History Main / InspectorLestrade

4th Aug '16 4:40:57 AM DeepRed
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Compare FriendOnTheForce, SleuthDatesCop, LopsidedArmOfTheLaw. Not to be confused with InspectorJavert or SympatheticInspectorAntagonist. See also TheCommissionerGordon, if superheroes are involved.

to:

Compare FriendOnTheForce, SleuthDatesCop, LopsidedArmOfTheLaw.TheLopsidedArmOfTheLaw. Not to be confused with InspectorJavert or SympatheticInspectorAntagonist. See also TheCommissionerGordon, if superheroes are involved.
4th Aug '16 4:40:40 AM DeepRed
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Compare FriendOnTheForce, SleuthDatesCop. Not to be confused with InspectorJavert or SympatheticInspectorAntagonist. See also TheCommissionerGordon, if superheroes are involved.

to:

Compare FriendOnTheForce, SleuthDatesCop.SleuthDatesCop, LopsidedArmOfTheLaw. Not to be confused with InspectorJavert or SympatheticInspectorAntagonist. See also TheCommissionerGordon, if superheroes are involved.
6th Jul '16 5:21:22 AM StFan
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-->-- '''Maya Fey''' on '''Dick Gumshoe''', ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney''

to:

-->-- '''Maya Fey''' on (on '''Dick Gumshoe''', Gumshoe'''), ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney''



** This series is notable in that virtually every criminal act the main character runs across includes an attempt to anticipate and reroute the police investigation (which rarely makes the majority of cases even in fiction). A consequence is that somebody has to demonstrate for the readers what conclusions said investigation is supposed to arrive at. There are a few cases in which it's acknowledged the police would have come to the correct conclusion (upon properly examining their collected evidence), just not as quickly. In instances where the police aren't handicapped by OccamsRazor and start out assuming a trick they do rather better.

to:

** This series is notable in that virtually every criminal act the main character runs across includes an attempt to anticipate and reroute the police investigation (which rarely makes the majority of cases even in fiction). A consequence is that somebody has to demonstrate for the readers what conclusions said investigation is supposed to arrive at. There are a few cases in which it's acknowledged the police would have come to the correct conclusion (upon properly examining their collected evidence), just not as quickly. In instances where the police aren't handicapped by OccamsRazor and start out assuming a trick trick, they do rather better.



* Most of the cast of ''Manga/DeathNote'' are this to L and friends, especially Aizawa in the final arc, who figures out that Light is most likely Kira, but can't find any good evidence against him.
** It's not like they are incompetent, it's just Light works in the Special Investigation Team, too. He manipulates them and he knows how to create perfect [[RedHerring Red Herrings]] and other traps. For him, the police are actually still a threat.
* Inspector Kenmochi in ''Manga/TheKindaichiCaseFiles'' is a rare example of a Lestrade who is actually genre savvy. After resisting Kindaichi in the series' first mystery, he is immediately won over and begins calling Kindaichi in to help him solve murders. He is quite aware that Kindaichi is going to solve everything while he just does the legwork, and he doesn't mind. Keep in mind that Kenmochi is a decorated police inspector, while Kindaichi is sixteen years old.

to:

* Most of the cast of ''Manga/DeathNote'' are this to L and friends, especially Aizawa in the final arc, who figures out that Light is most likely Kira, but can't find any good evidence against him.
**
him. It's not like they are incompetent, it's just Light works in the Special Investigation Team, too. He manipulates them and he knows how to create perfect [[RedHerring Red Herrings]] {{Red Herring}}s and other traps. For him, the police are actually still a threat.
* ''Manga/TheKindaichiCaseFiles'':
**
Inspector Kenmochi in ''Manga/TheKindaichiCaseFiles'' is a rare example of a Lestrade who is actually genre savvy. After resisting Kindaichi in the series' first mystery, he is immediately won over and begins calling Kindaichi in to help him solve murders. He is quite aware that Kindaichi is going to solve everything while he just does the legwork, and he doesn't mind. Keep in mind that Kenmochi is a decorated police inspector, while Kindaichi is sixteen years old.



