History Main / InnocuouslyImportantEpisode

19th Mar '17 9:47:08 AM nombretomado
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* The NewWorldOfDarkness core rulebook began with a story about mechanical angels serving the enigmatic [[DeusEstMachina God-Machine]]. While popular, this didn't seem important until ten years later, with the release of the second edition, the God-Machine Chronicle, and DemonTheDescent, both of which involve the God-Machine heavily.

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* The NewWorldOfDarkness TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness core rulebook began with a story about mechanical angels serving the enigmatic [[DeusEstMachina God-Machine]]. While popular, this didn't seem important until ten years later, with the release of the second edition, the God-Machine Chronicle, and DemonTheDescent, both of which involve the God-Machine heavily.
17th Mar '17 12:06:47 PM FordPrefect
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* In the Attitude Era, it was told that [[Wrestling/VinceMcMahon each]] [[Wrestling/LindaMcMahon of]] [[Wrestling/ShaneMcMahon the]] [[Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon four]] [=McMahon=] family members owned one quarter of the WWF. And then came [[WhamEpisode 2001]]. Linda's loss of the WWF stock to Vince during her breakdown, combined Shane and Stephanie's selling of their stock to purchase Wrestling/{{WCW}} and Wrestling/{{ECW}} during the Invasion set up the Brand Extension and the return to the WWF of Vince [=McMahon=]'s new business partner and co-owner: [[spoiler:Ric Flair]].

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* In the Attitude Era, it was told that [[Wrestling/VinceMcMahon each]] [[Wrestling/LindaMcMahon of]] [[Wrestling/ShaneMcMahon the]] [[Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon four]] [=McMahon=] family members owned one quarter of the WWF. And then came [[WhamEpisode 2001]]. Linda's loss of the WWF stock to Vince during her breakdown, combined with Shane and Stephanie's selling of their stock to purchase Wrestling/{{WCW}} and Wrestling/{{ECW}} during the Invasion Invasion, set up the Brand Extension and the return to the WWF of Vince [=McMahon=]'s new business partner and co-owner: [[spoiler:Ric Flair]].



* Wrestling/CMPunk's pipebomb would not only elevate him into a true main-eventer but would also set up the debut of "douchebag yesman" Wrestling/JohnLaurinaitis[[note]][[RunningGag Executive Vice President of Talent Relations and Interim/Permanent General Manger of Raw and Smackdown]][[/note]] but the fact that he mentioned being a "Wrestling/PaulHeyman guy" would later come into play when [[spoiler:Heyman (also aligned with Wrestling/BrockLesnar) returned at Punk's side after beating up Wrestling/JohnCena (and the term "Paul Heyman guy" actually came into use)]].

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* Wrestling/CMPunk's pipebomb would not only elevate him into a true main-eventer main-eventer, but would also set up the debut of "douchebag yesman" Wrestling/JohnLaurinaitis[[note]][[RunningGag Executive Vice President of Talent Relations and Interim/Permanent General Manger of Raw and Smackdown]][[/note]] but Smackdown]][[/note]], plus the fact that he mentioned being a "Wrestling/PaulHeyman guy" would later come into play when [[spoiler:Heyman (also aligned with Wrestling/BrockLesnar) returned at Punk's side after beating up Wrestling/JohnCena (and the term "Paul Heyman guy" actually came into use)]].
17th Mar '17 12:05:18 PM FordPrefect
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** "A Bugs Life," has a story about Peacekeepers and a virus capable of possessing people, but the reprocussions of that episode would echo throughout the series and beyond.

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** "A Bugs Life," Life" has a story about Peacekeepers and a virus capable of possessing people, but the reprocussions repercussions of that episode would echo throughout the series and beyond.
10th Mar '17 11:23:00 PM AthenaBlue
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** "[[Recap/BabylonFiveS01E01MidnightOnTheFiringLine Midnight on the Firing Line]]" is the former {{Trope Namer|s}}. The first episode after the pilot movie, it featured subplots and character moments that the show ''kept referring to'' throughout many of its best moments over the rest of its run.
** "[[Recap/BabylonFiveS01E04Infection Infection]]", the fourth episode of the show, managed to introduce several elements that would become ''very'' important later on, including Interplanetary Expeditions, ISN, Earth's desire for advanced biotechnology and the first mention of previous Shadow War a thousand years ago - and certain revelations about Sinclair's past and how it drives his behaviour in the present. Not bad for what is almost universally considered to be a lackluster MonsterOfTheWeek episode.

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** "[[Recap/BabylonFiveS01E01MidnightOnTheFiringLine Midnight [[Recap/BabylonFiveS01E01MidnightOnTheFiringLine "Midnight on the Firing Line]]" Line"]] is the former {{Trope Namer|s}}. The first episode after the pilot movie, it featured subplots and character moments that the show ''kept referring to'' throughout many of its best moments over the rest of its run.
** "[[Recap/BabylonFiveS01E04Infection Infection]]", [[Recap/BabylonFiveS01E04Infection "Infection"]], the fourth episode of the show, managed to introduce several elements that would become ''very'' important later on, including Interplanetary Expeditions, ISN, Earth's desire for advanced biotechnology and the first mention of previous Shadow War a thousand years ago - and certain revelations about Sinclair's past and how it drives his behaviour in the present. Not bad for what is almost universally considered to be a lackluster MonsterOfTheWeek episode.episode.
* The ''{{Series/Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'' first-season episode "Tigh Me Up, Tigh Me Down" was thought to be a comedy filler episode (the only intentionally comic episode in the entire show) revolving around a series of misunderstandings between Ellen Tigh (who unexpectedly reappears in the fleet) and Commander Adama (who believes Ellen is a Cylon sleeper agent). The whole episode climaxes in an amusing scene where everyone humorously works out their differences, and the matter is resolved. Three seasons later, in "Sometimes A Great Notion", it turns out this episode set up the eventual arc and reveal that [[spoiler:Ellen was the final Cylon]].
* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer''.
** "I Was Made To Love You" (and earlier, "Ted") seemed a bit out of place at the time of airing (robots? really?) but set up the suspension of disbelief needed for the Buffybot to exist in that series, which allowed Dawn to stay in Sunnydale after the events of "The Gift". Also, this episode introduced Warren, who would become a major villain in the following season.
** "Killed By Death". Buffy is sick and ends up in hospital - a place she hates since her cousin died in a hospital when they were children. While the MonsterOfTheWeek in the episode (which was also responsible for her cousin's death) is dealt with, Sunnydale General ends up playing a ''big'' role in Season Five - not only does Buffy's mother Joyce end up with a brain tumor and spends a few episodes there, but we're also, at the same time, introduced to the character Ben Wilkinson, a young medical intern who serves as a possible {{Love Interest|s}} to Buffy [[spoiler: and who turns out to be the mortal, human shell of Glory, the BigBad of Season Five - Glory's plans, in turn, result in Buffy's death in the Season Five finale]].



** "The Daleks" was initially written as a space adventure story based on 1950s sci-fi serials, with anti-war themes and some [[TheGrotesque quirky]] [[ANaziByAnyOtherName Nazi-like]] "bug-eyed monsters" as villains. Due to the extreme popularity of aforementioned villains it is now impossible to watch the story without being aware that this is the Doctor's first encounter with the Daleks.
** "The Tenth Planet" has three main points about it that get very important later. It introduced the "Base under Siege" formula that would dominate Troughton's tenure and influence the show's slide from a GenreRoulette format into MonsterOfTheWeek, introduced the Cybermen (though they were given a soft-reboot a few episodes later), and ended with a shock twist of the Doctor suddenly turning into a totally different actor. All of these at the time were just decisions being made for that particular episode and RealLifeWritesThePlot, but due to ''Who'''s KudzuPlot nature all became very significant (although some in terms of the show's feel rather than in plot points).
** "The Web of Fear". Intended at the time as a sequel to an earlier story about the Doctor teaming up with the military and a now-older ally to fight killer robot Yeti in the London Underground. The impact is massive - here is where the Brigadier gets introduced (in fact, he's [[RedHerringMole the prime suspect for being the Great Intelligence's vessel for most of the episode]], something that would not have been done had they known he would be a regular), here is the start of the UNIT arc and here is the start of the "Yeti on the loo in Tooting Bec"-style horror that would form the Pertwee era of the show.
** The first episode of Season 6, Episode 1 of "The Dominators", introduces us to Cully, an ageing ManChild from an alien species with two hearts, whose disgruntlement with his people makes him crave adventure and go travelling in his ship with a bunch of awkward teenagers. He lands and his entire crew gets murdered. This is an innocuous opening for a filler story at the time, but takes on a new meaning when you compare it to the ''last'' episode of Season 6, Episode 10 of "The War Games", in which the Doctor is confirmed to be a Time Lord on the run from his boring civilisation and his crew get sent back to where they were from by the other Time Lords (including the [[BolivianArmyEnding implicit death]] of Jamie).
** "The Brain of Morbius" was intended as a {{Filler}} BottleEpisode, but several of the Doctor's throwaway lines in the story imply that the Time Lords aren't as godlike and advanced as they had previously been portrayed. This could easily be brushed off by the fact that the Doctor hates the Time Lords and (in that incarnation at least) [[CloudCuckooLander has an unreliable grasp on reality]], but Robert Holmes picked up on it and used it as {{Foreshadowing}} for his WhamEpisode, "The Deadly Assassin", which revealed the Time Lords were a bunch of stagnant old politicians with ChronicBackstabbingDisorder.

