History Main / InnocuouslyImportantEpisode

23rd May '16 5:12:33 PM Psi001
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* In the ''{{Anime/Pokemon}}'' episode "Noodles Roamin' Off", Meowth finds out his Fury Swipes give him culinary ability. This seemingly just builds to a one off story where he becomes a noodle chef, [[StatusQuoIsGod only to quit by the end of the episode]]. However Meowth would continue developing and using this talent in several of Jessie's coordinator events later on.
21st May '16 1:35:37 AM Koveras
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* In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', the whole first act is this. It [[SlowPacedBeginning sets up many plot points and characters that become important several years later]]. In fact, that's ''all'' the first act is, leading the more impatient players to conclude the game has no [[MythArc overarching plot]] at all.
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' as a whole becomes this trope in light of new revelations and developments in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition.'' ''DAII'' was sometimes criticized for focusing on plot threads that appeared tangential to the MythArc developed in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' and its expansions, but some of those threads ([[spoiler: the red lyrium, Flemeth's connection to the elves, the entire ''Legacy'' DLC]]), turn out not to be tangential after all.

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* In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'':
** Within
the whole game itself, the first act is this. It [[SlowPacedBeginning mainly sets up many plot points and characters that become important several years later]]. In later]]--in fact, that's ''all'' the first act is, leading the which lead more impatient players to conclude the game has no [[MythArc overarching plot]] at all.
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' ** The game as a whole becomes this trope for the [[Franchise/DragonAge entire series]] in light of new revelations and developments in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition.'' ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition''. ''DAII'' was sometimes criticized for focusing on plot threads that appeared tangential to the MythArc developed in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' and [[VideoGame/DragonAgeOriginsAwakening its expansions, expansions]], but some of those threads ([[spoiler: the red lyrium, Flemeth's connection to the elves, the entire entirety of the ''Legacy'' DLC]]), turn out not to be tangential after all.
20th Apr '16 9:34:33 AM Berrenta
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* In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', the whole first act is this. It sets up many plot points and characters that become important several years later. In fact, that's ''all'' the first act is, leading the [[ItGetsBetter more impatient players]] to conclude the game has no [[MythArc overarching plot]] at all.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', the whole first act is this. It [[SlowPacedBeginning sets up many plot points and characters that become important several years later. later]]. In fact, that's ''all'' the first act is, leading the [[ItGetsBetter more impatient players]] players to conclude the game has no [[MythArc overarching plot]] at all.
12th Apr '16 11:56:38 AM Chadius
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** "A Better World", in which an alternate universe version of the Justice League assassinates President Luthor and seizes control of the government, becomes the basis for the conflict in the first two seasons of ''Justice League Unlimited''. The two-part finale of ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' (which aired ''eight years before'') also played a big part in this.

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** "A Better World", in which an alternate universe version of the Justice League assassinates President Luthor and seizes control of the government, becomes the basis for the conflict in the first two seasons of ''Justice League Unlimited''. The two-part finale of ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' (which aired ''eight years before'') also played a big part in this. Lampshaded thoroughly in the commentary tracks for Justice League, along with a flashback to an even [[Recap/SupermanTheAnimatedSeriesS2E14GhostInTheMachine earlier episode of Superman]].
8th Mar '16 11:48:49 AM Silverblade2
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* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' has the early episode "Phantom Traveler" which appears to be a straight MonsterOfTheWeek episode with the brothers having to exorcise a demon who causes planes to crash ForTheEvulz. Not only do we learn later in the season that [[spoiler: the one who killed the boys' mother and sam's girlfriend is also a demon]] but demons become the major threat for the next few seasons with the rise in demonic possessions being a major plot point.

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* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' has the ''Series/{{Supernatural}}''
** The
early episode "Phantom Traveler" which appears to be a straight MonsterOfTheWeek episode with the brothers having to exorcise a demon who causes planes to crash ForTheEvulz. Not only do we learn later in the season that [[spoiler: the one who killed the boys' mother and sam's girlfriend is also a demon]] but demons become the major threat for the next few seasons with the rise in demonic possessions being a major plot point.



* A season 2 episode of ''Series/{{Sliders}}'' introduces the Kromaggs as mere [[MonsterOfTheWeek monsters of the week]] but they become the main antagonists in the last two seasons.