* If [[LightNovel/{{Gosick}} Grevil de Blois]] wasn't one of these, he'd be a [[RichIdiotWithNoDayJob Noble Idiot With No Day Job]]. Luckily for him, Victorique is ready to play Holmes to his Lestrade...and the de Blois family is influential enough to make firing him awkward.

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* ''LightNovel/{{Gosick}}'': If [[LightNovel/{{Gosick}} Grevil de Blois]] wasn't Blois weren't one of these, he'd be a [[RichIdiotWithNoDayJob Noble Idiot With No Day Job]]. Luckily for him, Victorique is ready to play Holmes to his Lestrade... and the de Blois family is influential enough to make firing him awkward.



* Some incarnations of Jim Gordon are this to Franchise/{{Batman}}, particularly stories centered around Batman's early years.
** Actually Gordon becomes this for the Pruitt building sequence of ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', under the pressure he failed to heed Batman's correct instinct that the Joker had another trick up his sleeve. If it weren't for Batman the hostages would have been unintentionally killed by Gordon's orders. Gordon was also dealing with the fact that his son had been taken hostage by Harvey Dent, so that can't have helped.
** Foley in ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises''. During the stock exchange robbery, he actually orders the cops to go after Batman, not after those four guys who were shooting up the stock exchange with submachine guns.
* Recently, Batman's gained another: Edward Nigma, AKA The Riddler, who has (probably) reformed and is trying to use his fame as a villain to leverage a career as a detective. It hasn't gone well yet. At least one storyline has involved Batman and Nigma playing off each other, picking up tips.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'':
**
Some incarnations of Jim Gordon are this to Franchise/{{Batman}}, Batman, particularly stories centered around Batman's early years.
** Actually Gordon becomes this for the Pruitt building sequence of ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', under the pressure he failed to heed Batman's correct instinct that the Joker had another trick up his sleeve. If it weren't for Batman the hostages would have been unintentionally killed by Gordon's orders. Gordon was also dealing with the fact that his son had been taken hostage by Harvey Dent, so that can't have helped.
** Foley in ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises''. During the stock exchange robbery, he actually orders the cops to go after Batman, not after those four guys who were shooting up the stock exchange with submachine guns.
*
Recently, Batman's gained another: Edward Nigma, AKA a.k.a. The Riddler, who has (probably) reformed and is trying to use his fame as a villain to leverage a career as a detective. It hasn't gone well yet. At least one storyline has involved Batman and Nigma playing off each other, picking up tips.



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* ''Film/TheDarkKnightTrilogy'':
** Jim Gordon becomes this for the Pruitt building sequence of ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', under the pressure he failed to heed Batman's correct instinct that the Joker had another trick up his sleeve. If it weren't for Batman the hostages would have been unintentionally killed by Gordon's orders. Gordon was also dealing with the fact that his son had been taken hostage by Harvey Dent, so that can't have helped.
** Foley in ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises''. During the stock exchange robbery, he actually orders the cops to go after Batman, not after those four guys who were shooting up the stock exchange with submachine guns.
[[/folder]]



* In the first SherlockHolmes novel, ''Literature/AStudyInScarlet'', there were actually two such detectives (who were rivals between themselves): Tobias Gregson and the TropeNamer, [[NoNameGiven G.]] Lestrade. It should be noted that Gregson didn't have many significant appearances again afterward, whereas Lestrade gets some bits of CharacterDevelopment and often aids Holmes and Watson. Ironically, Holmes considers Gregson to be the smarter of the two. Watson later remarks in "The Red Circle" that while Gregson and the rest of the official police may be lacking in deductive skill, they are certainly not wanting in courage.
** Also: Inspector Athelney Jones, in ''The Sign of Four'' and ''The Red-Headed League'', and Inspector Stanley Hopkins, in several short stories.
** And a subversion: Inspector Baynes in ''Wisteria Lodge'' is the one official police officer who at the end of the story is praised by Holmes (and justly, as he turned out to have also found the correct solution).
** Averted with Stanley Hopkins, who respects and even looks up to Holmes's methods. Also, Inspector Martin of the Norfolk Constabulary in "The Dancing Men," was delighted to have Holmes' assistance upon learning that the murder victim was his client. Inspector Gregory, who worked with Holmes in "The Adventure Of Silver Blaze" was also warmly praised by Holmes for his investigative ability, lacking only the imagination to imagine what might have happened in a particular situation, and act on that intuition.
* Likewise, Inspector James Japp for Literature/HerculePoirot, though more so in the ''Series/{{Poirot}}'' TV series than in the original novels by Creator/AgathaChristie. This is partly because the early Poirot stories, on which the series is largely based, followed the SherlockHolmes pattern quite rigidly, with Poirot as Holmes, Captain Hastings in the role of Doctor Watson, and Inspector Japp playing the Lestrade part.
** However, it needs to be said that Japp is a ''really competent'' inspector who solved many cases on his own (as evidenced by his [[CharacterOverLap appearance]] in Literature/TommyAndTuppence). It's just that compared to Poirot, ''nobody'' is as competent. Japp also never viewed Poirot as an obstacle. If Poirot was present at a scene, Japp would be GenreSavvy and assume something big was up.
* Archie Goodwin functioned as a Lestrade for ''Literature/NeroWolfe''. However, Archie is smart and quick enough to connect ''most'' of the dots, to the point where he often figures out where his boss is going with a case before the last chapter (deliberately refusing to share it with the reader until Wolfe reveals the solution, of course). But he isn't really bothered when he doesn't: "That's why we keep a genius around here."