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** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E2TheDaleks "The Daleks" Daleks"]] was initially written as a space adventure story based on 1950s sci-fi serials, with anti-war themes and some [[TheGrotesque quirky]] [[ANaziByAnyOtherName Nazi-like]] "bug-eyed monsters" as villains. Due to the extreme popularity of aforementioned villains villains, it is now impossible to watch the story without being aware that this is the Doctor's first encounter with the Daleks.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet "The Tenth Planet" Planet"]] has three main points about it that get very important later. It introduced the "Base under Siege" formula that would dominate Troughton's tenure and influence the show's slide from a GenreRoulette format into MonsterOfTheWeek, introduced the Cybermen (though they were given a soft-reboot a few episodes later), and ended with a shock twist of the Doctor suddenly turning into a totally different actor. All of these at the time were just decisions being made for that particular episode and RealLifeWritesThePlot, but due to ''Who'''s KudzuPlot nature all became very significant (although some in terms of the show's feel rather than in plot points).
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E5TheWebOfFear "The Web of Fear".Fear"]]. Intended at the time as a sequel to an earlier story about the Doctor teaming up with the military and a now-older ally to fight killer robot Yeti in the London Underground. The impact is massive - here is where the Brigadier gets introduced (in fact, he's [[RedHerringMole the prime suspect for being the Great Intelligence's vessel for most of the episode]], something that would not have been done had they known he would be a regular), here is the start of the UNIT arc and here is the start of the "Yeti on the loo in Tooting Bec"-style horror that would form the Pertwee era of the show.
** The first episode of Season 6, Episode 1 of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E1TheDominators "The Dominators", Dominators"]], introduces us to Cully, an ageing ManChild from an alien species with two hearts, whose disgruntlement with his people makes him crave adventure and go travelling in his ship with a bunch of awkward teenagers. He lands and his entire crew gets murdered. This is an innocuous opening for a filler story at the time, but takes on a new meaning when you compare it to the ''last'' episode of Season 6, Episode 10 of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E7TheWarGames "The War Games", Games"]], in which the Doctor is confirmed to be a Time Lord on the run from his boring civilisation and his crew get sent back to where they were from by the other Time Lords (including the [[BolivianArmyEnding implicit death]] of Jamie).
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainOfMorbius "The Brain of Morbius" Morbius"]] was intended as a {{Filler}} BottleEpisode, but several of the Doctor's throwaway lines in the story imply that the Time Lords aren't as godlike and advanced as they had previously been portrayed. This could easily be brushed off by the fact that the Doctor hates the Time Lords and (in that incarnation at least) [[CloudCuckooLander has an unreliable grasp on reality]], but Robert Holmes picked up on it and used it as {{Foreshadowing}} for his WhamEpisode, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E3TheDeadlyAssassin "The Deadly Assassin", Assassin"]], which revealed the Time Lords were a bunch of stagnant old politicians with ChronicBackstabbingDisorder.



** The ending of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode "The Shakespeare Code"]] includes Creator/WilliamShakespeare using words to stop the villains. The last episode in the season, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E13LastOfTheTimeLords "Last of the Time Lords"]], took that concept and turned it UpToEleven. The relationship between the tenth Doctor and Elizabeth I is later explored in the [[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor 50th anniversary special]].
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E7TheLongGame "The Long Game"]] sets up a lot of later events -- including the Ninth Doctor's regeneration -- as the Doctor's actions lead to [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E12BadWolf "Bad Wolf"]]. Meaning of course that it also has perhaps the [[FridgeBrilliance most relevant title of the entire show.]]



** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E7TheLongGame "The Long Game"]] sets up a lot of later events -- including the Ninth Doctor's regeneration -- as the Doctor's actions lead to [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E12BadWolf "Bad Wolf"]]. Meaning of course that it also has perhaps the [[FridgeBrilliance most relevant title of the entire show.]]
** [[Recap/DoctorWho2005CSTheChristmasInvasion "The Christmas Invasion"]] appears to be nothing but a ChristmasEpisode to [[EstablishingCharacterMoment establish]] the newly regenerated Tenth Doctor but it actually set up many events for the next seasons. There's the first appearance of the [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E12ArmyOfGhosts Torchwood Institute]], the santa robots come back during [[Recap/DoctorWho2006CSTheRunawayBride Donna's first appearance]], the Doctor [[NiceJobBreakingItHero deposing Harriet Jones, Prime Minister]][[note]]Yes, we know who she is[[/note]] ultimately results in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E12TheSoundOfDrums Harold Saxon taking her place]] and last but not least, the Doctor's severed hand is later retrieved by Jack Harkness and become important to both this series and the spinoff ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''.
** The ending of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode "The Shakespeare Code"]] includes Creator/WilliamShakespeare using words to stop the villains. The last episode in the season, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E13LastOfTheTimeLords "Last of the Time Lords"]], took that concept and turned it UpToEleven. The relationship between the tenth Doctor and Elizabeth I is later explored in the [[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor 50th anniversary special]].
** In series 3 of the new series, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E6TheLazarusExperiment "The Lazarus Experiment"]] set up both [[spoiler:Martha's family's betrayal to Harold Saxon/The Master]], and [[spoiler:the aging device was used against the Doctor in the season finale]].
** Similarly, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E8HumanNature "Human Nature"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E9TheFamilyOfBlood "The Family of Blood"]] appeared to be an updated telling of a ''Doctor Who'' novel, leading to a unique circumstance where fans familiar with the spinoff media were actually less likely to realize these episodes were this trope, which comes off as exceptional filler otherwise. [[spoiler:In fact, they set up the Master's return.]]



** In series 3 of New Who, the episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E6TheLazarusExperiment "The Lazarus Experiment"]] set up both [[spoiler:Martha's family's betrayal to Harold Saxon/The Master]], and [[spoiler:the aging device was used against the Doctor in the season finale]].
** Similarly, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E8HumanNature "Human Nature"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E9TheFamilyOfBlood "The Family of Blood"]] appeared to be an updated telling of a ''Doctor Who'' novel, leading to a unique circumstance where fans familiar with the spinoff media were actually less likely to realize these episodes were this trope, which comes off as exceptional filler otherwise. [[spoiler:In fact, they set up the Master's return.]]
** [[Recap/DoctorWho2005CSTheChristmasInvasion "The Christmas Invasion"]] appears to be nothing but a ChristmasEpisode to [[EstablishingCharacterMoment establish]] the newly regenerated Tenth Doctor but it actually set up many events for the next seasons. There's the first appearance of the [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E12ArmyOfGhosts Torchwood Institute]], the santa robots come back during [[Recap/DoctorWho2006CSTheRunawayBride Donna's first appearance]], the Doctor [[NiceJobBreakingItHero deposing Harriet Jones, Prime Minister]][[note]]Yes, we know who she is[[/note]] ultimately results in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E12TheSoundOfDrums Harold Saxon taking her place]] and last but not least, the Doctor's severed hand is later retrieved by Jack Harkness and become important to both this series and the spinoff ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''.

to:

* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** In series 3 "A Bugs Life," has a story about Peacekeepers and a virus capable of New Who, possessing people, but the reprocussions of that episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E6TheLazarusExperiment "The Lazarus Experiment"]] would echo throughout the series and beyond.
** "Beware of Dog" had a fairly ridiculous main plot, with a B plot of Crichton going crazy and imagining Scorpius around every corner -- but it's a brilliant setup of the entire plotline for the rest of the season, one that would continue throughout much of the series.
** The very first time Crichton hallucinated Scorpius was in "Crackers Don't Matter", a nutty, off-the-wall episode where everyone's going crazy and fighting over crackers.
** "A Human Reaction", a well done though not especially memorable episode - until it's revealed a few episodes later that ''the'' major plot point of the ''entire series'' was
set up both [[spoiler:Martha's family's betrayal during its events.
** "Won't Get Fooled Again" seems like just another one of the series' frequent [[BizarroEpisode visits
to Harold Saxon/The Master]], and Bizarroworld]], but the ending reveals the existence of [[spoiler:the aging device neural chip in Crichton's head]] and its accompanying [[spoiler:mental clone of Scorpius]], both of which are crucial to the MythArc.
** "Eat Me" is just another MonsterOfTheWeek episode, and just another episode where Crichton gets split into duplicates (yes, it happened more than once). Then at the end it turns out that the duplication of Crichton
was used against ''permanent''. Cue most of the Doctor in rest of the season finale]].
** Similarly, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E8HumanNature "Human Nature"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E9TheFamilyOfBlood "The Family
being split between two groups of Blood"]] appeared to be an updated telling of a ''Doctor Who'' novel, leading to a unique circumstance where fans familiar characters on separate ships, each with the spinoff media were actually less likely to realize these episodes were this trope, which comes off as exceptional filler otherwise. [[spoiler:In fact, they set up the Master's return.]]
** [[Recap/DoctorWho2005CSTheChristmasInvasion "The Christmas Invasion"]]
its own Crichton.
* Series/{{Fringe}}'s BizarroEpisode, "Brown Betty" (2x19) at first
appears to be nothing but a ChristmasEpisode to [[EstablishingCharacterMoment establish]] funny BreatherEpisode after some important revelations in the newly regenerated Tenth Doctor but it actually set up many events for previous four episodes. Walter tells Olivia's niece Ella a drug-addled [[MusicalEpisode musical]] [[NoirEpisode noir-style]] detective story using all the regular cast members... then gives the story an incredibly dark and bitter ending about how only one man can have a mechanical heart and one must die without it. The ending reflects Walter's guilt about [[spoiler: stealing Peter and irrevocably damaging the alternate universe]] and how he feels the only good he's ever accomplished has come at the price of destroying children's lives (i.e., the cortexiphan trials). It reflects the major theme of the next seasons. There's season, that only one universe can survive; one must be destroyed, leading to the BadFuture glimpsed in the Season 3 finale, "The Day We Died". However, [[CheerfulChild Ella]] rejects Walter's unhappy ending and creates an ending where the heart can be shared, symbolizing [[spoiler: Peter realizing after seeing the BadFuture there is [[TakeAThirdOption another option]]: he can bridge the two universes, which will heal them both.]] Peter even does this with the aid of a grown-up version of Ella Dunham, bringing it full circle back to "Brown Betty".
* In the second season of ''Series/{{GARO}}'' called ''Makai Senki'', there is a flashback episode, in which the childhood of the main character Kouga is seen. The episode seems rather unimportant, until the final episode reveals Kouga knew [[spoiler:the BigBad as a child]], who made Kouga promise to kill him if he ever turns evil.
* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'':
** At first glance the "Showdown" episode seems like pure filler with Marshall and Lily preparing for their wedding and Barney going on ''The Price is Right''. However, we learn two episodes later that [[spoiler: Ted and Robin broke up at this time.]] It also sets up Barney's story arc of searching for his father that dominates most of season 6.
** One episode features a jokey subplot in which Marshall is unable to have sexual fantasies about women other than Lily without first imaging an intricate scenario in which Lily dies of an unspecified disease and gives him her blessing to move on once she is dead. [[spoiler: The widely-reviled ending of the show featured something similar, with the Mother dying of an unknown illness and Ted's children enthusiastically giving him the blessing to go after Aunt Robin years after the fact. Given that this ending was filmed between
the first appearance of and second seasons, it's highly likely that the [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E12ArmyOfGhosts Torchwood Institute]], the santa robots come back during [[Recap/DoctorWho2006CSTheRunawayBride Donna's first appearance]], the Doctor [[NiceJobBreakingItHero deposing Harriet Jones, Prime Minister]][[note]]Yes, we know who she is[[/note]] ultimately results in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E12TheSoundOfDrums Harold Saxon taking her place]] and last but not least, the Doctor's severed hand is later retrieved by Jack Harkness and become important to both this series and the spinoff ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''. Marshall-Lily plot was completely intentional foreshadowing.]]



* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'':
** At first glance the "Showdown" episode seems like pure filler with Marshall and Lily preparing for their wedding and Barney going on ''The Price is Right''. However, we learn two episodes later that [[spoiler: Ted and Robin broke up at this time.]] It also sets up Barney's story arc of searching for his father that dominates most of season 6.
** One episode features a jokey subplot in which Marshall is unable to have sexual fantasies about women other than Lily without first imaging an intricate scenario in which Lily dies of an unspecified disease and gives him her blessing to move on once she is dead. [[spoiler: The widely-reviled ending of the show featured something similar, with the Mother dying of an unknown illness and Ted's children enthusiastically giving him the blessing to go after Aunt Robin years after the fact. Given that this ending was filmed between the first and second seasons, it's highly likely that the Marshall-Lily plot was completely intentional foreshadowing.]]

to:

* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'':
** At first glance the "Showdown"
The ''Series/MadMen'' third season episode seems like pure filler with Marshall and Lily preparing for their wedding and Barney going on ''The Price is Right''. "My Old Kentucky Home." On its face, the FourLinesAllWaiting story serves as a series of character vignettes bound by the "work disguised as fun" theme. However, we learn this episode introduces us characters that become prominent in later episodes (Connie Hilton, Henry Francis); and story arcs that carry through the next couple of seasons (Peggy's introduction to the counterculture, Joan realizing that marrying her doctor is not going to give her the life she thought she wanted, Betty looking for a way out of her marriage, among others).
* ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'' had three:
** In the first series "The Gates of Avalon" was a fairly basic MonsterOfTheWeek story, in which Arthur is targeted by
two murderous Sidhe, but it also introduces the fact that [[DreamingOfThingsToCome Morgana is a seer]] which marks out her entire CharacterArc from then on.
** Series 2 has "The Lady of The Lake" introduce Freya, Merlin's {{love interest|s}} who dies at the end of the episode, but becomes The Lady of The Lake and helps Merlin retrieve Excalibur in the series 3 finale.
** The third series had "Queen of Hearts", which seemed a one-off {{filler}} which once more returned to [[StatusQuoIsGod status quo]] by the end of the episode, but it also introduced the character of "Dragoon", Merlin's old-man disguise which he puts to even greater effect in series four.
* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' has its first ChristmasEpisode, which is a standard case of the week with a scene that reveals that Monk is still keeping the last gift his late wife left him wrapped up. It's set up as yet another moment showcasing Monk's undying love for her. Four years later however the GrandFinale reveals that [[spoiler:said gift contains the evidence that reveals who the mastermind of her murder is.]]
* ''Franchise/PowerRangers''
** ''Series/PowerRangersOperationOverdrive'''s "One Fine Day" was a lighthearted episode featuring the Rangers on a camping trip which gets interrupted when their enemies erect a forcefield to search for part of the season's MacGuffin. A alien-powered human chain used as an attempt to pass through the forcefield is a major clue that [[spoiler:that the Red Ranger isn't human]] when it breaks, foreshadowing his [[spoiler:RoboticReveal]] character arc a few
episodes later that and his [[spoiler:[[DeathSeeker death-seeking]] HeroicSacrifice]] in the finale.
** ''Series/PowerRangersRPM'''s "Tenaya 7" not only properly introduces the titular cyborg villainess but also before she blows her cover, a throwaway line about a metal detector getting "false positives" gains new meaning when in the two-part finale [[spoiler:BigBad activates the sleeper drones among half of [[DomedHometown Corinth's]] populace including ''the officer'' who says ''said line'']].
** ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' season 3's "Master Vile and the Metallic Armor" introduces the Zeo Crystal which not only serves to reverse the time shift in the Alien Rangers arc, but also its later attempted theft causes
[[spoiler: Ted the Command Center's bombing]] and Robin broke up at this time.]] It also later serves as the basis of [[spoiler:[[Series/PowerRangersZeo next season's]]]] powers.
** And than ''Zeo'' mentions its BigBad's ties to an "alliance of evil" which is later prophised in the Millennium Message of ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo'', then [[spoiler:abducts mentor Zordon]] and plays a big role the Zordon Era's GrandFinale ''Series/PowerRangersInSpace''.
* The ''Series/PushingDaisies'' episode "Circus Circus". No other episode
sets up Barney's story arc as many of searching for the major arcs and themes in the second season: the corrosive effect of secrets; something new beginning as necessarily implying something else ending; stasis as the opposite of life/death/rebirth; the impossibility of simply picking up a relationship where it was left off; one's persona or public self versus one's TrueSelf; a parent's inability to recognize his father or her child.
* A season 2 episode of ''Series/{{Sliders}}'' introduces the Kromaggs as mere [[MonsterOfTheWeek monsters of the week]] but they become the main antagonists in the last two seasons.
* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'': In the first season, they encounter a planet
that dominates most had been developing a drug that would make them immune to the Wraith feeding on them, but also has a 50% chance of killing the person injected. It seems like a one-off story, until the middle of season 6.
** One episode features
4 when their enemy, a jokey subplot in which Marshall is unable to have sexual fantasies about women other than Lily without first imaging an intricate scenario in which Lily dies of an unspecified disease and gives him her blessing to move on once she is dead. [[spoiler: The widely-reviled ending Wraith-turned-human-turned-hybrid gets hold of the show featured something similar, with drug and begins to spread it across the Mother dying of galaxy. It plays an unknown illness and Ted's children enthusiastically giving him important role in several episodes from then to the blessing to go after Aunt Robin years after end of the fact. Given that this ending was filmed between the first and second seasons, it's highly likely that the Marshall-Lily plot was completely intentional foreshadowing.]]series.



* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'': In the first season, they encounter a planet that had been developing a drug that would make them immune to the Wraith feeding on them, but also has a 50% chance of killing the person injected. It seems like a one-off story, until the middle of season 4 when their enemy, a Wraith-turned-human-turned-hybrid gets hold of the drug and begins to spread it across the galaxy. It plays an important role in several episodes from then to the end of the series.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** "A Bugs Life," has a story about Peacekeepers and a virus capable of possessing people, but the reprocussions of that episode would echo throughout the series and beyond.
** "Beware of Dog" had a fairly ridiculous main plot, with a B plot of Crichton going crazy and imagining Scorpius around every corner -- but it's a brilliant setup of the entire plotline for the rest of the season, one that would continue throughout much of the series.
** The very first time Crichton hallucinated Scorpius was in "Crackers Don't Matter", a nutty, off-the-wall episode where everyone's going crazy and fighting over crackers.
** "A Human Reaction", a well done though not especially memorable episode - until it's revealed a few episodes later that ''the'' major plot point of the ''entire series'' was set up during its events.
** "Won't Get Fooled Again" seems like just another one of the series' frequent [[BizarroEpisode visits to Bizarroworld]], but the ending reveals the existence of [[spoiler:the neural chip in Crichton's head]] and its accompanying [[spoiler:mental clone of Scorpius]], both of which are crucial to the MythArc.
** "Eat Me" is just another MonsterOfTheWeek episode, and just another episode where Crichton gets split into duplicates (yes, it happened more than once). Then at the end it turns out that the duplication of Crichton was ''permanent''. Cue most of the rest of the season being split between two groups of characters on separate ships, each with its own Crichton.
* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer''.
** "I Was Made To Love You" (and earlier, "Ted") seemed a bit out of place at the time of airing (robots? really?) but set up the suspension of disbelief needed for the Buffybot to exist in that series, which allowed Dawn to stay in Sunnydale after the events of "The Gift". Also, this episode introduced Warren, who would become a major villain in the following season.
** "Killed By Death". Buffy is sick and ends up in hospital - a place she hates since her cousin died in a hospital when they were children. While the MonsterOfTheWeek in the episode (which was also responsible for her cousin's death) is dealt with, Sunnydale General ends up playing a ''big'' role in Season Five - not only does Buffy's mother Joyce end up with a brain tumor and spends a few episodes there, but we're also, at the same time, introduced to the character Ben Wilkinson, a young medical intern who serves as a possible {{Love Interest|s}} to Buffy [[spoiler: and who turns out to be the mortal, human shell of Glory, the BigBad of Season Five - Glory's plans, in turn, result in Buffy's death in the Season Five finale]].
* The ''Series/PushingDaisies'' episode "Circus Circus". No other episode sets up as many of the major arcs and themes in the second season: the corrosive effect of secrets; something new beginning as necessarily implying something else ending; stasis as the opposite of life/death/rebirth; the impossibility of simply picking up a relationship where it was left off; one's persona or public self versus one's TrueSelf; a parent's inability to recognize his or her child.
* The ''{{Series/Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'' first-season episode "Tigh Me Up, Tigh Me Down" was thought to be a comedy filler episode (the only intentionally comic episode in the entire show) revolving around a series of misunderstandings between Ellen Tigh (who unexpectedly reappears in the fleet) and Commander Adama (who believes Ellen is a Cylon sleeper agent). The whole episode climaxes in an amusing scene where everyone humorously works out their differences, and the matter is resolved. Three seasons later, in "Sometimes A Great Notion", it turns out this episode set up the eventual arc and reveal that [[spoiler:Ellen was the final Cylon]].
* The ''Series/MadMen'' third season episode "My Old Kentucky Home." On its face, the FourLinesAllWaiting story serves as a series of character vignettes bound by the "work disguised as fun" theme. However, this episode introduces us characters that become prominent in later episodes (Connie Hilton, Henry Francis); and story arcs that carry through the next couple of seasons (Peggy's introduction to the counterculture, Joan realizing that marrying her doctor is not going to give her the life she thought she wanted, Betty looking for a way out of her marriage, among others).
* ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'' had three:
** In the first series "The Gates of Avalon" was a fairly basic MonsterOfTheWeek story, in which Arthur is targeted by two murderous Sidhe, but it also introduces the fact that [[DreamingOfThingsToCome Morgana is a seer]] which marks out her entire CharacterArc from then on.
** Series 2 has "The Lady of The Lake" introduce Freya, Merlin's {{love interest|s}} who dies at the end of the episode, but becomes The Lady of The Lake and helps Merlin retrieve Excalibur in the series 3 finale.
** The third series had "Queen of Hearts", which seemed a one-off {{filler}} which once more returned to [[StatusQuoIsGod status quo]] by the end of the episode, but it also introduced the character of "Dragoon", Merlin's old-man disguise which he puts to even greater effect in series four.
* In the second season of ''Series/{{GARO}}'' called ''Makai Senki'', there is a flashback episode, in which the childhood of the main character Kouga is seen. The episode seems rather unimportant, until the final episode reveals Kouga knew [[spoiler:the BigBad as a child]], who made Kouga promise to kill him if he ever turns evil.
* ''Franchise/PowerRangers''
** ''Series/PowerRangersOperationOverdrive'''s "One Fine Day" was a lighthearted episode featuring the Rangers on a camping trip which gets interrupted when their enemies erect a forcefield to search for part of the season's MacGuffin. A alien-powered human chain used as an attempt to pass through the forcefield is a major clue that [[spoiler:that the Red Ranger isn't human]] when it breaks, foreshadowing his [[spoiler:RoboticReveal]] character arc a few episodes later and his [[spoiler:[[DeathSeeker death-seeking]] HeroicSacrifice]] in the finale.
** ''Series/PowerRangersRPM'''s "Tenaya 7" not only properly introduces the titular cyborg villainess but also before she blows her cover, a throwaway line about a metal detector getting "false positives" gains new meaning when in the two-part finale [[spoiler:BigBad activates the sleeper drones among half of [[DomedHometown Corinth's]] populace including ''the officer'' who says ''said line'']].
** ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' season 3's "Master Vile and the Metallic Armor" introduces the Zeo Crystal which not only serves to reverse the time shift in the Alien Rangers arc, but also its later attempted theft causes [[spoiler: the Command Center's bombing]] and later serves as the basis of [[spoiler:[[Series/PowerRangersZeo next season's]]]] powers.
** And than ''Zeo'' mentions its BigBad's ties to an "alliance of evil" which is later prophised in the Millennium Message of ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo'', then [[spoiler:abducts mentor Zordon]] and plays a big role the Zordon Era's GrandFinale ''Series/PowerRangersInSpace''.
* Series/{{Fringe}}'s BizarroEpisode, "Brown Betty" (2x19) at first appears to be funny BreatherEpisode after some important revelations in the previous four episodes. Walter tells Olivia's niece Ella a drug-addled [[MusicalEpisode musical]] [[NoirEpisode noir-style]] detective story using all the regular cast members... then gives the story an incredibly dark and bitter ending about how only one man can have a mechanical heart and one must die without it. The ending reflects Walter's guilt about [[spoiler: stealing Peter and irrevocably damaging the alternate universe]] and how he feels the only good he's ever accomplished has come at the price of destroying children's lives (i.e., the cortexiphan trials). It reflects the major theme of the next season, that only one universe can survive; one must be destroyed, leading to the BadFuture glimpsed in the Season 3 finale, "The Day We Died". However, [[CheerfulChild Ella]] rejects Walter's unhappy ending and creates an ending where the heart can be shared, symbolizing [[spoiler: Peter realizing after seeing the BadFuture there is [[TakeAThirdOption another option]]: he can bridge the two universes, which will heal them both.]] Peter even does this with the aid of a grown-up version of Ella Dunham, bringing it full circle back to "Brown Betty".



* A season 2 episode of ''Series/{{Sliders}}'' introduces the Kromaggs as mere [[MonsterOfTheWeek monsters of the week]] but they become the main antagonists in the last two seasons.
* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' has its first ChristmasEpisode, which is a standard case of the week with a scene that reveals that Monk is still keeping the last gift his late wife left him wrapped up. It's set up as yet another moment showcasing Monk's undying love for her. Four years later however the GrandFinale reveals that [[spoiler:said gift contains the evidence that reveals who the mastermind of her murder is.]]



* ''{{Franchise/Transformers}}: WesternAnimation/BeastWars''
** An episode near the end of the first season entitled "Before the Storm," which sets up the first season finale and a huge chunk of the second and third season subplots as well.
** Similarly, the second-last episode of the first season of ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'', "Nature Calls", was an odd episode that involved "space barnacles", but it also set up for [[spoiler:Megatron getting his body back in the season finale]].
** Also in Animated, the episode "Headmaster" seemed to just be another disconnected episode with a new human supervillain, except that the Headmaster would up responsible for (one of) Starscream's current predicament(s), as well as the introduction of Dirt Boss and the resultant effect on the Constructicons.
** In ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'', "Convoy" and the human villains it introduces seem to have nothing to do with anything else going on in the show. When they return in "Operation: Breakdown", they've become much more relevant, focussing their agenda on the Transformers themselves and [[CapturedSuperEntity finding out what makes them tick.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' has the fourth episode of the second season seem like padding but it became the first of the five-part arc about the second invasion of Geonosis with the most gigantic battle thus far and the introduction of [[spoiler: zombies]] in the show.
* The ''WesternAnimation/CampLazlo'' episode "The Engagement" contains ends with a joke where, after Jane's engagement falls apart, rather then recognize Lumpus' affection she starts flirting with the Navy Turtle, hoping to be engaged to ''him''. The final season sees Lumpus attending their wedding and subtly crashing it, beginning his relationship with Jane.
* The ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' episode "Ed, Pass It On" (from 2002) is about Eddy lying that his elusive older brother is returning to the cul-de-sac in an attempt to gain respect. When he supposedly does arrive [[spoiler: (it's actually Sarah and Jimmy in disguise)]], Eddy reacts with ''absolute fear''. Seven years later, the GrandFinale [[TheMovie Movie]] reveals that [[spoiler: Eddy's Brother is actually a sadistic bully who tortures Eddy for fun and all the stuff Eddy's been saying about him all these years were all lies so he can get respect from the other kids]].
** In the same episode, when Rolf gets the "news" that Eddy's Brother is coming, he barricades his farm and tells Eddy to tell his brother Rolf's chickens no longer exist. After watching TheMovie, it makes you wonder [[spoiler: ''[[FridgeHorror what was he doing to Rolf's Chickens?]]'']]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBros'' takes this to ''an art form''. Seemingly trivial details and bits of dialogue have a nasty habit of becoming the fulcrums to entire episodes, up to several seasons later. Case in point: In the Season 2 episode "¡Viva los Muertos!" Dr. Venture educates his newly-animated Venturestein with a series of videos depicting a Central American sweatshop. Three seasons later, in the episode "Venture Libre", we learn that Venturestein became rebellious because ''he recognized one of the boys in the videos'' when he was sent to quell a revolution.
* Almost everything that happened across the MythArc of ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' can be traced back to the simple act of Bob loaning Mike The TV To Hexadecimal in "Painted Windows". Before that, the show was episodic.
* The ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice'' episode "Denial" initially looks like a straightforward VillainOfTheWeek outing. Ultimately, though it turns out that not only was aforementioned villain actually a member of [[OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness the Light]], the BigBad group of the whole series, but he was the ''first'' member of the Light to appear in person. Adding to that, the episode launched the ongoing Dr. Fate subplot that would turn up again several more times during the season, hinted towards Red Tornado's ties to the Justice Society, and laid the groundwork for the Kid Flash/Artemis relationship as well.

to:

* ''{{Franchise/Transformers}}: WesternAnimation/BeastWars''
''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'':
** An episode near the end of the first season entitled "Before the Storm," which sets up the first season finale and a huge chunk of the second and third season subplots as well.
** Similarly, the second-last episode of the first season of ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'', "Nature Calls", was an odd episode that involved "space barnacles", but it also set up for [[spoiler:Megatron getting his body back in the season finale]].
** Also in Animated, the episode "Headmaster" seemed to just be another disconnected episode with a new human supervillain, except that the Headmaster would up responsible for (one of) Starscream's current predicament(s), as well as the introduction of Dirt Boss and the resultant effect on the Constructicons.
** In ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'', "Convoy" and the human villains it introduces seem to have nothing to do with anything else going on in the show. When they return in "Operation: Breakdown", they've become much more relevant, focussing their agenda on the Transformers themselves and [[CapturedSuperEntity finding out what makes them tick.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' has the fourth episode of the second season seem like padding but it became the first of the five-part arc about the second invasion of Geonosis with the most gigantic battle thus far and the introduction of [[spoiler: zombies]] in the show.
*
The ''WesternAnimation/CampLazlo'' episode "The Engagement" contains ends with a joke where, after Jane's engagement falls apart, rather then recognize Lumpus' affection she starts flirting with Enchiridion!", Princess Bubblegum sends Finn and Jake to retrieve the Navy Turtle, hoping to be engaged to ''him''. The final titular book. This is not a big deal until season sees Lumpus attending their wedding and subtly crashing it, beginning his relationship with Jane.
* The ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' episode "Ed, Pass It On" (from 2002) is about Eddy lying that his elusive older brother is returning to the cul-de-sac in an attempt to gain respect. When he supposedly does arrive [[spoiler: (it's actually Sarah and Jimmy in disguise)]], Eddy reacts with ''absolute fear''. Seven years later, the GrandFinale [[TheMovie Movie]]
4 reveals that [[spoiler: Eddy's Brother is actually a sadistic bully who tortures Eddy for fun and all the stuff Eddy's been saying about him all these years were all lies so he book can get respect opens portals to other universes. The Lich stole it from the other kids]].
heroes who then travels to a dimension where he plans to wish for the extinction of all life]].
** In the same episode, when Rolf gets the "news" that Eddy's Brother is coming, he barricades his farm and tells Eddy to tell his brother Rolf's chickens no longer exist. After watching TheMovie, it makes you wonder [[spoiler: ''[[FridgeHorror what was he doing to Rolf's Chickens?]]'']]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBros'' takes this to ''an art form''. Seemingly trivial details and bits of dialogue have a nasty habit of becoming the fulcrums to entire episodes, up to several seasons later. Case in point: In the Season 2 episode "¡Viva los Muertos!" Dr. Venture educates his newly-animated Venturestein with a series of videos depicting a Central American sweatshop. Three seasons later, in
the episode "Venture Libre", we learn that Venturestein became rebellious because ''he recognized one of the boys in the videos'' when he was sent "His Hero", Finn and Jake meet their hero Billy and try to quell a revolution.
* Almost everything that happened across the MythArc of ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' can be traced back to the simple act of Bob loaning Mike
emulate his non-violent lifestyle. The TV To Hexadecimal in "Painted Windows". Before that, the show was episodic.
* The ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice''
episode "Denial" initially looks like a straightforward VillainOfTheWeek outing. Ultimately, though itself is quiet forgettable but it turns out that not only was aforementioned villain actually a member of [[OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness has the Light]], first brief appearance of the Lich, who will be the BigBad group for the next seasons, along with [[ChekhovsGun the Gauntlet of the whole series, but he was Hero]] and Billy himself has a key role in the ''first'' member finales of the Light to appear in person. Adding to that, the seasons 4 and 5 [[spoiler: albeit a posthumous one]].
** The
episode launched the ongoing Dr. Fate subplot that would turn up again several more times during the season, hinted towards Red Tornado's ties to the Justice Society, and laid the groundwork "The Creeps" seems like a random episode about a fake murder mystery. Except for the Kid Flash/Artemis relationship appearance of [[spoiler:Shoko (Finn's past life) as well.a ghost as revealed in "The Vault".]]



