History Main / FamilyUnfriendlyAesop

25th Jun '16 4:13:16 PM trulymadmoves
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/TheAngryBirdsMovie'': The explorer pigs come to the island, and most of the birds accept them, with the exception of the protagonist Red. It turns out that the pigs just want to steal the bird's eggs. This can easily be interpreted as, if someone who doesn't look like you comes to your country, chances are, they want to take advantage of you.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheAngryBirdsMovie'': ''WesternAnimation/TheAngryBirdsMovie''
**
The explorer pigs come to the island, and most of the birds accept them, with the exception of the protagonist Red. It turns out that the pigs just want to steal the bird's eggs. This can easily be interpreted as, if someone who doesn't look like you comes to your country, chances are, they want to take advantage of you.you.
** The film's Aesop has also been interpreted as "embrace your anger and use it to get revenge".
25th Jun '16 3:47:19 AM iam12741
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Considering how ''{{Disney/Zootopia}}'' is a metaphor for racism using mammals in place of humans, it was kind of inevitable. The movie demonstrates that intentionally [[InnocentlyInsensitive or not]], ''anybody'' can be a carrier of racism (the main characters ''themselves'' aren't free from this), even those who are open-minded and/or suffered the most from racism ([[spoiler: Part of [[BigBad Bellwether's]] motivation for the Night Howler plot stems from feeling like she needed revenge for the racism she suffered at the paws of many predators]]). While it's harsh, and not really a thing anybody wants to admit, it's pretty much how racism works in the real world. Fortunately, the blow is softened in a couple of senses; 1), it shows that anybody ''can'' overcome their biases if one acknowledges and actively works on moving past them (A thing [[RighteousRabbit Judy]] does as part of her CharacterDevelopment). 2) Some bigoted characters ''are'' able to become more open-minded and accepting of other groups when given the time and encouragement, such as Judy's parents (they go from distrusting all foxes to forming a partnership with a fox-family-run bakery) and [[DaChief Chief Bogo]] (He was [[FantasticRacism distrusting of Nick due to him being a fox and saw Judy, as a bunny, incapable of being a cop]]. He became a lot more accepting of them over the course of the movie).

to:

* Considering how ''{{Disney/Zootopia}}'' is a metaphor for racism using mammals in place of humans, it was kind of inevitable. The movie demonstrates that intentionally [[InnocentlyInsensitive or not]], ''anybody'' can be a carrier of racism (the main characters ''themselves'' aren't free from this), even those who are open-minded and/or suffered the most from racism ([[spoiler: Part of [[BigBad Bellwether's]] motivation for the Night Howler plot stems from feeling like she needed revenge for the racism she suffered at the paws of many predators]]). While it's harsh, and not really a thing anybody wants to admit, it's pretty much how racism works in the real world. Fortunately, the blow is softened in a couple of senses; 1), it shows that anybody ''can'' overcome their biases if one acknowledges and actively works actively on moving past them (A thing [[RighteousRabbit Judy]] does as part of her CharacterDevelopment). 2) Some bigoted characters ''are'' able to become more open-minded and accepting of other groups when given the time and encouragement, such as Judy's parents (they go from distrusting all foxes to forming a partnership with a fox-family-run bakery) and [[DaChief Chief Bogo]] (He was [[FantasticRacism distrusting of Nick due to him being a fox and saw Judy, as a bunny, incapable of being a cop]]. He became a lot more accepting of them over the course of the movie).