to:

* ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'':
**
In the first SherlockHolmes first novel, ''Literature/AStudyInScarlet'', there were actually two such detectives (who were rivals between themselves): Tobias Gregson and the TropeNamer, [[NoNameGiven G.]] Lestrade. It should be noted that Gregson didn't have many significant appearances again afterward, whereas Lestrade gets some bits of CharacterDevelopment and often aids Holmes and Watson. Ironically, Holmes considers Gregson to be the smarter of the two. Watson later remarks in "The Red Circle" that while Gregson and the rest of the official police may be lacking in deductive skill, they are certainly not wanting in courage.
** Also: Inspector Athelney Jones, in ''The Sign of Four'' and ''The Red-Headed League'', and Inspector Stanley Hopkins, in several short stories.
** And a A subversion: Inspector Baynes in ''Wisteria Lodge'' is the one official police officer who at the end of the story is praised by Holmes (and justly, as he turned turns out to have also found the correct solution).
** Averted with Stanley Hopkins, who respects and even looks up to Holmes's methods. methods.
**
Also, Inspector Martin of the Norfolk Constabulary in "The Dancing Men," was Men" is delighted to have Holmes' assistance upon learning that the murder victim was his client. client.
**
Inspector Gregory, who worked works with Holmes in "The Adventure Of of Silver Blaze" was is also warmly praised by Holmes for his investigative ability, lacking only the imagination to imagine what might have happened in a particular situation, and act on that intuition.
* Likewise, Inspector James Japp for Literature/HerculePoirot, though more so in the ''Series/{{Poirot}}'' TV series than in the original novels by Creator/AgathaChristie. This is partly because the early Poirot stories, on which the series is largely based, followed the SherlockHolmes ''Sherlock Holmes'' pattern quite rigidly, with Poirot as Holmes, Captain Hastings in the role of Doctor Watson, and Inspector Japp playing the Lestrade part.
**
part. However, it needs to be said that Japp is a ''really competent'' inspector who solved many cases on his own (as evidenced by his [[CharacterOverLap appearance]] in Literature/TommyAndTuppence).''Literature/TommyAndTuppence''). It's just that compared to Poirot, ''nobody'' is as competent. Japp also never viewed Poirot as an obstacle. If Poirot was is present at a scene, Japp would will be GenreSavvy and assume something big was is up.
* ''Literature/NeroWolfe'':
**
Archie Goodwin functioned functions as a Lestrade for ''Literature/NeroWolfe''.Nero Wolfe. However, Archie is smart and quick enough to connect ''most'' of the dots, to the point where he often figures out where his boss is going with a case before the last chapter (deliberately refusing to share it with the reader until Wolfe reveals the solution, of course). But he isn't really bothered when he doesn't: "That's why we keep a genius around here."



