History Main / FromTheLatinIntroDucere

31st Mar '17 4:24:47 AM Doug86
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* In ''BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', when Comicbook/LexLuthor is introduced as a "philanthropist" as he's about to give a speech at a charity gala he's hosting, he begins his speech by pointing out that philanthropist is a greek word meaning a "a lover of humanity".

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* In ''BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', when Comicbook/LexLuthor is introduced as a "philanthropist" as he's about to give a speech at a charity gala he's hosting, he begins his speech by pointing out that philanthropist is a greek word meaning a "a lover of humanity".
9th Mar '17 6:32:33 PM SoapheadChurch
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* In ''Film/MalcolmX'', Malcolm uses this to explain his feelings towards Elijah Muhammad, who had saved his life (in narration lifted directly from his Autobiography).
--> My adoration of Mr. Muhammad grew, in the sense of the Latin root word adorare. It means much more than our "adoration" or "adore." It means that my worship of him was so awesome that he was the first man whom I had ever feared -- not fear such as of a man with a gun, but the fear such as one has of the power of the sun.
16th Feb '17 9:56:14 AM upupandaway42
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* In ''BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', when Comicbook/LexLuthor is introduced as a "philanthropist" as he's about to give a speech at a charity gala he's hosting, he begins his speech by pointing out that philanthropist is a greek word meaning a "a lover of humanity".
12th Feb '17 3:56:29 AM Getta
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Compare TranslationWithAnAgenda.

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Compare TranslationWithAnAgenda.
TranslationWithAnAgenda and DictionaryOpening.
16th Dec '16 11:09:35 AM AFP
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** And, in fact, gets it wrong. In Mal Reynolds' case, "Mal" is short for "Malcolm", a Scottish name meaning "Follower of St. Columba."

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** And, in fact, gets it wrong. In Mal Reynolds' case, "Mal" is short for "Malcolm", a Scottish name meaning "Follower of St. Columba."" Unless it should be taken to simply mean that Mal [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold isn't as bad as he presents himself to be.]]
12th Dec '16 4:20:12 AM tigerstar
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* Fletcher in ''Series/{{Porridge}}'' averts it for humorous effect in this exchange with Warden Barrowclough:
--> '''Fletcher:''' If you want to do something for us, give us more freedom, better grub, conjugal visits.
--> '''Mr. Barrowclough:''' What?
--> '''Fletcher:''' Conjugals. From the Latin "conjugari", meaning [[UnusualEuphemism "to have it away"]].
22nd Jul '16 2:08:29 AM DarkHunter
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* The father in ''Film/MyBigFatGreekWedding'' frequently claims that he can show the Greek root of any word. [[spoiler: He makes it up as he goes.]]
** There have been far too many nationalist linguists who really did try to show their language as the root of all others, or at least of some more prestigious language, and ''been taken seriously'' (at least by their own governments, which all should've known how silly they would look).

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* The father in ''Film/MyBigFatGreekWedding'' frequently claims that he can show the Greek root of any word. [[spoiler: He makes [[CulturalPosturing He's actually making most of it up as he goes.]]
** There have been far too many nationalist linguists who really did try to show their language as
up]].
-->'''Toula's Friend''': Alright, Mr. Portokalos: "kimono".\\
'''Gus''': ''[thinks for a moment]'' "Kimono"... that come from
the root of all others, or at least of some more prestigious language, and ''been taken seriously'' (at least by their own governments, Greek word "κρύωμα", which all should've known how silly they would look).means "cold". What do you wear when you are cold? A robe! [[InsaneTrollLogic So, kimono, robe, there you go!]]
15th Jun '16 6:16:05 AM Prfnoff
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* ''Literature/TheDevilsDictionary'' jokes that "tedium" derives "from a very obvious source--the first words of the ancient Latin hymn ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Te_Deum Te Deum Laudamus]]''. In this apparently natural derivation there is something that saddens."

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* ''Literature/TheDevilsDictionary'' makes a few jokes that "tedium" derives of this type:
** "Tedium" is alleged to derive
"from a very obvious source--the first words of the ancient Latin hymn ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Te_Deum Te Deum Laudamus]]''. In this apparently natural derivation there is something that saddens."
** "Tadpole," as mentioned in the [[KrakenAndLeviathan "Leviathan"]] entry, is implied to be derived from its Latin name, ''Thaddeus polandensis'' (Thaddeus of Poland).
14th May '16 11:51:45 AM nombretomado
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The examples may also be [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymological_fallacy etymological fallacies]] ("logos" is greek for "word", which is where "logic" comes from, so logic is just toying with words) or just plain nonsensical pseudo-etymology (Did you know "shit" originated as an acronym for Ship High In Transit? [[note]][[UrbanLegend No it didn't.]][[/note]]).

Beware: it's very easy for careless people to lapse into ArtisticLicenseLinguistics with etymologies. Just because a word was historically derived from an older word doesn't necessarily make that part of the word's meaning as it's used today. (When modern English speakers say we live in a "county," we probably don't mean "an area ruled by [[KnightFever a Count]]".)

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The examples may also be [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymological_fallacy etymological fallacies]] ("logos" is greek Greek for "word", which is where "logic" comes from, so logic is just toying with words) or just plain nonsensical pseudo-etymology (Did you know "shit" originated as an acronym for Ship High In Transit? [[note]][[UrbanLegend No it didn't.]][[/note]]).

Beware: it's very easy for careless people to lapse into ArtisticLicenseLinguistics with etymologies. Just because a word was historically derived from an older word doesn't necessarily make that part of the word's meaning as it's used today. (When modern English speakers say we live in a "county," we probably don't mean "an area ruled by [[KnightFever [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever a Count]]".)
13th Mar '16 1:08:31 PM nombretomado
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* Watanuki does this to a woman in ''XXXHolic'', explaining that she doesn't love Doumeki, only admires him. Admiration, from Latin, Ad - On and Mirare - being amazed. At least, that's how it goes in Portuguese. He then proceeds to explain the Japanese etymology, and proceeds to use said little etymology lesson to make his point.

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* Watanuki does this to a woman in ''XXXHolic'', ''Manga/XxxHolic'', explaining that she doesn't love Doumeki, only admires him. Admiration, from Latin, Ad - On and Mirare - being amazed. At least, that's how it goes in Portuguese. He then proceeds to explain the Japanese etymology, and proceeds to use said little etymology lesson to make his point.



* Literature/FromTheNewWorld in its anime adaptation, episode 25, Saki and Satoru are discussing about the bakenezumi's origin, erroneously interpreting a similarity between naked mole-rat's scientific name (Heterocephalus glaber) and human being's scientific name (homo sapiens). While Greek element "hetero" (meaning ''different'' or ''other'') in ''Heterocephalus'' is the opposite of Greek element "homos" (meaning ''same'') this element is not the one used in "''homo'' sapiens", which came from Latin element "homo" (meaning ''human'').

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* Literature/FromTheNewWorld ''Literature/FromTheNewWorld'' in its anime adaptation, episode 25, Saki and Satoru are discussing about the bakenezumi's origin, erroneously interpreting a similarity between naked mole-rat's scientific name (Heterocephalus glaber) and human being's scientific name (homo sapiens). While Greek element "hetero" (meaning ''different'' or ''other'') in ''Heterocephalus'' is the opposite of Greek element "homos" (meaning ''same'') this element is not the one used in "''homo'' sapiens", which came from Latin element "homo" (meaning ''human'').
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