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26th Feb '16 11:19:07 AM hamza678
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* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' has the early episode "Phantom Traveler" which appears to be a straight MonsterOfTheWeek episode with the brothers having to exorcise a demon who causes planes to chrash ForTheEvulz. Not only do we learn later in the season that [[spoiler: the one who killed the boys' mother and sam's girlfriend is also a demon]] but demons become the major threat for the next few seasons with the rise in demonic possessions being a major plot point.

to:

* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' has the early episode "Phantom Traveler" which appears to be a straight MonsterOfTheWeek episode with the brothers having to exorcise a demon who causes planes to chrash crash ForTheEvulz. Not only do we learn later in the season that [[spoiler: the one who killed the boys' mother and sam's girlfriend is also a demon]] but demons become the major threat for the next few seasons with the rise in demonic possessions being a major plot point.
9th Feb '16 4:39:16 PM merotoker
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** In the [[Anime/FullmetalAlchemist 2003 anime version]], you didn't think Russell and Fletcher would be ''content'' helping Bellsio with his farm for the rest of the show, did you? It seems Russell enjoys borrowing Ed's identity a bit too much. [[spoiler: Too bad the second time he does it, the homunculi have Ed pegged as an enemy after the events of Lior.]] Also there's Rose.
** The ''Brotherhood'' anime has an original story for its first episode, showing the characters chasing and fighting a rogue State Alchemist called Isaac, who is on an anti-government rampage because he doesn't trust the Amestrian higher-ups. He fails as you would expect a filler villain would. In fact, you would be forgiven if you thought this episode is pure filler to introduce newcomers to the series. However, it is ''full'' of {{Foreshadowing}}: [[spoiler:everything Isaac says about the Amestrian government is spot-on, it introduces several characters (like Kimblee) dozens of episodes before they become relevant to the plot, and even his grand plan to freeze the city with alchemy foreshadows the climax of the entire series!]]

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** In the [[Anime/FullmetalAlchemist 2003 anime version]], you didn't think Russell and Fletcher would be ''content'' helping Bellsio with his farm for the rest of the show, did you? It seems Russell enjoys borrowing Ed's identity a bit too much. [[spoiler: Too bad the second time he does it, the homunculi have Ed pegged as an enemy after the events of Lior.]] Lior]]. Also there's Rose.
** The ''Brotherhood'' anime has an original story for its first episode, showing the characters chasing and fighting a rogue State Alchemist called Isaac, who is on an anti-government rampage because he doesn't trust the Amestrian higher-ups. He fails as you would expect a filler villain would. In fact, you would be forgiven if you thought this episode is pure filler to introduce newcomers to the series. However, it is ''full'' of {{Foreshadowing}}: [[spoiler:everything Isaac says about the Amestrian government is spot-on, it introduces several characters (like Kimblee) dozens of episodes before they become relevant to the plot, and even his grand plan to freeze the city with alchemy foreshadows the climax of the entire series!]]series]]!



* ''SteinsGate'': The first episode introduces the characters and setting, and begins to get into the concepts of time-travel used throughout the series, but [[spoiler: the events of that episode also turn out to have far more significance than they'd seem. Okarin's time-travelling efforts in the final episodes show the events of that day as they truly unfolded, and towards the end of the last episode Okarin watches his past self discover Kurisu seemingly dead, remarking that he was to begin the most important 3 weeks of his life.]]

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* ''SteinsGate'': ''VisualNovel/SteinsGate'': The first episode introduces the characters and setting, and begins to get into the concepts of time-travel used throughout the series, but [[spoiler: the events of that episode also turn out to have far more significance than they'd seem. Okarin's time-travelling efforts in the final episodes show the events of that day as they truly unfolded, and towards the end of the last episode Okarin watches his past self discover Kurisu seemingly dead, remarking that he was to begin the most important 3 weeks of his life.]]life]].



** Ace also mentions seeking out Blackbeard, a traitor to Whitebeard's crew who killed one of his crewmates. Drum Island Arc makes a passing mention to him and four other crewmates going on a rampage there, causing Wapol to lose his kingdom. In the Jaya Arc, there are several unusual people in Mock Town who could be confused for the local colors and general riff-raff. Then Luffy meets a complete stranger who shares similar ideals to his, and outwardly seems like a pretty likable guy, becoming a friendly aquaintance of Luffy's. Until he suddenly decks Sarkies of the Bellamy Pirates without breaking a sweat and tries (unsuccessfully) to claim Straw Hat's bounty for himself. [[spoiler:Turns out ''he's'' Blackbeard, and is a backstabbing two-faced fiend, and those people from Mock Town are part of his crew, while another is off lobbying to get him a seat among the Seven Warlords. Nobody outside of Whitebeard's crew knows who he is since he's a relative upstart among pirates, but after Ace tracks him down and they finally fight, following the aftermath of the battle, ''everyone'' knows who Blackbeard is. By Impel Down[=/=]Marineford Arc, Luffy learns the truth about him, and it packs a wallop.]]

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** Ace also mentions seeking out Blackbeard, a traitor to Whitebeard's crew who killed one of his crewmates. Drum Island Arc makes a passing mention to him and four other crewmates going on a rampage there, causing Wapol to lose his kingdom. In the Jaya Arc, there are several unusual people in Mock Town who could be confused for the local colors and general riff-raff. Then Luffy meets a complete stranger who shares similar ideals to his, and outwardly seems like a pretty likable guy, becoming a friendly aquaintance acquaintance of Luffy's. Until he suddenly decks Sarkies of the Bellamy Pirates without breaking a sweat and tries (unsuccessfully) to claim Straw Hat's bounty for himself. [[spoiler:Turns out ''he's'' Blackbeard, and is a backstabbing two-faced fiend, and those people from Mock Town are part of his crew, while another is off lobbying to get him a seat among the Seven Warlords. Nobody outside of Whitebeard's crew knows who he is since he's a relative upstart among pirates, but after Ace tracks him down and they finally fight, following the aftermath of the battle, ''everyone'' knows who Blackbeard is. By Impel Down[=/=]Marineford Arc, Luffy learns the truth about him, and it packs a wallop.]]