* Westman Block became this in Glen Cook's ''GarrettPI'' series. Justified in that, when Block joined the force, it was more concerned with keeping the city free of riots and the lower classes off the Hill than with actually solving crimes: Block didn't really have anyone to learn proper detective techniques from.
* The father of Literature/EncyclopediaBrown tends to fall into this trope, despite being the chief of police. His son [[ConvictionByCounterfactualClue can usually]] [[ConvictionByContradiction solve the case, though]].
** Mentioned in the books that he ''can'' usually solve the case on his own, and that it's only about once a month or so he needs Encyclopedia's help. Still not the best record, though.

to:

* Westman Block became this in Glen Cook's ''GarrettPI'' ''Literature/GarrettPI'' series. Justified in that, when Block joined the force, it was more concerned with keeping the city free of riots and the lower classes off the Hill than with actually solving crimes: Block didn't really have anyone to learn proper detective techniques from.
* The father of Literature/EncyclopediaBrown tends to fall into this trope, despite being the chief of police. His son [[ConvictionByCounterfactualClue can usually]] [[ConvictionByContradiction solve the case, though]].
**
though]]. Mentioned in the books that he ''can'' usually solve the case on his own, and that it's only about once a month or so he needs Encyclopedia's help. Still not the best record, though.



* Milo Sturgis fills this role in the ''AlexDelaware'' books by JonathanKellerman.

to:

* Milo Sturgis fills this role in the ''AlexDelaware'' ''Literature/AlexDelaware'' books by JonathanKellerman.Creator/JonathanKellerman.



* In ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'', when Captain Pellaeon isn't being TheWatson, he's the good type of this for the Grand Admiral. While he's observant and intelligent, he always comes to simpler conclusions. Thrawn always either overrides him or nudges him into seeing what really happened.
** By the time Pellaeon is an Admiral, however, his strategizing has become much more like Thrawn's.
*** This has a lot to do with Pellaeon being as much Thrawn's protege as as his Watson.

to:

* In ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'', when Captain Pellaeon isn't being TheWatson, he's the good type of this for the Grand Admiral. While he's observant and intelligent, he always comes to simpler conclusions. Thrawn always either overrides him or nudges him into seeing what really happened.
**
happened. By the time Pellaeon is an Admiral, however, his strategizing has become much more like Thrawn's.
***
Thrawn's. This has a lot to do with Pellaeon being as much Thrawn's protege as as his Watson.



** Gil (An ARM agent) does the real detective-ing, while a civilian detective story buff that knew the victim and suspect plays Lestrade. Gil recognizes the kid hoping for this trope to be true, but it's anything but.
** In ''The Patchwork Girl'', alhough technically the Moon is under UN and ARM jurisdiction Gil's still an outsider, and official detective work may interfere with his diplomatic duties. A Luna policewoman and the mayor's son share the role of Lestrade for this story, and Gil tags along behind them figuring things out.

to:

** Gil (An (an ARM agent) does the real detective-ing, while a civilian detective story buff that knew the victim and suspect plays Lestrade. Gil recognizes the kid hoping for this trope to be true, but it's anything but.
** In ''The Patchwork Girl'', alhough although technically the Moon is under UN and ARM jurisdiction Gil's still an outsider, and official detective work may interfere with his diplomatic duties. A Luna policewoman and the mayor's son share the role of Lestrade for this story, and Gil tags along behind them figuring things out.



* When drawing all the comparisons between Sherlock Holmes and ''Series/{{House}}'', Dr. Cuddy most commonly fits the Lestrade role. She was a competent doctor, but spends most of her time behind the scenes in the administrative role. Add into that the fact that in the first seasons, House kind of tricked her into doing his boring legwork and the modern "I hate you, but you're too useful to fire" relationship commonly seen in adaptations today. His team fits this to a lesser degree.
* Captain Leland Stottlemeyer for ''Series/{{Monk}}''. He's a competent policeman, but no match for Monk's skills, as he himself is quite aware.
** [[DrunkenMaster Unless he gets drunk]].
** Take the first two letters of Stottlemeyer's first and last name, along with that of his junior associate Randy Deacon (renamed Disher after the pilot), and you get a shout-out to Lestrade: '''Le'''land '''St'''ottlemeyer + '''Ra'''ndy '''De'''acon = '''Lestrade'''

to:

