History Main / HyperspaceIsaScaryPlace

25th Nov '16 6:14:02 PM Xtifr
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* While not hyperspace per se, the dimension dwelt in by the Hounds of Tindalos (in Frank Belknap Long and later H.P. Lovecraft) is a pretty nasty place to be, as if you travel through it, you set the Hound on you. And as they can enter the world through any angle, and will never stop; this is bad to say the least.

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* While not hyperspace per se, the dimension dwelt in by the Hounds of Tindalos (in Frank Belknap Long stories by Creator/FrankBelknapLong and later H.P. Lovecraft) Creator/HPLovecraft) is a pretty nasty place to be, as if you travel through it, you set the Hound on you. And as they can enter the world through any angle, and will never stop; this is bad to say the least.
22nd Nov '16 6:36:32 PM PaulA
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* Creator/GordonRDickson's ''Literature/ChildeCycle'' stories have passengers and crew taking some sort of tranquillizer before a jump, because of the effect hyperspace has on the human nervous system. When Donal Graeme stages a daring raid against an enemy planet in ''Dorsai!'', he uses multiple swift hyperspace jumps to simulate a huge armada attacking his enemy, even though it drives him and his crew to the edge of collapse, with each jump leaving them more and more in pain and disorientation.

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* Creator/GordonRDickson's ''Literature/ChildeCycle'' stories have passengers and crew taking some sort of tranquillizer before a jump, because of the effect hyperspace has on the human nervous system. When Donal Graeme stages a daring raid against an enemy planet in ''Dorsai!'', ''Literature/{{Dorsai}}'', he uses multiple swift hyperspace jumps to simulate a huge armada attacking his enemy, even though it drives him and his crew to the edge of collapse, with each jump leaving them more and more in pain and disorientation.
21st Nov '16 4:12:57 PM Jake
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* In the sequel (of disputed canonicity) to the RTS ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}}'', ''Homeworld: Cataclysm'', the central enemy came from Hyperspace. This was a little disturbing for everyone, as until then Hyperspace has been thought to be perfectly safe (assuming you had a safe way of getting in and out of it). The Naggarok, an alien exploration vessel using an experimental form of hyperdrive, essentially went 'too deep', or something similar, resulting in it picking up a passenger in the form of a sentient biomatter [[TheVirus virus]].\\\

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* In the sequel (of disputed canonicity) to the RTS ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}}'', ''Homeworld: Cataclysm'', the central enemy came from Hyperspace. This was a little disturbing for everyone, as until then Hyperspace has been thought to be perfectly safe (assuming you had a safe way of getting in and out of it). The Naggarok, an alien exploration vessel using an experimental form of hyperdrive, essentially went 'too deep', or something similar, resulting in it picking up a passenger in the form of a sentient biomatter [[TheVirus virus]]. Although it's worth mentioning that this explanation for how The Beast came to enter our galaxy is explicitly guesswork based on fragmentary information; all we know for certain is that the Naggarok exited hyperspace covered in MeatMoss that had eaten most of the crew.\\\
8th Nov '16 2:30:58 PM WhosAsking
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* The Web in ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'', a bizarre and disturbing level of Cyber Space inhabiting all computers. There are no apparent separate systems in the Web, it is simply a continuous flow of energy and data, resulting in constant hurricane looking storms. It can only be accessed by strange portals and is filled with strange monsters and impossibly powerful Code Masters. Nobody knows much about the place or how it works, but everyone in the Net fears it. It is the chaotic opposite of the Net and most believe that the Web would destroy the Net if a portal between the two realms was left open too long. In the season 3 finale [[spoiler: Megabyte gets dragged into it by the Web Creature and when [[CameBackWrong he comes back out]] he's been twisted into an insane borderline EldritchAbomination who can mimic other sprites.]]

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* The Web in ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'', a bizarre and disturbing level of Cyber Space inhabiting all computers. There are no apparent separate systems in the Web, it is simply a continuous flow of energy and data, resulting in constant hurricane looking storms. It can only be accessed by strange portals and is filled with strange monsters and impossibly powerful Code Masters. Not to mention exposure to the Web or its creatures [[TheCorruption is corrupting]] without protection. Nobody knows much about the place or how it works, but everyone in the Net fears it. It is the chaotic opposite of the Net and most believe that the Web would destroy the Net if a portal between the two realms was left open too long. In the season 3 finale [[spoiler: Megabyte gets dragged into it by the Web Creature and when [[CameBackWrong he comes back out]] he's been twisted into an insane borderline EldritchAbomination who can mimic other sprites.]]
7th Nov '16 3:56:53 PM WhosAsking
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* ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'': ''Between'', through which dragons and fire-lizards teleport, is "black, blacker, blackest", has no reference points, and is freezing cold. It's also the dragon method of suicide... intentional or otherwise. (Going ''between'' without a clear mental image of your intended destination is a one-way trip.) It also has no air. Dragons can hold their breaths for a surprisingly long time, but this is rather inconvenient for their human riders. Prolonged and repeated trips through ''between'' also terminate human pregnancies. The Weyrwoman Kylara took advantage of this by using trips through ''between'' as birth control. This also can save dragonriders battling Thread. In the first book ''Dragonflight'', F'lar avoids being eaten by a wad of Thread that hit his face by going ''between''. The icy cold of ''between'' immediately kills the Threads. The series implies that this is the original use of ''between'', a method fire-lizards evolved to help them survive threadfall.