* The ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'' arc "I Killed Tomorrow" is a fast-paced, fun beat-the-clock arc rife with humour and energy. The two-issue arc deals with Grady Scraps' invention of a Time Door that allows for travel to and from the future, and neatly wraps itself up at the end. It plays like a "breather arc" in the period between the intensity of Spider-Island and the epic sprawl of Ends Of The Earth. Flash forward to the Superior Spider-Man arc "Necessary Evil", and it turns out this Time Door [[spoiler:is the passage through which Miguel O'Hara, Spider-Man 2099, comes to the present day and is subsequently stranded here.]]
* Creator/GrantMorrison's ''ComicBook/SevenSoldiers of Victory'' series consists of seven miniseries that all initially seem to be telling different stories, but ultimately overlap. Also, the Leviathan, a monster made up of hundreds of feral kids that appears in one issue of the ''Klarion'' mini-series, later turns up in ''[[ComicBook/GrantMorrisonsBatman Batman Incoporated]]'' as a sinister organization.

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* The ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'' arc "I Killed Tomorrow" is a fast-paced, fun beat-the-clock arc rife with humour and energy. The two-issue arc deals with Grady Scraps' invention of a Time Door that allows for travel to and from the future, and neatly wraps itself up at the end. It plays like a "breather arc" in the period between the intensity of Spider-Island and the epic sprawl of Ends Of The Earth. Flash forward to the Superior Spider-Man arc "Necessary Evil", and it turns out this Time Door [[spoiler:is the passage through which Miguel O'Hara, Spider-Man 2099, comes to the present day and is subsequently stranded here.]]
here]].
* Creator/GrantMorrison's ''ComicBook/SevenSoldiers of Victory'' series consists of seven miniseries that all initially seem to be telling different stories, but ultimately overlap. Also, the Leviathan, a monster made up of hundreds of feral kids that appears in one issue of the ''Klarion'' mini-series, later turns up in ''[[ComicBook/GrantMorrisonsBatman Batman Incoporated]]'' Incorporated]]'' as a sinister organization.



** Going back to the ''first'' book, Storm Front, [[spoiler:the ritual used by Victor Sells is the same one the Red Court wants to aim at Harry in Changes, the 12th book.]]

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** Going back to the ''first'' book, Storm Front, [[spoiler:the ritual used by Victor Sells is the same one the Red Court wants to aim at Harry in Changes, the 12th book.]]book]].



** "[[Recap/BabylonFiveS01E01MidnightOnTheFiringLine Midnight on the Firing Line]]" is the former TropeNamer. The first episode after the pilot movie, it featured subplots and character moments that the show ''kept referring to'' throughout many of its best moments over the rest of its run.

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** "[[Recap/BabylonFiveS01E01MidnightOnTheFiringLine Midnight on the Firing Line]]" is the former TropeNamer.{{Trope Namer|s}}. The first episode after the pilot movie, it featured subplots and character moments that the show ''kept referring to'' throughout many of its best moments over the rest of its run.



** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E3SilverNemesis "Silver Nemesis"]] had Cybermen vs [[ThoseWackyNazis Neo-Nazis]], but it set up the "Wolves of Fenric" arc with Ace and the Doctor as ChessMaster motif which concluded in rather sinister style in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric "The Curse of Fenric"]].

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** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E3SilverNemesis "Silver Nemesis"]] had Cybermen vs [[ThoseWackyNazis Neo-Nazis]], but it set up the "Wolves of Fenric" arc with Ace and the Doctor as ChessMaster [[TheChessMaster Chess Master]] motif which concluded in rather sinister style in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric "The Curse of Fenric"]].



** [[Recap/DoctorWho2005CSTheChristmasInvasion "The Christmas Invasion"]] apppears to be nothing but a ChristmasEpisode to [[EstablishingCharacterMoment etablish]] the newly regenerated Tenth Doctor but it actually set up many events for the next seasons. There's the first appearance of the [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E12ArmyOfGhosts Torchwood Institute]], the santa robots come back during [[Recap/DoctorWho2006CSTheRunawayBride Donna's first appearance]], the Doctor [[NiceJobBreakingItHero deposing Harriet Jones, Prime Minister]] ultimately results in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E12TheSoundOfDrums Harold Saxon taking her place]] and last but not least, the Doctor's severed hand is later retrieved by Jack Harkness and become important to both this series and the spinoff ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''.

