History Main / IndecisiveParody

21st Feb '17 11:45:19 PM gewunomox
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* [[JethroTull Jethro Tull's]] 1972 effort ''Thick as a Brick'' was intended to be a parody of ProgressiveRock, in response to Ian Anderson's discontent of their previous album consistently being called a ConceptAlbum. Of course, today the album is deemed one of the essential classics of the genre. So, depending on how you look at it, they either [[GoneHorriblyRight did it right]] or [[GoneHorriblyWrong terribly, terribly wrong]]. A {{sequel}} came out 40 years later in 2012.

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* [[JethroTull Jethro Tull's]] Music/JethroTull's 1972 effort ''Thick as a Brick'' was intended to be a parody of ProgressiveRock, in response to Ian Anderson's discontent of their previous album consistently being called a ConceptAlbum. Of course, today the album is deemed one of the essential classics of the genre. So, depending on how you look at it, they either [[GoneHorriblyRight did it right]] or [[GoneHorriblyWrong terribly, terribly wrong]]. A {{sequel}} came out 40 years later in 2012.
21st Feb '17 10:42:25 PM NumberFortyFour
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* ''Series/BigTimeRush'' can't seem to decide whether it's a parody of musical tweencoms or a straightforward example of one. As for the band itself, the first episode pokes fun at the stereotype of boy bands only singing about girls, and has the main characters refuse to sing an example of such a song. Guess what the majority of the songs featured in the rest of the series are about? [[spoiler: Girls]].
15th Feb '17 2:25:40 AM Luppercus
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* The Church of Satan: most of the public image projected was a deliberate taken on the HollywoodSatanism stereotype in order to mock the general conception of religion and superstition ([=LaVeyan=] Satanists considered themselves atheists) but other elements of the Church are straightforward religious like the belief in magic and the Church's organization.

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* The Church of Satan: most of the public image projected was a deliberate taken take on the HollywoodSatanism stereotype in order to mock the general conception of religion and superstition ([=LaVeyan=] Satanists considered themselves atheists) but other elements of the Church are straightforward religious like the belief in magic and the Church's organization.
15th Feb '17 2:24:06 AM Luppercus
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* ''Anime/MagicalProjectS'', and intentionally so. It starts off as a clear parody of Sailor Moon...but about three-quarters of the way through the series, an ''extreme'' case of CerebusSyndrome hits. [[CerebusRollercoaster It goes away pretty quickly]], but then ''Magical Project S'' becomes a MagicalGirl show played more or less straight.



* ''Anime/MagicalProjectS'', and intentionally so. It starts off as a clear parody of Sailor Moon...but about three-quarters of the way through the series, an ''extreme'' case of CerebusSyndrome hits. [[CerebusRollercoaster It goes away pretty quickly]], but then ''Magical Project S'' becomes a MagicalGirl show played more or less straight.



* ''ShugoChara'' is this to MagicalGirl stories and shojo romances.



* ''ShugoChara'' is this to MagicalGirl stories and shojo romances.



* ''The 7pm Project''. Is the show a news satire, a news parody which looks at amusing stories, or an ordinary news show that happens to be hosted by comedians?
* ''Series/ElChapulinColorado'' starts as a parody on superhero and totsukasu shows but most of the episodes play the hero part straight. Probably due to WeirdAlEffect.
* ''Series/DeathValley'' was a parody of both RealityTelevision and horror shows as itís about a COPS-like reality show in a world with vampires, zombies and werewolves, but most episodes play the horror part straight.



* ''Series/UglyBetty'' could never really decide if it was an affectionate send-up of soap operas and telenovelas or if was a dramatic example of one.
* ''Series/PowerRangersRPM'' In a definite case of TropesAreNotBad, it manages to be one of the most depressing parodies of ''PowerRangers'' ever. The show constantly varies between lampshading PR tropes ("Sometimes when I morph, a giant fireball appears behind me for no apparent reason..."), and dark storylines (Dr. K's past).
* ''The 7pm Project''. Is the show a news satire, a news parody which looks at amusing stories, or an ordinary news show that happens to be hosted by comedians?
* Nobody seemed to get that ''Series/SheSpies'' was an action-comedy series bordering on parody, mainly because to the untrained eye, it looked like just another trashy syndicated action show. Which is probably why it got [[ReTool retooled]] into a straight action show for its second (and last) season.



* ''Series/PowerRangersRPM'' In a definite case of TropesAreNotBad, it manages to be one of the most depressing parodies of ''PowerRangers'' ever. The show constantly varies between lampshading PR tropes ("Sometimes when I morph, a giant fireball appears behind me for no apparent reason..."), and dark storylines (Dr. K's past).
* Nobody seemed to get that ''Series/SheSpies'' was an action-comedy series bordering on parody, mainly because to the untrained eye, it looked like just another trashy syndicated action show. Which is probably why it got [[ReTool retooled]] into a straight action show for its second (and last) season.
* ''Series/UglyBetty'' could never really decide if it was an affectionate send-up of soap operas and telenovelas or if was a dramatic example of one.



* The Church of Satan: most of the public image projected was a deliberate taken on the HollywoodSatanism stereotype in order to mock the general conception of religion and superstition ([=LaVeyan=] Satanists considered themselves atheists) but other elements of the Church are straightforward religious like the belief in magic and the Church's organization.



* It's not always immediately clear whether ''VideoGame/IronBrigade'' is supposed to be RatedMForManly or TestosteronePoisoning. Some aspects seem to be firmly mocking over-the-top manliness, while others seem to be playing it straight. The WordOfGod isn't very helpful either -- when citing over-the-top men's magazines like ''Man's Life'' as a source, they both refer to how warped their values are, and how awesome they were.



* ''VideoGame/FarCry3'' was supposed to be a satire/deconstruction of typical video game power fantasies, but spent so much time playing them straight (and doing a very good job of it) that it's hard to actually parse out the intended satire. The lead writer, Jeffrey Yohalem, wound up on the interview circuit trying to explain to people what the story really meant.



* ''VideoGame/DukeNukemForever'' attempts to parody modern shooters and hold up itself and Duke as a proper hero from the ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'' era. A good number of people pointed out that, for all the schoolyard insults and dated jabs, ''DNF'''s gameplay is very clearly more inspired by those modern shooters than by the original game, with its two guns, regenerating health, slower speed, turret sections, and quicktime events.
** Early on in the game, Duke is told to look for a keycard and instead wrenches the door open. This would be a funny subversion of a common gaming cliche... but the way he opens the door is with a quicktime event requiring mashing a button, which is an even bigger cliche.



* ''VideoGame/FarCry3'' was supposed to be a satire/deconstruction of typical video game power fantasies, but spent so much time playing them straight (and doing a very good job of it) that it's hard to actually parse out the intended satire. The lead writer, Jeffrey Yohalem, wound up on the interview circuit trying to explain to people what the story really meant.
* ''VideoGame/HalfMinuteHero'' was a simple, clear-cut parody. Its ''sequel'', however, can't decide what it is from minute to minute. Put it this way: towards the end of the game, the Time Goddess rewinds the end credits because she doesn't want the game to end before she gets petty revenge. But during the final boss fight, the characters give long speeches about how they'd rather wipe out all existence than live in a world governed by determinism, and they are dead serious.
* It's not always immediately clear whether ''VideoGame/IronBrigade'' is supposed to be RatedMForManly or TestosteronePoisoning. Some aspects seem to be firmly mocking over-the-top manliness, while others seem to be playing it straight. The WordOfGod isn't very helpful either -- when citing over-the-top men's magazines like ''Man's Life'' as a source, they both refer to how warped their values are, and how awesome they were.



* ''VideoGame/DukeNukemForever'' attempts to parody modern shooters and hold up itself and Duke as a proper hero from the ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'' era. A good number of people pointed out that, for all the schoolyard insults and dated jabs, ''DNF'''s gameplay is very clearly more inspired by those modern shooters than by the original game, with its two guns, regenerating health, slower speed, turret sections, and quicktime events.
** Early on in the game, Duke is told to look for a keycard and instead wrenches the door open. This would be a funny subversion of a common gaming cliche... but the way he opens the door is with a quicktime event requiring mashing a button, which is an even bigger cliche.



* ''VideoGame/HalfMinuteHero'' was a simple, clear-cut parody. Its ''sequel'', however, can't decide what it is from minute to minute. Put it this way: towards the end of the game, the Time Goddess rewinds the end credits because she doesn't want the game to end before she gets petty revenge. But during the final boss fight, the characters give long speeches about how they'd rather wipe out all existence than live in a world governed by determinism, and they are dead serious.
22nd Jan '17 2:38:10 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/{{Glee}}'' seems to be sliding in here. Is it a quirky teen drama with dark comedy elements and {{Crowning Music of Awesome}}? Or is it a dark comedy parodying teen dramas with intentional SoundtrackDissonance? Nobody seems to really know. Indeed, one of the main criticisms of the is that it both wants to be a goofy hyper-skewed version of high school, while at the same time wanting to "really speak to the kids" and seriously "be a voice to the voiceless", something that smacks of eating one's cake and having it too.

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* Show runner Ryan Murphy has a knack for this:
**
''Series/{{Glee}}'' seems to be sliding in here. Is it a quirky teen drama with dark comedy elements and {{Crowning Music of Awesome}}? Or is it a dark comedy parodying teen dramas with intentional SoundtrackDissonance? Nobody seems to really know. Indeed, one of the main criticisms of the show is that it both wants to be a goofy hyper-skewed version of high school, while at the same time wanting to "really speak to the kids" and seriously "be a voice to the voiceless", something that smacks of eating one's cake and having it too.



* The Stacy Keach version of ''Literature/MikeHammer'', which is too serious to be a straight-up farce, but most of it is played incredibly tongue in cheek.

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* The Stacy Keach version of ''Literature/MikeHammer'', which is too serious to be a straight-up farce, farce of FilmNoir, but most of it is played incredibly tongue in cheek.
22nd Jan '17 2:32:28 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''UglyBetty'' could never really decide if it was an affectionate send-up of soap operas and telenovelas or if was a dramatic example of one.

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* ''UglyBetty'' ''Series/UglyBetty'' could never really decide if it was an affectionate send-up of soap operas and telenovelas or if was a dramatic example of one.


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* The Stacy Keach version of ''Literature/MikeHammer'', which is too serious to be a straight-up farce, but most of it is played incredibly tongue in cheek.
3rd Jan '17 7:05:25 PM Lemia
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* The prologue of the freeware VisualNovel ''Ristorante Amore'' was meant to be a parody/deconstruction of [[RomanceGame otome]] (i.e. girl-oriented romance game genre) stereotypes (ex: clumsy and not-too-bright heroine, NiceGuy and bad boy love interests, AlphaBitch who only exists as a romantic complication for the heroine, etc.) with the post-prologue part revealing that the "prologue" was only a ShowWithinAShow with the characters' actors having vastly different and less stereotypical personalities. However, a combination of the prologue actually being relatively well-written, the lack of overt parodic jokes causing the prologue to feel not all that different from other straight-up otome games, and several visual novel websites categorizing it as an otome game in spite of the majority of the game having a male protagonist, led many a player to not realize the prologue was intended to be a parody and become genuinely disappointed when the HalfwayPlotSwitch to a male protagonist occurred.
16th Nov '16 12:22:30 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Literature/SnowCrash'' is an Indecisive Parody of {{Cyberpunk}}. In places it feels like a checklist of all the cyberpunk tropes ramped UpToEleven: instead of the MegaCorp being as powerful as governments, corporations literally ''replace'' governments. The HeroProtagonist is ''named'' Hiro Protagonist, and is both the world's greatest hacker ''and'' the world's greatest [[KatanasAreJustBetter katana-duelist]]. [[EvilCounterpart Raven]] is the epitome of {{badass}}, [[InvokedTrope complete with a whole passage explaining in detail why]] he is the world's greatest badass. There are infodumps about various subjects, from toilet paper to Sumerian mythology, thrown in at random. From the [[MundaneMadeAwesome mock-epic]] first chapter to the insane climax, it oozes RuleOfCool. It's considered a landmark work of Cyberpunk, a parody of Cyberpunk, and a herald of PostCyberpunk.

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* ''Literature/SnowCrash'' is an Indecisive Parody of {{Cyberpunk}}. In places it feels like a checklist of all the cyberpunk tropes ramped UpToEleven: instead of the MegaCorp being as powerful as governments, corporations literally ''replace'' governments. The HeroProtagonist is ''named'' Hiro Protagonist, and is both the world's greatest hacker ''and'' the world's greatest [[KatanasAreJustBetter katana-duelist]]. [[EvilCounterpart Raven]] is the epitome of {{badass}}, badass, [[InvokedTrope complete with a whole passage explaining in detail why]] he is the world's greatest badass. There are infodumps about various subjects, from toilet paper to Sumerian mythology, thrown in at random. From the [[MundaneMadeAwesome mock-epic]] first chapter to the insane climax, it oozes RuleOfCool. It's considered a landmark work of Cyberpunk, a parody of Cyberpunk, and a herald of PostCyberpunk.
2nd Nov '16 8:43:50 PM Ramidel
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* ''Film/CatsAndDogs'' is honestly no than the TuxedoAndMartini films it's based on, and even with the use of [[TalkingAnimal Talking Animals]], it fits into the genre about as well as a straight example. The sequel slides out of this trope by turning the spoof UpToEleven and taking direct potshots at ''Franchise/JamesBond''.

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* ''Film/CatsAndDogs'' is honestly no sillier than the TuxedoAndMartini films it's based on, and even with the use of [[TalkingAnimal Talking Animals]], it fits into the genre about as well as a straight example. The sequel slides out of this trope by turning the spoof UpToEleven and taking direct potshots at ''Franchise/JamesBond''.
2nd Nov '16 8:42:36 PM Ramidel
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* ''Film/CatsAndDogs'' is honestly no than the TuxedoAndMartini films it's based on, and even with the use of [[TalkingAnimal Talking Animals]], it fits into the genre about as well as a straight example. The sequel slides out of this trope by turning the spoof UpToEleven and taking direct potshots at ''Franchise/JamesBond''.
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