History Main / GeorgeJetsonJobSecurity

24th Jul '17 10:38:10 AM MHarrington
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Bosses in the TV world have apparently never heard of such things as wrongful termination or hostile workplace lawsuits (or maybe they ''have'' heard of them, but were arrogantly dismissive of them).[[note]] this is Truth in Television for most of the US, due to at-will employment laws letting bosses fire anyone for any reason or no reason [[/note]] And neither has the poor fired employee, who will likely spend most of the time dejectedly scanning the want ads while his concerned family looks on instead of planning some kind of legal recourse.

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Bosses in the TV world have apparently never heard of such things as wrongful termination or hostile workplace lawsuits (or maybe they ''have'' heard of them, but were arrogantly dismissive of them, because they are so confident it could ''never'' happen to them).[[note]] this is Truth in Television for most of the US, due to at-will employment laws letting bosses fire anyone for any reason or no reason at all [[/note]] And neither has the poor fired employee, who will likely spend most of the time dejectedly scanning the want ads while his concerned family looks on instead of planning some kind of legal recourse.
10th Jul '17 7:11:17 AM Dracis
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* In the first ''Literature/ArtemisFowl'' book, Mrs. Fowl orders her son to fire a maid who displeased her. Artemis agrees, and then suggests that they hire Butler's sister Juliet as a replacement. Since Juliet ''was'' the maid in question, this results in her being fired and then rehired before she even finds out that she had been fired in the first place.

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* In the first ''Literature/ArtemisFowl'' book, Mrs. Fowl - who is in rather poor mental health - orders her son to fire a maid who displeased her. Artemis agrees, and then suggests that they hire Butler's sister Juliet as a replacement. Since Juliet ''was'' the maid in question, this results in her being fired and then rehired before she even finds out that she had been fired in the first place.
8th Jun '17 6:31:27 AM LadyJaneGrey
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'', Numbuh 13 seems to be universally despised by the entire organization, and for good reason. He's rude, incompetent, and a WalkingDisasterArea who causes more problems than he helps solve, and blames everyone but himself. When he's kidnapped by the villains, the good guys don't want him back, even though the villains ''want'' them to take him back. For some strange reason, however, nobody in the organization's leadership has ever considered decommissioning him.
16th Apr '17 1:13:03 PM Tropetastic1995
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->'''J. Jonah Jameson:''' Where were you? Photographing squirrels? You're fired!\\
'''Betty Brant''': (Chief, the planetarium party.)\\
'''Jameson''': Oh, right. You're unfired! Get back here!
-->-- ''Film/SpiderMan2''

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->'''J. Jonah Jameson:''' Where were you? Photographing squirrels? You're fired!\\
'''Betty Brant''': (Chief, the planetarium party.)\\
'''Jameson''': Oh, right. You're unfired! Get back here!
->'''Kaiba, after squeezing a bottle in a fit of frustration:''' ''Fire whoever made that bottle, Kaibacorp products should not bend that easily!''
-->-- ''Film/SpiderMan2''
''Anime/YuGiOhTheDarkSideOfDimensions''
28th Mar '17 3:23:17 PM readergirl304
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Bosses in the TV world have apparently never heard of such things as wrongful termination [[note]] Truth in Television for most of the US, due to at-will employment laws letting bosses fire anyone for any reason [[/note]] or hostile workplace lawsuits (or maybe they ''have'' heard of them, but were arrogantly dismissive of them). And neither has the poor fired employee, who will likely spend most of the time dejectedly scanning the want ads while his concerned family looks on instead of planning some kind of legal recourse.

to:

Bosses in the TV world have apparently never heard of such things as wrongful termination [[note]] Truth in Television for most of the US, due to at-will employment laws letting bosses fire anyone for any reason [[/note]] or hostile workplace lawsuits (or maybe they ''have'' heard of them, but were arrogantly dismissive of them). them).[[note]] this is Truth in Television for most of the US, due to at-will employment laws letting bosses fire anyone for any reason or no reason [[/note]] And neither has the poor fired employee, who will likely spend most of the time dejectedly scanning the want ads while his concerned family looks on instead of planning some kind of legal recourse.
28th Mar '17 3:22:16 PM readergirl304
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Bosses in the TV world have apparently never heard of such things as wrongful termination or hostile workplace lawsuits (or maybe they ''have'' heard of them, but were arrogantly dismissive of them). And neither has the poor fired employee, who will likely spend most of the time dejectedly scanning the want ads while his concerned family looks on instead of planning some kind of legal recourse.

to:

