History Main / FullMotionVideo

10th Aug '17 12:53:33 AM Piterpicher
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VisualNovel/ManEnough''
5th Aug '17 7:04:44 AM Piterpicher
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/KidsOnSite''
4th Aug '17 1:30:17 PM GrammarNavi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/AceCombatZero'', uniquely among the series, uses FMV cutscenes, justified by the FauxDocumentary format of the FramingStory: a journalist is interviewing retired Belkan War veterans and the "missions" you play are actually stories they tell about the [[PlayerCharacter Demon Lord]].

to:

* ''VideoGame/AceCombatZero'', ''VideoGame/AceCombatZeroTheBelkanWar'', uniquely among the series, uses FMV cutscenes, justified by the FauxDocumentary format of the FramingStory: a journalist is interviewing retired Belkan War veterans and the "missions" you play are actually stories they tell about the [[PlayerCharacter Demon Lord]].
3rd Aug '17 5:12:11 AM Piterpicher
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/PsychoKiller''
30th Jun '17 7:28:38 AM MrKosta
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/{{Strafe}}'' features live-action cutscenes in its tutorial, fitting with its 90's look.
27th Jun '17 2:28:24 PM optimusjamie
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedMostWanted'' (2005) and ''Carbon'' had a few FMV cutscenes each.
6th Jun '17 12:47:56 PM Klutz0
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/TheInfectiousMadnessOfDoctorDekker''
28th May '17 2:21:37 AM erforce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''[[VideoGame/AlanWake Alan Wake's American Nightmare]]'' uses [=FMV=] on cutscenes and in-game videos.

to:

* ''[[VideoGame/AlanWake Alan Wake's American Nightmare]]'' ''VideoGame/AlanWakesAmericanNightmare'' uses [=FMV=] on cutscenes and in-game videos.
15th Mar '17 6:29:49 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In arcades, the genre really began in 1983 with the release of ''VideoGame/DragonsLair'', a laserdisc-based game with animation by Don Bluth. The game typically cost twice as much to play as any other game, and gameplay consisted of pressing a button or direction at the appropriate point, but it was very popular, and inspired countless imitators. The fad died after a year or so because of the sameness of the gameplay and the difficulty in maintaining expensive laserdisc players. Plus, laserdisc games were prone to skipping and even outright malfunctions, due to factors such as the disc or reader wearing out after extensive play. Regardless, arcade laserdisc games were sporadically produced even through the 1990s. There were also attempts to bring laserdisc games into the home in the 1980s with the Palcom PX-7 {{MSX}} computer and the incredibly obscure [[http://www.videogameconsolelibrary.com/pg80-rdi.htm RDI Halcyon]] console, and in the 1990s with the Pioneer [=LaserActive=]. Many old laserdisc games were simple enough that they can be played nowadays on an ordinary DVD player.

to:

In arcades, the genre really began in 1983 with the release of ''VideoGame/DragonsLair'', a laserdisc-based game with animation by Don Bluth. The game typically cost twice as much to play as any other game, and gameplay consisted of pressing a button or direction at the appropriate point, but it was very popular, and inspired countless imitators. The fad died after a year or so because of the sameness of the gameplay and the difficulty in maintaining expensive laserdisc players. Plus, laserdisc games were prone to skipping and even outright malfunctions, due to factors such as the disc or reader wearing out after extensive play. Regardless, arcade laserdisc games were sporadically produced even through the 1990s. There were also attempts to bring laserdisc games into the home in the 1980s with the Palcom PX-7 {{MSX}} {{UsefulNotes/MSX}} computer and the incredibly obscure [[http://www.videogameconsolelibrary.com/pg80-rdi.htm RDI Halcyon]] console, and in the 1990s with the Pioneer [=LaserActive=]. Many old laserdisc games were simple enough that they can be played nowadays on an ordinary DVD player.
2nd Mar '17 12:01:15 AM Sammettik
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* VideoGame/OffWorldInterceptor had arguably the worst in this subcategory.
* VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution, VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps and VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim are some of the titles that have used FMV or a [[MediumBlending combination]] of FMV and in-game renders for their trailers, marketing campaigns and commercials.
** VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps also uses FMV during the game itself multiple times, though this is mostly to get around the ageing id Tech 3's inability to load multiple levels at a time.

to:

* VideoGame/OffWorldInterceptor ''VideoGame/OffWorldInterceptor'' had arguably the worst in this subcategory.
* VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution, VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'', ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' and VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' are some of the titles that have used FMV or a [[MediumBlending combination]] of FMV and in-game renders for their trailers, marketing campaigns and commercials.
** VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' also uses FMV during the game itself multiple times, though this is mostly to get around the ageing id Tech 3's inability to load multiple levels at a time.
This list shows the last 10 events of 236. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FullMotionVideo