* ''WesternAnimation/BewareTheBatman'':
** "Attraction" is a break from the League of Assassins storyline before its resolution. However, it also introduces Batman's possible identity crisis and instability, which plays a huge role in the second half of the season.
** "Nexus" introduces Harvey Dent, an important character in the latter half of the series. More importantly, [[spoiler:the events of this episode parallel the events of the three-part season finale on a far larger scale]].
** "Games" has a rather self-contained plot involving Humpty Dumpty. Later in the series, we learn that [[spoiler:the traumatic events of that episode caused Mayor Grange to resign, kicking off the mayoral elections that play a major role in the season finale]].
* The ''WesternAnimation/CampLazlo'' episode "The Engagement" contains ends with a joke where, after Jane's engagement falls apart, rather then recognize Lumpus' affection she starts flirting with the Navy Turtle, hoping to be engaged to ''him''. The final season sees Lumpus attending their wedding and subtly crashing it, beginning his relationship with Jane.
* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' started its [[GrowingTheBeard beard-growing]] with what just seemed like another of its early, one-off episodic stints, namely the episode where a baby network executive convinces the KND to let him use their satellite network, which turned out to be a plot to use his age-changing ray on the whole planet. The kids defeat the baby, but in TheStinger his age-changing device ends up in the hands of the Delightful Children...
* The ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' episode "Ed, Pass It On" (from 2002) is about Eddy lying that his elusive older brother is returning to the cul-de-sac in an attempt to gain respect. When he supposedly does arrive [[spoiler: (it's actually Sarah and Jimmy in disguise)]], Eddy reacts with ''absolute fear''. Seven years later, the GrandFinale [[TheMovie Movie]] reveals that [[spoiler: Eddy's Brother is actually a sadistic bully who tortures Eddy for fun and all the stuff Eddy's been saying about him all these years were all lies so he can get respect from the other kids]].
** In the same episode, when Rolf gets the "news" that Eddy's Brother is coming, he barricades his farm and tells Eddy to tell his brother Rolf's chickens no longer exist. After watching TheMovie, it makes you wonder [[spoiler: ''[[FridgeHorror what was he doing to Rolf's Chickens?]]'']]
* The events in ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode "The Cleveland-Loretta Quagmire" would haunt Cleveland for years to come, such as in "Love Blactually," and eventually led to the existence of ''WesternAnimation/TheClevelandShow''.
* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' has some tremendous hints to its big mysteries hidden in episodes that otherwise aren't massively relevant to the plot. "Carpet Diem", a first season episode, had a brief shot of [[spoiler:Stan discovering an old pair of glasses slightly different than his own]] that was one of the biggest clues to the ''second'' season's MidSeasonTwist [[spoiler:with the Author's identity revealed to be Stan's brother]].



* The ''WesternAnimation/LittlestPetShop2012'' first-season episode "[[Recap/LittlestPetShop2012S1E19WhatDidYouSay What Did You Say?]]" has a pretty subtle one: One of the side effects of Blythe's cold medicine, as written on the bottle, is [[spoiler:a temporary loss of the ability to talk to animals, implying there are people who can talk to animals other than Blythe.]] That Blythe is not alone would become a major theme for the final season and its StoryArc.
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'':
** Season 2 episode [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E20ItsAboutTime "It's About Time"]] is a typical slice-of-life episode whith Twilight having to learn not to worry so much about what might happen tomorrow after spending the week trying to prevent upcoming disasters. At the same time, it sets up two huge season-finale crises:
*** In that episode, Twilight had to bring Cerberus back to the gates of Tartarus where he belongs. In the [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E25TwilightskingdomPart1 Season 4]] [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E26TwilightskingdomPart2 finale]], we learn that [[spoiler: Tirek, one of the most dangerous creatures imprisoned there, escaped during this time]].
*** It also introduces a time-travel spell created by Star Swirl the Bearded. Pinkie Pie makes a point that it can only be used once, so you'd think it couldn't show up again, right? Except that, as demonstrated by the [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E25TheCutieRemarkPart1 Season 5]] [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E26TheCutieRemarkPart2 finale]], [[spoiler:the spell, altered by a very skilled unicorn alongside the use of an AmplifierArtifact, can have absolutely devastating effects]].
** [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E6AppleoosasMostWanted "Appleoosa's Most Wanted"]] is at first a self-standing episode in which the Cutie Mark Crusaders help an older stallion to find the real meaning of his Cutie Mark during one of their usual escapades to find their special talents. [[spoiler:Later on in the season, it turns out helping other ponies realize their talents '''is''' their own talent.]]
* Almost everything that happened across the MythArc of ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' can be traced back to the simple act of Bob loaning Mike The TV To Hexadecimal in "Painted Windows". Before that, the show was episodic.



* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' started its [[GrowingTheBeard beard-growing]] with what just seemed like another of its early, one-off episodic stints, namely the episode where a baby network executive convinces the KND to let him use their satellite network, which turned out to be a plot to use his age-changing ray on the whole planet. The kids defeat the baby, but in TheStinger his age-changing device ends up in the hands of the Delightful Children...

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' started its [[GrowingTheBeard beard-growing]] with what just ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS2E4SenateSpy "Senate Spy"]] may initially seem like padding, but it ends up kicking off a major arc about the second invasion of Geonosis, and ultimately leading to the first appearance of zombies on the show.
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'': [[Recap/StarWarsRebelsS1E01DroidsInDistress "Droids in Distress"]], the second episode, involves the ''Ghost'' crew, low on fuel and cash, taking a job to steal weapons from the Empire. They end up running into everyone's favourite droids, R2-D2 and C-3PO, on an undercover mission, and end up having to return the droids to Bail Organa -- which, eventually, leads directly to the crew joining the larger Rebellion.
* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' often has mundane sounding episodes which end up having major character or plot related impacts. For example:
** "Steven's Lion" in which Steven adopts a [[AmazingTechnicolorWildlife pink]] lion. The Lion becomes a recurring character. In "Lion 2: The Movie" he takes Steven to a secret armory, and he can make a sword come from his head. "Lion 3: Straight To Video" shows that Lion can store things in his mane, and also has [[spoiler: a video made by Steven's mother Rose Quartz]]. Finally, "Rose's Scabbard" reveals that [[spoiler: both the armory and the sword also belonged to Rose Quartz]].
** "Laser Light Cannon" That had the Red Eye, a MonsterOfTheWeek that
seemed like it had no importance. [[spoiler:In "Marble Madness" it was revealed to be a probe sent by Peridot.]]
** The eighth episode, "Serious Steven" is
another lighthearted romp where Steven and the Gems go to collect an artifact with little overall importance. Except for the mural on one of its early, one-off episodic stints, namely the pyramid walls, depicting [[GodEmperor the Diamonds]] positioned in opposition to Rose Quartz, with a [[ArcSymbol yellow, blue, and white triangle]] with a smaller, pink triangle next to her that's not the shape of her Gem. The full significance of this image wouldn't be revealed until two seasons later, when Rose was revealed to have [[spoiler:shattered Pink Diamond]] to start the war for Earth.
** "Keep Beach City Weird" has virtually no importance to anything until the ending goes into meta Foreshadowing. Ronaldo exclaims to Steven Universe (the character) that "It can't be that simple! There has to be more to it than just...YOU!", which may as well be talking about the show at that point. Peedee than says that it's not simple because "Steven is only one part of the puzzle" and that everything is tied to a conspiracy by "Level 8 beings". Ronaldo then realizes that everything is indeed tied to polymorphic, sentient rocks, and he starts raving that "they're here to hollow out the earth! It's all part of the Great Diamond Authority! They can take on any form!" This turns out to be a major case of TheCuckoolanderWasRight, making a statement of how the show was indeed not as simple as it first appeared and that there was more to it, all of it being exactly what Ronaldo described, over the horizon.
* ''{{Franchise/Transformers}}: WesternAnimation/BeastWars''
** An episode near the end of the first season entitled "Before the Storm," which sets up the first season finale and a huge chunk of the second and third season subplots as well.
** Similarly, the second-last episode of the first season of ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'', "Nature Calls", was an odd episode that involved "space barnacles", but it also set up for [[spoiler:Megatron getting his body back in the season finale]].
** Also in Animated,
the episode where "Headmaster" seemed to just be another disconnected episode with a baby network executive convinces new human supervillain, except that the KND to let him use their satellite network, which turned out to be a plot to use his age-changing ray Headmaster would up responsible for (one of) Starscream's current predicament(s), as well as the introduction of Dirt Boss and the resultant effect on the whole planet. The kids defeat Constructicons.
** In ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'', "Convoy" and
the baby, but in TheStinger his age-changing device ends up human villains it introduces seem to have nothing to do with anything else going on in the hands show. When they return in "Operation: Breakdown", they've become much more relevant, focussing their agenda on the Transformers themselves and [[CapturedSuperEntity finding out what makes them tick.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBros'' takes this to ''an art form''. Seemingly trivial details and bits of dialogue have a nasty habit of becoming the fulcrums to entire episodes, up to several seasons later. Case in point: In the Season 2 episode "¡Viva los Muertos!" Dr. Venture educates his newly-animated Venturestein with a series of videos depicting a Central American sweatshop. Three seasons later, in the episode "Venture Libre", we learn that Venturestein became rebellious because ''he recognized one
of the Delightful Children...boys in the videos'' when he was sent to quell a revolution.



