History Main / InformedFlaw

13th Feb '17 3:36:10 AM WaggishPony
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** Leah is often described as a shrew of the highest order, to the point where ''Breaking Dawn'' has Jacob finding it extremely weird to have a civil conversation with her, and everyone agreeing that the miserable life she's living is her own fault. While Leah does say some not nice things, a lot of her "jerkishness", like trying to convince Jacob to stop pursuing Bella because she's getting married, makes a lot of sense. Not to mention that her "shrewish" behavior started after her she lost her fiance to her cousin, turned into a werewolf, went through the stress of her dad dying, and generally had her whole life ruined and screwed up. It is not surprising that haters of the series see Leah as the UnintentionallySympathetic {{Woobie}}, garnering a ''massive'' fanbase int he process.

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** Leah is often described as a shrew of the highest order, to the point where ''Breaking Dawn'' has Jacob finding it extremely weird to have a civil conversation with her, and everyone agreeing that the miserable life she's living is her own fault. While Leah does say some not nice things, a lot of her "jerkishness", like trying to convince Jacob to stop pursuing Bella because she's getting married, makes a lot of sense. Not to mention that her "shrewish" behavior started after her she lost her fiance to her cousin, turned into a werewolf, went through the stress of her dad dying, and generally had her whole life ruined and screwed up. It is not surprising that haters of the series see Leah as the UnintentionallySympathetic {{Woobie}}, garnering a ''massive'' fanbase int he in the process.
13th Feb '17 3:30:50 AM WaggishPony
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** Leah is often described as a shrew of the highest order, to the point where ''Breaking Dawn'' has Jacob finding it extremely weird to have a civil conversation with her, and everyone agreeing that the miserable life she's living is her own fault. While Leah does say some not nice things, a lot of her "jerkishness", like trying to convince Jacob to stop pursuing Bella because she's getting married, makes a lot of sense. Not to mention that her "shrewish" behavior started after her she lost her fiance to her cousin, turned into a werewolf, went through the stress of her dad dying, and generally had her whole life ruined and screwed up. It is not surprising that fans see Leah as the UnintentionallySympathetic {{Woobie}}, with many favoring her over the main characters.

to:

** Leah is often described as a shrew of the highest order, to the point where ''Breaking Dawn'' has Jacob finding it extremely weird to have a civil conversation with her, and everyone agreeing that the miserable life she's living is her own fault. While Leah does say some not nice things, a lot of her "jerkishness", like trying to convince Jacob to stop pursuing Bella because she's getting married, makes a lot of sense. Not to mention that her "shrewish" behavior started after her she lost her fiance to her cousin, turned into a werewolf, went through the stress of her dad dying, and generally had her whole life ruined and screwed up. It is not surprising that fans haters of the series see Leah as the UnintentionallySympathetic {{Woobie}}, with many favoring her over the main characters.garnering a ''massive'' fanbase int he process.
13th Feb '17 3:29:45 AM WaggishPony
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** Leah is often described as a shrew of the highest order, to the point where ''Breaking Dawn'' has Jacob finding it extremely weird to have a civil conversation with her, and everyone agreeing that the miserable life she's living is her own fault. While Leah does say some not nice things, a lot of her "jerkishness", like trying to convince Jacob to stop pursuing Bella because she's getting married, makes a lot of sense. Not to mention that her "shrewish" behavior started after her she lost her fiance to her cousin, turned into a werewolf, went through the stress of her dad dying, and generally had her whole life ruined and screwed up.

to:

** Leah is often described as a shrew of the highest order, to the point where ''Breaking Dawn'' has Jacob finding it extremely weird to have a civil conversation with her, and everyone agreeing that the miserable life she's living is her own fault. While Leah does say some not nice things, a lot of her "jerkishness", like trying to convince Jacob to stop pursuing Bella because she's getting married, makes a lot of sense. Not to mention that her "shrewish" behavior started after her she lost her fiance to her cousin, turned into a werewolf, went through the stress of her dad dying, and generally had her whole life ruined and screwed up. It is not surprising that fans see Leah as the UnintentionallySympathetic {{Woobie}}, with many favoring her over the main characters.
9th Feb '17 7:46:31 PM SwampAdder
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** Holmes' drug use is this in the first few books. Naturally, since A. it wasn't really all that out of the ordinary for the time, at least for those of Holmes' bohemian lifestyle; B. he mainly does it from boredom when he doesn't have a case, and the stories are all about the cases; and C. Watson eventually gets him to kick the habit, it just doesn't come up. Adaptations like ''The Seven Percent Solution'' love to push the angle for all it's worth.

