History Main / FictionIsntFair

5th Jan '18 9:31:14 PM ultimomant
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[[folder:Nisual Novels]]

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[[folder:Nisual [[folder:Visual Novels]]
2nd Jan '18 4:52:49 AM StFan
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Sometimes no one even [[CantArgueWithElves disagrees with certain outlandish claims of superiority]].

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Sometimes no one no-one even [[CantArgueWithElves disagrees with certain outlandish claims of superiority]].



[[folder:Anime/Manga]]

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[[folder:Anime/Manga]][[folder:Anime & Manga]]



[[folder:Comics]]

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[[folder:Comics]][[folder:Comic Books]]



* The ''Franchise/MarvelUniverse''.
** Some one like [[ComicBook/SpiderMan J. Jonah Jameson]] whose paper is 90% about how a menace Spider-Man is, even though he has spent his whole life protecting innocent people (including him) on a daily basis. You think that his paper would have shut down, or gone out of business for all the bullcrap that it is; instead Jameson gets elected mayor of New York and bankrupts the city with his anti-Spider-Man SWAT team. Though he has recently been called to account for this (which included losing the Bugle), it's taken several real-time decades. In later decades, Marvel has tried to HandWave this by showing that, aside from his maniacal hate of Spider-Man, Jameson is really a very diligent and competent editor and reporter. Unfortunately, this varies a LOT.

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* The ''Franchise/MarvelUniverse''.
** Some one
''ComicBook/SpiderMan'': Someone like [[ComicBook/SpiderMan J. Jonah Jameson]] Jameson, whose paper is 90% about how a menace Spider-Man is, even though he has spent his whole life protecting innocent people (including him) on a daily basis. You think that his paper would have shut down, or gone out of business for all the bullcrap that it is; instead Jameson gets elected mayor of New York and bankrupts the city with his anti-Spider-Man SWAT team. Though he has recently been called to account for this (which included losing the Bugle), it's taken several real-time decades. In later decades, Marvel has tried to HandWave this by showing that, aside from his maniacal hate of Spider-Man, Jameson is really a very diligent and competent editor and reporter. Unfortunately, this varies a LOT.



[[folder:Film]]

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[[folder:Film]][[folder:Comic Strips]]
* From ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'': when it comes to schoolwork, Calvin's bad luck frequently outmatches his good luck. Mrs. Wormwood assigns her students projects that would be more appropriate for a high-school class (or at least a junior high-school one) than a first grade one. Then again, RuleOfFunny. Sometimes he also makes it hard for himself. Case in point, the leaf project:
-->'''Hobbes:''' Don't worry, Calvin, it's not ''that'' hard. You just need to collect three or four leaves a day.\\
'''Calvin:''' I'm not working on weekends.\\
'''Hobbes:''' All right, so you'll need five leaves a day.\\
'''Calvin:''' And my weekdays are booked solid until Thursday 7:00 P.M.\\
'''Hobbes:''' [[SarcasmMode So you'll need 50 leaves an hour.]]\\
'''Calvin:''' [[ComicallyMissingThePoint See? It's impossible!]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* In the movie ''LemonadeMouth'', the principal of the school berates a band for preaching a message against him, and threatens to discipline them severely if they ever sing or even hum at school again.

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* In the movie ''LemonadeMouth'', ''Film/LemonadeMouth'', the principal of the school berates a band for preaching a message against him, and threatens to discipline them severely if they ever sing or even hum at school again.



* The whole Tritter story arc in ''Series/{{House}}''.
** Most of what House himself does qualifies. An established flaw of Cuddy, his direct superior, is that she turns a blind eye to the laws, policy, and safety regulations he breaks in literally every episode. Especially obvious after the third season when he is required to pick a new diagnostic team, and chooses his employees not based on merit but on how much they interest him. He tells Cuddy and the candidates this, to their faces. Unfair hiring practices are very illegal, especially in hospitals where unqualified workers regularly kill people by accident. Both House and Cuddy are rather fortunate to still have their jobs.
** It might be justified because of how House is often the last resort for people/patients who would otherwise simply die. They might have insurance waivers that need to be signed before anyone could see him. House could justify his hiring practice easily enough.
** Cuddy mentions having a special fund for House-related lawsuits at one point early in the series.
** As Cuddy notes almost to the word in the pilot, House is a classic example of the BunnyEarsLawyer trope: "That sunovabitch is the best doctor we've got!"
* Principal Snyder on ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' is rather over-the-top in his freely-expressed hatred of students and the degree to which he openly and publicly gloats at the prospect of having them expelled. Possibly justified in that [[spoiler:the Mayor of Sunnydale is a century-old evil sorcerer actively plotting to transform himself into a giant snake-demon, and the entire town was founded in order to further his evil schemes]], so one can only assume that the Sunnydale School Board isn't likely to be very receptive to parental complaints.
** This is at one point subverted. After Buffy was expelled and Snyder refused to let her back Giles threatened to make a formal complaint. Snyder tells him to take it to the school board. Giles tells him he was thinking of the state supreme court. Snyder still refuses and only relents after Giles basically threatened to beat the crap out of him.
*** ...which of course would get Giles fired in real life. Writer's convenience for the win!
* ''Series/{{iCarly}}'':

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* The whole Tritter story arc in ''Series/{{House}}''.
**
''Series/{{House}}'': Most of what House himself does qualifies. An established flaw of Cuddy, his direct superior, is that she turns a blind eye to the laws, policy, and safety regulations he breaks in literally every episode. Especially obvious after the third season when he is required to pick a new diagnostic team, and chooses his employees not based on merit but on how much they interest him. He tells Cuddy and the candidates this, to their faces. Unfair hiring practices are very illegal, especially in hospitals where unqualified workers regularly kill people by accident. Both House and Cuddy are rather fortunate to still have their jobs.
**
jobs.\\\
It might be justified because of how House is often the last resort for people/patients who would otherwise simply die. They might have insurance waivers that need to be signed before anyone could see him. House could justify his hiring practice easily enough.
**
enough. Cuddy mentions having a special fund for House-related lawsuits at one point early in the series.
**
series. As Cuddy notes almost to the word in the pilot, House is a classic example of the BunnyEarsLawyer trope: "That sunovabitch is the best doctor we've got!"
* Principal Snyder on ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' is rather over-the-top in his freely-expressed hatred of students and the degree to which he openly and publicly gloats at the prospect of having them expelled. Possibly justified in that [[spoiler:the Mayor of Sunnydale is a century-old evil sorcerer actively plotting to transform himself into a giant snake-demon, and the entire town was founded in order to further his evil schemes]], so one can only assume that the Sunnydale School Board isn't likely to be very receptive to parental complaints.
**
complaints.\\\
This is at one point subverted. After Buffy was expelled and Snyder refused to let her back Giles threatened to make a formal complaint. Snyder tells him to take it to the school board. Giles tells him he was thinking of the state supreme court. Snyder still refuses and only relents after Giles basically threatened to beat the crap out of him.
*** ...
him... which of course would get Giles fired in real life. Writer's convenience for the win!
* ''Series/{{iCarly}}'': ''Series/ICarly'':



[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* From ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'': when it comes to schoolwork, Calvin's bad luck frequently outmatches his good luck. Mrs. Wormwood assigns her students projects that would be more appropriate for a high school class (or at least a junior high school one) than a first grade one. Then again, RuleOfFunny. Sometimes he also makes it hard for himself. Case in point, the leaf project:
-->'''Hobbes''': Don't worry, Calvin, it's not ''that'' hard. You just need to collect three or four leaves a day.\\
'''Calvin''': I'm not working on weekends.\\
'''Hobbes''': All right, so you'll need five leaves a day.\\
'''Calvin''': And my weekdays are booked solid until Thursday 7:00 P.M.\\
'''Hobbes''': [[SarcasmMode So you'll need 50 leaves an hour.]]\\
'''Calvin''': [[ComicallyMissingThePoint See? It's impossible!]]
[[/folder]]



* No one in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series seems to be particularly concerned by [[CourtroomAntic things like]] Manfred von Karma overriding the judge, his daughter Franziska attacking everyone in sight with her [[WhipItGood whip]], or Godot throwing his coffee cup across the room to land on the defense's head.



[[folder:Web Comic]]

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[[folder:Nisual Novels]]
* No one in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series seems to be particularly concerned by [[CourtroomAntic things like]] Manfred von Karma overriding the judge, his daughter Franziska attacking everyone in sight with her [[WhipItGood whip]], or Godot throwing his coffee cup across the room to land on the defense's head.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comic]]Comics]]



* In ''Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest'', Danya managing to get away with extremely high profile abductions of hundreds of high school kids (including the child of a vice president, in one version), and keeping the game on the air for periods that can be upwards of two weeks without getting tracked down. In version two, the island ''was'' tracked down, but only just after the game ended. Equally, earlier versions had a couple of villainous characters who were insane prior to the game to the point that they most definitely should have been committed.
** In version one, some of said villains ''were'' committed and subsequently broken out by the terrorists or escaped on their own. However, the other three versions have drifted away from that with the narrower focus.

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* In ''Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest'', Danya managing to get away with extremely high profile abductions of hundreds of high school kids (including the child of a vice president, in one version), and keeping the game on the air for periods that can be upwards of two weeks without getting tracked down. In version two, the island ''was'' tracked down, but only just after the game ended. Equally, earlier versions had a couple of villainous characters who were insane prior to the game to the point that they most definitely should have been committed.
**
committed. In version one, some of said villains ''were'' committed and subsequently broken out by the terrorists or escaped on their own. However, the other three versions have drifted away from that with the narrower focus.



--->'''Jimbo:''' (making a punching gesture) I look forward to whaling on all of you.
*** Heck, that entire episode uses this trope to justify why Bart hates school. He actually looked forward to it, until everyone and everything on his first day served to BreakTheCutie in ludicrous ways -- like the kindergarten teacher declaring him "not college material" simply because he threw in an extra clap while singing "Bingo".

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--->'''Jimbo:''' (making ''[making a punching gesture) gesture]'' I look forward to whaling on all of you.
*** ** Heck, that entire episode uses this trope to justify why Bart hates school. He actually looked forward to it, until everyone and everything on his first day served to BreakTheCutie in ludicrous ways -- like the kindergarten teacher declaring him "not college material" simply because he threw in an extra clap while singing "Bingo".



* Subverted in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'': When the school alters Daria and Jane's poster, and then attempts to display the altered poster in an art show over their protests, they take action by destroying it. Principal Li calls Daria's mother, Helen, who, despite having earlier agreed with Li on the issue, gets an awesome MamaBear moment:
---> '''Helen:''' All right Ms. Li, let me make sure I have this straight. You took my daughter's poster from her, altered its content, exhibited it against her will and are now threatening discipline because you claim she defaced her own property which you admit to stealing? Ms. Li, are you familiar with the phrase: "violation of civil liberties?" And the phrase: "big fat lawsuit?"
** Another good example is the season five episode ''Fizz Ed'' in which Ms. Li effectively allows the school to be used as a cash cow by a soda company. [[HilarityEnsues Her antics continue to the extent]] that even [[TheSnarkKnight Daria]] herself can't ignore it and makes an official complaint. Interestingly enough, the episode's AnAesop was somewhat centered around this trope, or rather, combating it. Daria was forced to admit that there were many things she perceived to be morally wrong in the world, but she never did anything about them, she just made sarcastic comments and it never solved anything.
* ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'' has its protagonist undergo bullying that counts as physical assault. People get shoved in lockers, physically beaten, and the mascot is hung from the goalposts. Add in the blatant favoritism shown to the football players and popular kids by the school system, and Casper High is BEGGING for a lawsuit...

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'':
**
Subverted in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'': When when the school alters Daria and Jane's poster, and then attempts to display the altered poster in an art show over their protests, they take action by destroying it. Principal Li calls Daria's mother, Helen, who, despite having earlier agreed with Li on the issue, gets an awesome MamaBear moment:
---> '''Helen:''' --->'''Helen:''' All right Ms. Li, let me make sure I have this straight. You took my daughter's poster from her, altered its content, exhibited it against her will and are now threatening discipline because you claim she defaced her own property which you admit to stealing? Ms. Li, are you familiar with the phrase: "violation of civil liberties?" And the phrase: "big fat lawsuit?"
** Another good example is the season five episode ''Fizz Ed'' in which Ms. Li effectively allows the school to be used as a cash cow by a soda company. [[HilarityEnsues Her antics continue to the extent]] that even [[TheSnarkKnight Daria]] herself can't ignore it and makes an official complaint. Interestingly enough, the episode's AnAesop [[AnAesop Aesop]] was somewhat centered around this trope, or rather, combating it. Daria was forced to admit that there were many things she perceived to be morally wrong in the world, but she never did anything about them, she just made sarcastic comments and it never solved anything.
* ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'' has its ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'':
** Its
protagonist undergo bullying that counts as physical assault. People get shoved in lockers, physically beaten, and the mascot is hung from the goalposts. Add in the blatant favoritism shown to the football players and popular kids by the school system, and Casper High is BEGGING for a lawsuit...



* So why hasn't Mr. Crocker of ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' been fired? Literally everyone in his class (except for AJ) is failing, he's thought to be mentally insane by pretty much everyone that doesn't have fairies (and even those that do still think he has issues), and he's known to be outright abusive to his students (when March 15th, the anniversary of the worst day of his life, rolls around you run). Also despite all of this, it's implied that he's got the highest salary he can get (it was used as a bit of a {{handwave}} to explain why he could afford his fairy hunting gear, but still!). This was handwaved in one episode in which he mentioned in passing that he had tenure. This was his justification for going on with an experiment that would kill a human subject, to prove that Timmy's "parents" were fairies.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'':
**
So why hasn't Mr. Crocker of ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' been fired? Literally everyone in his class (except for AJ) is failing, he's thought to be mentally insane by pretty much everyone that doesn't have fairies (and even those that do still think he has issues), and he's known to be outright abusive to his students (when March 15th, the anniversary of the worst day of his life, rolls around you run). Also despite all of this, it's implied that he's got the highest salary he can get (it was used as a bit of a {{handwave}} to explain why he could afford his fairy hunting gear, but still!). This was handwaved in one episode in which he mentioned in passing that he had tenure. This was his justification for going on with an experiment that would kill a human subject, to prove that Timmy's "parents" were fairies.



* ''WesternAnimation/TotalDrama''. No matter how sadistic or life threatening the challenges get, Chris still gets away with abusing several teens on international television. No law enforcement official ever steps in, nor do the kids' parents. Even when he's shown ''killing interns'' onscreen, no one seems to care. It was finally subverted in the finale of the fourth season when Chris was arrested for hosting a tv show in toxic environment.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TotalDrama''. No matter how sadistic or life threatening life-threatening the challenges get, Chris still gets away with abusing several teens on international television. No law enforcement official ever steps in, nor do the kids' parents. Even when he's shown ''killing interns'' onscreen, no one seems to care. It was finally subverted in the finale of the fourth season when Chris was arrested for hosting a tv show in toxic environment.



* ''SheepInTheBigCity'' has the BigBad General Specific, who's gross abuse of power would land any military official in prison. For one thing, he's performing military operations ''on U.S soil in the middle of a metropolitan area''! On top of that, whenever anyone calls him on it, he just says that he's the leader of a "top secret military organization", and refuses to divulge any sort of authority beyond that, he wont even say which organization it is, because "it wont be a secret" if he tells. He's caused harm to countless civilians as part of his operations too, none of which have ever succeeded.

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* ''SheepInTheBigCity'' ''WesternAnimation/SheepInTheBigCity'' has the BigBad General Specific, who's whose gross abuse of power would land any military official in prison. For one thing, he's performing military operations ''on U.S soil in the middle of a metropolitan area''! On top of that, whenever anyone calls him on it, he just says that he's the leader of a "top secret military organization", and refuses to divulge any sort of authority beyond that, he wont wo'nt even say which organization it is, because "it wont won't be a secret" if he tells. He's caused harm to countless civilians as part of his operations too, none of which have ever succeeded.
31st Dec '17 10:22:38 AM nombretomado
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%%* ''GreysAnatomy'' runs wild with this trope.%%

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%%* ''GreysAnatomy'' ''Series/GreysAnatomy'' runs wild with this trope.%%
18th Nov '17 11:46:17 AM RMc
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Added DiffLines:

***...which of course would get Giles fired in real life. Writer's convenience for the win!
30th Oct '17 9:06:17 AM ClintEastwood
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** The episode "Homer's Enemy" revolved around how someone from "real life" might react to Homer Simpson's life.
** In the flashback episode that shows Bart first attending the school, Principal Skinner introduces some members of staff to the new students, including school bully Jimbo.

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** The episode "Homer's Enemy" "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS8E23HomersEnemy Homer's Enemy]]" revolved around how someone from "real life" might react to Homer Simpson's life.
** In the flashback episode that shows Bart first attending the school, "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS9E3LisasSax Lisa's Sax]]", Principal Skinner introduces some members of staff to the new students, including school bully Jimbo.



** Another episode has Nelson talking about the proper way to prepare huckleberries-until Skinner walks past, when he starts telling stories about people he beat up.

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** Another episode "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS10E1LardOfTheDance Lard of the Dance]]" has Nelson talking about the proper way to prepare huckleberries-until Skinner walks past, when he starts telling stories about people he beat up.



* The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "Goobacks" involved people from the future [[TimeTravel traveling to the present]] and [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything taking everyone's jobs because they were willing to work for 20 cents an hour]]. At no point does anyone even ''try'' enforcing minimum wage laws.

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* The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "Goobacks" "[[Recap/SouthParkS8E7Goobacks Goobacks]]" involved people from the future [[TimeTravel traveling to the present]] and [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything taking everyone's jobs because they were willing to work for 20 cents an hour]]. At no point does anyone even ''try'' enforcing minimum wage laws.
24th Oct '17 6:58:44 AM RedScharlach
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* In Both ''Franchise/MarvelUniverse'' and Franchise/TheDCU, most supervillians are never really punished for their crimes, no matter how high a body count they rack up. They will always find a way to escape jail, or are rich enough to get out of court. Heck there are times that these people will be given positions in governments that they will surely abuse. The only reason they are even alive is so that authors don't have to think of new villains to make. The Comics Code attempted to remedy this by stating that villains who commited serious crimes like murder had to be permanently punished, which unfortunatly just resulted in the majority of all supervillains becoming cartoonish jokes instead.

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* In Both ''Franchise/MarvelUniverse'' and Franchise/TheDCU, most supervillians supervillains are never really punished for their crimes, no matter how high a body count they rack up. They will always find a way to escape jail, or are rich enough to get out of court. Heck Heck, there are times that these people will be given positions in governments that they will surely abuse. The only reason they are even alive is so that authors don't have to think of create new villains to make. villains. The Comics Code attempted to remedy this by stating that villains who commited committed serious crimes like murder had to be permanently punished, which unfortunatly unfortunately just resulted in the majority of all supervillains becoming cartoonish jokes instead.



* In ''Film/TradingMom'', all three kids get sent to the principals office and then grounded for the summer. Elizabeth for smoking, Jeremy for pushing down a bully who had pushed Harry down (the principal only saw Jeremy do it, [[KarmaHoudini and even told the bully he wasn't in trouble]]), and Harry for... No apparent reason.

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* In ''Film/TradingMom'', all three kids get sent to the principals principal's office and then grounded for the summer. Elizabeth for smoking, Jeremy for pushing down a bully who had pushed Harry down (the principal only saw Jeremy do it, [[KarmaHoudini and even told the bully he wasn't in trouble]]), and Harry for... No no apparent reason.



* A lot of Creator/RoaldDahl books revolve around this trope, such as the aunts from ''Literature/JamesAndTheGiantPeach'' or the Trunchbull from ''Literature/{{Matilda}}'', all of which would've been reported to the authorities for child abuse far before they get to the point they're at in the story (though at least for the Trunchbull the issue is brought up, but [[RefugeInAudacity nobody believes the children]]. As for why the ''staff'' don't take measures against the Trunchbull, it's likely because they're ''afraid'' of her-as Miss Honey herself says, no adult has yet gotten the better of her). The movie adaptation also mentions that she has a lot of economic clout in the town itself and most of the ''parents'' are scared of her too.
* In the ''Literature/HushHush'' series, apparently Nora's school has nothing to say about her teacher forcing her to sit next to and work with a boy who harassed and humiliated her and, we'll later learn, was stalking her with an intent to murder. Nora even points out that the school promises all students the right to safety on the grounds, which the teacher laughs off because Patch contributes to class while sitting next to Nora (never mind that said contributions are blatant sexual harassment). The school also apparently is fine with hiring a therapist who is not much older than the students, and who goes insane [[spoiler:and tries to kill Nora]]. One would think the school would offer some reparations for this, but it's completely swept under the rug. Not to mention, ''Crescendo'' brings up how Marcie constantly stole Nora's bra and hung it outside of the principle's office, yet there is never any mention of the principle or other teachers trying to put a stop to it.

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* A lot of Creator/RoaldDahl books revolve around this trope, such as the aunts from ''Literature/JamesAndTheGiantPeach'' or the Trunchbull from ''Literature/{{Matilda}}'', all of which would've been reported to the authorities for child abuse far before they get to the point they're at in the story (though at least for the Trunchbull the issue is brought up, but [[RefugeInAudacity nobody believes the children]]. As for why the ''staff'' don't take measures against the Trunchbull, it's likely because they're ''afraid'' of her-as her--as Miss Honey herself says, no adult has yet gotten the better of her). The movie adaptation also mentions that she has a lot of economic clout in the town itself and most of the ''parents'' are scared of her too.
* In the ''Literature/HushHush'' series, apparently Nora's school has nothing to say about her teacher forcing her to sit next to and work with a boy who harassed and humiliated her and, we'll later learn, was stalking her with an intent to murder. Nora even points out that the school promises all students the right to safety on the grounds, which the teacher laughs off because Patch contributes to class while sitting next to Nora (never mind that said contributions are blatant sexual harassment). The school also apparently is fine with hiring a therapist who is not much older than the students, and who goes insane [[spoiler:and tries to kill Nora]]. One would think the school would offer some reparations for this, but it's completely swept under the rug. Not to mention, ''Crescendo'' brings up how Marcie constantly stole Nora's bra and hung it outside of the principle's principal's office, yet there is never any mention of the principle principal or other teachers trying to put a stop to it.



* ''Series/KyleXY'', in the episode "Free to Be You and Me". The school refuses to allow gay couples into the dance. Teaches a moral about tolerance of gays, but totally fails to consider that the likely result of such a policy would be for some parent to call up the ACLU, who would then go to court (indeed, that is exactly what's happened in RealLife cases).

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* ''Series/KyleXY'', in the episode "Free to Be You and Me". The Me", the school refuses to allow gay couples into the dance. Teaches The episode tries to teach a moral about tolerance of gays, tolerance, but totally fails to consider that the likely result of such a policy would be for some parent to call up the ACLU, who would then go to court (indeed, that is exactly what's happened in RealLife cases).



** It might be justified because of how House is often the last resort, for people/patients who would otherwise simply die. They might have insurance waivers that need to be signed before anyone could see him. House could justify his hiring practice easily enough.

to:

** It might be justified because of how House is often the last resort, resort for people/patients who would otherwise simply die. They might have insurance waivers that need to be signed before anyone could see him. House could justify his hiring practice easily enough.



* The last episode of ''Masters of Science Fiction'' (''Watchbird''), DVD-only and broadcast in the UK and Canada. A guy invents an artificially-intelligent mechanical bird that can fly around on its own and attack and even kill people who may be about to commit crimes. They get deployed. In the USA. The present-day USA. Anyone who tried that would be jumped on in a minute by all sorts of civil rights groups. The episode also heavily falls into MisappliedPhlebotinum territory ([[AIIsACrapShoot imagine what else]] you could use [=AIs=] for) and NoPlansNoPrototypeNoBackup (the system is designed so that only the one programmer and nobody else can reprogram the birds). Also, it's programming apparently didn't include distinguishing between criminal and legal uses of force [[spoiler: and thus it shoots dead a police sniper who's aiming at a man who's taken hostages]].

to:

* The last episode of ''Masters of Science Fiction'' (''Watchbird''), DVD-only and broadcast in the UK and Canada. A guy invents an artificially-intelligent mechanical bird that can fly around on its own and attack and even kill people who may be about to commit crimes. They get deployed. In the USA. The present-day USA. Anyone who tried that would be jumped on in a minute by all sorts of civil rights groups. The episode also heavily falls into MisappliedPhlebotinum territory ([[AIIsACrapShoot imagine what else]] you could use [=AIs=] for) and NoPlansNoPrototypeNoBackup (the system is designed so that only the one programmer and nobody else can reprogram the birds). Also, it's its programming apparently didn't include distinguishing between criminal and legal uses of force [[spoiler: and thus it shoots dead a police sniper who's aiming at a man who's taken hostages]].



* ''Series/TheLibrarians2007'': The midwife's stubborn refusal to give Christine any pain relief despite her never requesting a natural birth would have her sued for malpractise in RealLife.

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* ''Series/TheLibrarians2007'': The midwife's stubborn refusal to give Christine any pain relief despite her never requesting a natural birth would have her sued for malpractise malpractice in RealLife.
23rd Oct '17 12:34:22 PM fruitstripegum
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* In ''Katy'' by Creator/JacquelineWilson (a modern retelling of ''Literature/WhatKatyDid''), the protagonist is permanently disabled after she breaks her back in an accident. When she tries to return to school, the headmistress excludes her from PE classes at the request of a classmate's parent, without speaking to Katy or her family or even attempting to work out any kind of compromise. This would realistically give Katy good grounds for a complaint to the board of governors, and leave the school at risk of legal action for discrimination.

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* In ''Katy'' ''Literature/{{Katy}}'' by Creator/JacquelineWilson (a modern retelling of ''Literature/WhatKatyDid''), the protagonist is permanently disabled after she breaks her back in an accident. When she tries to return to school, the headmistress excludes her from PE classes at the request of a classmate's parent, without speaking to Katy or her family or even attempting to work out any kind of compromise. This would realistically give Katy good grounds for a complaint to the board of governors, and leave the school at risk of legal action for discrimination.
12th Sep '17 4:51:40 AM WillBGood
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** Some one like [[ComicBook/SpiderMan Jameson]] who's paper is 90% about how a menace Spider-Man is, even though he has spent his whole life protecting innocent people, and him on a daily basis. You think that his paper would have shut down, or gone out of business for all the bullcrap that it is, instead Jameson gets elected mayor of New York and bankrupts the city with his anti-Spider-Man SWAT team. Though he has recently been called to account for this (which included losing the Bugle), it's taken several real-time decades. In later decades, Marvel has tried to HandWave this by showing that, aside from his maniacal hate of Spiderman, Jameson is really a very dilligent and competent editor and reporter. Unfortunatly, this varies a LOT.

to:

** Some one like [[ComicBook/SpiderMan J. Jonah Jameson]] who's whose paper is 90% about how a menace Spider-Man is, even though he has spent his whole life protecting innocent people, and him people (including him) on a daily basis. You think that his paper would have shut down, or gone out of business for all the bullcrap that it is, is; instead Jameson gets elected mayor of New York and bankrupts the city with his anti-Spider-Man SWAT team. Though he has recently been called to account for this (which included losing the Bugle), it's taken several real-time decades. In later decades, Marvel has tried to HandWave this by showing that, aside from his maniacal hate of Spiderman, Spider-Man, Jameson is really a very dilligent diligent and competent editor and reporter. Unfortunatly, Unfortunately, this varies a LOT.
23rd Jul '17 6:32:10 PM SimYouLater
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Subversions could count as RealityEnsues, when unlawful/unethical/etc. acts committed by characters who regularly get away with it or are expected by the audience to get away with it are suddenly treated the way they would be in RealLife.

SuperTrope to HollywoodLaw. Also compare the BunnyEarsLawyer -- the accomplished and competent character whose behavior would be too eccentric to tolerate if s/he weren't ''so'' very good at what s/he does.

to:

Subversions could count as RealityEnsues, when unlawful/unethical/etc. acts committed by characters who regularly get away with it or are expected by the audience to get away with it are suddenly treated the way they would be in RealLife.

RealLife. Alternatively, it could result in RageAgainstTheHeavens or RageAgainstTheAuthor, and if that fails expect either ItsAWonderfulPlot (one of ThePowersThatBe is either a DefectorFromParadise or has a HeelRealization), a ChoosingDeath sub-trope resulting in any BitterSweetEnding or DownerEnding, the start of a DeadToBeginWith StoryArc or GenreShift, unavoidable CosmicPlaything and likely CrapsackWorld or CrapsaccharineWorld, or a stalemate aversion by YouCannotKillAnIdea and free will being impossible to breach even for the creator of the setting.

SuperTrope to HollywoodLaw. Usually results from HumansAreBastards, AliensAreBastards, NatureIsNotNice and/or GodAndSatanAreBothJerks. Also compare the BunnyEarsLawyer -- the accomplished and competent character whose behavior would be too eccentric to tolerate if s/he weren't ''so'' very good at what s/he does.
4th Jul '17 2:43:25 PM Dere
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Added DiffLines:

** Snape shows obvious favoritism for his house, giving Slytherin students a high number of points for anything and using any excuse to deduct a lot of points from the other houses, especially Gryffindor. Despite this, he never gets called out or punished for it.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FictionIsntFair