* The events in ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode "The Cleveland-Loretta Quagmire" would haunt Cleveland for years to come, such as in "Love Blactually," and eventually led to the existence of ''WesternAnimation/TheClevelandShow''.
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'':
** Season 2 episode [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E20ItsAboutTime "It's About Time"]] is a typical slice-of-life episode whith Twilight having to learn not to worry so much about what might happen tomorrow after spending the week trying to prevent upcoming disasters. At the same time, it sets up two huge season-finale crises:
*** In that episode, Twilight had to bring Cerberus back to the gates of Tartarus where he belongs. In the [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E25TwilightskingdomPart1 Season 4]] [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E26TwilightskingdomPart2 finale]], we learn that [[spoiler: Tirek, one of the most dangerous creatures imprisoned there, escaped during this time]].
*** It also introduces a time-travel spell created by Star Swirl the Bearded. Pinkie Pie makes a point that it can only be used once, so you'd think it couldn't show up again, right? Except that, as demonstrated by the [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E25TheCutieRemarkPart1 Season 5]] [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E26TheCutieRemarkPart2 finale]], [[spoiler:the spell, altered by a very skilled unicorn alongside the use of an AmplifierArtifact, can have absolutely devastating effects]].
** [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E6AppleoosasMostWanted "Appleoosa's Most Wanted"]] is at first a self-standing episode in which the Cutie Mark Crusaders help an older stallion to find the real meaning of his Cutie Mark during one of their usual escapades to find their special talents. [[spoiler:Later on in the season, it turns out helping other ponies realize their talents '''is''' their own talent.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/BewareTheBatman'':
** "Attraction" is a break from the League of Assassins storyline before its resolution. However, it also introduces Batman's possible identity crisis and instability, which plays a huge role in the second half of the season.
** "Nexus" introduces Harvey Dent, an important character in the latter half of the series. More importantly, [[spoiler:the events of this episode parallel the events of the three-part season finale on a far larger scale]].
** "Games" has a rather self-contained plot involving Humpty Dumpty. Later in the series, we learn that [[spoiler:the traumatic events of that episode caused Mayor Grange to resign, kicking off the mayoral elections that play a major role in the season finale]].
* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'':
** The episode "The Enchiridion!", Princess Bubblegum sends Finn and Jake to retrieve the titular book. This is not a big deal until season 4 reveals that [[spoiler: the book can opens portals to other universes. The Lich stole it from the heroes who then travels to a dimension where he plans to wish for the extinction of all life]].
** In the episode "His Hero", Finn and Jake meet their hero Billy and try to emulate his non-violent lifestyle. The episode itself is quiet forgettable but it has the first brief appearance of the Lich, who will be the BigBad for the next seasons, along with [[ChekhovsGun the Gauntlet of the Hero]] and Billy himself has a key role in the finales of seasons 4 and 5 [[spoiler: albeit a posthumous one]].
** The episode "The Creeps" seems like a random episode about a fake murder mystery. Except for the appearance of [[spoiler:Shoko (Finn's past life) as a ghost as revealed in "The Vault".]]
* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' has some tremendous hints to its big mysteries hidden in episodes that otherwise aren't massively relevant to the plot. "Carpet Diem", a first season episode, had a brief shot of [[spoiler:Stan discovering an old pair of glasses slightly different than his own]] that was one of the biggest clues to the ''second'' season's MidSeasonTwist [[spoiler:with the Author's identity revealed to be Stan's brother]].
* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' often has mundane sounding episodes which end up having major character or plot related impacts. For example:
** "Steven's Lion" in which Steven adopts a [[AmazingTechnicolorWildlife pink]] lion. The Lion becomes a recurring character. In "Lion 2: The Movie" he takes Steven to a secret armory, and he can make a sword come from his head. "Lion 3: Straight To Video" shows that Lion can store things in his mane, and also has [[spoiler: a video made by Steven's mother Rose Quartz]]. Finally, "Rose's Scabbard" reveals that [[spoiler: both the armory and the sword also belonged to Rose Quartz]].
** "Laser Light Cannon" That had the Red Eye, a MonsterOfTheWeek that seemed it had no importance. [[spoiler:In "Marble Madness" it was revealed to be a probe sent by Peridot.]]
** The eighth episode, "Serious Steven" is another lighthearted romp where Steven and the Gems go to collect an artifact with little overall importance. Except for the mural on one of the pyramid walls, depicting [[GodEmperor the Diamonds]] positioned in opposition to Rose Quartz, with a [[ArcSymbol yellow, blue, and white triangle]] with a smaller, pink triangle next to her that's not the shape of her Gem. The full significance of this image wouldn't be revealed until two seasons later, when Rose was revealed to have [[spoiler:shattered Pink Diamond]] to start the war for Earth.
** "Keep Beach City Weird" has virtually no importance to anything until the ending goes into meta Foreshadowing. Ronaldo exclaims to Steven Universe (the character) that "It can't be that simple! There has to be more to it than just...YOU!", which may as well be talking about the show at that point. Peedee than says that it's not simple because "Steven is only one part of the puzzle" and that everything is tied to a conspiracy by "Level 8 beings." Ronaldo then realizes that everything is indeed tied to polymorphic, sentient rocks, and he starts raving that "they're here to hollow out the earth! It's all part of the Great Diamond Authority! They can take on any form!" This turns out to be a major case of TheCuckoolanderWasRight, making a statement of how the show was indeed not as simple as it first appeared and that there was more to it, all of it being exactly what Ronaldo described, over the horizon.
* The ''WesternAnimation/LittlestPetShop2012'' first-season episode "[[Recap/LittlestPetShop2012S1E19WhatDidYouSay What Did You Say?]]" has a pretty subtle one: One of the side effects of Blythe's cold medicine, as written on the bottle, is [[spoiler:a temporary loss of the ability to talk to animals, implying there are people who can talk to animals other than Blythe.]] That Blythe is not alone would become a major theme for the final season and its StoryArc.
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* The events in ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice'' episode "The Cleveland-Loretta Quagmire" would haunt Cleveland for years to come, such as in "Love Blactually," and eventually led to the existence of ''WesternAnimation/TheClevelandShow''.
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'':
** Season 2 episode [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E20ItsAboutTime "It's About Time"]] is
"Denial" initially looks like a typical slice-of-life episode whith Twilight having to learn not to worry so much about what might happen tomorrow after spending the week trying to prevent upcoming disasters. At the same time, it sets up two huge season-finale crises:
*** In that episode, Twilight had to bring Cerberus back to the gates of Tartarus where he belongs. In the [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E25TwilightskingdomPart1 Season 4]] [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E26TwilightskingdomPart2 finale]], we learn that [[spoiler: Tirek, one of the most dangerous creatures imprisoned there, escaped during this time]].
*** It also introduces a time-travel spell created by Star Swirl the Bearded. Pinkie Pie makes a point that it can only be used once, so you'd think it couldn't show up again, right? Except that, as demonstrated by the [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E25TheCutieRemarkPart1 Season 5]] [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E26TheCutieRemarkPart2 finale]], [[spoiler:the spell, altered by a very skilled unicorn alongside the use of an AmplifierArtifact, can have absolutely devastating effects]].
** [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E6AppleoosasMostWanted "Appleoosa's Most Wanted"]] is at first a self-standing episode in which the Cutie Mark Crusaders help an older stallion to find the real meaning of his Cutie Mark during one of their usual escapades to find their special talents. [[spoiler:Later on in the season,
straightforward VillainOfTheWeek outing. Ultimately, though it turns out helping other ponies realize their talents '''is''' their own talent.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/BewareTheBatman'':
** "Attraction" is
that not only was aforementioned villain actually a break from member of [[OmniscientCouncilOfVagueness the League of Assassins storyline before its resolution. However, it also introduces Batman's possible identity crisis and instability, which plays a huge role in Light]], the second half BigBad group of the season.
** "Nexus" introduces Harvey Dent, an important character in the latter half of the series. More importantly, [[spoiler:the events of this episode parallel the events of the three-part season finale on a far larger scale]].
** "Games" has a rather self-contained plot involving Humpty Dumpty. Later in the
whole series, we learn that [[spoiler:the traumatic events of that episode caused Mayor Grange to resign, kicking off but he was the mayoral elections that play a major role in ''first'' member of the season finale]].
* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'':
** The episode "The Enchiridion!", Princess Bubblegum sends Finn and Jake
Light to retrieve the titular book. This is not a big deal until season 4 reveals that [[spoiler: the book can opens portals appear in person. Adding to other universes. The Lich stole it from the heroes who then travels to a dimension where he plans to wish for the extinction of all life]].
** In
that, the episode "His Hero", Finn launched the ongoing Dr. Fate subplot that would turn up again several more times during the season, hinted towards Red Tornado's ties to the Justice Society, and Jake meet their hero Billy and try to emulate his non-violent lifestyle. The episode itself is quiet forgettable but it has laid the first brief appearance of the Lich, who will be the BigBad groundwork for the next seasons, along with [[ChekhovsGun the Gauntlet of the Hero]] and Billy himself has a key role in the finales of seasons 4 and 5 [[spoiler: albeit a posthumous one]].
** The episode "The Creeps" seems like a random episode about a fake murder mystery. Except for the appearance of [[spoiler:Shoko (Finn's past life)
Kid Flash/Artemis relationship as a ghost as revealed in "The Vault".]]
* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' has some tremendous hints to its big mysteries hidden in episodes that otherwise aren't massively relevant to the plot. "Carpet Diem", a first season episode, had a brief shot of [[spoiler:Stan discovering an old pair of glasses slightly different than his own]] that was one of the biggest clues to the ''second'' season's MidSeasonTwist [[spoiler:with the Author's identity revealed to be Stan's brother]].
* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' often has mundane sounding episodes which end up having major character or plot related impacts. For example:
** "Steven's Lion" in which Steven adopts a [[AmazingTechnicolorWildlife pink]] lion. The Lion becomes a recurring character. In "Lion 2: The Movie" he takes Steven to a secret armory, and he can make a sword come from his head. "Lion 3: Straight To Video" shows that Lion can store things in his mane, and also has [[spoiler: a video made by Steven's mother Rose Quartz]]. Finally, "Rose's Scabbard" reveals that [[spoiler: both the armory and the sword also belonged to Rose Quartz]].
** "Laser Light Cannon" That had the Red Eye, a MonsterOfTheWeek that seemed it had no importance. [[spoiler:In "Marble Madness" it was revealed to be a probe sent by Peridot.]]
** The eighth episode, "Serious Steven" is another lighthearted romp where Steven and the Gems go to collect an artifact with little overall importance. Except for the mural on one of the pyramid walls, depicting [[GodEmperor the Diamonds]] positioned in opposition to Rose Quartz, with a [[ArcSymbol yellow, blue, and white triangle]] with a smaller, pink triangle next to her that's not the shape of her Gem. The full significance of this image wouldn't be revealed until two seasons later, when Rose was revealed to have [[spoiler:shattered Pink Diamond]] to start the war for Earth.
** "Keep Beach City Weird" has virtually no importance to anything until the ending goes into meta Foreshadowing. Ronaldo exclaims to Steven Universe (the character) that "It can't be that simple! There has to be more to it than just...YOU!", which may as well be talking about the show at that point. Peedee than says that it's not simple because "Steven is only one part of the puzzle" and that everything is tied to a conspiracy by "Level 8 beings." Ronaldo then realizes that everything is indeed tied to polymorphic, sentient rocks, and he starts raving that "they're here to hollow out the earth! It's all part of the Great Diamond Authority! They can take on any form!" This turns out to be a major case of TheCuckoolanderWasRight, making a statement of how the show was indeed not as simple as it first appeared and that there was more to it, all of it being exactly what Ronaldo described, over the horizon.
* The ''WesternAnimation/LittlestPetShop2012'' first-season episode "[[Recap/LittlestPetShop2012S1E19WhatDidYouSay What Did You Say?]]" has a pretty subtle one: One of the side effects of Blythe's cold medicine, as written on the bottle, is [[spoiler:a temporary loss of the ability to talk to animals, implying there are people who can talk to animals other than Blythe.]] That Blythe is not alone would become a major theme for the final season and its StoryArc.
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well.
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7th Mar '17 12:05:34 PM MilesDryden
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** [[Recap/DoctorWho2005CSTheChristmasInvasion "The Christmas Invasion"]] appears to be nothing but a ChristmasEpisode to [[EstablishingCharacterMoment establish]] the newly regenerated Tenth Doctor but it actually set up many events for the next seasons. There's the first appearance of the [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E12ArmyOfGhosts Torchwood Institute]], the santa robots come back during [[Recap/DoctorWho2006CSTheRunawayBride Donna's first appearance]], the Doctor [[NiceJobBreakingItHero deposing Harriet Jones, Prime Minister]] ultimately results in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E12TheSoundOfDrums Harold Saxon taking her place]] and last but not least, the Doctor's severed hand is later retrieved by Jack Harkness and become important to both this series and the spinoff ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''.

