History Main / HollywoodAutism

17th Jun '17 3:18:33 PM ectostar
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* Carl from ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}''. Carl has Asperger's syndrome, a form of Autism spectrum disorder which makes him have problems with social interaction when being around people. He loves trains and can point out every detail of them with incredible accuracy and attention to detail. As well as trains, he likes to assemble jigsaws and can draw rather good lions all by hand. He can get somewhat anxious around situations that are unfamiliar to him, but can often find a rational solution to a problem whenever it presents itself. He likes apple juice in a box, not a bottle. His favorite color is blue, but he dislikes the color brown.

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* Carl from ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}''. Carl has Asperger's syndrome, a form of Autism spectrum disorder which makes him have problems with social interaction when being around people. He loves trains and can point out every detail of them with incredible accuracy and attention to detail. As well as trains, he likes to assemble jigsaws and can draw rather good lions all by hand. He can get somewhat anxious around situations that are unfamiliar to him, but can often find a rational solution to a problem whenever it presents itself. He likes apple juice in a box, not a bottle. His favorite color is blue, but he dislikes the color brown.brown.
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4th Jun '17 1:42:52 AM Ymirsdaughter
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Characters with Hollywood Autism are commonly LiteralMinded and may be {{Insufferable Genius}}es. Not only do they get really into their interests, but these interests tend to be something no normal person would ever be interested in, like naming every piece of a train-engine. This character may also be a {{Cloudcuckoolander}}. Expect him to be InspirationallyDisadvantaged or for his Hollywood Autism to be a DisabilitySuperpower. If the exact disorder the character has is not explicitly spelled out, see AmbiguousDisorder.

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Characters with Hollywood Autism are commonly LiteralMinded and may be {{Insufferable Genius}}es. Not only do they get really into their interests, but these interests tend to be something no normal neurotypical/allistic person would ever be interested in, like naming every piece of a train-engine. This character may also be a {{Cloudcuckoolander}}. Expect him to be InspirationallyDisadvantaged or for his Hollywood Autism to be a DisabilitySuperpower. If the exact disorder the character has is not explicitly spelled out, see AmbiguousDisorder.
3rd Jun '17 2:33:15 PM Tightwire
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Characters with Hollywood Autism are commonly LiteralMinded and may be {{Insufferable Genius}}es. This character may also be a {{Cloudcuckoolander}}. Expect him to be InspirationallyDisadvantaged or for his Hollywood Autism to be a DisabilitySuperpower. If the exact disorder the character has is not explicitly spelled out, see AmbiguousDisorder.

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Characters with Hollywood Autism are commonly LiteralMinded and may be {{Insufferable Genius}}es. Not only do they get really into their interests, but these interests tend to be something no normal person would ever be interested in, like naming every piece of a train-engine. This character may also be a {{Cloudcuckoolander}}. Expect him to be InspirationallyDisadvantaged or for his Hollywood Autism to be a DisabilitySuperpower. If the exact disorder the character has is not explicitly spelled out, see AmbiguousDisorder.
3rd Jun '17 1:53:10 PM Tightwire
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In RealLife, autism is a complex neurological disorder that can impair the autistic individual's social skills among other areas, as detailed in our UsefulNotes for UsefulNotes/AspergerSyndrome and UsefulNotes/HighFunctioningAutism. While there are more males than females diagnosed with autism, there are plenty of autistic women and girls out there, with some research showing that autism rates in both sexes are about the same. Also, autism affects adults as well as children and many autistic adults are verbal, work, go to college, or live on their own. Furthermore, autistic people in RealLife are, well, [[ShapedLikeItself portrayed by autistic people]].

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In RealLife, autism is a complex neurological disorder that can impair the autistic individual's social skills among other areas, as detailed in our UsefulNotes for UsefulNotes/AspergerSyndrome and UsefulNotes/HighFunctioningAutism. While there are more males than females diagnosed with autism, there are plenty of autistic women and girls out there, with some research showing that autism rates in both sexes are about the same. Also, autism affects adults as well as children and many autistic adults are verbal, work, go to college, or live on their own. Furthermore, autistic people in RealLife are, well, [[ShapedLikeItself portrayed by actually real autistic people]].