* When drawing all the comparisons between Sherlock Holmes and ''Series/{{House}}'', Dr. Cuddy most commonly fits the Lestrade role. She was is a competent doctor, but spends most of her time behind the scenes in the administrative role. Add into that the fact that in the first seasons, House kind of tricked her into doing his boring legwork and the modern "I hate you, but you're too useful to fire" relationship commonly seen in adaptations today. His team fits this to a lesser degree.
* Captain Leland Stottlemeyer for ''Series/{{Monk}}''. He's a competent policeman, but no match for Monk's skills, as he himself is quite aware.
**
aware. [[DrunkenMaster Unless he gets drunk]].
**
drunk]]. Take the first two letters of Stottlemeyer's first and last name, along with that of his junior associate Randy Deacon (renamed Disher after the pilot), and you get a shout-out to Lestrade: '''Le'''land '''St'''ottlemeyer + '''Ra'''ndy '''De'''acon = '''Lestrade'''



* To some extent, FBI Special Agent Don Eppes with regard to his brother, Charlie, on ''{{Numb3rs}}''.
* Sgt Lewis for ''InspectorMorse''.
** Lewis' 'weakness' is that compared to Morse he has a private life, and he's more "people" orientated then Morse's fact focus.
* [[Series/{{Columbo}} Lt. Columbo]] famously subverts this, although he himself would probably say otherwise.
* Simon Brimmer in the 1975 adaptation of ''Series/ElleryQueen''. He is the host of a radio mystery series who fancies himself a real detective. He proves to have a knack for ferreting out useful information but always names the wrong person as the killer.

to:

* To some extent, FBI Special Agent Don Eppes with regard to his brother, Charlie, on ''{{Numb3rs}}''.
''Series/Numb3rs''.
* ''Series/InspectorMorse'': Sgt Lewis for ''InspectorMorse''.
** Lewis' 'weakness'
Morse. Lewis's "weakness" is that compared to Morse he has a private life, and he's more "people" orientated then than Morse's fact focus.
* [[Series/{{Columbo}} Lt. Columbo]] Series/{{Columbo}} famously subverts this, this by looking like he ''is'' the Lestrade, although he himself would probably say otherwise.
* ''Series/ElleryQueen'':
**
Simon Brimmer in the 1975 adaptation of ''Series/ElleryQueen''.adaptation. He is the host of a radio mystery series who fancies himself a real detective. He proves to have a knack for ferreting out useful information but always names the wrong person as the killer.



* Cabot Cove's Sheriff Amos Tupper (and later Sheriff Mort Metzger) in ''Series/MurderSheWrote''.
** In their defence, they're both incredibly competent in the day-to-day things a small town sheriff would have to do.
* ''Series/JonathanCreek'' didn't have a recurring Lestrade character, but individual episodes sometimes had one. One example is Inspector Gideon Pryke from ''Black Canary'', who like a good Lestrade spots several clues, impresses Jonathan by figuring out part of the case, but cannot solve it all himself. Pryke returned in ''The Clue of the Savant's Thumb''.
** Jonathan isn't ''quite'' a straight example, however, as the mysteries he gets roped into solving with various degrees of reluctance involve hugely elaborate feats of sleight-of-hand that even the very best detective would struggle to unpick... but Jonathan's day-job is designing such tricks for a stage-illusionist, so arguably his role is as much "highly specialist CSI technician" as "consulting detective".
* Mikio Jinno in ''Series/KamenRiderDouble''.
* Detective Bum Woo in the KoreanSeries ''BadBoy''.
* In ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', Inspector Greg Lestrade is both a helpful, self-aware version of this trope, as well as being a FriendOnTheForce. The DVD commentary reveals that an important part of casting Lestrade was finding someone who the audience could believe would, if Sherlock Holmes did not exist, eventually solve the crimes on his own.

to:

* Cabot Cove's Sheriff Amos Tupper (and later Sheriff Mort Metzger) in ''Series/MurderSheWrote''.
**
''Series/MurderSheWrote''. In their defence, they're both incredibly competent in the day-to-day things a small town sheriff would have to do.
* ''Series/JonathanCreek'' didn't doesn't have a recurring Lestrade character, but individual episodes sometimes had have one. One example is Inspector Gideon Pryke from ''Black Canary'', "Black Canary", who like a good Lestrade spots several clues, impresses Jonathan by figuring out part of the case, but cannot solve it all himself. Pryke returned returns in ''The "The Clue of the Savant's Thumb''.
**
Thumb". Jonathan isn't ''quite'' a straight example, however, as the mysteries he gets roped into solving with various degrees of reluctance involve hugely elaborate feats of sleight-of-hand that even the very best detective would struggle to unpick... but Jonathan's day-job is designing such tricks for a stage-illusionist, so arguably his role is as much "highly specialist CSI technician" as "consulting detective".
* %%* Mikio Jinno in ''Series/KamenRiderDouble''.
* %%* Detective Bum Woo in the KoreanSeries ''BadBoy''.
''Series/BadBoy''.
* In ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'':
**
Inspector Greg Lestrade is both a helpful, self-aware version of this trope, as well as being a FriendOnTheForce. The DVD commentary reveals that an important part of casting Lestrade was finding someone who the audience could believe would, if Sherlock Holmes did not exist, eventually solve the crimes on his own.



* Various characters of this type show up throughout the entire run of ''Series/DoctorWho''.
* In ''Series/{{Elementary}}'', Lestrade's role is taken by his friend and rival from the books, Tobias (Thomas in the show) Gregson. In this iteration, his FriendOnTheForce status is heavily emphasised-- he's the one who makes the arrests after Sherlock finds the bad guy, and always has police backup on hand for tough situations. Gregson himself isn't an idiot (you don't become a police captain by being one). There are a number of times he advises Sherlock on a case and turns out to be right. When Sherlock finally decides to come out to Gregson about his heroin addiction, Gregson reveals that he has known about it from the start (he doesn't bring in a "consulting detective" without doing a thorough background check).
** Gareth Lestrade was introduced in season 2 and he's a deconstruction of this trope. The show revealed how damaging this kind of relationship would be when the secret of Lestrade's success (Holmes) left suddenly and Lestrade still craved the limelight but didn't have the skills to back it up. He is disgraced and laughed off the force when a case blows up in his face and [[spoiler: he falls back to his fame hungry ways after Sherlock solves the case for him.]] However, it should be mentioned that Lestrade is right about that particular case. He just doesn't know how the bad guy pulled it off.

to:

* Various characters of this type show up throughout the entire run of ''Series/DoctorWho''.
* In ''Series/{{Elementary}}'',
''Series/{{Elementary}}'':
**
Lestrade's role is taken by his friend and rival from the books, Tobias (Thomas in the show) Gregson. In this iteration, his FriendOnTheForce status is heavily emphasised-- emphasised -- he's the one who makes the arrests after Sherlock finds the bad guy, and always has police backup on hand for tough situations. Gregson himself isn't an idiot (you don't become a police captain by being one). There are a number of times he advises Sherlock on a case and turns out to be right. When Sherlock finally decides to come out to Gregson about his heroin addiction, Gregson reveals that he has known about it from the start (he doesn't bring in a "consulting detective" without doing a thorough background check).
** Gareth Lestrade was is introduced in season 2 and he's a deconstruction of this trope. The show revealed reveals how damaging this kind of relationship would be when the secret of Lestrade's success (Holmes) left suddenly and Lestrade still craved the limelight but didn't have the skills to back it up. He is disgraced and laughed off the force when a case blows up in his face and [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he falls back to his fame hungry fame-hungry ways after Sherlock solves the case for him.]] However, it should be mentioned that Lestrade is right about that particular case. He just doesn't know how the bad guy pulled it off.



%%* Various characters of this type show up throughout the entire run of ''Series/DoctorWho''.



