History Main / FranchiseOriginalSin

23rd Mar '17 10:54:40 AM azul120
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** Certain complaints about the series--particularly the different characterization and the heavier focus on humor--aren't actually all that different from criticisms of the original cartoon from fans of the comics or other more serious DC action shows such as Batman or Justice League. While the original cartoon had dramatic storylines, they were lightened quite a bit from the original comics, where, for instance, [[BigBad Slade]] went from a more sympathetic anti-villain to near-GenericDoomsdayVillain, the heroes had less characterization, and comedic {{animesque}} pratfalls and/or expressions were frequent. The only true difference, aside from Go being a straight comedy, is that the cast rarely acts heroically. YMMV on all of this, since it could be said that as a comedy, Go! abandoned practically any pretense of character depth that its 2003 predecessor could be accused of lacking in comparison to the original comics, actually making it less egregious in that regard. (And ironically enough, it ended up with a closer if still oversimplified interpretation of Terra.) If two flaws are for certain, its the Titans' sociopathy and the repetitious nature of the writing from ex-writers of WesternAnimation/MADtv.

to:

** Certain complaints about the series--particularly the different characterization and the heavier focus on humor--aren't actually all that different from criticisms of the original cartoon from fans of the comics or other more serious DC action shows such as Batman or Justice League. While the original cartoon had dramatic storylines, they were lightened quite a bit from the original comics, where, for instance, [[BigBad Slade]] went from a more sympathetic anti-villain to near-GenericDoomsdayVillain, the heroes had less characterization, and comedic {{animesque}} pratfalls and/or expressions were frequent. The only true difference, aside from Go being a straight comedy, is that the cast rarely acts heroically. YMMV on all of this, since it could be said that as a comedy, Go! abandoned practically any pretense of character depth that its 2003 predecessor could be accused of lacking in comparison to the original comics, actually making it less egregious in that regard. (And ironically enough, it ended up with a closer if still oversimplified interpretation of Terra.) If two flaws are for certain, its the Titans' sociopathy and the repetitious nature of the writing from ex-writers of WesternAnimation/MADtv.WesternAnimation/{{MAD}}.
23rd Mar '17 10:52:45 AM azul120
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** One of the many things fans/detractors complain about is the FamilyUnfriendlyViolence. And while this complaint is sometimes justified (the complaint is usually that the Titans are violent towards [[VitriolicBestFriends each]] [[WithFriendsLikeThese other]]), complaints regarding violence ''in general'' are a bit strange, since the [[WesternAnimation/TeenTitans original cartoon]] was an ''action'' series where the characters used violence in every other episode. The difference with ''TTG'' is that it's a ''comedy''.
** Certain complaints about the series--particularly the different characterization and the heavier focus on humor--aren't actually all that different from criticisms of the original cartoon from fans of the comics or other more serious DC action shows such as Batman or Justice League. While the original cartoon had dramatic storylines, they were lightened quite a bit from the original comics, where, for instance, [[BigBad Slade]] was a more sympathetic anti-villain, the heroes had less characterization, and comedic {{animesque}} pratfalls and/or expressions were frequent. The only true difference, aside from Go being a straight comedy, is that the cast rarely acts heroically.

to:

** One of the many things fans/detractors complain about is the FamilyUnfriendlyViolence. And while this complaint is sometimes justified (the complaint is usually that the Titans are violent towards [[VitriolicBestFriends [[VitriolicBestBuds each]] [[WithFriendsLikeThese other]]), complaints regarding violence ''in general'' are a bit strange, since the [[WesternAnimation/TeenTitans original cartoon]] was an ''action'' series where the characters used violence in every other episode. The difference with ''TTG'' is that it's a ''comedy''.
** Certain complaints about the series--particularly the different characterization and the heavier focus on humor--aren't actually all that different from criticisms of the original cartoon from fans of the comics or other more serious DC action shows such as Batman or Justice League. While the original cartoon had dramatic storylines, they were lightened quite a bit from the original comics, where, for instance, [[BigBad Slade]] was went from a more sympathetic anti-villain, anti-villain to near-GenericDoomsdayVillain, the heroes had less characterization, and comedic {{animesque}} pratfalls and/or expressions were frequent. The only true difference, aside from Go being a straight comedy, is that the cast rarely acts heroically. YMMV on all of this, since it could be said that as a comedy, Go! abandoned practically any pretense of character depth that its 2003 predecessor could be accused of lacking in comparison to the original comics, actually making it less egregious in that regard. (And ironically enough, it ended up with a closer if still oversimplified interpretation of Terra.) If two flaws are for certain, its the Titans' sociopathy and the repetitious nature of the writing from ex-writers of WesternAnimation/MADtv.
22nd Mar '17 5:26:10 PM azul120
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** Certain complaints about the series--particularly the different characterization and the heavier focus on humor--aren't actually all that different from criticisms of the original cartoon from fans of the comics. The comics were generally darker than the cartoon, and certain characters such as Starfire and Raven are significantly different from their comic counterparts. The difference is that the original ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' still had dramatic storylines, action, and characters who could be recognized as genuine heroes. By comparison, ''TTG'' is entirely comedic, and the characters are rarely heroic.

