History Main / FirstLawOfResurrection

20th Feb '17 5:16:22 AM jormis29
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* A subversion, perhaps providing a corollary: "If the character's ''owner'' wants a character to come back, it will come back ''[[ExecutiveMeddling even if the creator and writer doesn't]]''." RA Salvatore didn't want to bring [[Literature/TheLegendOfDrizzt Wulfgar]] back, but was told by [=TSR/=]WizardsOfTheCoast that if he didn't, someone else would. So he did it, figuring his version would probably be better than others. In ''VideoGame/BaldursGateII'', Drizzt's entire party gets a cameo, and upon reference to Hell, Wulfgar quips "I've been there. It was nothing special."

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* A subversion, perhaps providing a corollary: "If the character's ''owner'' wants a character to come back, it will come back ''[[ExecutiveMeddling even if the creator and writer doesn't]]''." RA Salvatore didn't want to bring [[Literature/TheLegendOfDrizzt Wulfgar]] back, but was told by [=TSR/=]WizardsOfTheCoast Creator/{{TSR}}[=/=]Creator/WizardsOfTheCoast that if he didn't, someone else would. So he did it, figuring his version would probably be better than others. In ''VideoGame/BaldursGateII'', Drizzt's entire party gets a cameo, and upon reference to Hell, Wulfgar quips "I've been there. It was nothing special."
22nd Jan '17 10:47:00 AM Pinokio
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** Though ComicBook/JeanGrey is often thought to have died and come back multiple times, the ''original'' Jean Grey has only died and returned a couple times, starting with her death and resurrection in the first Phoenix story, in ''X-Men'' #100-101. In ''ComicBook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga'', Jean wasn't meant to die at the end, as stated by Claremont and others, and it was the intention from the beginning to bring her back, [[AuthorsSavingThrow just not as a super hero who committed genocide]]. In ''ComicBook/NewXMen'', Jean dies [[KilledOffForReal for the final time]], and, aside from her afterlife appearances in the White Hot Room, stays dead, permanently, until her brief series of resurrections in ''Phoenix Endsong'', during which she is revived and killed repeatedly to weaken the Phoenix Force. A teenage, time-displaced Jean appears in ''Comicbook/AllNewXMen''.

to:

** Though ComicBook/JeanGrey is often thought to have died and come back multiple times, the ''original'' Jean Grey has only died and returned a couple times, starting with her death and resurrection in the first Phoenix story, in ''X-Men'' #100-101. In ''ComicBook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga'', Jean wasn't meant to die at the end, as stated by Claremont and others, and it was the intention from the beginning to bring her back, [[AuthorsSavingThrow just not as a super hero who committed genocide]]. In ''ComicBook/NewXMen'', Jean dies [[KilledOffForReal for the final time]], and, aside from her afterlife appearances in the White Hot Room, Jean stays dead, permanently, until her brief series of resurrections in ''Phoenix Endsong'', during which she is revived and killed repeatedly to weaken the Phoenix Force. A In ''X-Men: Deadly Genesis'', Jean's reputation for frequent resurrection was further lampshaded, when Vulcan impersonates Jean returning from the dead, with Wolverine swearing in disbelief. While the adult Jean has remained incorporeal, a teenage, time-displaced Jean appears in ''Comicbook/AllNewXMen''.



* I hate to tell you this guys, but Ben Reilly is back! In ''ComicBook/DeadNoMoreTheCloneConspiracy''.

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* I hate to tell you this guys, but Ben Reilly is back! In back in ''ComicBook/DeadNoMoreTheCloneConspiracy''.
5th Jan '17 6:42:48 AM Ramidel
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* In the original TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons ''TabletopGame/{{Dragonlance}}'' modules, DM's were specifically instructed that certain villains simply were not allowed to be killed off, and that if the players somehow succeeded in doing so, their apparent death should be done in such a way that the players [[NeverFoundTheBody could not recover the body]], allowing them to return in future modules.

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* In the original TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons ''TabletopGame/{{Dragonlance}}'' modules, DM's were specifically instructed that certain villains [[LordBritishPostulate simply were not allowed to be killed off, off]], and that if the players somehow succeeded in doing so, their apparent death should be done in such a way that the players [[NeverFoundTheBody could not recover the body]], allowing them to return in future modules.
13th Dec '16 12:00:28 PM Pinokio
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Added DiffLines:

* I hate to tell you this guys, but Ben Reilly is back! In ''ComicBook/DeadNoMoreTheCloneConspiracy''.
29th Nov '16 8:04:04 PM Pinokio
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* In general, the ''Comicbook/XMen'' franchise is the poster-child for this trope. The tendency of dead X-Men coming back to life is hilariously mocked in [[http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/218160 this flash cartoon parody]]. The fact of the matter is that there are 20+ main characters, and a writer is likely to have any one of them as a favorite. And various members are constantly being killed off for the sake of either drama or to try to thin out the herd. The result is that the average length of death for any mutant in the Marvel universe is 1 to 2 years.

to:

* In general, the The ''Comicbook/XMen'' franchise is the poster-child for this trope. The tendency of dead X-Men coming back to life is hilariously mocked in [[http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/218160 this flash cartoon parody]]. The fact of the matter is that there are 20+ main characters, and a writer is likely to have any one of them as a favorite. And various members are constantly being killed off for the sake of either drama or to try to thin out the herd. The result is that the average length of death for any mutant in the Marvel universe is 1 to 2 years.



** This happens so frequently in ''Comicbook/XMen'' that after Banshee dies in ''X-Men: Deadly Genesis'', in ''ComicBook/XFactor'', his daughter Siryn is informed of his death, and she point blank refuses to believe that he'll stay dead. He ended up coming back from the dead in ''Necrosha'', and again in ''ComicBook/ChaosWar'', and again in ''Comicbook/UncannyAvengers'', but the creator writing his daughter ignored all three of them so she could continue working out her issues on the subject.

to:

** This happens so frequently in ''Comicbook/XMen'' that after Banshee dies in ''X-Men: Deadly Genesis'', in ''ComicBook/XFactor'', his daughter Siryn is informed of his death, and she point blank refuses to believe that he'll stay dead. He ended showed up in Erebus in ''ComicBook/TheIncredibleHercules'' #129, coming back from the dead in ''Necrosha'', and again in ''ComicBook/ChaosWar'', and again in ''Comicbook/UncannyAvengers'', but the creator writing his daughter ignored all three of them so she could continue working out her issues on the subject.subject. Banshee returns for good in ''Comicbook/UncannyAvengers''.
29th Nov '16 7:54:09 PM Pinokio
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* In general, the ''Comicbook/XMen'' franchise is the poster-child for this trope. The fact of the matter is that there are 20+ main characters, and a writer is likely to have any one of them as a favorite. And various members are constantly being killed off for the sake of either drama or to try to thin out the herd. The result is that the average length of death for any mutant in the Marvel universe is 1 to 2 years.

to:

* In general, the ''Comicbook/XMen'' franchise is the poster-child for this trope. The tendency of dead X-Men coming back to life is hilariously mocked in [[http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/218160 this flash cartoon parody]]. The fact of the matter is that there are 20+ main characters, and a writer is likely to have any one of them as a favorite. And various members are constantly being killed off for the sake of either drama or to try to thin out the herd. The result is that the average length of death for any mutant in the Marvel universe is 1 to 2 years.years.
** This happens to Colossus in Creator/JossWhedon's run on ''[[ComicBook/XMen Astonishing X-Men]]''.
----> '''Kitty Pryde:''' ''You have to know that if you're a clone or robot or, yeah, a ghost or an alternate universe thingie, I can deal, ...but if you are some shapeshifter or illusionist who's just watching me twist I will kill you and I will kill you with an axe--''
** This happens so frequently in ''Comicbook/XMen'' that after Banshee dies in ''X-Men: Deadly Genesis'', in ''ComicBook/XFactor'', his daughter Siryn is informed of his death, and she point blank refuses to believe that he'll stay dead. He ended up coming back from the dead in ''Necrosha'', and again in ''ComicBook/ChaosWar'', and again in ''Comicbook/UncannyAvengers'', but the creator writing his daughter ignored all three of them so she could continue working out her issues on the subject.