* Dojima of ''VideoGame/Persona4''. He figures out a great deal about the murders, and that his HeroicMime nephew is involved in the case. Unfortunately, he [[WrongGenreSavvy doesn't realize]] that he's living in an UrbanFantasy setting so he really can't do much. And then he's handed the IdiotBall. Dojima is more LockedOutOfTheLoop than this trope. He manages to stay relatively close with the Investigation team on solving the murders with only about half (or less) of the clues [[spoiler: and later on, he's the only cop still working on the case despite the fact that the rest of the department believes that it has been closed]]. A better example would be his partner, Adachi, from whom the main characters learn much about the police investigation (Dojima himself remains tight lipped about the subject) [[spoiler:though it turns out that Adachi is the real killer and has spent the entire game misleading you]].
* Inspector Chelmey of the ''VideoGame/ProfessorLayton'' games fits this trope to a T. He jumps to conclusions regarding the second game's murder case, and Layton must set him straight. Chelmey apparently has a reputation for being a detective who gets solid results...[[InformedAbility Something the game notes as being a tad presumptuous about his abilities.]] In fact, his treating the matter as a murder at all casts doubts on his competence. You can't have a murder investigation without proof that somebody died, and non-medical personnel cannot legally declare someone to be dead unless the body is in pieces. So he is investigating a murder -- and actually tries to arrest a man for that murder -- without any evidence that a murder took place at all. [[spoiler:This becomes especially clear at the end, where it is revealed that not only was there no foul play involved in what happened to the doctor, he hadn't actually died.]] He also plays this role in the first game. [[spoiler:Except that he's actually the villain in disguise, who is trying to cover up this own "murder," so it's not actually him. Even so, the disguised villain portrays him remarkably well, minus one telltale flaw that has nothing to do with this trope.]]
* Sheriff George Woodman of ''VideoGame/DeadlyPremonition'' is a no-nonsense guy who's pretty good at rounding up normal small-town criminal elements but is a bit outclassed when it comes to dealing with the outlandish murders that start occurring in his town. [[spoiler: Or that's what he wants you to think...]]
* Dol Grenn in ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic II''. In particular, he arrests the Exile, Atton, and Kreia for destroying Peragus -- to be fair, a dark side Exile might be, but they still didn't create the circumstances that led to it. He would probably be more capable if he had the manpower he needed, a fact he laments. After it's cleared up, you can also get sidequests from him that consist of crimes that the security forces haven't been able to solve.
* The village in ''VideoGame/HometownStory'' eventually gets saddled with ''two'' of them. One is trying to make it as a private dectective, the other is the closest thing the village has to a police officer. The PlayerCharacter turns out to be better at resolving mysteries than both of them and is supposed to be a ''ShopKeeper''.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Visual Novels]]



* Dojima of ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}''. He figures out a great deal about the murders, and that his HeroicMime nephew is involved in the case. Unfortunately, he [[WrongGenreSavvy doesn't realize]] that he's living in an UrbanFantasy setting so he really can't do much. And then he's handed the IdiotBall.
** Dojima is more LockedOutOfTheLoop than this trope. He manages to stay relatively close with the Investigation team on solving the murders with only about half (or less) of the clues [[spoiler: and later on, he's the only cop still working on the case despite the fact that the rest of the department believes that it has been closed]]. A better example would be his partner, Adachi, from whom the main characters learn much about the police investigation (Dojima himself remains tight lipped about the subject) [[spoiler:though it turns out that Adachi is the real killer and has spent the entire game misleading you]].
* Inspector Chelmey of the ''ProfessorLayton'' games fits this trope to a T. He jumps to conclusions regarding the second game's murder case, and Layton must set him straight. Chelmey apparently has a reputation for being a detective who gets solid results...[[InformedAbility Something the game notes as being a tad presumptuous about his abilities.]]
** In fact, his treating the matter as a murder at all casts doubts on his competence. You can't have a murder investigation without proof that somebody died, and non-medical personnel cannot legally declare someone to be dead unless the body is in pieces. So he was investigating a murder - and actually tried to arrest a man for that murder - without any evidence that a murder took place at all. [[spoiler:This becomes especially clear at the end, where it is revealed that not only was there no foul play involved in what happened to the doctor, he hadn't actually died.]]
** He also plays this role in the first game. [[spoiler:Except that he's actually the villain in disguise, who is trying to cover up this own "murder," so it's not actually him. Even so, the disguised villain portrays him remarkably well, minus one telltale flaw that has nothing to do with this trope.]]
* Sheriff George Woodman of ''VideoGame/DeadlyPremonition'' is a no-nonsense guy who's pretty good at rounding up normal small-town criminal elements but is a bit outclassed when it comes to dealing with the outlandish murders that start occurring in his town. [[spoiler: Or that's what he wants you to think...]]
* Dol Grenn in ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic II''. In particular, he arrests the Exile, Atton, and Kreia for destroying Peragus--to be fair, a dark side Exile might be, but they still didn't create the circumstances that led to it. He would probably be more capable if he had the manpower he needed, a fact he laments. After it's cleared up, you can also get sidequests from him that consist of crimes that the security forces haven't been able to solve.
* The village in ''VideoGame/HometownStory'' eventually gets saddled with ''two'' of them. One is trying to make it as a private dectective, the other is the closest thing the village has to a police officer. The PlayerCharacter turns out to be better at resolving mysteries than both of them and is supposed to be a ''ShopKeeper''.