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** [[Recap/DoctorWho2005CSTheChristmasInvasion "The Christmas Invasion"]] apppears appears to be nothing but a ChristmasEpisode to [[EstablishingCharacterMoment etablish]] establish]] the newly regenerated Tenth Doctor but it actually set up many events for the next seasons. There's the first appearance of the [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E12ArmyOfGhosts Torchwood Institute]], the santa robots come back during [[Recap/DoctorWho2006CSTheRunawayBride Donna's first appearance]], the Doctor [[NiceJobBreakingItHero deposing Harriet Jones, Prime Minister]] ultimately results in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E12TheSoundOfDrums Harold Saxon taking her place]] and last but not least, the Doctor's severed hand is later retrieved by Jack Harkness and become important to both this series and the spinoff ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''.



* The ''Series/StarTrek'' episode "Space Seed" seems at first like another example of episodic 60's-era TV--a bad guy named Khan tries to take over the ''Enterprise'', Kirk outwits him and exiles him and his followers to an uninhabited planet, life goes on. Then [[Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan Khan returns]], and the ensuing events greatly influence the rest of the TOS-era movies.

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* The ''Series/StarTrek'' ''Series/{{Star Trek|TheOriginalSeries}}'' episode "Space Seed" "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E22SpaceSeed Space Seed]]" seems at first like another example of episodic 60's-era TV--a bad guy named Khan tries to take over the ''Enterprise'', Kirk outwits him and exiles him and his followers to an uninhabited planet, life goes on. Then [[Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan Khan returns]], and the ensuing events greatly influence the rest of the TOS-era movies.



** "Killed By Death". Buffy is sick and ends up in hospital - a place she hates since her cousin died in a hospital when they were children. While the MonsterOfTheWeek in the episode (which was also responsible for her cousin's death) is dealt with, Sunnydale General ends up playing a ''big'' role in Season Five - not only does Buffy's mother Joyce end up with a brain tumor and spends a few episodes there, but we're also, at the same time, introduced to the character Ben Wilkinson, a young medical intern who serves as a possible LoveInterest to Buffy [[spoiler: and who turns out to be the mortal, human shell of Glory, the BigBad of Season Five - Glory's plans, in turn, result in Buffy's death in the Season Five finale]].

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** "Killed By Death". Buffy is sick and ends up in hospital - a place she hates since her cousin died in a hospital when they were children. While the MonsterOfTheWeek in the episode (which was also responsible for her cousin's death) is dealt with, Sunnydale General ends up playing a ''big'' role in Season Five - not only does Buffy's mother Joyce end up with a brain tumor and spends a few episodes there, but we're also, at the same time, introduced to the character Ben Wilkinson, a young medical intern who serves as a possible LoveInterest {{Love Interest|s}} to Buffy [[spoiler: and who turns out to be the mortal, human shell of Glory, the BigBad of Season Five - Glory's plans, in turn, result in Buffy's death in the Season Five finale]].



* The ''MadMen'' third season episode "My Old Kentucky Home." On its face, the FourLinesAllWaiting story serves as a series of character vignettes bound by the "work disguised as fun" theme. However, this episode introduces us characters that become prominent in later episodes (Connie Hilton, Henry Francis); and story arcs that carry through the next couple of seasons (Peggy's introduction to the counterculture, Joan realizing that marrying her doctor is not going to give her the life she thought she wanted, Betty looking for a way out of her marriage, among others).
* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' had three:

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* The ''MadMen'' ''Series/MadMen'' third season episode "My Old Kentucky Home." On its face, the FourLinesAllWaiting story serves as a series of character vignettes bound by the "work disguised as fun" theme. However, this episode introduces us characters that become prominent in later episodes (Connie Hilton, Henry Francis); and story arcs that carry through the next couple of seasons (Peggy's introduction to the counterculture, Joan realizing that marrying her doctor is not going to give her the life she thought she wanted, Betty looking for a way out of her marriage, among others).
* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'' had three:



** Series 2 has "The Lady of The Lake" introduce Freya, Merlin's {{love interest}} who dies at the end of the episode, but becomes The Lady of The Lake and helps Merlin retrieve Excalibur in the series 3 finale.

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** Series 2 has "The Lady of The Lake" introduce Freya, Merlin's {{love interest}} interest|s}} who dies at the end of the episode, but becomes The Lady of The Lake and helps Merlin retrieve Excalibur in the series 3 finale.



