History Main / GoingDownWithTheShip

3rd Aug '17 2:22:30 PM TonyG
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* In one episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfWinnieThePooh'', the characters are playing pirate and their ship springs a leak. Tigger, as the first mate, tells Piglet, who's playing captain, that he must go down with the ship. Piglet then makes Tigger the new captain, who then makes Piglet captain again, and so forth.
16th Jul '17 9:39:07 AM nombretomado
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* PlayedForLaughs in one of the ''Commando War Stories''. A coxswain in WW2 is warned that if he puts a scratch on the landing boat he's steering for shore, the Navy will take it out of his pay. The coxswain quips that now he knows why the captain always goes down with his ship. "I'd hate to fork out for a battleship!"

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* PlayedForLaughs in one of the ''Commando War Stories''. A coxswain in WW2 [=WW2=] is warned that if he puts a scratch on the landing boat he's steering for shore, the Navy will take it out of his pay. The coxswain quips that now he knows why the captain always goes down with his ship. "I'd hate to fork out for a battleship!"
15th Jul '17 9:39:19 AM thatother1dude
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A maritime tradition that, if a ship is sinking, the Captain should remain aboard it, or, at least, [[TheMenFirst be the last one to escape]]. This can also extend to other crewmen, usually so they can oversee and direct passengers onto the lifeboats first. The latter often goes hand in hand with "[[MenAreTheExpendableGender women and children first]]" (leading to jokes where adult men dress in drag or like children). A common twist in comedic works is for the captain to [[YouAreInCommandNow appoint someone else captain]] and let ''them'' go down with the ship. Sometimes, the new captain then uses the "promotion" to reassign the old captain as captain, often going back and forth repeatedly until they both go under.

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A maritime tradition that, if a ship is sinking, the Captain should remain aboard it, or, at least, [[TheMenFirst be the last one to escape]]. This can also extend to other crewmen, usually so they can oversee and direct passengers onto the lifeboats first. The latter often goes hand in hand with "[[MenAreTheExpendableGender women and children first]]" (leading to jokes where adult men dress in drag or like children). A common twist in comedic works is for the captain to [[YouAreInCommandNow [[PromotedToScapegoat appoint someone else captain]] and let ''them'' go down with the ship. Sometimes, the new captain then uses the "promotion" to reassign the old captain as captain, often going back and forth repeatedly until they both go under.
13th Jul '17 4:32:42 AM thatother1dude
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In many cases, the captain goes down with the ship because he would [[DirtyCoward face major disgrace if he didn't]]--[[DeathEqualsRedemption especially if the ship is only sinking because of his screw-up.]]

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In many cases, the captain goes down with the ship because he would [[DirtyCoward [[DrivenToSuicide face major disgrace if he didn't]]--[[DeathEqualsRedemption especially if the ship is only sinking because of his screw-up.]]
1st Jun '17 10:23:11 PM morane
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* Subverted in Jämijärvi skydiving disaster, Finland, 2014. Comp Air 8 carrying skydivers broke up mid-air with the starboard wing strut collapsing and starboard wing folding upon the fuselage, effectively blocking the jump door. The only way out was the cockpit door. The pilot (captain) bailed out first, opening the cockpit door and enabling two skydivers jumping out before the plane crashed to ground. The pilot's actions were essential to enable ''anyone'' to make an emergency jump in such situation.
30th May '17 1:56:34 AM Az_Tech341
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->'''Peter Pan:''' You know the rules, Hook: A good captain always goes down with his ship.

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->'''Peter Pan:''' You know the rules, Hook: A a good captain always goes down with his ship.



A maritime tradition that if a ship is sinking, the Captain should remain aboard it, or at least [[TheMenFirst be the last one to escape]]. This can also extend to other crewmen, usually so they can oversee and direct passengers onto the lifeboats first. The latter often goes hand in hand with [[MenAreTheExpendableGender "Women and children first"]] (leading to jokes where adult men dress in drag or like children). A common twist in comedic works is for the captain to [[YouAreInCommandNow appoint someone else captain]] and let ''them'' go down with the ship. Sometimes the new captain then uses the "promotion" to reassign the old captain as captain, often going back and forth repeatedly until they both go under.

Originally came about because of maritime salvage laws - if the ship was abandoned by all the crew but didn't sink, anyone who got on board could claim the ship and contents as salvage. So a senior officer had to remain until it was clear that the ship really was going to sink (or at least be the last to leave) to prevent embarrassing losses of cargo and/or repairable ships.

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A maritime tradition that that, if a ship is sinking, the Captain should remain aboard it, or or, at least least, [[TheMenFirst be the last one to escape]]. This can also extend to other crewmen, usually so they can oversee and direct passengers onto the lifeboats first. The latter often goes hand in hand with [[MenAreTheExpendableGender "Women "[[MenAreTheExpendableGender women and children first"]] first]]" (leading to jokes where adult men dress in drag or like children). A common twist in comedic works is for the captain to [[YouAreInCommandNow appoint someone else captain]] and let ''them'' go down with the ship. Sometimes Sometimes, the new captain then uses the "promotion" to reassign the old captain as captain, often going back and forth repeatedly until they both go under.