to:

** Certain complaints about the series--particularly the different characterization and the heavier focus on humor--aren't actually all that different from criticisms of the original cartoon from fans of the comics. The comics were generally darker than the cartoon, and certain characters or other more serious DC action shows such as Starfire and Raven are significantly different from their comic counterparts. The difference is that Batman or Justice League. While the original ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' still cartoon had dramatic storylines, action, they were lightened quite a bit from the original comics, where, for instance, [[BigBad Slade]] was a more sympathetic anti-villain, the heroes had less characterization, and characters who could be recognized as genuine heroes. By comparison, ''TTG'' comedic {{animesque}} pratfalls and/or expressions were frequent. The only true difference, aside from Go being a straight comedy, is entirely comedic, and that the characters are cast rarely heroic.acts heroically.
18th Mar '17 4:23:56 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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Added DiffLines:

** ''FranchiseOriginalSin/AmericanIdol''
** ''FranchiseOriginalSin/DoctorWho''
** ''FranchiseOriginalSin/GameOfThrones''
7th Mar '17 2:12:06 PM Kelothan
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* ''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths''. While cleaning up the ContinuitySnarl that was the multiverse was a good idea, bringing {{Retcon}} to whole new levels and unleashing the horror that was UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks did not help things.

to:

* ''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths''. While cleaning up the ContinuitySnarl that was the multiverse was a good idea, bringing {{Retcon}} to whole new levels and unleashing the horror that was bringing about UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks did not help things.



* ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'' can point theirs all the way back to issue 50 and the creation of Knuckles' comic. Issue 50 was meant to be the GrandFinale for the comic and have Robotnik finally KilledOffForReal. However, the comic was UnCancelled and entered its PostScriptSeason, leaving everyone to scramble as to what to do. Robotnik was first replaced with Ixis Naugus, only to be put away and replaced with Dr. Eggman in time for ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure''. However, Eggman was portrayed as an ineffectual villain and the comic seemed to just ''forget'' Eggman and focus more on Love Triangles, aliens, and everything that ''wasn't'' "speedy blue hedgehog fights fat scientist".\\

to:

* ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'' ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog''
** They
can point theirs all the way back to issue 50 and the creation of Knuckles' comic. Issue 50 was meant to be the GrandFinale for the comic and have Robotnik finally KilledOffForReal. However, the comic was UnCancelled and entered its PostScriptSeason, leaving everyone to scramble as to what to do. Robotnik was first replaced with Ixis Naugus, only to be put away and replaced with Dr. Eggman in time for ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure''. However, Eggman was portrayed as an ineffectual villain and the comic seemed to just ''forget'' Eggman and focus more on Love Triangles, aliens, and everything that ''wasn't'' "speedy blue hedgehog fights fat scientist". It got to the point where the writers considered bringing the original Robotnik back.
**The Knuckles comic was another problem, with writer Ken Penders deciding not to expand on clues left behind with the video games at that time to create a soicety of Echidnas. It worked out for a while, mainly because it was WorldBuilding, but after the two comics joined together it felt like the echidnas were too perfect in their portrayal. Then Penders decided to make Knuckles [[TheChosenOne The Avatar]], a hero prophesied to bring peace to Mobius, effectively giving Knuckles a bigger role in the story... [[SpotlightstealingSquad at the expense of Sonic.]]
** The revelation that [[spoiler:Espio was a member of a ninja clan and then betrays the Chaotix to the Iron Dominion (said ninja clans' masters)]] was only the latest in a series of {{Retcon}}s[=/=]{{Face Heel Turn}}s involving certain characters during Ian Flynn's run, most famously Fiona Fox revealing out of nowhere that the only reason she fell in love with Sonic was because of [[EvilTwin Scourge]], and then betraying the Freedom Fighters to be his Girlfriend. While not without controversy ([[LoveItorHateIt like a lot of Ian Flynn's run]]), it slid by, as Fiona was a mostly forgotten CanonForeigner before ''exploding'' in popularity as a villain. In Espio's case, however, he was not only a popular character as a hero, but also a character straight from the games, and it became far harder to ignore.
** The ExecutiveMeddling was there from the beginning, with Creator/{{Sega}} executives basically controlling the comic from day one. However, they did not pile a bunch of arbitrary mandates upon the writers. that if their successors faults.
* When Superboy-Prime was reintroduced in ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' by Creator/GeoffJohns, he was something of an affectionate jab/deconstruction at the fandom and a TakeThat towards [[StopHavingFunGuy obnoxious]], [[RuinedForever overreacting]] FanDumb. This was somewhat clever and liked by fans, especially since it picked on jerkass fans who deserved to be mocked. Unfortunately, less talented writers got their hands on him and Flanderized him into a giant insult towards ''[[ThisLoserIsYou all]]'' readers. Thus he was quickly turned into TheScrappy and readers started hating him and the comics he was in since they were doing nothing but insulting the very people who pay for comics.
* The entirety of ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' itself is a bit of a discourse on the "Return to the [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]]" movement that had arisen since the publication of ''ComicBook/KingdomCome''. The latter was written as a late-90s treatise on UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, showing the absurdity of Dark Age heroes with their KillEmAll stance, juxtaposing them against the Silver Age heroes with their ThouShaltNotKill stance. However, it was not afraid to point out that the Silver Age ideals were quite prone to believing in BlackAndWhiteMorality, TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong, and thus [[NotSoAboveItAll they could very easily fall to using albeit nonviolent totalitarian tactics in order to make sure their ideals, and ONLY their ideals, were followed by other heroes]]. The final moral is that the two sides (Silver Age and Dark Age) must come to terms an analogy that a return to the [[UsefulNotes/TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Bronze Age]] is best: Heroes should treat matters seriously as the gray areas they often are, but should never lose the convictions to do what's right, rather than just do what's easiest/most permanent. However many fans of, and authors at, DC misunderstood and figured this was the windfall that would allow them to return comics to their Silver Age {{Camp}}iness, if not completely return to Pre-Crisis status as a whole, and the years to come saw a multitude of attempts by various authors to do this. ''Infinite Crisis'', then, pointed out that while the Dark Age was admittedly an OldShame, fans and authors also needed to take off the NostalgiaFilter and realize that while the Silver Age has a lot to offer in terms of plot devices and elements, it was also filled with tons of embarrassingly-badly-written nonsense that should just be forgotten, or remembered as SoBadItsGood.
* From the ''Franchise/SpiderMan'' franchise:
** [[ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied The famous Gwen Stacy death plotline]]. Behind the scenes, it happened as a way for writer Gerry Conway to resolve the Gwen Stacy romance since she had become too close to Peter and realistically they would eventually marry and settle down which aged up the character considerably. Thing is, Gerry Conway was a decent writer and the storyline worked out pretty well, becoming a stunning WhamEpisode that changed the course of the series. When [[Creator/JoeQuesada a later editor]] developed the same fear of aging Peter too much, we got universally reviled storylines and retcons like ''[[ComicBook/JMSSpiderMan Sins Past]]'' and ''ComicBook/OneMoreDay''.
\\



The Knuckles comic was another problem, with writer Ken Penders deciding not to expand on clues left behind with the video games at that time to create a super-secret society of Echidnas and try to turn Knuckles into TheChosenOne who would end up defeating Eggman and bringing peace to Mobius. Between the main title's lack of focus and the Knuckles comic's MarySuetopia and CharacterShilling problems, it nearly destroyed the comic until Ian Flynn's arrival.
** The revelation that [[spoiler:Espio was a member of a ninja clan and then betrays the Chaotix to the Iron Dominion (said ninja clans' masters)]] was only the latest in a series of {{Retcon}}s[=/=]{{Face Heel Turn}}s involving certain characters during Ian Flynn's run, most famously Fiona Fox revealing out of nowhere that the only reason she fell in love with Sonic was because of [[EvilTwin Scourge]], and then betraying the Freedom Fighters to be his Girlfriend. While not without controversy ([[LoveItorHateIt like a lot of Ian Flynn's run]]), it slid by, as Fiona was mostly forgotten as a character before ''exploding'' in popularity as a villain. In Espio's case, however, he was not only a popular character as a hero, but also a character straight from the games, and it became far harder to ignore.
* When Superboy-Prime was reintroduced in ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' by Creator/GeoffJohns, he was something of an affectionate jab/deconstruction at the fandom and a TakeThat towards [[StopHavingFunGuy obnoxious]], [[RuinedForever overreacting]] FanDumb. This was somewhat clever and liked by fans, especially since it picked on jerkass fans who deserved to be mocked. Unfortunately, less talented writers got their hands on him and Flanderized him into a giant assholish insult towards ''[[ThisLoserIsYou all]]'' readers. Thus he was quickly turned into TheScrappy and readers started hating him and the comics he was in since they were doing nothing but insulting the very people who pay for comics.
* The entirety of ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' itself is a bit of a discourse on the "Return to the [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]]" movement that had arisen since the publication of ''ComicBook/KingdomCome''. The latter was written as a late-90s treatise on UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, showing the absurdity of Dark Age heroes with their KillEmAll stance, juxtaposing them against the Silver Age heroes with their ThouShaltNotKill stance. However, it was not afraid to point out that the Silver Age ideals were quite prone to believing in BlackAndWhiteMorality, TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong, and thus [[NotSoAboveItAll they could very easily fall to using albeit nonviolent totalitarian tactics in order to make sure their ideals, and ONLY their ideals, were followed by other heroes]]. The final moral is that the two sides (Silver Age and Dark Age) must come to terms an analogy that a return to the [[UsefulNotes/TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Bronze Age]] is best: Heroes should treat matters seriously as the gray areas they often are, but should never lose the convictions to do what's right, rather than just do what's easiest/most permanent. However many fans of, and authors at, DC misunderstood and figured this was the windfall that would allow them to return comics to their Silver Age {{Camp}}iness, if not completely return to Pre-Crisis status as a whole, and the years to come saw a multitude of attempts by various authors to do this. ''Infinite Crisis'', then, pointed out that while the Dark Age was admittedly an OldShame, fans and authors also needed to take off the NostalgiaFilter and realize that while the Silver Age has a lot to offer in terms of plot devices and elements, it was also filled with tons of embarrassingly-badly-written nonsense that should just be forgotten, or remembered as SoBadItsGood.
* From the ''Franchise/SpiderMan'' franchise:
** [[ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied The famous Gwen Stacy death plotline]]. Behind the scenes, it happened as a way for writer Gerry Conway to resolve the Gwen Stacy romance since she had become too close to Peter and realistically they would eventually marry and settle down which aged up the character considerably. Thing is, Gerry Conway was a decent writer and the storyline worked out pretty well, becoming a stunning WhamEpisode that changed the course of the series. When [[Creator/JoeQuesada a later editor]] developed the same fear of aging Peter too much, we got universally reviled storylines and retcons like ''[[ComicBook/JMSSpiderMan Sins Past]]'' and ''ComicBook/OneMoreDay''. \\
\\
3rd Mar '17 2:14:29 PM Kelothan
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* Most of the criticisms of the second half of ''Anime/YuGiOh5Ds'', widely acknowledged as a major step down from the first half (promising plot arcs being [[TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot resolved inadequately]], {{Creator/Konami}} [[ExecutiveMeddling butting in where they don't belong]], out-of-place goofiness, focusing on Team Satisfaction characters and Yusei in particular [[SpotlightStealingSquad to the exclusion of everyone else]]) could be found in the earlier Dark Signer arc and even the Fortune Cup arc, widely acknowledged as two of the pinnacles of the franchise. The debate is ongoing as to how the drop happened, but the easiest answer would probably be that the earlier arcs had strong serialized plots that kept the audience interested through their flaws, while the second half... [[{{Filler}} didn't]].

to:

* Most of the criticisms of the second half of ''Anime/YuGiOh5Ds'', widely acknowledged as a major step down from the first half (promising plot arcs being [[TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot resolved inadequately]], {{Creator/Konami}} [[ExecutiveMeddling butting in where they don't belong]], out-of-place goofiness, focusing on Team Satisfaction characters and Yusei in particular [[SpotlightStealingSquad to the exclusion of everyone else]]) could be found in the earlier Dark Signer arc and even the Fortune Cup arc, widely acknowledged as two of the pinnacles of the franchise. The debate is ongoing as to how the drop happened, but the easiest answer would probably be that the earlier arcs had strong serialized plots that kept the audience interested through their flaws, while the second half... [[{{Filler}} didn't]]. Also, criticisms of the [[AnimeHair wacky hairsyles]] don't tell you that it was there from the beginning, just toned done in saturation.
26th Feb '17 2:31:03 PM nombretomado
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* Most of the criticisms of the second half of ''Anime/YuGiOh5Ds'', widely acknowledged as a major step down from the first half (promising plot arcs being [[TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot resolved inadequately]], {{Konami}} [[ExecutiveMeddling butting in where they don't belong]], out-of-place goofiness, focusing on Team Satisfaction characters and Yusei in particular [[SpotlightStealingSquad to the exclusion of everyone else]]) could be found in the earlier Dark Signer arc and even the Fortune Cup arc, widely acknowledged as two of the pinnacles of the franchise. The debate is ongoing as to how the drop happened, but the easiest answer would probably be that the earlier arcs had strong serialized plots that kept the audience interested through their flaws, while the second half... [[{{Filler}} didn't]].

to:

* Most of the criticisms of the second half of ''Anime/YuGiOh5Ds'', widely acknowledged as a major step down from the first half (promising plot arcs being [[TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot resolved inadequately]], {{Konami}} {{Creator/Konami}} [[ExecutiveMeddling butting in where they don't belong]], out-of-place goofiness, focusing on Team Satisfaction characters and Yusei in particular [[SpotlightStealingSquad to the exclusion of everyone else]]) could be found in the earlier Dark Signer arc and even the Fortune Cup arc, widely acknowledged as two of the pinnacles of the franchise. The debate is ongoing as to how the drop happened, but the easiest answer would probably be that the earlier arcs had strong serialized plots that kept the audience interested through their flaws, while the second half... [[{{Filler}} didn't]].
23rd Feb '17 10:58:53 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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Season 19, however, had a season-spanning arc that was tied into every episode, with the final three episodes (out of a ten-episode season) devoted purely to wrapping it up. The arc left the show feeling bloated, with less time to turn its satirical eye to other targets, losing the scattershot, highly topical humor that had been one of its trademarks. These problems only got worse in season 20, as every episode in the season was part of a linear story arc that continued from episode to episode, unlike season 19 where the episodes, while part of the overall season arc, had plots that were largely self-contained. Eventually, [[RealLifeWritesThePlot real life wrote the plot]] in a way they hadn't foreseen and forced Creator/TreyParkerAndMattStone to hastily rewrite the final episodes to reflect it.[[note]]The planned resolution was that Mr. Garrison, running for President as a parody of Creator/DonaldTrump, would ultimately go down in defeat to UsefulNotes/HillaryRodhamClinton, as many people, Parker and Stone included, were predicting Trump would do against Clinton in real life. Trump ''winning'' left Parker and Stone blindsided and derailed the resolution they'd spent a season building up to.[[/note]] This left several sub plots that had been building up during the season being abandoned. The general consensus was that, on a show as famously rapid-fire and up-to-the-minute as ''South Park'', trying to do a long-form storyline just doesn't work.

to:

Season 19, however, had a season-spanning arc that was tied into every episode, with the final three episodes (out of a ten-episode season) devoted purely to wrapping it up. The arc left the show feeling bloated, with less time to turn its satirical eye to other targets, losing the scattershot, highly topical humor that had been one of its trademarks. These problems only got worse in season 20, as every episode in the season was part of a linear story arc that continued from episode to episode, unlike season 19 where the episodes, while part of the overall season arc, had plots that were largely self-contained. Eventually, [[RealLifeWritesThePlot real life wrote the plot]] in a way they hadn't foreseen and forced that Creator/TreyParkerAndMattStone hadn't foreseen, forcing them to hastily rewrite the final episodes episode to reflect it.[[note]]The it[[note]]The planned resolution was that Mr. Garrison, running for President as a parody of Creator/DonaldTrump, would ultimately go down in defeat to UsefulNotes/HillaryRodhamClinton, as many people, Parker and Stone included, were predicting Trump would do against Clinton in real life. Trump ''winning'' left Parker and Stone blindsided and derailed their planned resolution.[[/note]] and, in the resolution they'd process, abandon several subplots that they had spent a the entire season building up to.[[/note]] This left several sub plots that had been building up during the season being abandoned.up. The general consensus was that, on a show as famously rapid-fire and up-to-the-minute as ''South Park'', trying to do a long-form storyline just doesn't work.
20th Feb '17 6:35:21 PM kquinn0830
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Season 19, however, had a season-spanning arc that was tied into every episode, with the final three episodes (out of a ten-episode season) devoted purely to wrapping it up. The arc left the show feeling bloated, with less time to turn its satirical eye to other targets, losing the scattershot, highly topical humor that had been one of its trademarks. These problems only got worse in season 20, especially once [[RealLifeWritesThePlot real life wrote the plot]] and forced Creator/TreyParkerAndMattStone to hastily rewrite the final episode.[[note]]The planned resolution was that Mr. Garrison, running for President as a parody of Creator/DonaldTrump, would ultimately go down in defeat to UsefulNotes/HillaryRodhamClinton, as many people, Parker and Stone included, were predicting Trump would do against Clinton in real life. Trump ''winning'' left Parker and Stone blindsided and derailed the resolution they'd spent a season building up to.[[/note]] The general consensus was that, on a show as famously rapid-fire and up-to-the-minute as ''South Park'', trying to do a long-form storyline just doesn't work.

to:

Season 19, however, had a season-spanning arc that was tied into every episode, with the final three episodes (out of a ten-episode season) devoted purely to wrapping it up. The arc left the show feeling bloated, with less time to turn its satirical eye to other targets, losing the scattershot, highly topical humor that had been one of its trademarks. These problems only got worse in season 20, especially once as every episode in the season was part of a linear story arc that continued from episode to episode, unlike season 19 where the episodes, while part of the overall season arc, had plots that were largely self-contained. Eventually, [[RealLifeWritesThePlot real life wrote the plot]] in a way they hadn't foreseen and forced Creator/TreyParkerAndMattStone to hastily rewrite the final episode.episodes to reflect it.[[note]]The planned resolution was that Mr. Garrison, running for President as a parody of Creator/DonaldTrump, would ultimately go down in defeat to UsefulNotes/HillaryRodhamClinton, as many people, Parker and Stone included, were predicting Trump would do against Clinton in real life. Trump ''winning'' left Parker and Stone blindsided and derailed the resolution they'd spent a season building up to.[[/note]] This left several sub plots that had been building up during the season being abandoned. The general consensus was that, on a show as famously rapid-fire and up-to-the-minute as ''South Park'', trying to do a long-form storyline just doesn't work.
19th Feb '17 9:12:05 PM RacattackForce
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** Back when it started, the series was revolutionary when compared to [[OlderThanTheyThink other]] cynical shows centered on a dysfunctional family because it was an animated show set in ComicBookTime ''and'' with NegativeContinuity. The family could go anywhere, interact with anyone, and do anything without having to care about budget constraints, actors that wanted to leave or children that grew up. However, after 20 years that original strength has turned into its biggest constraint. Bart and Lisa [[YoungerThanTheyLook behave like teenagers]], but they are still 10 and 8 and go to the same elementary school, so the writers can't make them face the actual teenage (or [[LongRunners young adult]]) problems they would be dealing with by now if the show was live-acted; Marge and Homer have gone through countless marriage crises and been thrown into jail countless times, but they have to go back home together at the end; Maggie feels more like a prop than a character in most episodes because the writers can't think of new plotlines starring a baby, etc. As a result, the show has become stalled and boring.

to:

** Back when it started, the series was revolutionary when compared to [[OlderThanTheyThink other]] cynical shows centered on a dysfunctional family because it was an animated show set in ComicBookTime ''and'' with NegativeContinuity. The family could go anywhere, interact with anyone, and do anything without having to care about budget constraints, actors that wanted to leave or children that grew up. However, after 20 years that original strength has turned into its biggest constraint. Bart and Lisa [[YoungerThanTheyLook behave like teenagers]], but they are still 10 and 8 and go to the same elementary school, so the writers can't make them face the actual teenage (or [[LongRunners young adult]]) problems they would be dealing with by now if the show was live-acted; live-acted or used WebcomicTime; Marge and Homer have gone through countless marriage crises and been thrown into jail countless times, but they have to go back home together at the end; Maggie feels more like a prop than a character in most episodes because the writers can't think of new plotlines starring a baby, etc. As a result, the show has become stalled and boring.
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