History Main / InsaneEqualsViolent

28th May '18 10:35:30 AM REV6Pilot
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* ''VideoGame/{{Outlast}}'' zig-zags ''and'' deconstructs the trope. Mount Massive is meant to be an asylum for insane criminals, but out of the many, ''many'' inmates you find throughout the game, surprisingly few are hostile, and among those some only are so because [[spoiler:Murkoff denied them or even went against their treatment in order to use them further in Project WALRIDER]].
12th Apr '18 6:29:19 PM ELST
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Although [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mental_illness#Epidemiology over one third]] of the world's population qualify as mentally ill at some point, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mental_illness#Perception_and_discrimination media coverage of mental illness]] is mainly comprised of extremely negative and derogatory depictions - [[MadnessTropes as you can see]] on TV Tropes itself. Incompetence, violence or criminality are generally the forms that appear in fiction, with far less depiction of 'uninteresting' conditions such as depression, catatonia or harmless OCD. In 1999, characters in prime time television portrayed as having a mental illness were depicted as the most dangerous of all demographic groups, [[http://depts.washington.edu/mhreport/facts_violence.php with 60 percent shown to be involved in crime or violence.]] Such negative depictions, including in children's cartoons, are thought to contribute to stigma and negative attitudes in the public and in those with mental health problems themselves, although more sensitive or serious cinematic portrayals have increased in prevalence.

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Although [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mental_illness#Epidemiology over one third]] of the world's population qualify as mentally ill at some point, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mental_illness#Perception_and_discrimination media coverage of mental illness]] is mainly comprised of extremely negative and derogatory depictions - [[MadnessTropes as you can see]] on TV Tropes itself. Incompetence, violence or criminality are generally the forms that appear in fiction, with far less depiction of 'uninteresting' conditions such as depression, catatonia or harmless 'harmless' OCD. In 1999, characters in prime time television portrayed as having a mental illness were depicted as the most dangerous of all demographic groups, [[http://depts.washington.edu/mhreport/facts_violence.php with 60 percent shown to be involved in crime or violence.]] Such negative depictions, including in children's cartoons, are thought to contribute to stigma and negative attitudes in the public and in those with mental health problems themselves, although more sensitive or serious cinematic portrayals have increased in prevalence.
10th Feb '18 4:12:32 AM IamTheCaligula
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* In ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' there's Yuuki Terumi who, though he can come across as quite affable and contained in his Hazama guise, can also completely [[AxCrazy lose his shit]] [[HairTriggerTemper at the drop of a hat]]. While he's in his Hazama guise, his fighting-style most of all looks like Music/MichaelJackson-ish dance moves and, for some fridge brilliant characterization integration, revolves around baiting the opponent into making mistakes, perfectly fitting his ManipulativeBastard tendencies. When he lets loose for real, though, his fighting-style switches to sheer {{Sadist}}ic VideoGameCrueltyPotential with [[AttackAttackAttack few defensive options but some of the highest damage outputs in the game when on the offensive]].

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* In ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' there's Yuuki Terumi who, though he can come across as quite affable and contained in his Hazama guise, can also completely [[AxCrazy lose his shit]] [[HairTriggerTemper at the drop of a hat]]. While It also slips into gameplay; while he's in his Hazama guise, his fighting-style most of all looks like Music/MichaelJackson-ish dance moves and, for some fridge brilliant characterization integration, revolves around baiting the opponent into making mistakes, perfectly fitting his ManipulativeBastard tendencies. When he lets loose for real, though, his fighting-style switches to sheer {{Sadist}}ic VideoGameCrueltyPotential with [[AttackAttackAttack few defensive options but some of the highest damage outputs in the game when on the offensive]]. Come the fourth game in the series, it's revealed that he's actually [[spoiler:[[Myth/JapaneseMythology Takehaya Susanoo no Mikoto]], JerkassGod [[SatanicArchetype extraordinaire]], and though he lays off the {{Maniacal Laugh}}ing madness for a while, his ultimate goal of usurping the [[DeusEstMachina Master Unit: Amaterasu]] and turning reality into [[ToCreateAPlaygroundForEvil a cesspool of terror and despair where everyone kills each other]] [[GroundhogDayLoop on loop]] reveals that he's]] way more insane than previously believed.
14th Jan '18 7:20:20 PM AgentKyles
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Joffrey was a cruel, arrogant, sadistic, malicious, and tyrannical ruler even by the standards of his time. He hugely enjoyed the agony of others, and playing sadistic games with them (for example, giving a man a choice between losing his fingers or his tongue), and even joyously speculating serving Sansa Stark the head of her brother Robb at his wedding feast. However, he was also incompetent, unintelligent, naive, impulsive, petulant, extremely cowardly, and prone to rash outbursts of violence when angered, frightened or even mildly slighted. Much like earlier Targaryen kings, it was suspected that Joffrey's sociopath behavior was a result of his incestuous bloodline (though his sister and brother both were of a kinder disposition). As well as being intensely sadistic, Joffrey was consumed by megalomaniacal delusions of grandeur, even though he was absurdly unskilled at ruling, making far more problems than he solved (though he was literally unable to see this and unapologetic for doing so).