** In fact this happens so frequently in X-Men that when [[spoiler: Banshee]] dies and his daughter is informed of his death, she point blank refuses to believe that he'll stay dead. This tendency of dead X-Men coming back to life is also hilariously mocked in [[http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/218160 this flash cartoon parody]]. He ended up coming back from the dead ''twice'' in two minor crossover events and again slightly later, but the creator writing his daughter ignored all three of them so she could continue working out her issues on the subject.

to:

** In fact this happens so frequently in X-Men that when [[spoiler: Banshee]] dies They've even gotten GenreSavvy about it, with Beast calling one villain's death a "ComicBook/{{Magneto}} moment," invoking the frequent "deaths" and his daughter is informed "returns" of his the sometimes-[[BigBad Big-Bad]]-sometimes-[[AntiHero Anti-Hero]]. (Almost none of these involved Magneto ''actually'' dying, though sometimes that's via retcon, and very few characters have been ''believed'' to be dead as often as Magneto.) "The more certain the death, she point blank refuses to believe the more certain the resurrection."
** The "Necrosha" {{crossover}} has Selene resurrecting deceased mutants left and right, proving once and for all
that he'll stay dead. This tendency for mutants, death is nothing more than a big game of dead X-Men coming back to life is also hilariously mocked in [[http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/218160 this flash cartoon parody]]. He ended up coming back from the dead ''twice'' in two minor crossover events and again slightly later, but the creator writing his daughter ignored all three of them so she could continue working out her issues on the subject.freeze tag.



** They've even gotten GenreSavvy about it, with Beast calling one villain's death a "Magneto moment," invoking the frequent "deaths" and "returns" of the sometimes-[[BigBad Big-Bad]]-sometimes-[[AntiHero Anti-Hero]]. (Almost none of these involved Magneto ''actually'' dying, though sometimes that's via retcon, and very few characters have been ''believed'' to be dead as often as Magneto.) "The more certain the death, the more certain the resurrection."
** This happens to Colossus in Creator/JossWhedon's run on ''[[ComicBook/XMen Astonishing X-Men]]''. Quote Kitty Pryde:
--> ''You have to know that if you're a clone or robot or, yeah, a ghost or an alternate universe thingie, I can deal, ...but if you are some shapeshifter or illusionist who's just watching me twist I will kill you and I will kill you with an axe--''
** The "Necrosha" {{crossover}} has Selene resurrecting deceased mutants left and right, proving once and for all that for mutants, death is nothing more than a big game of freeze tag.
29th Nov '16 7:00:55 PM Pinokio
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** Though ComicBook/JeanGrey is often thought to have died and come back multiple times (possibly the result of adaptations of the original story), the ''original'' Jean Grey died and stayed dead. Jean Grey wasn't actually meant to die at the end of the Dark Phoenix Saga (as stated by Claremont and others), and it was the intention from the beginning to bring her back, [[AuthorsSavingThrow just not as a super hero who committed genocide]]. A teenage, time-displaced Jean appears in ''Comicbook/AllNewXMen''.

to:

** Though ComicBook/JeanGrey is often thought to have died and come back multiple times (possibly the result of adaptations of the original story), times, the ''original'' Jean Grey has only died and stayed dead. returned a couple times, starting with her death and resurrection in the first Phoenix story, in ''X-Men'' #100-101. In ''ComicBook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga'', Jean Grey wasn't actually meant to die at the end of the Dark Phoenix Saga (as end, as stated by Claremont and others), others, and it was the intention from the beginning to bring her back, [[AuthorsSavingThrow just not as a super hero who committed genocide]].genocide]]. In ''ComicBook/NewXMen'', Jean dies [[KilledOffForReal for the final time]], and, aside from her afterlife appearances in the White Hot Room, stays dead, permanently, until her brief series of resurrections in ''Phoenix Endsong'', during which she is revived and killed repeatedly to weaken the Phoenix Force. A teenage, time-displaced Jean appears in ''Comicbook/AllNewXMen''.
13th Nov '16 12:45:07 PM nombretomado
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* At the end of ''JusticeLeagueUnlimited'', ComicBook/LexLuthor and {{ComicBook/Darkseid}} both seemingly die, thanks to Lex making a HeroicSacrifice to kill them both with the Anti-Life Equation. Batman muses that neither of them are likely dead and both of them will probably come back. Unusually, this was the GrandFinale of the show, and for all intents and purposes the entire DCAU came to an end with this, so as far as anyone knows they ''don't'' come back. Even more unusually, the whole thing was so ambiguous that it's not even clear that Lex was even using the Equation to kill the two of them in the first place, and both of them might not even have died at all. [[WordOfGod They didn't.]] They got stuck in the source wall, but that still means they're not coming back.

to:

* At the end of ''JusticeLeagueUnlimited'', ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'', ComicBook/LexLuthor and {{ComicBook/Darkseid}} both seemingly die, thanks to Lex making a HeroicSacrifice to kill them both with the Anti-Life Equation. Batman muses that neither of them are likely dead and both of them will probably come back. Unusually, this was the GrandFinale of the show, and for all intents and purposes the entire DCAU came to an end with this, so as far as anyone knows they ''don't'' come back. Even more unusually, the whole thing was so ambiguous that it's not even clear that Lex was even using the Equation to kill the two of them in the first place, and both of them might not even have died at all. [[WordOfGod They didn't.]] They got stuck in the source wall, but that still means they're not coming back.
31st Oct '16 3:14:38 PM margdean56
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* Ian Malcolm in the original ''Literature/JurassicPark'' novel. He is implied to die while other characters watch near the end of the novel, but in [[Literature/TheLostWorld1995 the second]] he's back, and says in a lecture that reports of his death were "exaggerated". The real circumstances are left ambiguous at best: When they are escaping with the helicopters, Muldoon tells Grant that there is another heli which will collect the other survivors. When Grant asks him about Malcolm, Muldoon just shakes his head. Muldoon could have been wrong; the evacuation ''was'' pretty hectic, and there was also a lot of stress with some roaming raptors. The epilogue, in which a funeral for Hammond and Malcolm is mentioned, is clearly written in Grant's point of view, so he may have received wrong information from Muldoon -or others- or Malcolm was revived after Muldoon has left.

to:

* Ian Malcolm in the original ''Literature/JurassicPark'' novel. He is implied to die while other characters watch near the end of the novel, but in [[Literature/TheLostWorld1995 the second]] he's back, and says in a lecture that reports of his death were "exaggerated". The real circumstances are left ambiguous at best: When they are escaping with the helicopters, Muldoon tells Grant that there is another heli which will collect the other survivors. When Grant asks him about Malcolm, Muldoon just shakes his head. Muldoon could have been wrong; the evacuation ''was'' pretty hectic, and there was also a lot of stress with some roaming raptors. The epilogue, in which a funeral for Hammond and Malcolm is mentioned, is clearly written in Grant's point of view, so he may have received wrong information from Muldoon -or others- or Muldoon--or others--or Malcolm was revived after Muldoon has left.



* Ditto for Literature/JamesBond, who was killed off at the end of ''Literature/FromRussiaWithLove'', and then resurrected for ''Literature/DrNo''. The author actually had a fairly good justification for his survival - he wasn't actually ''dead'', just ''dying'', and the people he was with at the time were able to keep him alive long enough for proper medical help to arrive.

to:

* Ditto for Literature/JamesBond, who was killed off at the end of ''Literature/FromRussiaWithLove'', and then resurrected for ''Literature/DrNo''. The author actually had a fairly good justification for his survival - -- he wasn't actually ''dead'', just ''dying'', and the people he was with at the time were able to keep him alive long enough for proper medical help to arrive.
31st Oct '16 3:11:55 PM margdean56
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* The Green Goblin[=/=]ComicBook/NormanOsborn had one of the greatest death scenes in comics - impaled on his own Goblin Glider after a brutal fight with Spider-Man (after having killed Peter Parker's girlfriend, Gwen Stacy), and was then resurrected with a lot of [[HandWave Handwaving]][[note]] Basically, it turned out the serum that gave him his powers also gave him a HealingFactor; he then murdered a lookalike for his funeral and ran off to Europe to found a criminal empire and took over a weird evil cult called the Scriers; after coming back, he even wrote a book to explain why he had to fake his death and to refute all the evidence that he was ever the ComicBook/GreenGoblin[[/note]]. The resurrection didn't happen until 20+ years later, and the writers brought him back because they had written themselves deep into a corner with ComicBook/TheCloneSaga and had to come up with ''something'' suitably climactic to end it. His resurrection also allowed them to bring back Aunt May via a [[VoodooShark contrived storyline involving an actress replacing her in her final days]]. Since he came BackFromTheDead Osborn has TookALevelInBadass[=/=]TookALevelInJerkass and become a major player in the wider Marvel U. as well as once for all firmly establishing himself as Spidey's one, true ArchEnemy, so in many ways he's an example of how to do this ''right''.

to:

* The Green Goblin[=/=]ComicBook/NormanOsborn had one of the greatest death scenes in comics - impaled on his own Goblin Glider after a brutal fight with Spider-Man (after having killed Peter Parker's girlfriend, Gwen Stacy), and was then resurrected with a lot of [[HandWave Handwaving]][[note]] Basically, it turned out the serum that gave him his powers also gave him a HealingFactor; he then murdered a lookalike for his funeral and ran off to Europe to found a criminal empire and took over a weird evil cult called the Scriers; after coming back, he even wrote a book to explain why he had to fake his death and to refute all the evidence that he was ever the ComicBook/GreenGoblin[[/note]]. The resurrection didn't happen until 20+ years later, and the writers brought him back because they had written themselves deep into a corner with ComicBook/TheCloneSaga and had to come up with ''something'' suitably climactic to end it. His resurrection also allowed them to bring back Aunt May via a [[VoodooShark contrived storyline involving an actress replacing her in her final days]]. Since he came BackFromTheDead Osborn has TookALevelInBadass[=/=]TookALevelInJerkass and has become a major player in the wider Marvel U. as well as once for all firmly establishing himself as Spidey's one, true ArchEnemy, so in many ways he's an example of how to do this ''right''.



* Also what a lot of fans were hoping for [[spoiler:Peter Parker/Spider-Man himself]] to come back after he died [[spoiler:in Doctor Octopus' body and Ock became ComicBook/TheSuperiorSpiderMan]]. They got their wish - [[spoiler:Peter's memories and personality stuck around in the body that Ock now controlled. Even after Ock supposedly wiped it out entirely, he got in over his head and salvaged it to fix things, effectively handing control back to Peter]].

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* Also what a lot of fans were hoping for [[spoiler:Peter Parker/Spider-Man himself]] to come back after he died [[spoiler:in Doctor Octopus' body and Ock became ComicBook/TheSuperiorSpiderMan]]. They got their wish - -- [[spoiler:Peter's memories and personality stuck around in the body that Ock now controlled. Even after Ock supposedly wiped it out entirely, he got in over his head and salvaged it to fix things, effectively handing control back to Peter]].
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