It is most common for an autistic character to be a child and if he is an adult, he's most likely to be TheRainMan or the IdiotSavant or otherwise totally unable to live what most people would call a normal life. They're also portrayed by actors, who wouldn't actually know what it's like to be autistic.

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It is most common for an autistic character to be a child and if he is an adult, he's most likely to be TheRainMan or the IdiotSavant or otherwise totally unable to live what most people would call a normal life. They're They are also portrayed by actors, ones who wouldn't actually know what it's like to be autistic.
probably weren't picked for an experience of living with Autism.
19th May '17 10:09:21 AM gothelittle
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** One autistic kid, hearing about the advent of Julia, [[https://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/10/27/the-other-autistic-muppet/?_r=0 told his mom]] that there was already an autistic Muppet: Fozzie Bear. He perseverates (repeats words or phrases), has little actual sense for humor (or timing!), and tends to take everything overly literally and seriously.
2nd May '17 11:20:37 PM CaptEquinox
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* Julia from ''Series/SesameStreet'', an Anything Muppet, is designed to subvert this trope, starting with the fact that she's female. In the episode "Meet Julia", her friends Elmo and Abby Cadabby introduce her to Big Bird and help him understand that although she interacts with others in different ways than most and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged -- she hates loud noises and panics upon hearing a fire engine siren, and Big Bird touching her shoulder in an attempt to help makes matters worse, whereupon Alan takes her aside to calm down -- she is a happy person and a great friend. She's also performed by a Muppeteer who has an autistic son.

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* Julia from ''Series/SesameStreet'', an Anything Muppet, is designed to subvert this trope, starting with the fact that she's female. In the episode "Meet Julia", her friends Elmo and Abby Cadabby introduce her to Big Bird and help him understand that although she interacts with others in different ways than most and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged -- she hates loud noises and panics upon hearing a fire engine siren, siren[[note]]TruthInTelevision. For someone even "mildly" autistic, walking through a modern parking lot can be like walking through a God-damned minefield, thanks to the sudden horn honks emitted by car lock remotes.[[/note]], and Big Bird touching her shoulder in an attempt to help makes matters worse, whereupon Alan takes her aside to calm down -- she is a happy person and a great friend. She's also performed by a Muppeteer who has an autistic son.
2nd May '17 11:14:44 PM CaptEquinox
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* Jacob in ''Literature/HouseRules'' is really good at crime scene know-how, but will have a meltdown if his routine is interrupted in any way. He is clearly stated to be autistic by multiple characters in the story, including himself and it is mentioned repeatedly that Jacob's mother has tried many treatments for Jacob such as a GFCF diet and vitamin B12 supplements. Jacob's brother Theo complains about the effect Jacob has on his life including a transparently metaphorical example of them both being under an upside-down boat and Jacob breathing in all the oxygen. In fact, the title House Rules refers to the list of house rules that Theo and Jacob's mother has set for the family to follow, most of them having something to do with Jacob's special needs. Despite Jacob's intelligence and fascination with forensic analysis, he is portrayed as being a burden on his family. Rather than being InspirationallyDisadvantaged, the book focuses on whether or not Jacob murdered his social-skills tutor, which is left ambiguous but is pushed more of the side of "yes" by the family's push for an InsanityDefense and Theo's narrating quote: "My mother will tell you Jacob's not violent, but I am living proof that she's kidding herself."

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* Jacob in ''Literature/HouseRules'' is really good at crime scene know-how, but will have a meltdown if his routine is interrupted in any way. He is clearly stated to be autistic by multiple characters in the story, including himself and it is mentioned repeatedly that Jacob's mother has tried many treatments for Jacob such as a GFCF diet and vitamin B12 supplements. [[note]]These ideas come from Dr. Bernard Rimland who thought B12 and B6 could help autistics process communication and that a GFCF diet could reduce stomach/intestinal discomfort.[[/note]] Jacob's brother Theo complains about the effect Jacob has on his life including a transparently metaphorical example of them both being under an upside-down boat and Jacob breathing in all the oxygen. In fact, the title House Rules ''House Rules'' refers to the list of house rules that Theo and Jacob's mother has set for the family to follow, most of them having something to do with Jacob's special needs. Despite Jacob's intelligence and fascination with forensic analysis, he is portrayed as being a burden on his family. Rather than being InspirationallyDisadvantaged, InspirationallyDisadvantaged or just different, the book focuses on whether or not Jacob murdered his social-skills tutor, which is left ambiguous but is pushed more of the side of "yes" by the family's push for an InsanityDefense and Theo's narrating quote: "My mother will tell you Jacob's not violent, but I am living proof that she's kidding herself."


