History Main / GrandeDame

10th Dec '17 3:51:24 PM nombretomado
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The trope is nearly always a [[ComedyTropes Comedy Trope]], associated particularly with the Comedy of Manners; as such, it serves as a useful device for mocking social pretensions, and dates back to the ancient Roman plays of Creator/{{Plautus}} and Terence, where the ''Grande Dame'' appeared as the ''Matrona''. She was not used much in the uninhibited [[TheMiddleAges Middle Ages]], but made a comeback as the humorless, self-important ''dueña'' of the 16th and 17th century Spanish theater (SmallNameBigEgo Doña Rodríguez is the only one character stupid enough in all the novel to believe that DonQuixote is a real KnightErrant). The prude and bluestocking of the Restoration (such as [[Creator/{{Moliere}} Molière's]] [[Theatre/TheMisanthrope Arsinoé]] and his ''Précieuses ridicules'') and Sentimental comedies (for instance, Mrs. Malaprop in Sheridan's ''Theatre/TheRivals'') also have some affinities with the type, insofar as they made pretensions to virtue and culture.

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The trope is nearly always a [[ComedyTropes Comedy Trope]], associated particularly with the Comedy of Manners; as such, it serves as a useful device for mocking social pretensions, and dates back to the ancient Roman plays of Creator/{{Plautus}} and Terence, where the ''Grande Dame'' appeared as the ''Matrona''. She was not used much in the uninhibited [[TheMiddleAges Middle Ages]], but made a comeback as the humorless, self-important ''dueña'' of the 16th and 17th century Spanish theater (SmallNameBigEgo Doña Rodríguez is the only one character stupid enough in all the novel to believe that DonQuixote Literature/DonQuixote is a real KnightErrant). The prude and bluestocking of the Restoration (such as [[Creator/{{Moliere}} Molière's]] [[Theatre/TheMisanthrope Arsinoé]] and his ''Précieuses ridicules'') and Sentimental comedies (for instance, Mrs. Malaprop in Sheridan's ''Theatre/TheRivals'') also have some affinities with the type, insofar as they made pretensions to virtue and culture.
1st Dec '17 6:10:46 PM Prime32
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Manga/UQHolder'', Dana is an enormous woman who dresses in extravagant clothing and calls herself "young and beautiful". She is also [[TheDreaded an ancient High Daywalker vampire]] known as [[VoidBetweenTheWorlds "The Witch of the Rift"]], responsible for training Evangeline and later Touta. While [[TrainingFromHell effective]], her regiment [[TheWonka has odd requirements that seem more focused on aesthetics than anything else]], like demanding that immortals strike a pose while regenerating.
26th Oct '17 3:38:19 AM Spindriver
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* Marya Dmitriyevna Ahkrosimova from ''Theatre/NatashaPierreandtheGreatCometof1812''. The lyrics of the prologue even say so!

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* Marya Dmitriyevna Ahkrosimova from ''Theatre/NatashaPierreandtheGreatCometof1812''.''Theatre/NatashaPierreAndTheGreatCometOf1812''. The lyrics of the prologue even say so!
26th Oct '17 3:36:05 AM Spindriver
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* ''Theatre/AlbertHerring'' has Lady Billows, a fiercely Puritanical and exacting old solon who sings in florid Handelian coloratura.
* Marya Dmitriyevna Ahkrosimova from ''Theatre/{{NatashaPierreandtheGreatCometof1812}}''. The lyrics of the prologue even say so!

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* ''Theatre/AlbertHerring'' ''Albert Herring'' has Lady Billows, a fiercely Puritanical and exacting old solon who sings in florid Handelian coloratura.
* Marya Dmitriyevna Ahkrosimova from ''Theatre/{{NatashaPierreandtheGreatCometof1812}}''.''Theatre/NatashaPierreandtheGreatCometof1812''. The lyrics of the prologue even say so!
26th Oct '17 3:30:59 AM Spindriver
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* Judi Dench's version of M in the new ''Film/JamesBond'' films (''e.g., Film/CasinoRoyale2006'') is portrayed in this manner:
-->'''Bond:''' I always thought M was a randomly assigned initial; I had no idea it stood for--\\

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* Judi Dench's Creator/JudiDench sometimes seems to have cornered the market in playing a steely and capable version of the type:
** Her
version of M in the new ''Film/JamesBond'' films (''e.g., Film/CasinoRoyale2006'') is portrayed in this manner:
-->'''Bond:'''
downright dangerous:
--->'''Bond:'''
I always thought M was a randomly assigned initial; I had no idea it stood for--\\



* And Dame Judi again in the film ''The Importance of Being Earnest''.
* And again in ''Mrs. Henderson Presents''.