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Joffrey was a cruel, arrogant, sadistic, malicious, and tyrannical ruler even by the standards of his time. He hugely enjoyed the agony of others, and playing sadistic games with them (for example, giving a man singer a choice SadisticChoice between losing his fingers or his tongue), tongue [[DisproportionateRetribution for the heinous and despicable deed of]] performing a less-than-flattering song about his late supposed father), and even joyously speculating serving Sansa Stark the head of her brother Robb at his wedding feast. However, he was also incompetent, unintelligent, naive, impulsive, petulant, extremely cowardly, and prone to rash outbursts of violence when angered, frightened or even mildly slighted. Much like earlier Targaryen kings, it was suspected that Joffrey's sociopath behavior was a result of his [[TangledFamilyTree incestuous bloodline bloodline]] (though his sister and brother both were of a somewhat kinder disposition). As well as being intensely sadistic, Joffrey was consumed by megalomaniacal delusions of grandeur, even though he was absurdly unskilled at ruling, making far more problems than he solved (though he was literally unable to see this and unapologetic for doing so).
26th Dec '17 6:11:56 AM SeizureFerret
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* In ''The Wereling Trilogy'', Mercy is a complete psycho who is violent by ''werewolf'' standards. According to Kate, this is because of excessive inbreed (which is also the only reason that they want Kate to mate with a newly-turned werewolf, to stabilize things). Kate's brother is just as bad. [[spoiler:After Tom kills him, Kate shows how he kept the wallets of his victims as trophies.]]

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* In ''The Wereling Trilogy'', Mercy is a complete psycho who is violent by ''werewolf'' standards. According to Kate, this is because of excessive inbreed inbreeding (which is also the only reason that they want Kate to mate with a newly-turned werewolf, to stabilize things). Kate's brother is just as bad. [[spoiler:After Tom kills him, Kate shows how he kept the wallets of his victims as trophies.]]
8th Dec '17 1:45:53 AM jormis29
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** In the TV miniseries remake ''Stephen King's The Shining'', Jack (played by Steven Weber) is more clearly a nasty person only when he's drunk, an aspect King felt Kubrick's film lacked (in Nicholson's portrayal, Jack seems a bit scary even before he falls off the wagon). Problem is, Weber isn't nearly as frightening. As Kubrick said, when some of his actors complained he was pushing them into unrealistic, over-the-top performances, "Real is good. '''Interesting''' is better."

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** In the TV miniseries remake ''Stephen King's The Shining'', Jack (played by Steven Weber) Creator/StevenWeber) is more clearly a nasty person only when he's drunk, an aspect King felt Kubrick's film lacked (in Nicholson's portrayal, Jack seems a bit scary even before he falls off the wagon). Problem is, Weber isn't nearly as frightening. As Kubrick said, when some of his actors complained he was pushing them into unrealistic, over-the-top performances, "Real is good. '''Interesting''' is better."
22nd Nov '17 6:34:25 AM HighCrate
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* ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' generally implies that the more insane the villain, the more powerful. The series went from the generally sane, but evil [[FauxAffablyEvil Frieza,]] to [[AffablyEvil Cell,]] to the unbelievably psychotic being that is [[OmnicidalManiac Majin Buu.]]
21st Nov '17 1:34:00 AM Baeraad555
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** It's not so much that they're violent as the fact that they're crazy and [[RealityWarper have the power to make their insane delusions reality]]. While one male channeler may or may not be a problem, over a hundred of them deciding that peaches are poisonous, or that mountains belong ''there'', or that they're 100% certain a hurricane/earthquake is coming, and then using their powers to make these things happen, leads to a lot of death and destruction.

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** It's not so much that they're violent as the fact that they're crazy and [[RealityWarper have the power to make their insane delusions reality]]. While one male channeler may or may not be a problem, over a hundred of them deciding that peaches are poisonous, or that mountains belong ''there'', or that they're 100% certain a hurricane/earthquake is coming, and then using their powers to make these things happen, leads to a lot of death and destruction. We get a perfect example of how it works at the end of ''A Path of Daggers'', where a male channeler snaps and remains quite good-natured... but one of the protagonists keeps having to explain to him that he should not collapse the palace they're standing in so that he can use the stones to build a shelter for her.
21st Nov '17 1:27:32 AM Baeraad555
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* Jake in ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' apparently believes this. He is certain that Johnny is a danger to Sadie's life, even though he just seems to suffer from some kind of obsessive-compulsive disorder that, while it certainly makes him behave like an emotionally abusive JerkAss, should not immediately translate into being homicidal. [[spoiler: He turns out to be right, mind you.]] He also refers to Oswald as one of "the crazies," who he seems to consider violent per definition.
4th Nov '17 2:23:41 PM eroock
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[[caption-width-right:300:DonaldDuck + hunger-induced insanity = AxCrazy]]

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[[caption-width-right:300:DonaldDuck [[caption-width-right:300:[-DonaldDuck + hunger-induced insanity = AxCrazy]]
AxCrazy-]]]
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