19th Jun '16 6:13:00 PM MajinAkuma
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* In ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'', a couple of Officer Junsars/[[DubNameChange Jennys]] do false conclusions or are not capable of judging situations right until it's either already too late or already solved. Although, there are a lot of other Officer Junsars/Jennys who are actually quite competent.
19th Jun '16 2:25:59 PM nombretomado
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* In ''TheThrawnTrilogy'', when Captain Pellaeon isn't being TheWatson, he's the good type of this for the Grand Admiral. While he's observant and intelligent, he always comes to simpler conclusions. Thrawn always either overrides him or nudges him into seeing what really happened.

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* In ''TheThrawnTrilogy'', ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'', when Captain Pellaeon isn't being TheWatson, he's the good type of this for the Grand Admiral. While he's observant and intelligent, he always comes to simpler conclusions. Thrawn always either overrides him or nudges him into seeing what really happened.
14th Jun '16 9:25:51 PM DanaO
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** This series is notable in that virtually every criminal act the main character runs across includes an attempt to anticipate and reroute the police investigation (which rarely makes the majority of cases even in fiction). A consequence is that somebody has to demonstrate for the readers what conclusions said investigation is supposed to arrive at. There are a few cases in which it's acknowledged the police would have come to the correct conclusion (upon properly examining their collected evidence), just not as quickly. In instances where the police aren't handicapped by OccamsRazor and start out assuming a trick they do rather better.
19th May '16 5:04:19 PM nombretomado
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* Cabot Cove's Sheriff Amos Tupper (and later Sheriff Mort Metzger) in ''MurderSheWrote''.

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* Cabot Cove's Sheriff Amos Tupper (and later Sheriff Mort Metzger) in ''MurderSheWrote''.''Series/MurderSheWrote''.
10th Apr '16 7:35:55 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* Chief Grizzly ([[HeyItsThatVoice Voiced by Xzibit, incidentally.]]) in ''WesternAnimation/{{Hoodwinked}}''.

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* Chief Grizzly ([[HeyItsThatVoice Voiced (Voiced by Xzibit, incidentally.]]) ) in ''WesternAnimation/{{Hoodwinked}}''.
25th Feb '16 8:09:43 PM AnotherGuy
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** However, it needs to be said that Japp is a ''really competent'' inspector who solved many cases on his own (as evidenced by his [[CharacterOverLap appearance]] in Literature/TommyAndTuppence). It's just that compared to Poirot, ''nobody'' is as competent.

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** However, it needs to be said that Japp is a ''really competent'' inspector who solved many cases on his own (as evidenced by his [[CharacterOverLap appearance]] in Literature/TommyAndTuppence). It's just that compared to Poirot, ''nobody'' is as competent. Japp also never viewed Poirot as an obstacle. If Poirot was present at a scene, Japp would be GenreSavvy and assume something big was up.
15th Jan '16 6:38:13 PM sgamer82
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* Occurs with moderate frequency in DetectiveAcademyQ. Q's class is ordered by Dan to avoid revealing their status as members of DDS unless necessary, on account of the fact that the revelation will often change how people deal with them. As a result, many of the cases involve some inexplicably ignorant detective who's too quick to jump to the wrong conclusions and needs Q to set him straight. Naturally, this almost always only lasts up to the point where they reveal their identities.

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* Occurs with moderate frequency in DetectiveAcademyQ.''Manga/DetectiveSchoolQ''. Q's class is ordered by Dan to avoid revealing their status as members of DDS unless necessary, on account of the fact that the revelation will often change how people deal with them. As a result, many of the cases involve some inexplicably ignorant detective who's too quick to jump to the wrong conclusions and needs Q to set him straight. Naturally, this almost always only lasts up to the point where they reveal their identities.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InspectorLestrade