History Main / InSpaceEveryoneCanSeeYourFace

6th Sep '17 8:09:52 AM Rday
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* ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'' does something very similar with the crew's helmets, although it's not in space. The helmets have no face plates, which might cause a problem if the windows ever shattered. They have visors, but they're only used for firing certain weapons.

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* ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'' does something very similar with the crew's helmets, although it's not in space. The helmets have no face plates, which might cause a problem if the windows ever shattered. They have visors, open visors that can be sealed in case of pressure loss, but they're only used for firing certain weapons.are normally open to allow the actor's eyes to be seen, though the helmets do cover the actors' lower faces.
12th Aug '17 3:35:47 PM JackG
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* Averted in ''Film/{{Sunshine}}'', where the suits have only a narrow viewing slit, but substituting claustrophobic shots of the actors from within the bulk helmets.

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* Averted in ''Film/{{Sunshine}}'', ''Film/{{Sunshine}}'' where the suits have only a narrow viewing slit, slit (because they have to operate [[BlindedByTheLight close to the Sun]]) but substituting claustrophobic shots of the actors from within the bulk bulky helmets.
21st Jun '17 6:24:52 AM NNinja
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* Completely subverted in ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward''. Whenever we see a character in [[spoiler:what turns out to be]] space suits [[spoiler:on the moon]], we can't see their face, or who the person in the suit is at all. Players and the character can only tell who's who thanks to the communication line between the suits. There's one scene in which one character is about to smash another over the head with a rock, both of whom are in space suits, and Sigma specifics that he can't tell who's who because of the suits.

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* Completely subverted averted in ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward''. Whenever we see a character in [[spoiler:what turns out to be]] space suits [[spoiler:on the moon]], we can't see their face, or who the person in the suit is at all. Players and the character can only tell who's who thanks to the communication line between the suits. There's one scene in which one character is about to smash another over the head with a rock, both of whom are in space suits, and Sigma specifics that he can't tell who's who because of the suits.
10th Jun '17 7:13:16 AM JackG
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* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' did't put the cast in spacesuits much, but when they did they had transparent visors but avoided the silly lights.

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* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' did't didn't put the cast in spacesuits much, but when they did they had transparent visors but avoided the silly lights.
10th Jun '17 7:13:00 AM JackG
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** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E5Oxygen "Oxygen"]]: The spacesuit helmets have clear glass visors, although the Doctor, Bill and Nardole's encounter with an [[AnimatedArmour empty suit animated by its AI]] suggests it's possible to darken the visors.

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** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E5Oxygen "Oxygen"]]: The spacesuit helmets have clear glass visors, although the Doctor, Bill and Nardole's encounter with an [[AnimatedArmour empty suit animated by its AI]] suggests it's possible to darken the visors. Although they have the usual lights inside, individual helmet forcefields are used to prevent the actors having to spend the entire episode inside a helmet. {{Handwave}}d as the forcefields not being substantial enough to withstand a total vacuum, so you only need them outside the space station.
18th May '17 10:25:22 AM fdsa1234567890
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* ''Series/TheExpanse'' does this as well. Even the Martian helmets in season 1 that block most of the face have this trait, with the eyes lighting up. Though it does give them a more [[GasMaskMooks sinister look]], which actually [[ArmiesAreEvil fits quite nicely]]. In season 2, when main characters wear Martian armor, it follows this trait exactly.
14th May '17 9:48:04 PM AthenaBlue
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[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]

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[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]Live-Action]]
* ''Film/TwelveToTheMoon'' tries to get round this trope with a ForcefieldDoor that is allegedly covering the astronauts open-face helmets.
-->'''Astronaut:''' I am now turning on my invisible electromagnetic rayscreen...\\
'''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]:''' Even I don't buy it.\\
'''Astronaut:''' ...which forms a protective shield over our faces...\\
'''[=MST3K=]:''' [[SarcasmMode Of course it does.]]



** Justified as well--the light emitted by his HUD provides just enough to see his face by in the extreme closeups.

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** Justified as well--the well -- the light emitted by his HUD provides just enough to see his face by in the extreme closeups.



* ''Film/TwelveToTheMoon'' tries to get round this trope with a ForcefieldDoor that is allegedly covering the astronauts open-face helmets.
-->'''Astronaut:''' I am now turning on my invisible electromagnetic rayscreen...
-->'''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]:''' Even I don't buy it.
-->'''Astronaut:''' ...which forms a protective shield over our faces...
-->'''[=MST3K=]:''' [[SarcasmMode Of course it does.]]


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** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E5Oxygen "Oxygen"]]: The spacesuit helmets have clear glass visors, although the Doctor, Bill and Nardole's encounter with an [[AnimatedArmour empty suit animated by its AI]] suggests it's possible to darken the visors.
13th May '17 10:43:12 PM bweb
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** The Star Trek films often have this, on the few occasions when the crew goes out in space suits, such as Spock's thruster-suit in StarTrekTheMotionPicture or the team of Picard, Worf, and Lt. Hawk in StarTrekFirstContact, including the view of Lt. Hawk's fully [[YouWillBeAssimilated Borgified face]].
18th Mar '17 8:49:58 AM Morgenthaler
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* A vast majority of LEGOSpace minifigures have transparent visors, to the point where the ClassicLEGOSpace minifigures simply [[ExaggeratedTrope don't have visors at all]]; appropriately enough, this trope is averted primarily with sets which intend to portray space travel as it stands today, where the minifigures accordingly have opaque visors.

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* A vast majority of LEGOSpace Toys/LEGOSpace minifigures have transparent visors, to the point where the ClassicLEGOSpace Toys/ClassicLEGOSpace minifigures simply [[ExaggeratedTrope don't have visors at all]]; appropriately enough, this trope is averted primarily with sets which intend to portray space travel as it stands today, where the minifigures accordingly have opaque visors.
15th Mar '17 9:14:35 PM AthenaBlue
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* Averted in ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' during Dave Bowman's spacewalk. His face is briefly illuminated by sunlight, until he adjusts the polarization of his helmet visor.
%%* ''Film/TheAbyss''.



%%* ''Film/TheAbyss''.
* ''Film/{{Outland}}'' Helmets have a whole ring of lights round the visor, used in one case for a a dramatic reveal of TheMole when their lights are suddenly switched on.
%%* ''Film/TheCore''.



%%* ''Film/TheCore''.
* Averted in ''Film/DeepImpact'', as the astronauts worked on the dark side of the comet their face shields were open, only closing them as the Sun approached the horizon. This scene also attempts to portray the effects of failing to use face shields as one astronaut fails to close his shield in time. The exposure of only a few seconds results in immediate permanent blindness and severe sun burn. Unfortunately this is a case of SpaceDoesNotWorkThatWay; solar radiation in space at that distance is only about 20% stronger than in the desert at Earth's surface, and space suit helmets block both IR and UV, eliminating the major sources of heat burns and sunburn from solar radiation, respectively.
* The lights are averted in ''Film/DestinationMoon'' (1950), leaving the actors' faces partly in shadow (to help tell them apart they wear coloured spacesuits). No reflective helmet visors, though, as the movie was made even before Sputnik, it's forgivable.
* ''Film/DoomsdayMachine'', a film featured on ''WebVideo/CinematicTitanic'', actually averts this trope in the end, where the two astronauts who board the Russian spacecraft have black, reflective visors on their helmets. Unfortunately, this was mostly an attempt to (not particularly successfully) cover up the fact that the last part of the movie was filmed with different actors and different sets due to budget constraints.
* ''Film/EventHorizon'' -- as every ship appears to have different models of space suits, both straight and averted [[spoiler: in the case of the aversion, to allow a horrifying DreamSequence Reveal as someone flips up a visor.]]
* In ''Film/FrauImMond'' (''The Woman in the Moon''), the 1929 silent sci-fi movie by Fritz Lang, the explorers actually walk round without spacesuits, despite the high degree of technical accuracy (for the time) of the rest of the film. Although it was known the Moon has no atmosphere, silent film actors depended greatly on facial expressions and body language, which would have been obscured by bulky spacesuits and helmets.



* In ''Film/{{Prometheus}}'', the ship's crew all wear clear domed helmets with lights on them.
* ''Film/EventHorizon'' -- as every ship appears to have different models of space suits, both straight and averted [[spoiler: in the case of the aversion, to allow a horrifying DreamSequence Reveal as someone flips up a visor.]]
* Averted in the ''Film/IronMan'' films. Tony's face is completely obscured in the the suit. The film has to cut to interior shots of the helmet to see Tony's expressions.

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* In ''Film/{{Prometheus}}'', ''Film/{{Gravity}}'', the ship's crew least realistic aspect of an otherwise [[ShownTheirWork thoroughly researched]] movie is probably this trope--it's so you can get a good look at stars Creator/SandraBullock and Creator/GeorgeClooney.
* In ''Film/{{Interstellar}}'',
all wear clear domed helmets crew's visors are transparent with lights on them.
* ''Film/EventHorizon'' -- as every ship appears to have different models of space suits, both straight and averted [[spoiler: in the case of the aversion, to allow a horrifying DreamSequence Reveal as someone flips up a visor.]]
no protective coating.
* Averted in the ''Film/IronMan'' films. Tony's face is completely obscured in the the suit. The film has to cut to interior shots of the helmet to see Tony's expressions.



* The Kryptonian spacesuits seen in Zod's flashback in ''Film/ManOfSteel'' are equipped with in-helmet lights to keep everybody's faces visable.
* In ''Film/TheMartian'', all the EVA suits have broad visors and face-floodlights.
* ''Film/{{Outland}}'' Helmets have a whole ring of lights round the visor, used in one case for a a dramatic reveal of TheMole when their lights are suddenly switched on.
* ''Film/Passengers2016'': Jim's helmet is lit up as usual so that the audience can view his face while he goes on a space walk.
* In ''Film/{{Prometheus}}'', the ship's crew all wear clear domed helmets with lights on them.



* Earthbound example: In ''Film/TheSignal2014'', Damon wears a hazmat suit with lighting inside the helmet.
* Lights are included in otherwise bog-standard NASA spacesuits in ''Film/SpaceCowboys''.



* Averted in ''Film/DeepImpact'', as the astronauts worked on the dark side of the comet their face shields were open, only closing them as the Sun approached the horizon. This scene also attempts portray the effects of failing to use face shields as one astronaut fails to close his shield in time. The exposure of only a few seconds results in immediate permanent blindness and severe sun burn. Unfortunately this is a case of SpaceDoesNotWorkThatWay; solar radiation in space at that distance is only about 20% stronger than in the desert at Earth's surface, and space suit helmets block both IR and UV, eliminating the major sources of heat burns and sunburn from solar radiation, respectively.
* The lights are averted in ''Film/DestinationMoon'' (1950), leaving the actors' faces partly in shadow (to help tell them apart they wear coloured spacesuits). No reflective helmet visors, though, as the movie was made even before Sputnik, it's forgivable.
* In ''Film/FrauImMond'' (''The Woman in the Moon''), the 1929 silent sci-fi movie by Fritz Lang, the explorers actually walk round without spacesuits, despite the high degree of technical accuracy (for the time) of the rest of the film. Although it was known the Moon has no atmosphere, silent film actors depended greatly on facial expressions and body language, which would have been obscured by bulky spacesuits and helmets.
* In ''Film/TransformersDarkOfTheMoon'', the astronauts on the 1969 Moon landing have their iconic reflective visors at first, but while examining the crashed Ark up close, actually slide them up to reveal face-illuminating lights inside their fishbowl helmets.
* ''Film/DoomsdayMachine'', a film featured on ''WebVideo/CinematicTitanic'', actually averts this trope in the end, where the two astronauts who board the Russian spacecraft have black, reflective visors on their helmets. Unfortunately, this was mostly an attempt to (not particularly successfully) cover up the fact that the last part of the movie was filmed with different actors and different sets due to budget constraints.



* Averted in ''Film/{{Sunshine}}'', where the suits have only a narrow viewing slit, but substituting claustrophobic shots of the actors from within the bulk helmets.
* In ''Film/TransformersDarkOfTheMoon'', the astronauts on the 1969 Moon landing have their iconic reflective visors at first, but while examining the crashed Ark up close, actually slide them up to reveal face-illuminating lights inside their fishbowl helmets.



* In ''Film/{{Gravity}}'', the least realistic aspect of an otherwise [[ShownTheirWork thoroughly researched]] movie is probably this trope--it's so you can get a good look at stars Creator/SandraBullock and Creator/GeorgeClooney.
* Averted in ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' during Dave Bowman's spacewalk. His face is briefly illuminated by sunlight, until he adjusts the polarization of his helmet visor.
* In ''Film/{{Interstellar}}'', all crew's visors are transparent with no protective coating.
* Averted in ''Film/{{Sunshine}}'', where the suits have only a narrow viewing slit, but substituting claustrophobic shots of the actors from within the bulk helmets.
* In ''Film/TheMartian'', all the EVA suits have broad visors and face-floodlights.
* Lights are included in otherwise bog-standard NASA spacesuits in ''Film/SpaceCowboys''.
* Earthbound example: In ''Film/TheSignal2014'', Damon wears a hazmat suit with lighting inside the helmet.
* The Kryptonian spacesuits seen in Zod's flashback in Film/ManOfSteel are equipped with in-helmet lights to keep everybody's faces visable.
* ''Film/Passengers2016'': Jim's helmet is lit up as usual so that the audience can view his face while he goes on a space walk.



* Averted in the early SpaceOpera where spacemen and women would wear bubble-top helmets, especially on the covers of lurid pulp magazines where you wanted to show the straight-jawed hero and his redheaded female companion to advantage.
* ''Literature/Discworld'': In ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', the {{Steampunk}} spacesuit worn by Leonard of Quirm is specifically designed with a transparent bubble-helmet. In this case, it's because Leonard wanted to be able to see ''out'' of it as easily as possible.



* Averted in Literature/TheMartian. It's mentioned when Watney is gonna get his picture taken that his face wouldn't be visible through his helmet. Played straight in [[Film/TheMartian the movie]], though.

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* The Toralii boarders in ''{{Literature/Lacuna}}'' have opaque visors, but one raises it to gloat to a wounded, fallen Captain Liao. [[spoiler: That proves to be his undoing.]]
* Averted in Literature/TheMartian.''Literature/TheMartian''. It's mentioned when Watney is gonna get his picture taken that his face wouldn't be visible through his helmet. Played straight in [[Film/TheMartian the movie]], though.



* In Melinda Selmys' SteamPunk short story "The Virginal Seas of the Moon," the would-be astronauts have helmets with faceplates made of stained glass in their likenesses. Presumably this is because of [[FridgeLogic gaps in their technical expertise]].



* The Toralii boarders in ''{{Literature/Lacuna}}'' have opaque visors, but one raises it to gloat to a wounded, fallen Captain Liao. [[spoiler: That proves to be his undoing.]]
* Averted in the early SpaceOpera where spacemen and women would wear bubble-top helmets, especially on the covers of lurid pulp magazines where you wanted to show the straight-jawed hero and his redheaded female companion to advantage.
* In ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', the {{Steampunk}} spacesuit worn by Leonard of Quirm is specifically designed with a transparent bubble-helmet. In this case, it's because Leonard wanted to be able to see ''out'' of it as easily as possible.

to:

* The Toralii boarders in ''{{Literature/Lacuna}}'' In Melinda Selmys' SteamPunk short story "The Virginal Seas of the Moon," the would-be astronauts have opaque visors, but one raises it to gloat to a wounded, fallen Captain Liao. [[spoiler: That proves to be his undoing.]]
* Averted in the early SpaceOpera where spacemen and women would wear bubble-top helmets, especially on the covers of lurid pulp magazines where you wanted to show the straight-jawed hero and his redheaded female companion to advantage.
* In ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', the {{Steampunk}} spacesuit worn by Leonard of Quirm is specifically designed
helmets with a transparent bubble-helmet. In faceplates made of stained glass in their likenesses. Presumably this case, it's is because Leonard wanted to be able to see ''out'' of it as easily as possible.[[FridgeLogic gaps in their technical expertise]].



* ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'' does something very similar with the crew's helmets, although it's not in space. The helmets have no face plates, which might cause a problem if the windows ever shattered. They have visors, but they're only used for firing certain weapons.



** In "The Impossible Planet" and "The Satan Pit", the Tenth Doctor spends much of his screen-time gallivanting around a pit-and-cave-system wearing a pressure suit and helmet. The helmet features four tiny lights which are pointed directly at the corners of the Doctor's mouth and eyes.
** "Silence in the Library" features helmets with blue lights shining into the face around the mouth area.

to:

** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E8TheImpossiblePlanet "The Impossible Planet" and Planet"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E9TheSatanPit "The Satan Pit", Pit"]], the Tenth Doctor spends much of his screen-time gallivanting around a pit-and-cave-system wearing a pressure suit and helmet. The helmet features four tiny lights which are pointed directly at the corners of the Doctor's mouth and eyes.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E8SilenceInTheLibrary "Silence in the Library" Library"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E9ForestOfTheDead "Forest of the Dead"]] features helmets with blue lights shining into the face around the mouth area.



** Averted, however, in the Series 6 "Impossible Astronaut" arc, presumably because it was important that the astronaut remain anonymous until TheReveal.

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** Averted, however, in the Series 6 "Impossible Astronaut" arc, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E1TheImpossibleAstronaut "The Impossible Astronaut"]], presumably because it was important that the astronaut remain anonymous until TheReveal.



* ''Series/{{Firefly}}''. The lights in the helmets are on even on when the crew is on the surface of [[spoiler:Miranda]] ''in broad daylight''. This could be explained by their needing to be able to see each other's faces in case the radios cut out. The reason they left the lights on planetside was because they're cheap suits, and the gloves can't work the switches to turn them off.
* An Earthbound example in ''Series/{{Fringe}}'': the team sometimes wear full-coverage suits to protect against chemical and biological hazards. These have lights inside the helmets, so the audience can see who's who.
* Averted in ''Series/RedDwarf'' episode "Thanks For The Memory", though that's largely due to the fact that Craig Charles isn't in the spacesuit due to his wife giving birth on the day of the shoot.
* Especially ridiculous in ''Series/SpaceAboveAndBeyond'' as the lighted helmet interior would have proved a wonderful aiming point for chig soldiers when fighting in the dark.



* ''Series/StargateSG1'' and ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' have had this, though rarely.



* ''Series/StargateSG1'' and ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' have had this, though rarely.
* ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'' does something very similar with the crew's helmets, although it's not in space. The helmets have no face plates, which might cause a problem if the windows ever shattered. They have visors, but they're only used for firing certain weapons.
* Especially ridiculous in ''Series/SpaceAboveAndBeyond'' as the lighted helmet interior would have proved a wonderful aiming point for chig soldiers when fighting in the dark.
* ''Series/{{Firefly}}''. The lights in the helmets are on even on when the crew is on the surface of [[spoiler:Miranda]] ''in broad daylight''. This could be explained by their needing to be able to see each other's faces in case the radios cut out. The reason they left the lights on planetside was because they're cheap suits, and the gloves can't work the switches to turn them off.
* Averted in ''Series/RedDwarf'' episode "Thanks For The Memory", though that's largely due to the fact that Craig Charles isn't in the spacesuit due to his wife giving birth on the day of the shoot.
* An Earthbound example in ''Series/{{Fringe}}'': the team sometimes wear full-coverage suits to protect against chemical and biological hazards. These have lights inside the helmets, so the audience can see who's who.



* In ''WesternAnimation/StaticShock'', Gear's face mask, while hiding his identity, allows the viewer to see his face.


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* In ''WesternAnimation/StaticShock'', Gear's face mask, while hiding his identity, allows the viewer to see his face.


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