Bosses in the TV world have apparently never heard of such things as wrongful termination [[note]] Truth in Television for most of the US, due to at-will employment laws letting bosses fire anyone for any reason [[/note]] or hostile workplace lawsuits (or maybe they ''have'' heard of them, but were arrogantly dismissive of them). And neither has the poor fired employee, who will likely spend most of the time dejectedly scanning the want ads while his concerned family looks on instead of planning some kind of legal recourse.
14th Mar '17 9:40:09 PM FordPrefect
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In Japan, the ethos of "lifetime employment" means that outright firing or laying off someone is considered disgraceful for both the company and the employee. So employees on the way out would be placed into a "banishment room", where they are given meaningless busywork to do. The shame of being so treated generally means that the employee would quit on short order.\\\
Many companies in the US implement what is known as at-will employment. That is the employer can fire the employee for any reason or no reason at all. However, the employee can also leave the company for any reason or no reason. That is, either party need not have a just cause for termination of employment.\\\

to:

In Japan, the ethos of "lifetime employment" means that outright firing or laying off someone is considered disgraceful for both the company and the employee. So employees on the way out would be placed into a "banishment room", where they are given meaningless busywork to do. The shame of being so treated generally means that the employee would quit on in short order.\\\
Many companies in the US implement what is known as at-will employment. That is is, the employer can fire the employee for any reason or no reason at all. However, the employee can also leave the company for any reason or no reason. That is, either Neither party need not needs to have a just cause for termination of employment.\\\
14th Mar '17 9:37:50 PM FordPrefect
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** Which in fact makes this trope TruthInTelevision for pro. wrestling. Employees have lost jobs with WWE for [[Wrestling/MattHardy posting blogs about being cheated]] on by [[Wrestling/{{Lita}} their girlfriends]], being associated with the competition in any vague way (friends of Wrestling/HulkHogan generally get their walking papers when he and Wrestling/{{Vince McMahon}} are having one of their semi-regular RealLife feuds) or having "heat" backstage with a member of management.
** Or for looking at the boss funny, for being too fat, being too skinny, too short (but never too tall for Wrestling/{{Vince McMahon}}!), screwing up a match's scripted finish just once, getting into altercations with wrestlers backstage that are favored by the management.

to:

** Which in fact makes this trope TruthInTelevision for pro. pro wrestling. Employees have lost jobs with WWE for [[Wrestling/MattHardy posting blogs about being cheated]] on cheated on]] by [[Wrestling/{{Lita}} their girlfriends]], being associated with the competition in any vague way (friends of Wrestling/HulkHogan generally get their walking papers when he and Wrestling/{{Vince McMahon}} are having one of their semi-regular RealLife feuds) feuds), or having "heat" backstage with a member of management.
** Or for looking at the boss funny, for being too fat, being too skinny, too short (but never too tall for Wrestling/{{Vince McMahon}}!), screwing up a match's scripted finish just once, or getting into altercations with wrestlers backstage that are favored by the management.
14th Mar '17 9:36:22 PM FordPrefect
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** The "You're Fired" (originally "Loser Leaves Town") match was most common in the pre-Sports Entertainment era, when wrestlers traveled from promotion to promotion more often, and would be the culmination of a heated feud. The stipulation would also be used when a more prominent wrestler wanted time off and/or to heal from legitimate injuries, with some explanation given when the "fired" wrestler returns. And then, there was the "[[CharlieBrownFromOuttaTown masked stranger]]" that would show up to cause trouble for his (almost always, heel) foe, with the masked wrestler acting on the "departed" wrestler's behalf; invariably at some point, the masked wrestler would be exposed and the feud would turn up another notch.

to:

** The "You're Fired" (originally "Loser Leaves Town") match was most common in the pre-Sports Entertainment era, when wrestlers traveled from promotion to promotion more often, and would be the culmination of a heated feud. The stipulation would also be used when a more prominent wrestler wanted time off and/or to heal from legitimate injuries, with some explanation given when the "fired" wrestler returns. And then, then there was the "[[CharlieBrownFromOuttaTown masked stranger]]" that would show up to cause trouble for his (almost always, always heel) foe, with the masked wrestler acting on the "departed" wrestler's behalf; invariably at some point, the masked wrestler would be exposed and the feud would turn up another notch.
15th Feb '17 10:01:36 PM Vir
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* Jonesy Garcia from the cartoon ''[[WesternAnimation/{{Sixteen}} 6teen]]'' attains and is fired from a new job [[OncePerEpisode every episode]]. For some reason, none of the stores at the mall seem to think a teenager with a four page long resume is a little suspicious. He even lampshades that as a good thing for getting future jobs. In one episode he realizes that he's about to be fired again and declares, "I QUIT! ...''Man'', that feels good!"

to:

* Jonesy Garcia from the cartoon ''[[WesternAnimation/{{Sixteen}} 6teen]]'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Sixteen}}'' attains and is fired from a new job [[OncePerEpisode every episode]]. For some reason, none of the stores at the mall seem to think a teenager with a four page long resume is a little suspicious. He even lampshades that as a good thing for getting future jobs. In one episode he realizes that he's about to be fired again and declares, "I QUIT! ...''Man'', that feels good!"
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