History Main / FictionIsntFair

12th Sep '17 4:51:40 AM WillBGood
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** Some one like [[ComicBook/SpiderMan Jameson]] who's paper is 90% about how a menace Spider-Man is, even though he has spent his whole life protecting innocent people, and him on a daily basis. You think that his paper would have shut down, or gone out of business for all the bullcrap that it is, instead Jameson gets elected mayor of New York and bankrupts the city with his anti-Spider-Man SWAT team. Though he has recently been called to account for this (which included losing the Bugle), it's taken several real-time decades. In later decades, Marvel has tried to HandWave this by showing that, aside from his maniacal hate of Spiderman, Jameson is really a very dilligent and competent editor and reporter. Unfortunatly, this varies a LOT.

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** Some one like [[ComicBook/SpiderMan J. Jonah Jameson]] who's whose paper is 90% about how a menace Spider-Man is, even though he has spent his whole life protecting innocent people, and him people (including him) on a daily basis. You think that his paper would have shut down, or gone out of business for all the bullcrap that it is, is; instead Jameson gets elected mayor of New York and bankrupts the city with his anti-Spider-Man SWAT team. Though he has recently been called to account for this (which included losing the Bugle), it's taken several real-time decades. In later decades, Marvel has tried to HandWave this by showing that, aside from his maniacal hate of Spiderman, Spider-Man, Jameson is really a very dilligent diligent and competent editor and reporter. Unfortunatly, Unfortunately, this varies a LOT.
23rd Jul '17 6:32:10 PM SimYouLater
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Subversions could count as RealityEnsues, when unlawful/unethical/etc. acts committed by characters who regularly get away with it or are expected by the audience to get away with it are suddenly treated the way they would be in RealLife.

SuperTrope to HollywoodLaw. Also compare the BunnyEarsLawyer -- the accomplished and competent character whose behavior would be too eccentric to tolerate if s/he weren't ''so'' very good at what s/he does.

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Subversions could count as RealityEnsues, when unlawful/unethical/etc. acts committed by characters who regularly get away with it or are expected by the audience to get away with it are suddenly treated the way they would be in RealLife.

RealLife. Alternatively, it could result in RageAgainstTheHeavens or RageAgainstTheAuthor, and if that fails expect either ItsAWonderfulPlot (one of ThePowersThatBe is either a DefectorFromParadise or has a HeelRealization), a ChoosingDeath sub-trope resulting in any BitterSweetEnding or DownerEnding, the start of a DeadToBeginWith StoryArc or GenreShift, unavoidable CosmicPlaything and likely CrapsackWorld or CrapsaccharineWorld, or a stalemate aversion by YouCannotKillAnIdea and free will being impossible to breach even for the creator of the setting.

SuperTrope to HollywoodLaw. Usually results from HumansAreBastards, AliensAreBastards, NatureIsNotNice and/or GodAndSatanAreBothJerks. Also compare the BunnyEarsLawyer -- the accomplished and competent character whose behavior would be too eccentric to tolerate if s/he weren't ''so'' very good at what s/he does.
4th Jul '17 2:43:25 PM Dere
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** Snape shows obvious favoritism for his house, giving Slytherin students a high number of points for anything and using any excuse to deduct a lot of points from the other houses, especially Gryffindor. Despite this, he never gets called out or punished for it.
18th Jun '17 10:58:22 AM talltalltree
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** In ''Katy'' by Creator/JacquelineWilson (a modern retelling of ''Literature/WhatKatyDid''), the protagonist is permanently disabled after she breaks her back in an accident. When she tries to return to school, the headmistress excludes her from PE classes at the request of a classmate's parent, without speaking to Katy or her family or even attempting to work out any kind of compromise. This would realistically give Katy good grounds for a complaint to the board of governors, and leave the school at risk of legal action for discrimination.

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** * In ''Katy'' by Creator/JacquelineWilson (a modern retelling of ''Literature/WhatKatyDid''), the protagonist is permanently disabled after she breaks her back in an accident. When she tries to return to school, the headmistress excludes her from PE classes at the request of a classmate's parent, without speaking to Katy or her family or even attempting to work out any kind of compromise. This would realistically give Katy good grounds for a complaint to the board of governors, and leave the school at risk of legal action for discrimination.
18th Jun '17 10:57:58 AM talltalltree
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* ''Looking for JJ'' by Anne Cassidy is about a teenage girl living under an assumed name after she is released from jail for causing the death of a classmate. She spends most of the story trying to keep her identity secret, only to be exposed by an undercover journalist. In the real world, if a prisoner in the UK is given a new identity after their release, there are strict laws preventing the media from disclosing any personal details about them - as evidenced in a case around the time of the book's release, where journalists were prevented from publishing information about a recently released prisoner involved in a highly publicised murder.
** In ''Katy'' by Creator/JacquelineWilson (a modern retelling of ''Literature/WhatKatyDid''), the protagonist is permanently disabled after she breaks her back in an accident. When she tries to return to school, the headmistress excludes her from PE classes at the request of a classmate's parent, without speaking to Katy or her family or even attempting to work out any kind of compromise. This would realistically give Katy good grounds for a complaint to the board of governors, and leave the school at risk of legal action for discrimination.
4th Jun '17 7:21:37 PM SilentStranger
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* In Both ''Franchise/MarvelUniverse'' and Franchise/TheDCU, most supervillians are never really punished for their crimes, no matter how high a body count they rack up. They will always find a way to escape jail, or are rich enough to get out of court. Heck there are times that these people will be given positions in governments that they will surely abuse. The only reason they are even alive is so that authors don't have to think of new villains to make.

