History Main / FourPointScale

19th Mar '17 9:14:29 AM nombretomado
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* ''{{Newgrounds}}'' is somewhat of an aversion to this; while the scale is only 0-5, it's an unspoken rule that if it's not up to snuff for the portal, it's a 0, if you just didn't like it or something along those lines you should vote 2, and if you love it vote 5. While 1, 3 and 4 are in there, hardly anyone uses them. Undoubtedly this is partially due to its "Blam"/"Protection" system which, generally, rewards you for relatively high ratings of content others have rated relatively high and low ratings for content others have rated low, in a blind system.

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* ''{{Newgrounds}}'' ''{{Website/Newgrounds}}'' is somewhat of an aversion to this; while the scale is only 0-5, it's an unspoken rule that if it's not up to snuff for the portal, it's a 0, if you just didn't like it or something along those lines you should vote 2, and if you love it vote 5. While 1, 3 and 4 are in there, hardly anyone uses them. Undoubtedly this is partially due to its "Blam"/"Protection" system which, generally, rewards you for relatively high ratings of content others have rated relatively high and low ratings for content others have rated low, in a blind system.
14th Mar '17 11:20:54 PM bootmii
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* Grading in high schools and colleges follows this to a tee, and may be the reason why this trope is so prevalent elsewhere. Most schools grade along a five-letter system of "A", "B", "C", "D", and "F", with an "A" being in the 90-100% range, "B" being in the 80s, "C" being in the 70s, "D" being in the 60s, and "F" being a score lower than 60%. Much like the California health inspectors' grading system above, this has a real-world justification in that, if you finish your class knowing less than 60% of the material you learned, then you don't deserve to pass the class. Some colleges go further and make a "D" (or even "C-", at [[UsefulNotes/UniversityOfCalifornia UC Santa Cruz]] or pass/fail at other colleges) a failing grade as well, on the grounds that just barely passing this class means that you probably aren't ready for the next one. When you've spent your whole life associating a 65% with "barely adequate", and you become a professional critic, that's going to rub off on your grading. It's for this reason that some magazines and websites (such as ''Entertainment Weekly'') simply use the A-through-F grading system.

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* Grading in high schools and colleges follows this to a tee, and may be the reason why this trope is so prevalent elsewhere. Most schools grade along a five-letter system of "A", "B", "C", "D", and "F", with an "A" being in the 90-100% range, "B" being in the 80s, "C" being in the 70s, "D" being in the 60s, and "F" being a score lower than 60%. Much like the California health inspectors' grading system above, this has a real-world justification in that, if you finish your class knowing less than 60% of the material you learned, then you don't deserve to pass the class. Some colleges go further and make a "D" (or even "C-", "C-" (70-72%), at [[UsefulNotes/UniversityOfCalifornia UC Santa Cruz]] or pass/fail at other colleges) a failing grade as well, on the grounds that just barely passing this class means that you probably aren't ready for the next one. When you've spent your whole life associating a 65% with "barely adequate", and you become a professional critic, that's going to rub off on your grading. It's for this reason that some magazines and websites (such as ''Entertainment Weekly'') simply use the A-through-F grading system.
14th Mar '17 11:19:49 PM bootmii
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* Grading in high schools and colleges follows this to a tee, and may be the reason why this trope is so prevalent elsewhere. Most schools grade along a five-letter system of "A", "B", "C", "D", and "F", with an "A" being in the 90-100% range, "B" being in the 80s, "C" being in the 70s, "D" being in the 60s, and "F" being a score lower than 60%. Much like the California health inspectors' grading system above, this has a real-world justification in that, if you finish your class knowing less than 60% of the material you learned, then you don't deserve to pass the class. Some colleges go further and make a "D" a failing grade as well, on the grounds that just barely passing this class means that you probably aren't ready for the next one. When you've spent your whole life associating a 65% with "barely adequate", and you become a professional critic, that's going to rub off on your grading. It's for this reason that some magazines and websites (such as ''Entertainment Weekly'') simply use the A-through-F grading system.

to:

* Grading in high schools and colleges follows this to a tee, and may be the reason why this trope is so prevalent elsewhere. Most schools grade along a five-letter system of "A", "B", "C", "D", and "F", with an "A" being in the 90-100% range, "B" being in the 80s, "C" being in the 70s, "D" being in the 60s, and "F" being a score lower than 60%. Much like the California health inspectors' grading system above, this has a real-world justification in that, if you finish your class knowing less than 60% of the material you learned, then you don't deserve to pass the class. Some colleges go further and make a "D" (or even "C-", at [[UsefulNotes/UniversityOfCalifornia UC Santa Cruz]] or pass/fail at other colleges) a failing grade as well, on the grounds that just barely passing this class means that you probably aren't ready for the next one. When you've spent your whole life associating a 65% with "barely adequate", and you become a professional critic, that's going to rub off on your grading. It's for this reason that some magazines and websites (such as ''Entertainment Weekly'') simply use the A-through-F grading system.
2nd Mar '17 5:08:26 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** MMA also uses the 10-point must system, but has no knockdown rules. Therefore, if you lose the round, you get 9 points. If you're utterly dominated from start to finish, you'll get 8 points. Barring fouls, there's basically no way to get fewer than 8, as a fighter who is performing that poorly would be rescued by the referee.
*** In practice, 10-9s are more or less the only score used in MMA fights. Because there is no objective criteria for scoring a 10-8 (unlike in boxing), and because most MMA fights last only three rounds (meaning a single 10-8 round makes it pretty much impossible to win without scoring a knockout), they are rarely scored. To avoid making things uneven, 10-10s (draw rounds) are also then rarely scored. In practice, the 10 point system for MMA becomes a 1-point scale, which is why most MMA bouts are slated for an odd number of rounds (three or five), as it's essentially a best-out-of-X system.

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** MMA also uses the 10-point must system, but has no knockdown rules. Therefore, if you lose the round, you get 9 points. If you're utterly dominated from start to finish, dominated, you'll get 8 points. Barring fouls, there's There's basically no way to get fewer than 8, as a fighter who is performing that poorly would be rescued by the referee.
***
referee. In practice, 10-9s are more or less 2017, changes in the only score used in MMA fights. Because there is no objective criteria for Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts made the scoring a of 10-8 (unlike in boxing), and because most MMA fights last only three rounds (meaning a single less strict, allowing 10-8 round makes it pretty much impossible to win without scoring a knockout), they are rarely scored. To avoid making things uneven, 10-10s (draw rounds) are also then rarely scored. In practice, the 10 point system for MMA becomes a 1-point scale, which is why most MMA bouts are slated for an odd number of rounds (three or five), as it's essentially a best-out-of-X system.to be scored when one fighter is defeated soundly, but not completely. The change was made in an effort to combat this trope.
19th Dec '16 5:05:43 PM AzureSeas
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** Upon GiantBomb merging with Gamespot in 2012, Gerstmann was finally able to fully explain his firing [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GagFPnSG0j4 here]]. The firing ended up being related to review scores after all, but was a more chronic problem of an inexperienced executive team not knowing how to responsibly deal with dropping ad dollars due to (justifiably) low review scores across several mediocre games.

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** Upon GiantBomb merging with Gamespot in 2012, Giant Bomb's acquisition by [=CBSi=], which also owns Gamespot, Gerstmann was finally able to fully explain his firing [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GagFPnSG0j4 here]]. The firing ended up being related to review scores after all, but was a more chronic problem of an inexperienced executive team not knowing how to responsibly deal with dropping ad dollars due to (justifiably) low review scores across several mediocre games.
19th Dec '16 11:35:55 AM TheKaizerreich
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** Of course they handle out extra issues in which they only give the reviews of their AAA games to balance out this problem. The fact that they are only a part of a larger magazine publishing company also helps.

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** Of course they handle out extra issues in which they only give the reviews of their AAA games to balance out this problem. The fact that they are only a part of a larger magazine publishing company also helps. They also make a point of ''never'' using preview versions of games. While this obviously means their reviews may be as much as two months late compared to the release, this also means the review will be more accurate about the actual state of the game (many, ''many'' games nowadays have Day One {{DLC}}s and patches that change the game content and performance so much that a preview review is more often than not highly inaccurate).
30th Nov '16 8:26:49 AM Edvardelis
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Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicVine'' has what some would consider a two point scale. They loved a comic? Five stars. A comic was decent? Four stars. It's rare to see a three or even two star review from them, but when that does happen, people take notice.


Added DiffLines:

* Polygon does their best to use all 10 points of the scale (including half steps) and will actually go back and adjust a score if a game changes enough between release and updates.
28th Nov '16 6:01:20 PM ZombieAladdin
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[[folder:Pinball]]
* Review scores on Pinball News have never dropped below roughly 70%, even widely disliked machines like ''Pinball/IndianaJonesStern'' and ''CSI''. The reasons for this are unknown, but considering Pinball News reviewers receive machines directly from manufacturers for review, it may be to prevent those manufacturers from cutting them off.
* Thoroughly avoided with user aggregate scores on sites like The Internet Pinball Database and Pinside, however: At these sites, a 50% DOES describe a mediocre machine, with really bad ones dropping between 10% to 25%.[[note]]Internet Pinball Database has reatings out of 10, and Pinside has them out of 100.[[/note]] There is no enforcement necessary for either site--it seems the pinball audiences, by and large, naturally do not use the Four-Point Scale.
[[/folder]]



* In Southern Califorina, restaurants are given a letter grade based on health and safety standards. It's mostly about clean the place is. While the rankings follow the usual A, B, C, D, F moniker, most restaurants have an A grade. It's rare that a place has B (even in food courts where its neighbors have A's). [[JustifiedTrope Since it's an official government statement on a restaurant's hygienic practices, anything below an A is a kiss of death]] -- consumers tend to assume that even a B rated place is a plague pit, even though objectively that's still considered an acceptable rating. Most restaurants overhaul their practices ''very quickly'' to get back to an A rating or risk going bankrupt. Although this imbalance was not intended, it's generally seen as an overall good thing from a public health perspective. [[note]] The one exception is niche resturants whose select customers care less about the rating and more about the niche[[/note]]. New York City also has a similar grading system for its eateries, though the ratings only consist of A, B, C, and "pending". Any place that doesn't have an A are usually not bothered with by consumers, even though a B rating isn't generally too bad (passable but with minor problems found that can easily be fixed).

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* In Southern Califorina, California, restaurants are given a letter grade based on health and safety standards. It's mostly about clean the place is. While the rankings follow the usual A, B, C, D, F moniker, most restaurants have an A grade. It's rare that a place has B (even in food courts where its neighbors have A's). [[JustifiedTrope Since it's an official government statement on a restaurant's hygienic practices, anything below an A is a kiss of death]] -- consumers tend to assume that even a B rated place is a plague pit, even though objectively that's still considered an acceptable rating. Most restaurants overhaul their practices ''very quickly'' to get back to an A rating or risk going bankrupt. Although this imbalance was not intended, it's generally seen as an overall good thing from a public health perspective. [[note]] The one exception is niche resturants whose select customers care less about the rating and more about the niche[[/note]].niche, and in ethnic neighborhoods where eateries may cater only to the local population, who will eat there regardless[[/note]]. It's also enforced to an extent: You will never eat at a restaurant graded D or F, even if you wanted to, because the health department will have shut it down. New York City also has a similar grading system for its eateries, though the ratings only consist of A, B, C, and "pending". Any place that doesn't have an A are usually not bothered with by consumers, even though a B rating isn't generally too bad (passable but with minor problems found that can easily be fixed).
28th Nov '16 5:26:33 PM ZombieAladdin
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* While Creator/{{Toonami}} hosted dozens of video game reviews over the course of the show, only a handful ever scored below 7 out of 10. No games ever scored lower than 6 on that scale either. The creators have admitted this is due to not having a profession reviewer in their group and only playing games they really like, not wanting to fill the air with needless negativity.

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* While Creator/{{Toonami}} hosted dozens of video game reviews over the course of the show, only a handful ever scored below 7 out of 10. No games ever scored lower than 6 on that scale either. The creators have admitted this is due to not having a profession reviewer in their group and only playing games they really like, not wanting to fill the air with needless negativity. That being said, they only rarely give a game a perfect 10 out of 10, with 8 by far the most common score.
23rd Oct '16 6:56:20 PM nombretomado
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* The user-rated difficulty rating scale on GameFAQs is a 2.5-4.0 scale, when counting only the games with least 50 difficulty level votes. Easy games have a difficulty rating of less than 3. Average difficulty games, which represent the majority of games for most genres, are between 3 and 3.5 in difficulty. Minimum threshold for low-end NintendoHard starts at around 3.5. Difficulty rating 4 or above are reserved for the hardest of the NintendoHard, and several genres (such as Adventure, Puzzle, and Sports) have no games rated with such high difficulty. Only a very small number of games exceed the 4.5 mark, examples of such games include Ghosts and Goblins (NES), Battletoads (NES), Silver Surfer (NES), Ikuraga, and Touhou Chireiden: Subterranean Animism.

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* The user-rated difficulty rating scale on GameFAQs Website/GameFAQs is a 2.5-4.0 scale, when counting only the games with least 50 difficulty level votes. Easy games have a difficulty rating of less than 3. Average difficulty games, which represent the majority of games for most genres, are between 3 and 3.5 in difficulty. Minimum threshold for low-end NintendoHard starts at around 3.5. Difficulty rating 4 or above are reserved for the hardest of the NintendoHard, and several genres (such as Adventure, Puzzle, and Sports) have no games rated with such high difficulty. Only a very small number of games exceed the 4.5 mark, examples of such games include Ghosts and Goblins (NES), Battletoads (NES), Silver Surfer (NES), Ikuraga, and Touhou Chireiden: Subterranean Animism.
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