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* ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'': ''Between'', through which dragons and fire-lizards teleport, is "black, blacker, blackest", has no reference points, and is freezing cold. It's also the dragon method of suicide... intentional or otherwise. (Going ''between'' without a clear mental image of your intended destination is a one-way trip.) It also has no air. Dragons can hold their breaths for a surprisingly long time, but this is rather inconvenient for their human riders. Prolonged and repeated trips through ''between'' also terminate human pregnancies. The Weyrwoman Kylara took advantage of this by using trips through ''between'' as birth control. This also can save dragonriders battling Thread. In the first book ''Dragonflight'', F'lar avoids being eaten by a wad of Thread that hit his face by going ''between''. The icy cold of ''between'' immediately kills the Threads. The series implies that this is the original use of ''between'', a method fire-lizards evolved to help them survive threadfall. One last thing. If the image of the destination is both clear enough and specific enough, it's possible to TimeTravel via ''between''.
25th Oct '16 11:26:48 PM PaulA
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*** It's also noted that getting ThrownOutTheAirlock is instantly fatal when in hyperspace, unlike in realspace when it might take a bit. In ''Han Solo at Star's End'', one of the Han Solo Adventure books by Brian Daley (not to be confused with the ''Han Solo Trilogy'' by AC Crispin), [[spoiler:turncoat Torm]] is blown out an airlock into hyperspace. The victim's body is instantly and utterly destroyed.

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*** It's also noted that getting ThrownOutTheAirlock is instantly fatal when in hyperspace, unlike in realspace when it might take a bit. In ''Han Solo at Star's End'', one of the Han Solo Adventure books by Brian Daley (not to be confused with the ''Han Solo Trilogy'' by AC Crispin), ''Literature/HanSoloAtStarsEnd'', [[spoiler:turncoat Torm]] is blown out an airlock into hyperspace. The victim's body is instantly and utterly destroyed.
16th Oct '16 8:54:12 PM Nerrin
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Added DiffLines:

** The earlier ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiI'' had a very ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}''-esque explanation for the sudden demonic invasion of Japan - a blatant {{Expy}} of Creator/StephenHawking succeeded in inventing teleportation but it connected to the demon world, allowing demons to spill into Earth through his experimental terminals. He eventually fixed the system so [[WarpWhistle it was safe to use]], but not before it was too late to stop the invasion.
14th Oct '16 8:34:06 AM ChronoLegion
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* The ''Franchise/{{Dune}}'' universe has hyperspace only being successfully navigated by, well, Navigators, who are creatures so addicted to Spice that it's physically transformed them into something totally alien. The addiction gives them the ability to see into the future and plot a course that will bring them to their destination. One wonders how many ships were lost before they figured out the whole "Mutate the volunteer" aspect. According to the [[Literature/LegendsOfDune prequel series]] written by the son (Brian Herbert) of the author (Frank Herbert) of the original trilogies, a lot. Specifically, because of the anti-machine backlash happening during the [[RobotWar Butlerian Jihad]], Norma Cenva, the inventor of this new type of FTL (another, slower, type exists) is forbidden from installing computers into the ships to reduce the risk of CriticalExistenceFailure. Thus, the loss rate is ''20%''. One out of five ships never returns. Considering the armada's ships are mostly crewed by religious fanatics, they don't care.

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* The ''Franchise/{{Dune}}'' universe has hyperspace only being successfully navigated by, well, Navigators, who are creatures so addicted to Spice that it's physically transformed them into something totally alien. The addiction gives them the ability to see into the future and plot a course that will bring them to their destination. One wonders how many ships were lost before they figured out the whole "Mutate the volunteer" aspect. According to the [[Literature/LegendsOfDune prequel series]] written by the son (Brian Herbert) of the author (Frank Herbert) of the original trilogies, a lot. Specifically, because of the anti-machine backlash happening during the [[RobotWar Butlerian Jihad]], Norma Cenva, the inventor of this new type of FTL (another, slower, type exists) is forbidden from installing computers into the ships to reduce the risk of CriticalExistenceFailure. Thus, the loss rate is ''20%''. One out of five ships never returns. Considering the armada's ships are mostly crewed by religious fanatics, they don't care. In ''Navigators of Dune'', [[spoiler:the newly-crowned Emperor Roderick sends a sizable chunk of the Imperial forces aboard an [=EsconTran=] foldspace carrier to take the planet Korhal and punish Josef Venport for assassinating his brother Emperor Salvador. However, without a Navigator, the crew of the carrier makes a tiny miscalculation during the jump and pops out in the corona of Korhal's sun, being vaporized moments later]].
8th Oct '16 11:36:24 AM Nippertipper
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[[SubspaceOrHyperspace Hyperspace]], being AnotherDimension or close, sets aside the natural laws that our universe and biologies need. It's sure to be [[AlienGeometries mind-bendingly different]] and hostile to conventional life -- even more so than the void of space itself. [[HyperspaceLanes Clearly marked paths]] may be [[StayOnThePath slightly safer]], or ships may generate a safe field around themselves while travelling. If it fails, the ship is at best returned to normal space, or at worst the passengers are exposed to incomprehensibly fatal horrors. Authors will often take the time to point out that hyperspace is hazardous and fraught with peril, for both the characters and the ships that have to make passage through it.