* In the second season of ''Series/{{GARO}}'' called ''Makai Senki'', there is a flashback episode, in which the childhood of the main character Kouga is seen. The episode seems rather unimportant, until the final episode reveals Kouga knew [[spoiler:the BigBad as a child]], who made Kouga promise to kill him if he ever turns evil
* Series/PowerRangersOperationOverdrive's "One Fine Day" was a lighthearted episode featuring the Rangers on a camping trip which gets interrupted when their enemies erect a forcefield to search for part of the season's McGuffin. A alien-powered human chain used as an attempt to pass through the forcefield is a major clue that [[spoiler:that the Red Ranger isn't human]] when it breaks, foreshadowing his [[spoiler:RoboticReveal]] character arc a few episodes later and his [[spoiler:[[DeathSeeker death-seeking]] HeroicSacrifice]] in the finale.
** Series/PowerRangersRPM's "Tenaya 7" not only properly introduces the titular cyborg villainess but also before she blows her cover, a throwaway line about a metal detector getting "false positives" gains new meaning when in the two-part finale [[spoiler:BigBad activates the sleeper drones among half of [[DomedHometown Corinth's]] populace including ''the officer'' who says ''said line''.]]
** Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers season 3's "Master Vile and the Metallic Armor introduces the Zeo Crystal which not only serves to reverse the time shift in the Alien Rangers arc, but also its later attempted theft causes [[spoiler: the Command Center's bombing]] and later serves as the basis of [[spoiler:[[Series/PowerRangersZeo next season's]]]] powers.
** And than Zeo mentions its BigBad's ties to an "alliance of evil" which is later prophised in the Millennium Message of Series/PowerRangersTurbo, then [[spoiler:abducts mentor Zordon]] and plays a big role the Zordon Era's GrandFinale Series/PowerRangersInSpace.
* Series/{{Fringe}}'s BizarroEpisode, "Brown Betty" (2x19) at first appears to be funny BreatherEpisode after some important revelations in the previous four episodes. Walter tells Olivia's niece Ella a drug-addled [[MusicalEpisode musical]] [[NoirEpisode noir-style]] detective story using all the regular cast members... then gives the story an incredibly dark and bitter ending about how only one man can have a mechanical heart and one must die without it. The ending reflects Walter's guilt about [[spoiler: stealing Peter and irrevocably damaging the alternate universe]] and how he feels the only good he's ever accomplished has come at the price of destroying children's lives (ie, the cortexiphan trials). It reflects the major theme of the next season, that only one universe can survive; one must be destroyed, leading to the BadFuture glimpsed in the Season 3 finale, "The Day We Died". However, [[CheerfulChild Ella]] rejects Walter's unhappy ending and creates an ending where the heart can be shared, symbolizing [[spoiler: Peter realizing after seeing the BadFuture there is [[TakeAThirdOption another option]]: he can bridge the two universes, which will heal them both.]] Peter even does this with the aid of a grown-up version of Ella Dunham, bringing it full circle back to "Brown Betty".

to:

* In the second season of ''Series/{{GARO}}'' called ''Makai Senki'', there is a flashback episode, in which the childhood of the main character Kouga is seen. The episode seems rather unimportant, until the final episode reveals Kouga knew [[spoiler:the BigBad as a child]], who made Kouga promise to kill him if he ever turns evil
evil.
* Series/PowerRangersOperationOverdrive's ''Franchise/PowerRangers''
** ''Series/PowerRangersOperationOverdrive'''s
"One Fine Day" was a lighthearted episode featuring the Rangers on a camping trip which gets interrupted when their enemies erect a forcefield to search for part of the season's McGuffin.MacGuffin. A alien-powered human chain used as an attempt to pass through the forcefield is a major clue that [[spoiler:that the Red Ranger isn't human]] when it breaks, foreshadowing his [[spoiler:RoboticReveal]] character arc a few episodes later and his [[spoiler:[[DeathSeeker death-seeking]] HeroicSacrifice]] in the finale.
** Series/PowerRangersRPM's ''Series/PowerRangersRPM'''s "Tenaya 7" not only properly introduces the titular cyborg villainess but also before she blows her cover, a throwaway line about a metal detector getting "false positives" gains new meaning when in the two-part finale [[spoiler:BigBad activates the sleeper drones among half of [[DomedHometown Corinth's]] populace including ''the officer'' who says ''said line''.]]
line'']].
** Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' season 3's "Master Vile and the Metallic Armor Armor" introduces the Zeo Crystal which not only serves to reverse the time shift in the Alien Rangers arc, but also its later attempted theft causes [[spoiler: the Command Center's bombing]] and later serves as the basis of [[spoiler:[[Series/PowerRangersZeo next season's]]]] powers.
** And than Zeo ''Zeo'' mentions its BigBad's ties to an "alliance of evil" which is later prophised in the Millennium Message of Series/PowerRangersTurbo, ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo'', then [[spoiler:abducts mentor Zordon]] and plays a big role the Zordon Era's GrandFinale Series/PowerRangersInSpace.
''Series/PowerRangersInSpace''.
* Series/{{Fringe}}'s BizarroEpisode, "Brown Betty" (2x19) at first appears to be funny BreatherEpisode after some important revelations in the previous four episodes. Walter tells Olivia's niece Ella a drug-addled [[MusicalEpisode musical]] [[NoirEpisode noir-style]] detective story using all the regular cast members... then gives the story an incredibly dark and bitter ending about how only one man can have a mechanical heart and one must die without it. The ending reflects Walter's guilt about [[spoiler: stealing Peter and irrevocably damaging the alternate universe]] and how he feels the only good he's ever accomplished has come at the price of destroying children's lives (ie, (i.e., the cortexiphan trials). It reflects the major theme of the next season, that only one universe can survive; one must be destroyed, leading to the BadFuture glimpsed in the Season 3 finale, "The Day We Died". However, [[CheerfulChild Ella]] rejects Walter's unhappy ending and creates an ending where the heart can be shared, symbolizing [[spoiler: Peter realizing after seeing the BadFuture there is [[TakeAThirdOption another option]]: he can bridge the two universes, which will heal them both.]] Peter even does this with the aid of a grown-up version of Ella Dunham, bringing it full circle back to "Brown Betty".