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* ** And Dame Judi again in the recent film ''The Importance version of Being Earnest''.
*
''Theatre/TheImportanceOfBeingEarnest''.
**
And again in ''Mrs. Henderson Presents''.
13th Sep '17 10:55:44 PM Abodos
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* Madame Aroma from ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'' is a benevolent example. Though her husband Dotour is the mayor of Clock Town, she is the one who organizes the festivities scheduled for the Carnival of Time and is implied to have more power over the town's committee members than him.
17th Jun '17 7:36:24 PM karstovich2
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* Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham, on ''Series/DowntonAbbey''. Appropriately enough, she is played by an actual Dame, Maggie Smith.

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* Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham, on ''Series/DowntonAbbey''. Appropriately enough, she is played by an actual Dame, Maggie Smith.Creator/MaggieSmith.
17th Jun '17 7:34:37 PM karstovich2
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The trope is nearly always a [[ComedyTropes Comedy Trope]], associated particularly with the Comedy of Manners; as such, it serves as a useful device for mocking social pretensions, and dates back to the ancient Roman plays of Creator/{{Plautus}} and Terence, where the ''Grande Dame'' appeared as the ''Matrona''. She was not used much in the uninhibited [[TheMiddleAges Middle Ages]], but made a comeback as the humorless, self-important ''dueña'' of the 16th and 17th century Spanish theater (SmallNameBigEgo Doña Rodríguez is the only one character stupid enough in all the novel to believe that DonQuixote is a real KnightErrant) . The prude and bluestocking of the Restoration (such as [[Creator/{{Moliere}} Molière's]] [[Theatre/TheMisanthrope Arsinoé]] and his ''Précieuses ridicules'') and Sentimental comedies (for instance, Mrs. Malaprop in Sheridan's ''Theatre/TheRivals'') have some affinities with the type, insofar as they made pretensions to virtue and culture, but it was only with the [[UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain Victorian]] age that the great era of the ''Grande Dame'' opened. Here, with her [[ErmineCapeEffect fur stole]] and her ancestral [[HighClassGlass lorgnette]] in hand, the ''Grande Dame'' quashed social climbers, sought advantageous marriages for her daughters and repelled impossible matches for her sons, and maintained the natural order of Society with frigid hauteur for a good hundred years and more. In England, she was generally in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debrett%27s Debrett]] and was called "Lady" something if she didn't have some title or other ("Countess" was particularly imposing); in the US, she was one of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Brahmin Brahmins]] or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ward_McAllister the Four Hundred]] or the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_families_of_virginia FFV]] and was called "Mrs. Van" Whoozis or Miss Firstname. She will still turn up occasionally, to preside over banquets and to be aghast at the excesses of [[StrawFeminist Feminism]] or the [[TeensAreMonsters Youth movement]] and to wonder why [[YeGoodeOldeDays no young ladies bother to go to the cotillion any more]].

to:

The trope is nearly always a [[ComedyTropes Comedy Trope]], associated particularly with the Comedy of Manners; as such, it serves as a useful device for mocking social pretensions, and dates back to the ancient Roman plays of Creator/{{Plautus}} and Terence, where the ''Grande Dame'' appeared as the ''Matrona''. She was not used much in the uninhibited [[TheMiddleAges Middle Ages]], but made a comeback as the humorless, self-important ''dueña'' of the 16th and 17th century Spanish theater (SmallNameBigEgo Doña Rodríguez is the only one character stupid enough in all the novel to believe that DonQuixote is a real KnightErrant) .KnightErrant). The prude and bluestocking of the Restoration (such as [[Creator/{{Moliere}} Molière's]] [[Theatre/TheMisanthrope Arsinoé]] and his ''Précieuses ridicules'') and Sentimental comedies (for instance, Mrs. Malaprop in Sheridan's ''Theatre/TheRivals'') also have some affinities with the type, insofar as they made pretensions to virtue and culture, but culture.

However,
it was only with the [[UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain Victorian]] age that the great era of the ''Grande Dame'' opened. Here, with her [[ErmineCapeEffect fur stole]] and her ancestral [[HighClassGlass lorgnette]] in hand, the ''Grande Dame'' quashed social climbers, sought advantageous marriages for her daughters and repelled impossible matches for her sons, and maintained the natural order of Society with frigid hauteur for a good hundred years and more. In England, she was generally in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debrett%27s Debrett]] and was called "Lady" something if she didn't have some title or other ("Countess" was particularly imposing); in the US, she was one of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Brahmin Brahmins]] or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ward_McAllister the Four Hundred]] or the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_families_of_virginia FFV]] and was called "Mrs. Van" Whoozis or Miss Firstname. She will still turn up occasionally, to preside over banquets and to be aghast at the excesses of [[StrawFeminist Feminism]] or the [[TeensAreMonsters Youth movement]] and to wonder why [[YeGoodeOldeDays no young ladies bother to go to the cotillion any more]].
21st May '17 10:56:17 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The trope is nearly always a [[ComedyTropes Comedy Trope]], associated particularly with the Comedy of Manners; as such, it serves as a useful device for mocking social pretensions, and dates back to the ancient Roman plays of Creator/{{Plautus}} and Terence, where the ''Grande Dame'' appeared as the ''Matrona''. She was not used much in the uninhibited [[TheMiddleAges Middle Ages]], but made a comeback as the humorless, self-important ''dueña'' of the 16th and 17th century Spanish theater (SmallNameBigEgo Doña Rodríguez is the only one character stupid enough in all the novel to believe that DonQuixote is a real KnightErrant) . The prude and bluestocking of the Restoration (such as [[Creator/{{Moliere}} Molière's]] [[Theatre/TheMisanthrope Arsinoé]] and his ''Précieuses ridicules'') and Sentimental comedies (for instance, Mrs. Malaprop in Sheridan's ''Theatre/TheRivals'') have some affinities with the type, insofar as they made pretensions to virtue and culture, but it was only with the [[VictorianBritain Victorian]] age that the great era of the ''Grande Dame'' opened. Here, with her [[ErmineCapeEffect fur stole]] and her ancestral [[HighClassGlass lorgnette]] in hand, the ''Grande Dame'' quashed social climbers, sought advantageous marriages for her daughters and repelled impossible matches for her sons, and maintained the natural order of Society with frigid hauteur for a good hundred years and more. In England, she was generally in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debrett%27s Debrett]] and was called "Lady" something if she didn't have some title or other ("Countess" was particularly imposing); in the US, she was one of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Brahmin Brahmins]] or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ward_McAllister the Four Hundred]] or the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_families_of_virginia FFV]] and was called "Mrs. Van" Whoozis or Miss Firstname. She will still turn up occasionally, to preside over banquets and to be aghast at the excesses of [[StrawFeminist Feminism]] or the [[TeensAreMonsters Youth movement]] and to wonder why [[YeGoodeOldeDays no young ladies bother to go to the cotillion any more]].

to:

The trope is nearly always a [[ComedyTropes Comedy Trope]], associated particularly with the Comedy of Manners; as such, it serves as a useful device for mocking social pretensions, and dates back to the ancient Roman plays of Creator/{{Plautus}} and Terence, where the ''Grande Dame'' appeared as the ''Matrona''. She was not used much in the uninhibited [[TheMiddleAges Middle Ages]], but made a comeback as the humorless, self-important ''dueña'' of the 16th and 17th century Spanish theater (SmallNameBigEgo Doña Rodríguez is the only one character stupid enough in all the novel to believe that DonQuixote is a real KnightErrant) . The prude and bluestocking of the Restoration (such as [[Creator/{{Moliere}} Molière's]] [[Theatre/TheMisanthrope Arsinoé]] and his ''Précieuses ridicules'') and Sentimental comedies (for instance, Mrs. Malaprop in Sheridan's ''Theatre/TheRivals'') have some affinities with the type, insofar as they made pretensions to virtue and culture, but it was only with the [[VictorianBritain [[UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain Victorian]] age that the great era of the ''Grande Dame'' opened. Here, with her [[ErmineCapeEffect fur stole]] and her ancestral [[HighClassGlass lorgnette]] in hand, the ''Grande Dame'' quashed social climbers, sought advantageous marriages for her daughters and repelled impossible matches for her sons, and maintained the natural order of Society with frigid hauteur for a good hundred years and more. In England, she was generally in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debrett%27s Debrett]] and was called "Lady" something if she didn't have some title or other ("Countess" was particularly imposing); in the US, she was one of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Brahmin Brahmins]] or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ward_McAllister the Four Hundred]] or the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_families_of_virginia FFV]] and was called "Mrs. Van" Whoozis or Miss Firstname. She will still turn up occasionally, to preside over banquets and to be aghast at the excesses of [[StrawFeminist Feminism]] or the [[TeensAreMonsters Youth movement]] and to wonder why [[YeGoodeOldeDays no young ladies bother to go to the cotillion any more]].
24th Feb '17 7:09:10 AM TFSyndicate
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[[caption-width-right:204:"You'll take no liberties with ''[-ME-]'', my good man." "Indeed, madame, that is the ''[-LAST-]'' thing I should desire!"]]

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[[caption-width-right:204:"You'll take no liberties with ''[-ME-]'', my good man." "Indeed, madame, that is [[caption-width-right:204:"[[Film/DuckSoup Will you marry me? Did your ex leave you any money? Answer the ''[-LAST-]'' thing I should desire!"]]
second question first!]]"]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GrandeDame