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[[SubspaceOrHyperspace Hyperspace]], being AnotherDimension or close, sets aside the natural laws that our universe and biologies need. It's sure to be [[AlienGeometries mind-bendingly different]] and hostile to conventional life -- even more so than the void of space itself. [[HyperspaceLanes Clearly marked paths]] may be [[StayOnThePath slightly safer]], or ships may generate a safe field around themselves while travelling. If it fails, the ship is at best returned to normal space, or at worst the passengers are exposed to incomprehensibly fatal horrors. Authors will often take the time to point out that hyperspace or subspace is hazardous and fraught with peril, for both the characters and the ships that have to make passage through it.
26th Sep '16 11:28:39 PM PaulA
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* In the novels that describe Creator/CJCherryh's ''Literature/AllianceUnion'' universe, entry into "jumpspace" is psychologically traumatic for most humans, requiring them to drug themselves with tranquillisers for the passage. A few individuals are able to tolerate the transfer and remain conscious "in-jump". They are nicknamed "nightwalkers", a term that suggests the mixed feelings with which they are viewed. On the one hand, they make excellent navigators, and are able to react far faster when the ship comes out of jump than their doped-up crewmates. On the other, the rest of the crew wonder what nightwalkers get up to as they wander round the ship while everyone is asleep...\\\
Of course, being a nightwalker is no picnic at first either, because time and space don't properly exist in jumpspace, which is why they're so rare: most sentient minds can't cope with the stress, which is why Hani and Mahendo'sat black out, and humans and stsho need tranq. It's harder on stsho: without tranq, they just die. Hani don't need precautions; the non-nightwalkers are just useless in jump (and they all shed horribly after). Methane-breathers, who knows. One of the scarier things about the kif is the hints that ''all animal life'' from their world are nightwalkers. Like Chanur's "pet" kif. And his "dinner". BTW, the kif had no problem doing this to captured humans. Kif don't need tranqs, so...

to:

* In the novels that describe Creator/CJCherryh's ''Literature/AllianceUnion'' universe, entry into "jumpspace" is psychologically traumatic for most humans, requiring them to drug themselves with tranquillisers for the passage. A few individuals are able to tolerate the transfer and remain conscious "in-jump". They are nicknamed "nightwalkers", a term that suggests the mixed feelings with which they are viewed. On the one hand, they make excellent navigators, and are able to react far faster when the ship comes out of jump than their doped-up crewmates. On the other, the rest of the crew wonder what nightwalkers get up to as they wander round the ship while everyone is asleep...\\\
Of course, being
asleep. Being a nightwalker is no picnic at first either, because time and space don't properly exist in jumpspace, which is why they're so rare: most sentient minds can't cope with the stress, which is why Hani and Mahendo'sat black out, and humans and stsho need tranq. It's harder on stsho: without tranq, they just die. Hani don't need precautions; the non-nightwalkers are just useless in jump (and they all shed horribly after). Methane-breathers, who knows. One of the scarier things about the kif is the hints that ''all animal life'' from their world are nightwalkers. Like Chanur's "pet" kif. And his "dinner". BTW, the kif had no problem doing this to captured humans. Kif don't need tranqs, so...



** In the back story of ''Literature/RimRunners'', N G ("No Good") Ramey was wrongly accused of being at fault in a fatal accident, and was denied tranquilizers during a jump as punishment.
** ''Downbelow Station'' describes a scary incident involving an overloaded refugee ship, the ''Hanford'', which has had an onboard riot; there were not nearly enough tranqs for those onboard during Jump.

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** In the back story of ''Literature/RimRunners'', ''Literature/{{Rimrunners}}'', N G ("No Good") Ramey was wrongly accused of being at fault in a fatal accident, and was denied tranquilizers during a jump as punishment.
** ''Downbelow Station'' ''Literature/DownbelowStation'' describes a scary incident involving an overloaded refugee ship, the ''Hanford'', which has had an onboard riot; there were not nearly enough tranqs for those onboard during Jump.
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