Originally came about because of maritime salvage laws - if the ship was abandoned by all the crew but didn't sink, anyone who got on board could claim the ship and contents as salvage. So So, a senior officer had to remain until it was clear that the ship really was going to sink (or at least be the last to leave) to prevent embarrassing losses of cargo and/or repairable ships.



Because, of course, SpaceIsAnOcean this also applies to starship captains. Even though [[TwoDSpace there's no (literal) "down" for them to go]]...

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Because, of course, SpaceIsAnOcean SpaceIsAnOcean, this also applies to starship captains. Even though [[TwoDSpace there's no (literal) "down" for them to go]]...
go]]....
19th May '17 1:20:23 PM LtFedora
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** Chief Officer Henry Wilde and Second Officer Charles Lightoller both had the ship sink beneath their feet as they tried to load the remaining two collapsible boats. Wilde clung to a deck chair and perished while Lightoller mounted Collapsible B with nearly two dozen-men and survived (the highest-ranking officer to do so). The manner of First Officer William Murdoch's death is unknown, but it's believed that he was crushed by the forward funnel collapsing.
21st Apr '17 7:14:18 AM DeepRed
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* Averted by Captain Yiannis Avranas of the ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oceanos Oceanos]],'' who was one of the ''first'' off the ship. He later stated that "abandon ship is for everybody. If some people want to stay, they can stay," but many people on board said there was no alarm raised and they ''had no idea that the ship was sinking''. To make matters worse, his crew didn't close the lower deck portholes, which made the sinking even ''faster''. The rescue operation was carried out by two ''entertainers''. People were furious with the captain and crew for abandoning them. Luckily, all people on board were rescued. The year following the sinking, Captain Avranas and his senior crew were found guilty of negligence by Greek maritime authorities.

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* Averted by Captain Yiannis Avranas of the ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oceanos Oceanos]],'' who was one of the ''first'' off the ship. He later stated that "abandon ship is for everybody. If some people want to stay, they can stay," but many people on board said there was no alarm raised and they ''had no idea that the ship was sinking''. To make matters worse, his crew didn't close the lower deck portholes, which made the sinking even ''faster''. The rescue operation was carried out by two ''entertainers''. People were furious with the captain and crew [[DirtyCoward for abandoning them.them]]. Luckily, all people on board were rescued. The year following the sinking, Captain Avranas and his senior crew were found guilty of negligence by Greek maritime authorities.
15th Apr '17 9:56:44 PM eowynjedi
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* In the ''Literature/{{Temeraire}}'' series, dragons and their captains tend to die together. In part this is because they are usually falling from a great height with no kind of rescue equipment (such as a parachute) and so the ''whole'' crew dies unless another dragon is close enough to help, but given the powerful emotional bond between dragon and captain, many of them wouldn't save themselves even if they were able.
10th Apr '17 4:22:44 PM nombretomado
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* In SergeyLukyanenko's ''[[Literature/LineOfDelirium Emperors of Illusions]]'', Admiral Lemak's destroyer is hijacked while in hyperspace, and the hijacker forces the bridge crew to prepare to exit hyperspace without first decelerating. This would result in the ship entering real space at relativistic speed, and TimeDilation would ensure that, in the time it takes the ship to slow down, a century may pass in the outside universe. The Admiral gives in and releases the prisoners, as the hijacker demands. However, attempts to retake the bridge result in the deceleration being held off long enough to ensure the unfortunate outcome. In the minute before dropping out of hyperspace, Lemak announces to the crew what is happening and urges anyone who has [[ResurrectiveImmortality aTan]] to kill themselves immediately (they will be resurrected on the nearest colony). Despite himself having aTan, Lemak chooses to stay with the ship and those members of the crew who don't have it, although he cries as the ship is passing into the unknown future.

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* In SergeyLukyanenko's Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's ''[[Literature/LineOfDelirium Emperors of Illusions]]'', Admiral Lemak's destroyer is hijacked while in hyperspace, and the hijacker forces the bridge crew to prepare to exit hyperspace without first decelerating. This would result in the ship entering real space at relativistic speed, and TimeDilation would ensure that, in the time it takes the ship to slow down, a century may pass in the outside universe. The Admiral gives in and releases the prisoners, as the hijacker demands. However, attempts to retake the bridge result in the deceleration being held off long enough to ensure the unfortunate outcome. In the minute before dropping out of hyperspace, Lemak announces to the crew what is happening and urges anyone who has [[ResurrectiveImmortality aTan]] to kill themselves immediately (they will be resurrected on the nearest colony). Despite himself having aTan, Lemak chooses to stay with the ship and those members of the crew who don't have it, although he cries as the ship is passing into the unknown future.
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