* Music/HarryChapin's song ''Mr. Tanner'' is about a man who runs a dry cleaner and loves to sing, and is an amateur performer in his spare time. His friends convince him to try to become a professional singer, so he throws all his money into a concert performance that... bombs. Critics are terse and dismissive with him, suggesting he'd be better off keeping his day job. Mr. Tanner returns to his home and his job and stops performing publicly. The moral here is "Sometimes chasing your dream fails". If you want to be more blunt, you could phrase it "Loving to do something doesn't make you ''good'' at it."

to:

* Music/HarryChapin's song ''Mr. Tanner'' is about a man who runs a dry cleaner and loves to sing, and is an amateur performer in his spare time. His friends convince him to try to become a professional singer, so he throws all his money into a concert performance that... bombs. Critics are terse and dismissive with him, suggesting he'd be better off keeping his day job. Mr. Tanner returns to his home and his job and stops performing publicly. The moral here is "Sometimes chasing your dream fails". If you want to be more blunt, you could phrase it "Loving to do something doesn't make you ''good'' at it."it.
*Music/CarrieUnderwood's song "Church Bells" describes an girl marrying an physically aabusive partner who repeatedly abused her. That is, until she reaches her breaking point and dishes out some, err, lethal justice. This self-enforced death sentence would prevent him from abusing any other woman and you could possibly call it self-defensive, yes, but she's legally a murderer, a lot worse then anything he did to her. The other message being taught here? Don't trust the police, if you want justice served then best do it yourself and in an unlawful fashion. Depending on the society which the listener is in, this could be quite possibly a painful reality, especially in difficult to prove cases including rape.
*Music/Rihanna's Man Down, or at least the music video. Same message as Church Bells, different genre and artist
23rd Jun '16 6:06:45 AM Adept
Is there an issue? Send a Message
21st Jun '16 7:42:31 PM merotoker
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Note that being "jarring" is not necessarily the same as being pessimistic. Some more optimistic Family-Unfriendly Aesops might be, for instance, "[[PeerPressureMakesYouEvil Peer pressure]] [[InvertedTrope is good for you]] because it convinces you to try new things" (or, conversely, "Rejecting the wisdom of the crowd could end badly") or "[[YouNeedToGetLaid Having sex reduces stress and makes you happier]], so go have some." Note also that how the Aesop is conveyed may be what makes it family-unfriendly: for instance, GoodPeopleHaveGoodSex almost always gets a far friendlier reception from MoralGuardians than YouNeedToGetLaid, though both promote sex as a good thing.

to:

Note that being "jarring" is not necessarily the same as being pessimistic. Some more optimistic Family-Unfriendly Aesops might be, for instance, "[[PeerPressureMakesYouEvil Peer pressure]] "{{peer pressure|MakesYouEvil}} [[InvertedTrope is good for you]] because it convinces you to try new things" (or, conversely, "Rejecting the wisdom of the crowd could end badly") or "[[YouNeedToGetLaid Having sex reduces stress and makes you happier]], so go have some." Note also that how the Aesop is conveyed may be what makes it family-unfriendly: for instance, GoodPeopleHaveGoodSex almost always gets a far friendlier reception from MoralGuardians than YouNeedToGetLaid, though both promote sex as a good thing.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheAngryBirdsMovie'':The explorer pigs come to the island, and most of the birds accept them, with the exception of the protagonist Red. It turns out that the pigs just want to steal the bird's eggs. This can easily be interpreted as, if someone who doesn't look like you comes to your country, chances are, they want to take advantage of you.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheAngryBirdsMovie'':The ''WesternAnimation/TheAngryBirdsMovie'': The explorer pigs come to the island, and most of the birds accept them, with the exception of the protagonist Red. It turns out that the pigs just want to steal the bird's eggs. This can easily be interpreted as, if someone who doesn't look like you comes to your country, chances are, they want to take advantage of you.



** The film also has a more brutally honest message: [[spoiler:No matter how hard you try or how much you love and know about the material, there are just things in life you ''can't'' do, at least not in the traditional sense, much like the message of ''Disney/WreckItRalph''. Accept it, and find where your real talents lie at.]] This is notably balanced out in that it clarifies that you can still work for the thing you love, but with a different task as [[spoiler: Mike never becomes an on-field Scarer, but an assistant and is treated like an equal to Scarers]].

to:

** The film also has a more brutally honest message: [[spoiler:No matter how hard you try or how much you love and know about the material, there are just things in life you ''can't'' do, at least not in the traditional sense, much like the message of ''Disney/WreckItRalph''. Accept it, and find where your real talents lie at.]] at]]. This is notably balanced out in that it clarifies that you can still work for the thing you love, but with a different task as [[spoiler: Mike never becomes an on-field Scarer, but an assistant and is treated like an equal to Scarers]].



* Considering how ''{{Disney/Zootopia}}'' is a metaphor for racism using mammals in place of humans, it was kind of inevitable. The movie demonstrates that intentionally [[InnocentlyInsensitive or not]], ''anybody'' can be a carrier of racism (the main characters ''themselves'' aren't free from this), even those who are open-minded and/or suffered the most from racism ([[spoiler: Part of [[BigBad Bellwether's]] motivation for the Night Howler plot stems from feeling like she needed revenge for the racism she suffered at the paws of many predators]]). While it's harsh, and not really a thing anybody wants to admit, it's pretty much how racism works in the real world. Fortunately, the blow is softened in a couple of senses; 1), it shows that anybody ''can'' overcome their biases if one acknowleges and actively works on moving past them (A thing [[RighteousRabbit Judy]] does as part of her CharacterDevelopment). 2) Some bigoted characters ''are'' able to become more open-minded and accepting of other groups when given the time and encouragement, such as Judy's parents (they go from distruating all foxes to forming a partnership with a fox-family-run bakery) and [[DaChief Chief Bogo]] (He was [[FantasticRacism distrusting of Nick due to him being a fox and saw Judy, as a bunny, incapable of being a cop]]. He became a lot more accepting of them over the course of the movie).

to:

* Considering how ''{{Disney/Zootopia}}'' is a metaphor for racism using mammals in place of humans, it was kind of inevitable. The movie demonstrates that intentionally [[InnocentlyInsensitive or not]], ''anybody'' can be a carrier of racism (the main characters ''themselves'' aren't free from this), even those who are open-minded and/or suffered the most from racism ([[spoiler: Part of [[BigBad Bellwether's]] motivation for the Night Howler plot stems from feeling like she needed revenge for the racism she suffered at the paws of many predators]]). While it's harsh, and not really a thing anybody wants to admit, it's pretty much how racism works in the real world. Fortunately, the blow is softened in a couple of senses; 1), it shows that anybody ''can'' overcome their biases if one acknowleges acknowledges and actively works on moving past them (A thing [[RighteousRabbit Judy]] does as part of her CharacterDevelopment). 2) Some bigoted characters ''are'' able to become more open-minded and accepting of other groups when given the time and encouragement, such as Judy's parents (they go from distruating distrusting all foxes to forming a partnership with a fox-family-run bakery) and [[DaChief Chief Bogo]] (He was [[FantasticRacism distrusting of Nick due to him being a fox and saw Judy, as a bunny, incapable of being a cop]]. He became a lot more accepting of them over the course of the movie).



* Early on in ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', Martha Kent gives Superman a rousing speech about being a hero, and a symbol, and then abruptly ends it by saying, "Or be none of it. You don't owe this world a thing. You never did." Although it's obvious from the context that what she's saying is "having super powers does not mean you are obligated to let public opinion and peer pressure force you to use them how the public sees fit, especially if they are ultimately ungrateful to you for your efforts to help; be a hero because that's what ''you'' feel is the right thing to do, not because people demand that you should,", people have had ComesGreatResponsibility beaten into their head by superhero media for decades, so it elicits a very strong reaction.



* During the conclusion of ''Film/OneHundredAndTwoDalmatians'', a major character explicitly states, as an Aesop, "For people like Cruella, there ''are'' no second chances." Okay, sure she's obsessed with making a fur coat [[KickTheDog out of the pelts of adorable puppies]], and she's nowhere near the first Disney villain to be irredeemably evil. But hearing it put so bluntly...



** Owen Lars in the role of FantasyForbiddingFather to Luke in ''A New Hope''. He really just wanted to keep Luke out of the galaxy-spanning conflict because GoodParents don't like sending their kids into danger, especially since Luke's father became the BigBad Darth Vader. Their deaths are actually treated as having ''liberated'' Luke to pursue his destiny, and after a ''very'' brief period of sorrow he displays an AngstWhatAngst attitude, never mentioning Owen and Beru again, but deeply mourning [[TheObiWan Obi-Wan]] when he dies.
** Use of motivational stories told FromACertainPointOfView left a seriously blurry line between trying to spare somebody's feelings and being a ManipulativeBastard when it advanced your goals.

to:

** Owen Lars in the role of FantasyForbiddingFather to Luke in ''A New Hope''. He really just wanted to keep Luke out of the galaxy-spanning conflict because GoodParents don't like sending their kids into danger, especially since Luke's father became the BigBad Darth Vader. Their deaths are actually treated as having ''liberated'' ''[[ConvenientlyAnOrphan liberated]]'' Luke to pursue his destiny, and after a ''very'' brief period of sorrow he displays an AngstWhatAngst attitude, never mentioning Owen and Beru again, but deeply mourning [[TheObiWan Obi-Wan]] when he dies.
** Use of motivational stories told FromACertainPointOfView [[MetaphoricallyTrue from a certain point of view]] left a seriously blurry line between trying to spare somebody's feelings and being a ManipulativeBastard when it advanced your goals.



* During the conclusion of ''Film/OneHundredAndTwoDalmatians'', a major character explicitly states, as an Aesop, "For people like Cruella, there ''are'' no second chances." Okay, sure she's obsessed with making a fur coat [[KickTheDog out of the pelts of adorable puppies]], and she's nowhere near the first Disney villain to be irredeemably evil. But hearing it put so bluntly...
* Early on in ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', Martha Kent gives Superman a rousing speech about being a hero, and a symbol, and then abruptly ends it by saying, "Or be none of it. You don't owe this world a thing. You never did." Although it's obvious from the context that what she's saying is "having super powers does not mean you are obligated to let public opinion and peer pressure force you to use them how the public sees fit, especially if they are ultimately ungrateful to you for your efforts to help; be a hero because that's what ''you'' feel is the right thing to do, not because people demand that you should,", people have had ComesGreatResponsibility beaten into their head by superhero media for decades, so it elicits a very strong reaction.



* In the famous science fiction short story "{{Literature/The Cold Equations}}," the moral is "life is fundamentally unfair." This serves as a {{deconstruction}} of stories where the day is always saved somehow, all too often by {{Contrived Coincidence}}s or AppliedPhlebotinum. However, [[http://web.archive.org/web/20060701043227/http://home.tiac.net/~cri_d/cri/1999/coldeq.html some people]] were not impressed, feeling that the writer created a [[IdiotPlot very contrived situation]] riddled with [[Headscratchers/TheColdEquations logic holes]] to justify the Aesop. {{Enforced|Trope}} in that John Campbell [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cold_Equations#Reactions sent the story back]] to Tom Godwin ''three'' times because Godwin kept saving the girl without resorting to either plot device.

to:

* In the famous science fiction short story "{{Literature/The Cold Equations}}," "Literature/TheColdEquations," the moral is "life is fundamentally unfair." This serves as a {{deconstruction}} of stories where the day is always saved somehow, all too often by {{Contrived Coincidence}}s or AppliedPhlebotinum. However, [[http://web.archive.org/web/20060701043227/http://home.tiac.net/~cri_d/cri/1999/coldeq.html some people]] were not impressed, feeling that the writer created a [[IdiotPlot very contrived situation]] riddled with [[Headscratchers/TheColdEquations logic holes]] to justify the Aesop. {{Enforced|Trope}} in that John Campbell [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cold_Equations#Reactions sent the story back]] to Tom Godwin ''three'' times because Godwin kept saving the girl without resorting to either plot device.



** You can't get much more family-unfriendly than "[[{{SlidingScaleofIdealismVersusCynicism}} suicide bombing is justified]]."

to:

** You can't get much more family-unfriendly than "[[{{SlidingScaleofIdealismVersusCynicism}} "[[SlidingScaleofIdealismVersusCynicism suicide bombing is justified]]."



* In ''Series/MortalKombatConquest'', Kung Lao is the fated champion of the Earth Realm in the next tournament, and so must survive for our world to have any chance. In one episode, he sets off into an obvious trap to get the antidote his poisoned friends need to survive, despite their telling him not to do it. He succeeds and cures them, leading to the FamilyUnfriendlyAesop that your close friends are more important than the entirety of humanity. And then Raiden shows up, in his full godly fury, to tell him quite emphatically that yes, his friends were right, and Kung Lao really is more important than them. Raiden's aesop was that the safety of the entire world is more important than one person's circle of friends.

to:

* In ''Series/MortalKombatConquest'', Kung Lao is the fated champion of the Earth Realm in the next tournament, and so must survive for our world to have any chance. In one episode, he sets off into an obvious trap to get the antidote his poisoned friends need to survive, despite their telling him not to do it. He succeeds and cures them, leading to the FamilyUnfriendlyAesop Family-Unfriendly Aesop that your close friends are more important than the entirety of humanity. And then Raiden shows up, in his full godly fury, to tell him quite emphatically that yes, his friends were right, and Kung Lao really is more important than them. Raiden's aesop was that the safety of the entire world is more important than one person's circle of friends.



** In Season 3, we get the Wicked Witch of the West holding a much redeemed Rumple as her toy and captive, driving him into madness. She effortlessly manipulated Snow White, and [[spoiler: killed off one of the most moral characters on the show, Rumple's son, just to tighten her grip on Rumple]]. Of course, when they did manage defeat the Witch, [[spoiler: the rest of the cast were willing to let her stay in jail and have a chance to repent. Rumple decided revenge was the better option, lied to his girlfriend about ''not'' going out to seek it, and stabbed the Witch to death after altering the security tapes so none would be the wiser. The morals being "If you're sneaky about it, you can get away with anything" and "some people are just too dangerous to live, even de-powered and imprisoned."]]

to:

** In Season 3, we get the Wicked Witch of the West holding a much redeemed Rumple as her toy and captive, driving him into madness. She effortlessly manipulated Snow White, and [[spoiler: killed off one of the most moral characters on the show, Rumple's son, just to tighten her grip on Rumple]]. Of course, when they did manage to defeat the Witch, [[spoiler: the rest of the cast were willing to let her stay in jail and have a chance to repent. Rumple decided revenge was the better option, lied to his girlfriend about ''not'' going out to seek it, and stabbed the Witch to death after altering the security tapes so none would be the wiser. The morals being "If you're sneaky about it, you can get away with anything" and "some people are just too dangerous to live, even de-powered and imprisoned."]]



** Off the back of that first moral: "It's fine to avoid paying rent, mooch off local cafes, and even ''steal from ATMs'', as long as you're an artist or bohemian."

to:

** Off the back of that first moral: "It's fine to avoid paying rent, mooch off local cafes, and even ''steal from ATMs'', [=ATMs=]'', as long as you're an artist or bohemian."



* Parodied in Creator/TeamStarKid's ''[[Theatre/TwistedTheUntoldStoryOfARoyalVizier Twisted]]''. The opening number "Dream A Little Harder" pokes fun at the family unfriendly morals offered up by some Disney animated fairy-tales: "If you're [[BeautyEqualsGoodness good and you're attractive]], / No need to be proactive: / Good things will just [[{{Disney/Cinderella}} happen]] [[Disney/SleepingBeauty to]] [[Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs you]]!", and "If you're sure of your intention, / Some [[{{Disney/Cinderella}} magic]] [[{{Disney/Aladdin}} intervention]] / Will give you the edge that you need!"
* ''Theatre/{{Wicked}}'': The message of "Popular", Glinda's IAmSong, is that being liked by others will get your farther than merely being a good person. You may think this is only to show what a shallow and pretentious character Glinda starts out as... Except she's ultimately proven right. Elphaba's actions, no matter how heroic and selfless, all fail to change anything as Madame Morrible launches a smear campaign against her and makes everyone too afraid of her to listen to the problems she's trying to fix. In the end it's Glinda who gets the power to dispose of the villains and change Oz for the better, but does she do it by speaking out against their crimes or trying to help their victims? No, she does it by sucking up to them and endearing herself to the dim-witted people of Oz until she has enough power and influence of her own to launch a non-violent coup d'état.



* ''Theatre/{{Wicked}}'': The message of "Popular", Glinda's IAmSong, is that being liked by others will get your farther than merely being a good person. You may think this is only to show what a shallow and pretentious character Glinda starts out as... Except she's ultimately proven right. Elphaba's actions, no matter how heroic and selfless, all fail to change anything as Madame Morrible launches a smear campaign against her and makes everyone too afraid of her to listen to the problems she's trying to fix. In the end it's Glinda who gets the power to dispose of the villains and change Oz for the better, but does she do it by speaking out against their crimes or trying to help their victims? No, she does it by sucking up to them and endearing herself to the dim-witted people of Oz until she has enough power and influence of her own to launch a non-violent coup d'état.
* Parodied in Creator/TeamStarKid's ''[[Theatre/TwistedTheUntoldStoryOfARoyalVizier Twisted]]''. The opening number "Dream A Little Harder" pokes fun at the family unfriendly morals offered up by some Disney animated fairy-tales: "If you're [[BeautyEqualsGoodness good and you're attractive]], / No need to be proactive: / Good things will just [[{{Disney/Cinderella}} happen]] [[Disney/SleepingBeauty to]] [[Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs you]]!", and "If you're sure of your intention, / Some [[{{Disney/Cinderella}} magic]] [[{{Disney/Aladdin}} intervention]] / Will give you the edge that you need!"



** To be fair, there's a specifically designed clause that states one can simply become a member of another race by forsaking any technology that is an essential part of their culture, to prevent the CargoCult apocalypses that caused this law to become the PrimeDirective.

to:

** To be fair, there's a specifically designed clause that states one can simply become a member of another race by forsaking any technology that is an essential part of their culture, to prevent the CargoCult apocalypses that caused this law to become the PrimeDirective.[[AlienNonInterferenceClause Prime Directive]].



* WebVido/HonestTrailers [[DiscussedTrope discusses this trope]] whenever they make a video of a children's movie. Notably with ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', as mentioned above.

to:

* WebVido/HonestTrailers WebVideo/HonestTrailers [[DiscussedTrope discusses this trope]] whenever they make a video of a children's movie. Notably with ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', as mentioned above.



* In ''Disney/EducationForDeath'', the Nazi school teacher uses a story of a fox hunting and eating a rabbit to point out an aesop. When Hans does what a reasonable human being would do and voices sympathy for the "poor rabbit", the teacher is horrified and punishes him, before pointing out the true moral of the story: that the rabbit should be despised for being too weak and stupid to stop the strong, cunning fox from killing him, and that the children should aspire to be like the fox. This is entirely intentional on the part of the film-makers, as Nazi ideology was very big on VirtueIsWeakness and MightMakesRight.



** Another episode was about Helga performing a stand-up comedy act in which she made insulting jokes about her friends. This upset them, so she stopped, but then her act wasn't funny. Arnold encouraged her to go back to doing the insult routine, and the audience loved it. The moral: It's OK to insult people if you're funny enough. When going back to the insult routine, she added a bit of SelfDeprecation humor to warm her audience up to the idea and it was something they all expected to see. The moral could therefore be "insults can be funny as long as everyone gets a chance to laugh."
*** ''Spongebob Squarepants'' had a similar aesop in the episode "Squirrel Jokes."
** And how could we forget about the episode where Harold, Sid, and Stinky mooned the school principal, who gave Arnold a month of detention for not divulging the names of the three boys who mooned him? This episode is either teaching us that being a "rat" is wrong or that the people who committed the prank should confess themselves. Hmm...

to:

** Another episode was about Helga performing a stand-up comedy act in which she made insulting jokes about her friends. This upset them, so she stopped, but then her act wasn't funny. Arnold encouraged her to go back to doing the insult routine, and the audience loved it. The moral: It's OK to insult people if you're funny enough. When going back to the insult routine, she added a bit of SelfDeprecation humor to warm her audience up to the idea and it was something they all expected to see. The moral could therefore be "insults can be funny as long as everyone gets a chance to laugh." ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' had a similar aesop in the episode "Squirrel Jokes."
*** ''Spongebob Squarepants'' had a similar aesop in the episode "Squirrel Jokes."
** And how could we forget about the episode where Harold, Sid, and Stinky mooned the school principal, who gave Arnold a month of detention for not divulging the names of the three boys who mooned him? This episode is either teaching us that being a "rat" is wrong or that the people who committed the prank should confess themselves. Hmm...Hmm...
* An in-universe example in ''WesternAnimation/TheLifeAndTimesOfJuniperLee''. The comic book Boom-Fist gives messages like "use violence as a first resort," "put yourself before others," and "if you can't win, make sure the other guy loses."



** "One Bad Apple" has Babs Seed [[KarmaHoudini getting away with bullying the Cutie Mark Crusaders]] because [[FreudianExcuse she was also bullied in her hometown of Manehattan]]. When we find out why Babs has been picking on the CMC, we get the {{Aesop}} that "standing up to a bully will make ''you'' a bully as well".

to:

** "One Bad Apple" has Babs Seed [[KarmaHoudini getting away with bullying the Cutie Mark Crusaders]] because [[FreudianExcuse she was also bullied in her hometown of Manehattan]]. When we find out why Babs has been picking on the CMC, we get the {{Aesop}} AnAesop that "standing up to a bully will make ''you'' a bully as well".



* An ''accidental'' case of this due to ValuesDissonance caused the ''WesternAnimation/PeppaPig'' episode "Mister Skinnylegs" to be [[BannedInChina stricken from Australian airwaves]]. The plot of the episode is that spiders shouldn't be considered scary and are okay to have in the house. While that works fine in the show's native Britain, it's unacceptable to teach this to young kids in Australia. [[JustifiedTrope For very]] [[EverythingTryingToKillYou good reason]]. Australia is ''loaded'' with venomous spiders, and actually includes some of the most dangerous spiders ''in the world''. To put this in perspective, a ''short'' list of "[[UsefulNotes/AustralianWildlife dangerous Australian spiders]]" would include the ubiquitous Red-Back Spider (basically a Black Widow with anger management issues), the White-Tailed Spider (highly poisonous, and suspected of being the infamous "necrotizing spider", a spider whose bite ''[[BodyHorror causes your flesh to start rotting away whilst you're still alive]]'') and the Sydney Funnelweb (a highly aggressive pseudo-tarantula known to have the most powerful venom in the world). Understandably, Australians don't particularly want small children to think it's okay to play with these things.



* ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'':
** "Mortynight Run" and "Auto-Erotic Assimilation" have "the universe doesn't function according to BlackAndWhiteMorality, and if you don't know the full details of the situation, it's best to not get involved at all."
** "Look Who's Purging Now" seems to teach "No matter how good a person you think you are, in the right set of circumstances, you will end up being [[HeWhoFightsMonsters just as bad as those you look down upon for being 'evil']]." Also, "no matter what happens, people will always find reasons to be violent and not learn from their mistakes".



** Some episodes like "Whale Whores" and "Night of the Living Homeless" teaches that the best way to handle your problems is to pass it onto another target

to:

** Some episodes like "Whale Whores" and "Night of the Living Homeless" teaches that the best way to handle your problems is to pass it onto another targettarget.



* A couple of episodes of "WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown" had Master Fung encouraging the team to play mind games with their opponents.



* A couple of episodes of ''WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown'' had Master Fung encouraging the team to play mind games with their opponents.



* In ''Disney/EducationForDeath'', the Nazi school teacher uses a story of a fox hunting and eating a rabbit to point out an aesop. When Hans does what a reasonable human being would do and voices sympathy for the "poor rabbit", the teacher is horrified and punishes him, before pointing out the true moral of the story: that the rabbit should be despised for being too weak and stupid to stop the strong, cunning fox from killing him, and that the children should aspire to be like the fox. This is entirely intentional on the part of the film-makers, as Nazi ideology was very big on VirtueIsWeakness and MightMakesRight.
* An ''accidental'' case of this due to ValuesDissonance caused the ''WesternAnimation/PeppaPig'' episode "Mister Skinnylegs" to be [[BannedInChina stricken from Australian airwaves]]. The plot of the episode is that spiders shouldn't be considered scary and are okay to have in the house. While that works fine in the show's native Britain, it's unacceptable to teach this to young kids in Australia. [[JustifiedTrope For very]] [[EverythingTryingToKillYou good reason]]. Australia is ''loaded'' with venomous spiders, and actually includes some of the most dangerous spiders ''in the world''. To put this in perspective, a ''short'' list of "[[UsefulNotes/AustralianWildlife dangerous Australian spiders]]" would include the ubiquitous Red-Back Spider (basically a Black Widow with anger management issues), the White-Tailed Spider (highly poisonous, and suspected of being the infamous "necrotizing spider", a spider whose bite ''[[BodyHorror causes your flesh to start rotting away whilst you're still alive]]'') and the Sydney Funnelweb (a highly aggressive pseudo-tarantula known to have the most powerful venom in the world). Understandably, Australians don't particularly want small children to think it's okay to play with these things.
* An in-universe example in ''WesternAnimation/TheLifeAndTimesOfJuniperLee''. The comic book Boom-Fist gives messages like "use violence as a first resort," "put yourself before others," and "if you can't win, make sure the other guy loses."
* ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'':
** "Mortynight Run" and "Auto-Erotic Assimilation" have "the universe doesn't function according to BlackAndWhiteMorality, and if you don't know the full details of the situation, it's best to not get involved at all."
** "Look Who's Purging Now" seems to teach "No matter how good a person you think you are, in the right set of circumstances, you will end up being [[HeWhoFightsMonsters just as bad as those you look down upon for being 'evil']]." Also, "no matter what happens, people will always find reasons to be violent and not learn from their mistakes".
15th Jun '16 6:16:14 PM TotalDramaRox97
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** "Peter-assment" teaches that female on male sexual harassment is okay if the female hasn't had sex in a while


Added DiffLines:

** Some episodes like "Whale Whores" and "Night of the Living Homeless" teaches that the best way to handle your problems is to pass it onto another target
9th Jun '16 1:35:20 PM hamza678
Is there an issue? Send a Message
9th Jun '16 1:35:19 PM hamza678
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Webcomic/TheWalkyverse'' has "Morals mean diddly squat without experiences to back them up... which is a license to screw around and do stupid things"

to:

* ''Webcomic/TheWalkyverse'' ''Webcomic/{{Walkyverse}}'' has "Morals mean diddly squat without experiences to back them up... which is a license to screw around and do stupid things"
9th Jun '16 1:33:12 PM hamza678
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Walkyverse has "Morals mean diddly squat without experiences to back them up... which is a license to screw around and do stupid things"

to:

* The Walkyverse ''Webcomic/TheWalkyverse'' has "Morals mean diddly squat without experiences to back them up... which is a license to screw around and do stupid things"
9th Jun '16 1:29:07 PM hamza678
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheAngryBirdsMovie'':The explorer pigs come to the island, and most of the birds accept them, with the exception of the protagonist Red. It turns out that the pigs just want to steal the bird's eggs. This can easily be interpreted as, if someone who doesn't look like you comes to your country, chances are, they want to take advantage of you.
9th Jun '16 1:23:00 PM hamza678
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WesternAnimation/SouthPark

to:

* WesternAnimation/SouthPark''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'':
This list shows the last 10 events of 2107. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FamilyUnfriendlyAesop