History Main / Idiosyncrazy

27th Jun '17 2:20:20 PM Austin
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* The Riddler (Edward Nigma) and riddles. It originated as a harmless theme, but became DarkerAndEdgier as the years went by: Riddler suffers from SuperOCD and narcissistic personality disorder, and ''has'' to leave puzzles to prove how smart he is (he's even been given a FreudianExcuse in the form of a father who, not understanding his son's intelligence, beat him, giving Nigma an obsession with expressing his smarts in convoluted ways). In one instance, Riddler thinks he's found a way around his compulsion by leaving notes instead of riddles...but Batman discovers puzzles embedded within the notes that Nigma ''didn't intentionally leave''--in other words, he's so mentally ill that he doesn't even realize when he's acting on his compulsions. However, he's sometimes able to make this work for him: sometimes, the ''obvious'' answer to his clue masks the ''real'' answer, which is much more difficult to figure out.

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* The Riddler ComicBook/TheRiddler (Edward Nigma) and riddles. It originated as a harmless theme, but became DarkerAndEdgier as the years went by: Riddler suffers from SuperOCD and narcissistic personality disorder, and ''has'' to leave puzzles to prove how smart he is (he's even been given a FreudianExcuse in the form of a father who, not understanding his son's intelligence, beat him, giving Nigma an obsession with expressing his smarts in convoluted ways). In one instance, Riddler thinks he's found a way around his compulsion by leaving notes instead of riddles...but Batman discovers puzzles embedded within the notes that Nigma ''didn't intentionally leave''--in other words, he's so mentally ill that he doesn't even realize when he's acting on his compulsions. However, he's sometimes able to make this work for him: sometimes, the ''obvious'' answer to his clue masks the ''real'' answer, which is much more difficult to figure out.
20th Jun '17 9:35:40 PM Gamermaster
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* ''Manga/MaouJouDeOyasumi'': Everything the Princess does is in the name of getting a good night's sleep. Escaping? Getting rescued? Making friends? She couldn't care less. She just wants a nice comfy sleep.
[[/folder]]
13th Jun '17 1:23:28 PM HighCrate
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* Most of the villains on ''WesternAnimation/CoolMcCool'' fit this mold.

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* %%* Most of the villains on ''WesternAnimation/CoolMcCool'' fit this mold.
13th Jun '17 1:19:13 PM HighCrate
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* The Riddler (Edward Nigma) and riddles. It originated as a harmless theme, but became DarkerAndEdgier as the years went by: Riddler suffers from SuperOCD and narcissistic personality disorder, and ''has'' to leave puzzles to prove how smart he is (he's even been given a FreudianExcuse in the form of a father who, not understanding his son's intelligence, beat him, giving Nigma an obsession with expressing his smarts in convoluted ways). In one instance, Riddler thinks he's found a way around his compulsion by leaving notes instead of riddles...but Batman discovers puzzles embedded within the notes that Nigma ''didn't intentionally leave''--in other words, he's so mentally ill that he doesn't even realize when he's acting on his compulsions. However, he's also GenreSavvy enough to make this work for him: sometimes, the ''obvious'' answer to his clue masks the ''real'' answer, which is much more difficult to figure out.

to:

* The Riddler (Edward Nigma) and riddles. It originated as a harmless theme, but became DarkerAndEdgier as the years went by: Riddler suffers from SuperOCD and narcissistic personality disorder, and ''has'' to leave puzzles to prove how smart he is (he's even been given a FreudianExcuse in the form of a father who, not understanding his son's intelligence, beat him, giving Nigma an obsession with expressing his smarts in convoluted ways). In one instance, Riddler thinks he's found a way around his compulsion by leaving notes instead of riddles...but Batman discovers puzzles embedded within the notes that Nigma ''didn't intentionally leave''--in other words, he's so mentally ill that he doesn't even realize when he's acting on his compulsions. However, he's also GenreSavvy enough sometimes able to make this work for him: sometimes, the ''obvious'' answer to his clue masks the ''real'' answer, which is much more difficult to figure out.
13th Jun '17 8:47:26 AM sgamer82
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** The Red Panda and Flying Squirrel note eponymous themes are a common trait for "sick in the head, wannabe supervillains". It's first seen in the episode "Rabbit Season", where the Red Panda is able to set a trap for that episode's villain, Jack Rabbit, after recognizing that the reason for her unusually selective thefts was because she only stole things whose value was measured in karats.

to:

** The Red Panda and Flying Squirrel note eponymous themes are a common trait for "sick in the head, wannabe supervillains". It's first seen in the episode "Rabbit Season", where the Red Panda is able to set a trap for that episode's villain, Jack Rabbit, Jackrabbit, after recognizing that the reason for her unusually selective thefts was because she only stole things whose value was measured in karats.karats. He takes the theme to its logical conclusion and has a rabbit statue put in display to lure her in.
23rd Apr '17 8:03:12 AM narm00
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* [[TheFlash Flash]] villain Rainbow Raider (real name [[StevenUlyssesPerhero Roy G. Bivolo]]), a failed artist who became obsessed with ''colors'' as a result of his colorblindness.
* {{Superman}}'s enemy Bizarro feels compelled to do the opposite of everything normal people do. This leads to some truly strange behavior, such as building a basement on top of his house.

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* [[TheFlash [[Franchise/TheFlash Flash]] villain Rainbow Raider (real name [[StevenUlyssesPerhero Roy G. Bivolo]]), a failed artist who became obsessed with ''colors'' as a result of his colorblindness.
* {{Superman}}'s Franchise/{{Superman}}'s enemy Bizarro feels compelled to do the opposite of everything normal people do. This leads to some truly strange behavior, such as building a basement on top of his house.



* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' Kim has fought her share of {{Idiosyncrazy}} villains: Duff Killigan, the homicidal golfer; Frugal Lucre, the world's cheapest criminal; and so on.

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* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'': Kim has fought her share of {{Idiosyncrazy}} villains: Duff Killigan, the homicidal golfer; Frugal Lucre, the world's cheapest criminal; and so on.
18th Apr '17 8:59:20 AM sgamer82
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* In the ''Podcast/RedPandaAdventures'', the Red Panda and Flying Squirrel note eponymous themes are a common trait for "sick in the head, wannabe supervillains". It's first seen in the episode "Rabbit Season", where the Red Panda is able to set a trap for that episode's villain, Jack Rabbit, after recognizing that the reason for her unusually selective thefts was because she only stole things whose value was measured in karats.

to:

* In the ''Podcast/RedPandaAdventures'', the ''Podcast/RedPandaAdventures''
** The
Red Panda and Flying Squirrel note eponymous themes are a common trait for "sick in the head, wannabe supervillains". It's first seen in the episode "Rabbit Season", where the Red Panda is able to set a trap for that episode's villain, Jack Rabbit, after recognizing that the reason for her unusually selective thefts was because she only stole things whose value was measured in karats.karats.
** The Mad Monkey invokes this as much as he falls prey to it. He's motivated to be a villain because he views himself as the ideal arch-nemesis to the Red Panda. To this end, he embraces the theme presented by his power to control baboons by committing monkey related crimes.
18th Apr '17 7:59:31 AM sgamer82
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* In the ''Podcast/RedPandaAdventures'' episode "Rabbit Season", the Red Panda notes this is a common trait for up and coming supervillains. It's how he's able to set a trap for that episode's villain, Jack Rabbit. He recognized that the reason for her unusually selective thefts was because she only stole things whose value was measured in karats.

to:

* In the ''Podcast/RedPandaAdventures'' ''Podcast/RedPandaAdventures'', the Red Panda and Flying Squirrel note eponymous themes are a common trait for "sick in the head, wannabe supervillains". It's first seen in the episode "Rabbit Season", where the Red Panda notes this is a common trait for up and coming supervillains. It's how he's able to set a trap for that episode's villain, Jack Rabbit. He recognized Rabbit, after recognizing that the reason for her unusually selective thefts was because she only stole things whose value was measured in karats.
15th Apr '17 5:38:20 PM sgamer82
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* In the ''Podcast/RedPandaAdventures'' episode "Rabbit Season", the Red Panda notes this is a common trait for up and coming supervillains. It's how he's able to set a trap for that episode's villain, Jack Rabbit. He recognized that the reason for her unusually selective thefts was because she only stole things whose value was measured in karats.



* WesternAnimation/KimPossible has fought her share of {{Idiosyncrazy}} villains: Duff Killigan, the homicidal golfer; Frugal Lucre, the world's cheapest criminal; and so on.

to:

* WesternAnimation/KimPossible ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' Kim has fought her share of {{Idiosyncrazy}} villains: Duff Killigan, the homicidal golfer; Frugal Lucre, the world's cheapest criminal; and so on.
31st Mar '17 9:07:08 PM Gravidef
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* The Riddler and riddles. Sometimes treated as an actual psychological disorder. At one point, he ''tries'' to stop leaving riddles, without success. Usually, though, he makes his disorder work for him, as the ''obvious'' answer to his clue masks the ''real'' answer, which is much more difficult to figure out.

to:

* The Riddler (Edward Nigma) and riddles. Sometimes treated It originated as a harmless theme, but became DarkerAndEdgier as the years went by: Riddler suffers from SuperOCD and narcissistic personality disorder, and ''has'' to leave puzzles to prove how smart he is (he's even been given a FreudianExcuse in the form of a father who, not understanding his son's intelligence, beat him, giving Nigma an actual psychological disorder. At obsession with expressing his smarts in convoluted ways). In one point, he ''tries'' to stop instance, Riddler thinks he's found a way around his compulsion by leaving riddles, without success. Usually, though, notes instead of riddles...but Batman discovers puzzles embedded within the notes that Nigma ''didn't intentionally leave''--in other words, he's so mentally ill that he makes doesn't even realize when he's acting on his disorder compulsions. However, he's also GenreSavvy enough to make this work for him, as him: sometimes, the ''obvious'' answer to his clue masks the ''real'' answer, which is much more difficult to figure out.


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** In other instances, Calendar Man is relatively sane and calm for most of the year...except on holidays, when he always commits some horrific themed crime (such as cutting a woman's brake line on April Fool's Day as a "prank" or attempting to blow up a maternity ward on ''Labor'' Day).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Idiosyncrazy