* Wrestling/CMPunk's pipebomb would not only elevate him into a true main-eventer but would also set up the debut of "douchebag yesman" Wrestling/Laurinaitis[[note]][[RunningGag Executive Vice President of Talent Relations and Interim/Permanent General Manger of Raw and Smackdown]][[/note]] but the fact that he mentioned being a "Wrestling/PaulHeyman guy" would later come into play when [[spoiler:Heyman (also aligned with Wrestling/BrockLesnar) returned at Punk's side after beating up Wrestling/JohnCena (and the term "Paul Heyman guy" actually came into use)]].

to:

* Wrestling/CMPunk's pipebomb would not only elevate him into a true main-eventer but would also set up the debut of "douchebag yesman" Wrestling/Laurinaitis[[note]][[RunningGag Wrestling/JohnLaurinaitis[[note]][[RunningGag Executive Vice President of Talent Relations and Interim/Permanent General Manger of Raw and Smackdown]][[/note]] but the fact that he mentioned being a "Wrestling/PaulHeyman guy" would later come into play when [[spoiler:Heyman (also aligned with Wrestling/BrockLesnar) returned at Punk's side after beating up Wrestling/JohnCena (and the term "Paul Heyman guy" actually came into use)]].



* In the original ''KingdomHearts'', the story of the Deep Jungle world has Sora reacting to a slideshow picture of a large castle with an odd familiarity even though he'd never left the islands before, and Tarzan telling Sora, in response to the question of where he can find Riku and Kairi, "Friends here; *&&X%.", which turns out to mean that his friends are in his heart. [[spoiler: During the games climactic level at Hollow Bastion, Tarzan's words turn out to be {{Foreshadowing}} since it's revealed that Kairi IS REALLY inside Sora's heart and since she came from Hollow Bastion, that was also the reason why the castle seemed so familiar to Sora.]]

to:

* In the original ''KingdomHearts'', ''VideoGame/{{Kingdom Hearts|I}}'', the story of the Deep Jungle world has Sora reacting to a slideshow picture of a large castle with an odd familiarity even though he'd never left the islands before, and Tarzan telling Sora, in response to the question of where he can find Riku and Kairi, "Friends here; *&&X%.", which turns out to mean that his friends are in his heart. [[spoiler: During the games climactic level at Hollow Bastion, Tarzan's words turn out to be {{Foreshadowing}} since it's revealed that Kairi IS REALLY inside Sora's heart and since she came from Hollow Bastion, that was also the reason why the castle seemed so familiar to Sora.]]



* In the first ''Franchise/MassEffect'' game, there's a side mission that involves going to the Moon and helping shut down a rogue [[ArtificialIntelligence AI]]. The third game reveals that [[spoiler:this was an early form of EDI, the AI on the second Normandy, who was recovered by Cerberus and rebuilt]].

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* In the first ''Franchise/MassEffect'' game, ''VideoGame/{{Mass Effect|1}}'', there's a side mission that involves going to the Moon and helping shut down a rogue [[ArtificialIntelligence AI]]. [[VideoGame/MassEffect3 The third game game]] reveals that [[spoiler:this was an early form of EDI, the AI on the second Normandy, who was recovered by Cerberus and rebuilt]].



* In ''VideoGame/RaymanOrigins'', after beating a level, you give your Lums to the Magician, who gives you Electoons and Lum Medals. This doesn't seem too special until [[spoiler: The Reveal, where you find The Magician behind the machinery of Moody Clouds, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero using the Lums to power it. ]]]]

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* In ''VideoGame/RaymanOrigins'', after beating a level, you give your Lums to the Magician, who gives you Electoons and Lum Medals. This doesn't seem too special until [[spoiler: The Reveal, where you find The Magician behind the machinery of Moody Clouds, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero using the Lums to power it. ]]]]it]]]].



* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'''s intermission at first seems to be a completely unrelated, silly tangent that has no bearing whatsoever on the plot. Of course, ''everything'' in Homestuck is plot-relevant, and said intermission turned out to have a big impact on [[spoiler:the trolls' session, especially after the [=EOA5=] flash when Spades Slick kills Snowman and destroys their universe. In fact, the Intermission includes the first mention of the comic's eventual BigBad.]] For some, as much as ''the first three acts'' could be considered this, appearing to be nothing more than a bunch of pointless gags, but in actuality setting up a ''lot'' for later on such as [[spoiler:the bunny John receives as a birthday present, which ends up becoming incredibly powerful, reaching the hands of a villain, and in doing so causes at least half of the terrible things that happen during the kids' and trolls' sessions.]]

to:

* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'''s intermission at first seems to be a completely unrelated, silly tangent that has no bearing whatsoever on the plot. Of course, ''everything'' in Homestuck is plot-relevant, and said intermission turned out to have a big impact on [[spoiler:the trolls' session, especially after the [=EOA5=] flash when Spades Slick kills Snowman and destroys their universe. In fact, the Intermission includes the first mention of the comic's eventual BigBad.]] BigBad]]. For some, as much as ''the first three acts'' could be considered this, appearing to be nothing more than a bunch of pointless gags, but in actuality setting up a ''lot'' for later on such as [[spoiler:the bunny John receives as a birthday present, which ends up becoming incredibly powerful, reaching the hands of a villain, and in doing so causes at least half of the terrible things that happen during the kids' and trolls' sessions.]]sessions]].



* The ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' episode "Ed, Pass It On" (from 2002) is about Eddy lying that his elusive older brother is returning to the cul-de-sac in an attempt to gain respect. When he supposedly does arrive [[spoiler: (it's actually Sarah and Jimmy in disguise)]], Eddy reacts with ''absolute fear''. Seven years later, the GrandFinale [[TheMovie Movie]] reveals that [[spoiler: Eddy's Brother is actually a sadistic bully who tortures Eddy for fun and all the stuff Eddy's been saying about him all these years were all lies so he can get respect from the other kids.]]

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'' episode "Ed, Pass It On" (from 2002) is about Eddy lying that his elusive older brother is returning to the cul-de-sac in an attempt to gain respect. When he supposedly does arrive [[spoiler: (it's actually Sarah and Jimmy in disguise)]], Eddy reacts with ''absolute fear''. Seven years later, the GrandFinale [[TheMovie Movie]] reveals that [[spoiler: Eddy's Brother is actually a sadistic bully who tortures Eddy for fun and all the stuff Eddy's been saying about him all these years were all lies so he can get respect from the other kids.]]kids]].



* Almost everything that happened across the MythArc of WesternAnimation/ReBoot can be traced back to the simple act of Bob loaning Mike The TV To Hexadecimal in "Painted Windows". Before that, the show was episodic.

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* Almost everything that happened across the MythArc of WesternAnimation/ReBoot ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' can be traced back to the simple act of Bob loaning Mike The TV To Hexadecimal in "Painted Windows". Before that, the show was episodic.



* "Nightmares And Daydreams" from WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender is a BizarroEpisode, with a plot that mainly focuses on Aang becoming too sleep-deprived and hallucinating. The B plot focuses on Zuko and Mai GettingCrapPastTheRadar (Zuko sends the servants away, and they both sink out of sight on the couch) while Zuko worries about a war meeting. Then we have one scene near the end, not even three minutes long, [[HeelRealization where Zuko finally has an epiphany that sticks]]. [[spoiler: The next time we see him, [[HeelFaceTurn he's preparing to leave and join Team Avatar]].]]

to:

* "Nightmares And Daydreams" from WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' is a BizarroEpisode, with a plot that mainly focuses on Aang becoming too sleep-deprived and hallucinating. The B plot focuses on Zuko and Mai GettingCrapPastTheRadar (Zuko sends the servants away, and they both sink out of sight on the couch) while Zuko worries about a war meeting. Then we have one scene near the end, not even three minutes long, [[HeelRealization where Zuko finally has an epiphany that sticks]]. [[spoiler: The next time we see him, [[HeelFaceTurn he's preparing to leave and join Team Avatar]].]]



** In the Grand Finale, the audience finally sees what happened during the meeting: Zuko inadvertently inspired the plan to use Sozin's Comet to [[spoiler: burn down the ''entire'' Earth Kingdom in order to break the spirit of its citizens once and for all]]
* The ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'' episode "Alone Against AIM" seems rudimentary at first, boasting a simple storyline in which Iron Man and some of his companions prevent AIM from stealing important Stark Industries data and armor. It does, however, contain at least two ties to the season's main arc. First, Iron Man introduces a new suit of armor, which he will continue to use up through the series finale. Secondly, Captain America (actually a Skrull in disguise) reveals to the other heroes during the aftermath that he managed to keep the data out of AIM's hands, but [[spoiler: the Skrulls later use this information to implant a crippling virus into Iron Man's suit]].

to:

** In the Grand Finale, the audience finally sees what happened during the meeting: Zuko inadvertently inspired the plan to use Sozin's Comet to [[spoiler: burn down the ''entire'' Earth Kingdom in order to break the spirit of its citizens once and for all]]
all]].
* The ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'' episode "Alone Against AIM" seems rudimentary at first, boasting a simple storyline in which Iron Man and some of his companions prevent AIM from stealing important Stark Industries data and armor. It does, however, contain at least two ties to the season's main arc. First, Iron Man introduces a new suit of armor, which he will continue to use up through the series finale. Secondly, Captain America (actually a Skrull in disguise) reveals to the other heroes during the aftermath that he managed to keep the data out of AIM's hands, but [[spoiler: the Skrulls later use this information to implant a crippling virus into Iron Man's suit]].