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* In Both ''Franchise/MarvelUniverse'' and Franchise/TheDCU, most supervillians are never really punished for their crimes, no matter how high a body count they rack up. They will always find a way to escape jail, or are rich enough to get out of court. Heck there are times that these people will be given positions in governments that they will surely abuse. The only reason they are even alive is so that authors don't have to think of new villains to make. The Comics Code attempted to remedy this by stating that villains who commited serious crimes like murder had to be permanently punished, which unfortunatly just resulted in the majority of all supervillains becoming cartoonish jokes instead.



** Some one like [[ComicBook/SpiderMan Jameson]] who's paper is 90% about how a menace Spider-Man is, even though he has spent his whole life protecting innocent people, and him on a daily basis. You think that his paper would have shut down, or gone out of business for all the bullcrap that it is, instead Jameson gets elected mayor of New York and bankrupts the city with his anti-Spider-Man SWAT team. Though he has recently been called to account for this (which included losing the Bugle), it's taken several real-time decades.

to:

** Some one like [[ComicBook/SpiderMan Jameson]] who's paper is 90% about how a menace Spider-Man is, even though he has spent his whole life protecting innocent people, and him on a daily basis. You think that his paper would have shut down, or gone out of business for all the bullcrap that it is, instead Jameson gets elected mayor of New York and bankrupts the city with his anti-Spider-Man SWAT team. Though he has recently been called to account for this (which included losing the Bugle), it's taken several real-time decades. In later decades, Marvel has tried to HandWave this by showing that, aside from his maniacal hate of Spiderman, Jameson is really a very dilligent and competent editor and reporter. Unfortunatly, this varies a LOT.



* A lot of Creator/RoaldDahl books revolve around this trope, such as the aunts from ''Literature/JamesAndTheGiantPeach'' or the Trunchbull from ''Literature/{{Matilda}}'', all of which would've been reported to the authorities for child abuse far before they get to the point they're at in the story (though at least for the Trunchbull the issue is brought up, but [[RefugeInAudacity nobody believes the children]]. As for why the ''staff'' don't take measures against the Trunchbull, it's likely because they're ''afraid'' of her-as Miss Honey herself says, no adult has yet gotten the better of her).

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* A lot of Creator/RoaldDahl books revolve around this trope, such as the aunts from ''Literature/JamesAndTheGiantPeach'' or the Trunchbull from ''Literature/{{Matilda}}'', all of which would've been reported to the authorities for child abuse far before they get to the point they're at in the story (though at least for the Trunchbull the issue is brought up, but [[RefugeInAudacity nobody believes the children]]. As for why the ''staff'' don't take measures against the Trunchbull, it's likely because they're ''afraid'' of her-as Miss Honey herself says, no adult has yet gotten the better of her). The movie adaptation also mentions that she has a lot of economic clout in the town itself and most of the ''parents'' are scared of her too.



* Taken UpToEleven (like everything else on the show) on ''WesternAnimation/DrawnTogether''. One episode had two groups compete to see who would have all the food and who would starve. The first group had to put an egg in a pail. The second group had to find a low carb cure for polio. Considering that it's supposed to be like a RealityShow makes it even more insane.

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* Taken UpToEleven (like everything else on the show) on ''WesternAnimation/DrawnTogether''. One episode had two groups compete to see who would have all the food and who would starve. The first group had to put an egg in a pail. The second group had to find a low carb cure for polio. Considering that it's supposed to be like a RealityShow makes it even more insane. (The previous challenge had been a contest of which team ''got to have access to oxygen!'')
* ''SheepInTheBigCity'' has the BigBad General Specific, who's gross abuse of power would land any military official in prison. For one thing, he's performing military operations ''on U.S soil in the middle of a metropolitan area''! On top of that, whenever anyone calls him on it, he just says that he's the leader of a "top secret military organization", and refuses to divulge any sort of authority beyond that, he wont even say which organization it is, because "it wont be a secret" if he tells. He's caused harm to countless civilians as part of his operations too, none of which have ever succeeded.
22nd Apr '17 8:15:26 PM nombretomado
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* In ''SurvivalOfTheFittest'', Danya managing to get away with extremely high profile abductions of hundreds of high school kids (including the child of a vice president, in one version), and keeping the game on the air for periods that can be upwards of two weeks without getting tracked down. In version two, the island ''was'' tracked down, but only just after the game ended. Equally, earlier versions had a couple of villainous characters who were insane prior to the game to the point that they most definitely should have been committed.

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* In ''SurvivalOfTheFittest'', ''Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest'', Danya managing to get away with extremely high profile abductions of hundreds of high school kids (including the child of a vice president, in one version), and keeping the game on the air for periods that can be upwards of two weeks without getting tracked down. In version two, the island ''was'' tracked down, but only just after the game ended. Equally, earlier versions had a couple of villainous characters who were insane prior to the game to the point that they most definitely should have been committed.
11th Mar '17 3:31:43 PM nombretomado
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* A skit on the 1980s updated version of ''TheMickeyMouseClub'' takes place in a supermarket, where an adolescent girl working at the checkout line is forced to deal with an item scanner endowed with a ridiculous level of artificial intelligence; the scanner has a {{Jerkass}} personality and keeps insulting shoppers in its obnoxious robotic voice (calling them fat, saying they have bad breath, etc.). The hapless girl gets blamed for all this rudeness (despite not actually being a robot), and is finally fired by her supervisor (although by that point she's [[{{Unishment}} almost]] ''[[{{Unishment}} happy]]'' [[{{Unishment}} to be fired]], since she won't have to put up with the asshole computer anymore). It was obviously PlayedForLaughs, though.

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* A skit on the 1980s updated version of ''TheMickeyMouseClub'' ''Series/TheMickeyMouseClub'' takes place in a supermarket, where an adolescent girl working at the checkout line is forced to deal with an item scanner endowed with a ridiculous level of artificial intelligence; the scanner has a {{Jerkass}} personality and keeps insulting shoppers in its obnoxious robotic voice (calling them fat, saying they have bad breath, etc.). The hapless girl gets blamed for all this rudeness (despite not actually being a robot), and is finally fired by her supervisor (although by that point she's [[{{Unishment}} almost]] ''[[{{Unishment}} happy]]'' [[{{Unishment}} to be fired]], since she won't have to put up with the asshole computer anymore). It was obviously PlayedForLaughs, though.
31st Dec '16 8:39:27 PM nombretomado
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* In ''FruitsBasket'', there is a staggering amount of child abuse and neglect. The series implies that the Sohma family hides most of it, explaining why half the family members haven't been carted off for various charges of abuse, assault, attempted murder, and so forth, but there's also Uotani's father (pretty much did nothing to care for his daughter, and now ''she'' looks after him), Kyoko (had a mental breakdown for an unspecified amount of time after her husband died, where it was implied she forgot to even feed her daughter), and Hanajima's classmates (they burned her with a match and forced her to eat a newt's tail). Not to mention, Haru completely destroys a classroom in a rage and all we hear of is the teacher talking to his mother.

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* In ''FruitsBasket'', ''Manga/FruitsBasket'', there is a staggering amount of child abuse and neglect. The series implies that the Sohma family hides most of it, explaining why half the family members haven't been carted off for various charges of abuse, assault, attempted murder, and so forth, but there's also Uotani's father (pretty much did nothing to care for his daughter, and now ''she'' looks after him), Kyoko (had a mental breakdown for an unspecified amount of time after her husband died, where it was implied she forgot to even feed her daughter), and Hanajima's classmates (they burned her with a match and forced her to eat a newt's tail). Not to mention, Haru completely destroys a classroom in a rage and all we hear of is the teacher talking to his mother.
2nd Nov '16 11:51:45 PM foxley
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* ''Series/{{Glee}}'': When Sue becomes principal her methods of improving the school are ridiculous to dangerous. She releases dogs in hallway, sends a flying drone to watch students, and has a female inmate as a secretary. That last one should have gotten her removed, but she keeps her job because she got th school grades up, despite the fact she cares more of her own ambitions and personal pride than the school itself.

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* ''Series/{{Glee}}'': When Sue becomes principal her methods of improving the school are ridiculous to dangerous. She releases dogs in hallway, sends a flying drone to watch students, and has a female inmate as a secretary. That last one should have gotten her removed, but she keeps her job because she got th the school grades up, despite the fact she cares more of her own ambitions and personal pride than the school itself.itself.
* ''Series/TheLibrarians2007'': The midwife's stubborn refusal to give Christine any pain relief despite her never requesting a natural birth would have her sued for malpractise in RealLife.
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