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** Holmes' drug use is this in the first few books. Naturally, since A. it wasn't really all that out of the ordinary for the time, at least for those of Holmes' bohemian lifestyle; B. he mainly does it from boredom when he doesn't have a case, and the stories are all about the cases; and C. Watson eventually gets him to kick the habit, it just doesn't come up. Adaptations like ''The Seven Percent Solution'' love to push the this angle for all it's worth.
9th Feb '17 7:45:04 PM SwampAdder
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** Holmes' drug use is this in the first few books. Naturally, since A. it wasn't really all that out of the ordinary for the time, at least for those of Holmes' bohemian lifestyle; B. he mainly does it from boredom when he doesn't have a case, and the stories are all about cases; and C. Watson eventually gets him to kick the habit, it just doesn't come up. Adaptations, like ''The Seven Percent Solution'' love to push the angle for all its worth.

to:

** Holmes' drug use is this in the first few books. Naturally, since A. it wasn't really all that out of the ordinary for the time, at least for those of Holmes' bohemian lifestyle; B. he mainly does it from boredom when he doesn't have a case, and the stories are all about the cases; and C. Watson eventually gets him to kick the habit, it just doesn't come up. Adaptations, Adaptations like ''The Seven Percent Solution'' love to push the angle for all its it's worth.
9th Feb '17 7:44:30 PM SwampAdder
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** Watson lists several "vices" in the first book, which include being lazy, hating arguments and noise, and getting up at odd hours at night. Seeing as how he's a ShellShockedVeteran recovering from being wounded and ill, these hardly count as vices and do not appear in later stories after he recovers. He also says that he has "another set of vices when I'm well", none of which are ever actually depicted in the stories either (there are subtle allusions that hint that these mysterious vices may include gambling and ''possibly'' womanizing, but they are never shown). Of course, he ''is'' the narrator; [[UnreliableNarrator maybe he's editing out the parts he's uncomfortable with?]]

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** Watson lists several of his own "vices" in the first book, which include being lazy, hating arguments and noise, and getting up at odd hours at night. Seeing as how he's a ShellShockedVeteran recovering from being wounded and ill, these hardly count as vices and do not appear in later stories after he recovers. He also says that he has "another set of vices when I'm well", none of which are ever actually depicted in the stories either (there are subtle allusions that hint that these mysterious vices may include gambling and ''possibly'' womanizing, but they are never shown). Of course, he ''is'' the narrator; [[UnreliableNarrator maybe he's editing out the parts he's uncomfortable with?]]
7th Feb '17 2:00:17 AM ImpudentInfidel
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** In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', the ''Defiant'' is supposedly overpowered for its size and [[FragileSpeedster almost tore itself apart when it was pushed to its top speed]] in testing. It never performs anything less than flawlessly in the show, however. Apparently, chief engineer O'Brien is ''just that good''.

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** In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', the ''Defiant'' is supposedly overpowered for its size and [[FragileSpeedster almost tore itself apart when it was pushed to its top speed]] in testing. It never performs anything less than flawlessly in the show, however. Apparently, chief engineer O'Brien is ''just that good''. It's later clarified that the fix is actually pretty simple, but it requires violating standard Federation safety rules; two episodes involve cast members getting other ships of the same class up to snuff almost immediately by basically changing the settings.
31st Jan '17 6:46:01 AM Argon2
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* In ''Anime/Danganronpa3'', Chiaki apparently had no friends before Hope's Peak and mostly spent her time indoors. By the second episode, everyone in her class- no matter how grumpy or asocial- likes her and she is unanimously elected class president. (She is slightly socially awkward, but only ever in cute or inconsequential ways.)
27th Jan '17 8:41:49 PM Darth_Marth
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* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'': From season 2 onwards, it is repeatedly stated by the heroes that Grant Ward does not take responsibility for his crimes, preferring instead to blame John Garrett, his family, or anyone else he can think of for the way he turned out. Ward himself, however, ''does'' repeatedly own up to his actions, even going so far as to explicitly [[{{Jossed}} Joss]] the possibility he might have been brainwashed or otherwise forced to act against his will. While it is arguable he's only saying these things in an attempt to manipulate the heroes and earn their forgiveness (which he wants for his own self-fulfillment more than genuine remorse for the pain he's caused them) it still creates a pretty clear dissonance between how we're told he acts and how he actually acts.
24th Jan '17 12:59:07 PM DanaO
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** This could be partly because he tries to take singing ''lessons'' over the course of the series (which covers over two decades in-universe), and partly because by the standards of the setting he's in (rock and its derivatives are unknown and there are common species with innately more melodic voices than humans) his singing style ''is'' much harsher than anyone's used to. Whether and how much it's an actual flaw (as he's making music for magic rather than audience entertainment) is never really clear.
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