** "Nexus" introduces Harvey Dent, an important character in the latter half of the series. More importantly, [[spoiler:the events of this episode parallel the events of three-part season finale on a far larger scale]].

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** "Nexus" introduces Harvey Dent, an important character in the latter half of the series. More importantly, [[spoiler:the events of this episode parallel the events of the three-part season finale on a far larger scale]].



** The episode "The Enchiridion!", Princess Bubblegum sends Finn and Jake to retrieve the titular book. This is not a big deal until season 4 reveals that [[spoiler: the book can opens portals to other universes. The Lich stole it from the heroes who then travels to a dimension where he plans to wish for the extinction of all life.]]
** In the episode "His Hero", Finn and Jake meet their hero Billy and try to emulate his non-violent lifestyle. The episode itself is quiet forgetable but it has the first brief appearance of the Lich, who will be the BigBad for the next seasons, along with [[ChekhovsGun the Gauntlet of the Hero]] and Billy himself has a key role in the finales of seasons 4 and 5 [[spoiler: albeit a posthumous one]].

to:

** The episode "The Enchiridion!", Princess Bubblegum sends Finn and Jake to retrieve the titular book. This is not a big deal until season 4 reveals that [[spoiler: the book can opens portals to other universes. The Lich stole it from the heroes who then travels to a dimension where he plans to wish for the extinction of all life.]]
life]].
** In the episode "His Hero", Finn and Jake meet their hero Billy and try to emulate his non-violent lifestyle. The episode itself is quiet forgetable forgettable but it has the first brief appearance of the Lich, who will be the BigBad for the next seasons, along with [[ChekhovsGun the Gauntlet of the Hero]] and Billy himself has a key role in the finales of seasons 4 and 5 [[spoiler: albeit a posthumous one]].



* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' has some tremendous hints to its big mysteries hidden in episodes that otherwise aren't massively relevant to the plot. "Carpet Diem", a first season episode, had a brief shot of [[spoiler:Stan discovering an old pair of glasses slightly different than his own]] that was one of the biggest clues to the ''second'' season's MidSeasonTwist [[spoiler:with the Author's identity revealed to be Stan's brother.]]

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' has some tremendous hints to its big mysteries hidden in episodes that otherwise aren't massively relevant to the plot. "Carpet Diem", a first season episode, had a brief shot of [[spoiler:Stan discovering an old pair of glasses slightly different than his own]] that was one of the biggest clues to the ''second'' season's MidSeasonTwist [[spoiler:with the Author's identity revealed to be Stan's brother.]]brother]].



** "Steven's Lion" in which Steven adopts a pink lion, until [[spoiler: "Rose's Scabbard" it's learned that Lion knew Steven's mom Rose Quartz and has many of her possessions in his fur.]]

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** "Steven's Lion" in which Steven adopts a pink lion, until [[spoiler: "Rose's Scabbard" it's learned that Lion knew Steven's mom Rose Quartz and has many of her possessions in his fur.]]fur]].



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25th Jan '16 8:53:25 PM Scrounge
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Added DiffLines:

** In ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'', "Convoy" and the human villains it introduces seem to have nothing to do with anything else going on in the show. When they return in "Operation: Breakdown", they've become much more relevant, focussing their agenda on the Transformers themselves and [[CapturedSuperEntity finding out what makes them tick.]]
11th Jan '16 8:26:29 AM Furienna
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* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' had two:

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* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' had two:three:



** Series 2 has "The Lady of The Lake" introduce Freya, Merlin's {{love interest}} who dies at the end of the episode, but becomes The Lady of The Lake and helps Merlin retrieve Excalibur in the series 3 finale.



** Series 2 has "The Lady of The Lake" introduce Freya, Merlin's {{love interest}} who dies at the end of the episode, but becomes The Lady of The Lake and helps Merlin retrieve Excalibur in the series 3 finale.
9th Jan '16 1:27:08 PM ZombieAladdin
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* While ''Manga/OnePiece'' author Eiichiro Oda is a past master of the ChekhovsGun, one instance that hits this trope is the Skypeia arc. A largely standalone arc with no immediate connection to the primary story except for the near-end reveal that Gold Roger had been there himself. Three very important things derive from this arc, however:

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* While ''Manga/OnePiece'' author Eiichiro Oda is a past master of the ChekhovsGun, one instance that hits this trope is the Skypeia arc. A largely standalone arc with no immediate connection to the primary story except for the near-end reveal that Gold Roger had been there himself. Three At least four very important things derive from this arc, however:
This list shows the last 10 events of 295. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InnocuouslyImportantEpisode