarrior'' series by the same author, with the additional rule that you lose stealth if you have more items. Oddly, you aren't able to store items excess items in the car you spend most of your time driving.
* Some books in the ''[[Literature/TimeMachineSeries Time Machine]]'' gamebook series allow you to choose an item to take with you to the past. So, you can take a tiny compass... a tiny lockpick... OR a huge unwieldy scary mask, but only ONE of these. (And heaven help you if you [[UnwinnableByDesign choose the wrong one.]])

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* The system is used in the post-apocalyptic ''Literature/FreewayWarrior'' series by the same author, with the additional rule that you lose stealth if you have more items. Oddly, you aren't able to store items excess items in the car you spend most of your time driving.
* Some books in the ''[[Literature/TimeMachineSeries Time Machine]]'' ''Literature/{{Time Machine|Series}}'' gamebook series allow you to choose an item to take with you to the past. So, you can take a tiny compass... a tiny lockpick... OR a huge unwieldy scary mask, but only ONE of these. (And heaven help you if you [[UnwinnableByDesign choose the wrong one.]])



* The roleplaying game ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'' sometimes plays with this by giving the [=PCs=] an impractically large amount of assigned equipment, which they ''have'' to take with them (or suffer hefty punishment for abandoning it).
** In the sample mission in the 2nd edition rulebook, the warehouse staff (having heard a treasonous rumor that the [=PCs=] are being sent on a doozy of a deathtrap mission) gleefully unload all the crap taking up valuable warehouse space, including thousands of ball bearings, a 1000-kilogram Teela-O-MLY statue, a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firkin firkin]] of neutronium...
* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' mostly gets by with a weight limit determined by your strength (and a few factors like your race's size and number of legs) and some common sense from the DM ("No you can't pick up the castle and bring it with you, I don't care how many 1 copper piece a day hirelings you can afford"). D&D is also the TropeNamer for BagOfHolding, which is bigger on the inside and reduces the weight of everything within.

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* The roleplaying game ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'' sometimes plays with this by giving the [=PCs=] an impractically large amount of assigned equipment, which they ''have'' to take with them (or suffer hefty punishment for abandoning it).
**
it). In the sample mission in the 2nd edition rulebook, the warehouse staff (having heard a treasonous rumor that the [=PCs=] are being sent on a doozy of a deathtrap mission) gleefully unload all the crap taking up valuable warehouse space, including thousands of ball bearings, a 1000-kilogram Teela-O-MLY statue, a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firkin firkin]] of neutronium...
* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' mostly gets by with a weight limit determined by your strength (and a few factors like your race's size and number of legs) and some common sense from the DM ("No you can't pick up the castle and bring it with you, I don't care how many 1 copper piece a day copper-piece-a-day hirelings you can afford"). D&D ''D&D'' is also the TropeNamer for BagOfHolding, which is bigger on the inside and reduces the weight of everything within.



* While not technically a videogame, a lot of thought appears to have gone into making the inventory mechanics for ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' as complicated as possible. In some cases, the main character has had to "captchalogue" (pick up) useless items just to get the item he actually wants to use out of his "sylladex" (inventory stack) so he can captchalogue it AGAIN and then use it. Rules for which item a character can use vary depending on how many items they've picked up before or after the one they want to use, where the item falls in alphabetical order in relation to the other ones, or whether a value calculated by the number of consonants and vowels in the word matches the same value for the verb you want to use with the item, depending on the "fetch modus" used. Items forced out of the inventory system due to lack of space tend to shoot out with enough force to break or maim whatever is in their path, which has been used to great effect in Strife.

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* While not technically a videogame, video game, a lot of thought appears to have gone into making the inventory mechanics for ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' as complicated as possible. In some cases, the main character has had to "captchalogue" (pick up) useless items just to get the item he actually wants to use out of his "sylladex" (inventory stack) so he can captchalogue it AGAIN and then use it. Rules for which item a character can use vary depending on how many items they've picked up before or after the one they want to use, where the item falls in alphabetical order in relation to the other ones, or whether a value calculated by the number of consonants and vowels in the word matches the same value for the verb you want to use with the item, depending on the "fetch modus" used. Items forced out of the inventory system due to lack of space tend to shoot out with enough force to break or maim whatever is in their path, which has been used to great effect in Strife.
4th Jun '16 9:52:25 AM nombretomado
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* The PS2 game ''VideoGame/DisasterReport'' and its sequel, ''Raw Danger'', had a backpack that carried all your stuff. Since the game was designed as a survival game where speed was more important that carrying everything you could find, you had to make hard choices about what you wanted to carry, as what seemed useful could be useless later. As the game progressed you can get better backpacks with more space, starting with an emergency field aid bag and ending up with a massive camping bag that ''still'' couldn't hold everything you wanted.

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* The PS2 [=PS2=] game ''VideoGame/DisasterReport'' and its sequel, ''Raw Danger'', had a backpack that carried all your stuff. Since the game was designed as a survival game where speed was more important that carrying everything you could find, you had to make hard choices about what you wanted to carry, as what seemed useful could be useless later. As the game progressed you can get better backpacks with more space, starting with an emergency field aid bag and ending up with a massive camping bag that ''still'' couldn't hold everything you wanted.
3rd Jun '16 9:08:33 PM MyFinalEdits
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** The system is also used in the post-apocalyptic ''Literature/FreewayWarrior'' series by the same author, with the additional rule that you lose stealth if you have more items. Oddly, you aren't able to store items excess items in the car you spend most of your time driving.

to:

** * The system is also used in the post-apocalyptic ''Literature/FreewayWarrior'' series by the same author, with the additional rule that you lose stealth if you have more items. Oddly, you aren't able to store items excess items in the car you spend most of your time driving.
3rd Jun '16 1:14:11 PM pi4t
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* The ''Literature/LoneWolf'' gamebook series lets you have 8 backpack items and around 12 Special Items. It can get really hard to decide what to throw out, especially when you continue and find out that one of the things you threw out, thinking it was useless, is for a puzzle in the current book which you now can't do. Thankfully, some Special Items don't count toward your 12-item limit (for example, a sheath that hides the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Sommerswerd]] from evil eyes), and while Meals count toward Backpack inventory, learning Hunting allows you to leave them behind entirely for most areas.
* A choose-your-path book series set in a post apocalyptic Texas handles the situation rather egregiously, setting a backpack limit which would increasingly hinder your stealth abilities and forcing you to abandon items to replace them with new ones or regain said stealth. All this to a character who owns a vehicle he is never an hour's walk from, with no option to use, say, the trunk to hold the excess items!

to:

* The ''Literature/LoneWolf'' gamebook series lets you have 8 backpack items and around 12 Special Items. It can get really hard to decide what to throw out, especially when you continue and find out that one of the things you threw out, thinking it was useless, is for a puzzle in the current book which you now can't do. Thankfully, some Special Items don't count toward your 12-item limit (for example, a sheath that hides the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Sommerswerd]] from evil eyes), and while Meals count toward Backpack inventory, learning Hunting allows you to leave them behind entirely for most areas.
* A choose-your-path book
areas. You can also store items for safekeeping between books.
** The system is also used in the post-apocalyptic ''Literature/FreewayWarrior''
series set in a post apocalyptic Texas handles by the situation rather egregiously, setting a backpack limit which would increasingly hinder your same author, with the additional rule that you lose stealth abilities and forcing if you have more items. Oddly, you aren't able to abandon store items to replace them with new ones or regain said stealth. All this to a character who owns a vehicle he is never an hour's walk from, with no option to use, say, the trunk to hold the excess items!items in the car you spend most of your time driving.
26th May '16 6:48:06 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''XMenLegends 2'' infuriated many players with its inventory management system. There were set limits on the number of pieces of equipment the player's party could carry, and there was a set limit on the number of pieces of equipment that could be stored, but taking up more than half the space in the storage inventory forced the player to run the risk of the game glitching in various and sundry ways. Making things worse, the player could not simply leave pieces of equipment laying on the ground, because those would also count toward the overall total, eventually resulting in the same glitch. Thus, the only way to keep the game from glitching out halfway through was to periodically sell off piles of equipment to Forge, the only way to eliminate a piece of equipment altogether.

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* ''XMenLegends ''VideoGame/XMenLegends 2'' infuriated many players with its inventory management system. There were set limits on the number of pieces of equipment the player's party could carry, and there was a set limit on the number of pieces of equipment that could be stored, but taking up more than half the space in the storage inventory forced the player to run the risk of the game glitching in various and sundry ways. Making things worse, the player could not simply leave pieces of equipment laying on the ground, because those would also count toward the overall total, eventually resulting in the same glitch. Thus, the only way to keep the game from glitching out halfway through was to periodically sell off piles of equipment to Forge, the only way to eliminate a piece of equipment altogether.
7th May '16 11:36:10 PM tadaru
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* Amazon Prime Pantry is a simple example. Each box has a flat shipping rate, and each item is listed with what percentage of the capacity it will take up..

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* Amazon Prime Pantry is a simple example. Each box has a flat shipping rate, and each item is listed with what percentage of the capacity it will take up..up.
7th May '16 11:35:53 PM tadaru
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Added DiffLines:

* Amazon Prime Pantry is a simple example. Each box has a flat shipping rate, and each item is listed with what percentage of the capacity it will take up..
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