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*** Autistic individuals can have "high" and "low" functioning from one day or one ''hour'' to the next, depending on many factors, making the "high/low" stuff meaningless.
25th Apr '17 1:00:01 PM MitchellProductions
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[[FlameBait Most controversially]], their lives are rarely depicted as being as fulfilling or as much of a life as that of someone who is not autistic, although there have been more examples of autistic adults in media whose lives are depicted as non-tragic and even find romance and have children, but they are still far rarer than examples of children and adults whose autism is shown as tragic. Finally, due to the overwhelming attitude that autism is automatically a tragedy in all cases rather than a different way of being or a disability that can be lived with and managed, it is common for an autistic character to [[ThrowingOffTheDisability miraculously be cured of his autism, usually through]] AppliedPhlebotinum. Not likely TruthInTelevision, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement and]] ''[[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement please]]'' [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement leave it at that]]!

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[[FlameBait Most controversially]], their lives are rarely depicted as being as fulfilling or as much of a life as that of someone who is not autistic, although there have been more examples of autistic adults in media whose lives are depicted as non-tragic and even find romance and have children, but they are still far rarer than examples of children and adults whose autism is shown as tragic. Finally, due to the overwhelming attitude that autism is automatically a tragedy in all cases rather than a different way of being or a disability that can be lived with and managed, it is common for an autistic character to [[ThrowingOffTheDisability miraculously be cured of his autism, usually through]] AppliedPhlebotinum. Not likely TruthInTelevision, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement and]] ''[[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement please]]'' [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement leave it at that]]!
Real-life autism is much more complex than how this trope portrays it, making this trope's TruthInTelevision status too questionable for real life examples.
14th Apr '17 9:19:32 AM Sapphirea2
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* Julia from ''Series/SesameStreet'' is designed to avert this trope, starting with the fact that she's female. In the episode "Meet Julia", her friends Elmo and Abby Cadabby introduce her to Big Bird and help him understand that although she interacts with others in different ways and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged -- she hates loud noises and panics upon hearing a fire engine siren, and Big Bird touching her shoulder in an attempt to help makes matters worse, whereupon Alan takes her aside to calm down -- she is a happy person and a great friend. (She's performed by a Muppeteer who has an autistic son.)

to:

* Julia from ''Series/SesameStreet'' ''Series/SesameStreet'', an Anything Muppet, is designed to avert subvert this trope, starting with the fact that she's female. In the episode "Meet Julia", her friends Elmo and Abby Cadabby introduce her to Big Bird and help him understand that although she interacts with others in different ways than most and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged -- she hates loud noises and panics upon hearing a fire engine siren, and Big Bird touching her shoulder in an attempt to help makes matters worse, whereupon Alan takes her aside to calm down -- she is a happy person and a great friend. (She's She's also performed by a Muppeteer who has an autistic son.)
son.
14th Apr '17 9:14:20 AM Sapphirea2
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to:

* Julia from ''Series/SesameStreet'' is designed to avert this trope, starting with the fact that she's female. In the episode "Meet Julia", her friends Elmo and Abby Cadabby introduce her to Big Bird and help him understand that although she interacts with others in different ways and has sensitivities that need to be acknowledged -- she hates loud noises and panics upon hearing a fire engine siren, and Big Bird touching her shoulder in an attempt to help makes matters worse, whereupon Alan takes her aside to calm down -- she is a happy person and a great friend. (She's performed by a Muppeteer who has an autistic son.)
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