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** [[Recap/DoctorWho2005CSTheChristmasInvasion "The Christmas Invasion"]] appears to be nothing but a ChristmasEpisode to [[EstablishingCharacterMoment establish]] the newly regenerated Tenth Doctor but it actually set up many events for the next seasons. There's the first appearance of the [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E12ArmyOfGhosts Torchwood Institute]], the santa robots come back during [[Recap/DoctorWho2006CSTheRunawayBride Donna's first appearance]], the Doctor [[NiceJobBreakingItHero deposing Harriet Jones, Prime Minister]] Minister]][[note]]Yes, we know who she is[[/note]] ultimately results in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E12TheSoundOfDrums Harold Saxon taking her place]] and last but not least, the Doctor's severed hand is later retrieved by Jack Harkness and become important to both this series and the spinoff ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''.
20th Feb '17 11:47:44 AM mario0987
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'' also has several chapters that seem to be completely irrelevant to the main story. If a chapter is not important to something that happens later in the book, it foreshadows something that happens in one of the later books.


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* Franchise/AceAttorney
** Case 1-2 features [[spoiler: the death of Mia Fey]] and is the first to introduce us to [[spoiler: DL-6]]. Both of these things are the two most important plot points of the original trilogy.
** Case 2-2 looks at first glance as a way to give Maya some backstory. [[spoiler: It also sets up the plot of Case 3-5.]]
** Case 3-1 is the standard tutorial of the game. [[spoiler: The villain is the BigBad of the game.]]
** Case 4-1 ends without a clear explanation of the motives for the murder and who the victim was. [[spoiler: The villain is also the BigBad and the case sets up Case 4-4.]]
** Case 5-1 foreshadows Athena's post traumatic stress disorder. Additionally, the bombing and murder that makes up the trial interrupts Case 5-4 and [[spoiler: while Case 5-1's villain is responsible for the murder, it was the BigBad and the one responsible for the last two cases that set of the bomb.]]
** Case 1 of ''Ace Attorney Investigations'' features the villain stealing a file from Edgeworth's office. What said case file is for [[spoiler: is revealed in the fourth case to have a big baring on the plot.]]
** ''Investigations 2'' has the first three cases. Case 1 features an attempted assassination of the president of a foreign country [[spoiler: who is one of the [[GreaterScopeVillain Greater Scope Villains]]. The murderer in this case also has a connection to the BigBad that gets revealed later.]] Case 2 introduces three important characters:[[spoiler: another GreaterScopeVillain, the BigBad and an assassin with connections to both.]] It also introduces the CentralTheme of the game. Case 3 looks like it has little connection to the main plots of the other cases but [[spoiler: it forms part of the main antagonist's backstory.]]
25th Jan '17 6:09:22 AM themisterfree
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** "A Better World", in which an alternate universe version of the Justice League assassinates President Luthor and seizes control of the government, becomes the basis for the conflict in the first two seasons of ''Justice League Unlimited''. The two-part finale of ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' (which aired ''eight years before'') also played a big part in this. Lampshaded thoroughly in the commentary tracks for Justice League, along with a flashback to an even [[Recap/SupermanTheAnimatedSeriesS2E14GhostInTheMachine earlier episode of Superman]].

to:

** "A Better World", in which an alternate universe version of the Justice League assassinates President Luthor and seizes control of the government, becomes the basis for the conflict in the first two seasons of ''Justice League Unlimited''. The two-part finale of ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' (which aired ''eight ''four years before'') also played a big part in this. Lampshaded thoroughly in the commentary tracks for Justice League, ''Justice League'', along with a flashback to an even [[Recap/SupermanTheAnimatedSeriesS2E14GhostInTheMachine earlier episode of Superman]].
19th Sep '16 3:04:07 PM ToaofGallifrey
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* Episode 33 of ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena'' is one of the several recap episodes. While Utena's recap episodes tend to have some significance, such as explaining (some of) the weirdness behind Nanami's fillers, this episode contains [[Utena's loss of her virginity to Akio, the event that sets in motion the Apocalypse arc that makes up the final 6 episodes of the series.]]

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* Episode 33 of ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena'' is one of the several recap episodes. While Utena's recap episodes tend to have some significance, such as explaining (some of) the weirdness behind Nanami's fillers, this episode contains [[Utena's [[spoiler:Utena's loss of her virginity to Akio, the event that sets in motion the Apocalypse arc that makes up the final 6 episodes of the series.]]
19th Sep '16 3:03:33 PM ToaofGallifrey
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Added DiffLines:

* Episode 33 of ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena'' is one of the several recap episodes. While Utena's recap episodes tend to have some significance, such as explaining (some of) the weirdness behind Nanami's fillers, this episode contains [[Utena's loss of her virginity to Akio, the event that sets in motion the Apocalypse arc that makes up the final 6 episodes of the series.]]
16th Sep '16 6:09:33 AM Koveras
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** Within the game itself, the first act [[SlowPacedBeginning mainly sets up many plot points and characters that become important several years later]]--in fact, that's ''all'' the first act is, which lead more impatient players to conclude the game has no [[MythArc overarching plot]] at all.

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** Within the game itself, the first act [[SlowPacedBeginning mainly sets up many plot points and characters that become important several years later]]--in fact, that's ''all'' the first act is, which lead more impatient commonly leads less patient players to conclude assume that the game has no [[MythArc overarching plot]] at all.
This list shows the last 10 events of 322. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InnocuouslyImportantEpisode