History Main / FamilyUnfriendlyAesop

25th Apr '16 4:34:35 AM Andyroid
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** "Ocarina" sees Jake deliver a rather cynical monologue that "the law ain't made to help earthy cats like us", that the powerful make laws to protect themselves and keep "the little guys" down.

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** "Ocarina" sees Jake deliver a rather cynical monologue that "the law ain't made to help earthy cats like us", and that the powerful make laws to protect themselves and keep "the little guys" down.
23rd Apr '16 6:03:28 PM Kid
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* Another classical [[AnAesop moral]] is that having imagination is ''good''. So ''When The Windman Comes'' by Antonia Michaelis is a huge subversion, with the moral "imagination, when not strictly separated from reality, is potentially very dangerous-it can isolate you and make you live in fear of imaginary horrors-all the while making you more vulnerable to RealLife. Sometimes, being a skeptic is favorable, even for a child." This is particularly jarring since many other books by the same author actually promote imagination and/or openness to seemingly impossible things.

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* Another classical [[AnAesop moral]] is that having imagination is ''good''. So ''When The Windman Comes'' by Antonia Michaelis is a huge subversion, with the moral "imagination, when not strictly separated from reality, is potentially very dangerous-it dangerous--it can isolate you and make you live in fear of imaginary horrors-all horrors--all the while making you more vulnerable to RealLife. Sometimes, being a skeptic is favorable, even for a child." This is particularly jarring since many other books by the same author actually promote imagination and/or openness to seemingly impossible things.
23rd Apr '16 5:59:31 PM Kid
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** ''The Bully'': Getting targeted by a bully at school? Don't bother to contact adults - AdultsAreUseless. Instead, ''fight back''! ''ONLY'' the bully will get in trouble... even though in real life, most schools have a "Zero tolerance" policy that would result in Sister being in just as much trouble as Tuffy. Oh, and all bullies have bad home lives, too. Some will argue that sometimes Adults ''are'' Useless, and physically self-defense can be necessary against a bully, but keep in mind that no other options were explored for dealing with said antagonist, and ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption seems ''very''out of place in a book aimed at preschoolers.

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** ''The Bully'': Getting targeted by a bully at school? Don't bother to contact adults - AdultsAreUseless. Instead, ''fight back''! ''ONLY'' the bully will get in trouble... even though in real life, most schools have a "Zero tolerance" policy that would result in Sister being in just as much trouble as Tuffy. Oh, and all bullies have bad home lives, too. Some will argue that sometimes Adults ''are'' Useless, and physically self-defense can be necessary against a bully, but keep in mind that no other options were explored for dealing with said antagonist, and ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption seems ''very''out ''very'' out of place in a book aimed at preschoolers.
23rd Apr '16 5:58:12 PM Kid
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** Another one is "The Bat and the Weasels", in which a bat escapes from a bird-hating weasel by claiming to be a mouse, then later from a second weasel who hates mice by pretending to be a bird. The moral, which Aesop himself states outright at the end of the fable, is that it's sometimes wiser to change your affiliation in order to save your own skin. It's ethically questionable and it encourages cowardice, deception and equivocation, but it's also undeniably practical and effective. (Although it also verges on BrokenAesop since, as many people have pointed out, the bat could just [[TakeAThirdOption tell the weasels he's neither a bird]] ''[[TakeAThirdOption nor]]'' [[TakeAThirdOption a mouse]].)

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** Another one is "The Bat and the Weasels", in which a bat escapes from a bird-hating weasel by claiming to be a mouse, then later from a second weasel who hates mice by pretending to be a bird. The moral, which Aesop himself states outright at the end of the fable, is that it's sometimes wiser to change your affiliation in order to save your own skin. It's ethically questionable and it encourages cowardice, deception and equivocation, but it's also undeniably practical and effective. (Although it also verges on BrokenAesop since, as many people have pointed out, the bat could just [[TakeAThirdOption tell the weasels he's neither a bird]] ''[[TakeAThirdOption nor]]'' [[TakeAThirdOption a mouse]].mouse]], though this might be a side effect of ScienceMarchesOn.)
15th Apr '16 11:47:42 AM Jhonny
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** Use of motivational stories told FromACertainPointOfView left a seriously blurry line between between trying to spare somebody's feelings and being a ManipulativeBastard when it advanced your goals.

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** Use of motivational stories told FromACertainPointOfView left a seriously blurry line between between trying to spare somebody's feelings and being a ManipulativeBastard when it advanced your goals.
15th Apr '16 4:32:42 AM Andyroid
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** "Ocarina" sees Jake deliver a rather cynical monologue about how the powerful make laws to protect themselves and keep "the little guys" down.

to:

** "Ocarina" sees Jake deliver a rather cynical monologue about how that "the law ain't made to help earthy cats like us", that the powerful make laws to protect themselves and keep "the little guys" down.
13th Apr '16 9:37:20 AM Sapphirea2
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** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E11DarkWater "Dark Water"]], Clara is willing to stab the Doctor in the back, cut the Doctor off from the TARDIS forever and possibly condemn both himself and her to a death in lava just because the Doctor won't break the laws of time to save her boyfriend, and while this isn't portrayed entirely sympathetically (and Clara breaks down into tears upon realising what she's doing) the Doctor reveals he was testing her to see how far she would go and tells her "Do you think I care about you so little that your betrayal means anything?" Both sides of this are loaded with unfortunate readings as the aesop seems to be that unconditional love even forgives really bad things -- at least if the beloved is genuinely sorry. Compare the next season's finale "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]", in which the Doctor (as a result of a TraumaCongaLine turning him into a WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds) [[spoiler: breaks the laws of time -- which threatens to ''destroy the universe'' -- just to save an unwilling Clara from her fixed-point death. She stands up to his selfishness but also implicitly forgives him...'''but''' he realizes his love for her is unhealthy for everyone and not only lets her go but also ends up being mind-wiped of memories of her -- seeing his unhappy fate as a way of making amends for his selfish actions]]. And then compare his situation to those of...

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** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E11DarkWater "Dark Water"]], Clara is willing to stab the Doctor in the back, cut the Doctor off from the TARDIS forever and possibly condemn both himself and her to a death in lava just because the Doctor won't break the laws of time to save her boyfriend, and while this isn't portrayed entirely sympathetically (and Clara breaks down into tears upon realising what she's doing) the Doctor reveals he was testing her to see how far she would go and tells her "Do you think I care about you so little that your betrayal means anything?" Both sides of this are loaded with unfortunate readings as the aesop seems to be that unconditional love even forgives really bad things -- at least if the beloved is genuinely sorry. Compare the next season's finale "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]", in which the Doctor (as Doctor, as a result of a vicious TraumaCongaLine turning him into a WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds) WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds, [[spoiler: breaks the laws of time -- which threatens to ''destroy the universe'' -- just to save an unwilling Clara from her fixed-point death. She She's horrified by his actions and stands up to his selfishness but also implicitly forgives him...'''but''' him. '''However''' he realizes his their love for her is unhealthy for everyone and not only lets her go but also ends up being mind-wiped of memories of her -- her, seeing his unhappy fate as a way of making amends for his selfish actions]]. And then compare his situation to those of...
13th Apr '16 4:20:25 AM Zark
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Family Guy'' in general isn't exactly the show you should look for aesops in.
12th Apr '16 5:49:19 PM lloyd22
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Added DiffLines:

** And how could we forget about the episode where Harold, Sid, and Stinky mooned the school principal, who gave Arnold a month of detention for not divulging the names of the three boys who mooned him? This episode is either teaching us that being a "rat" is wrong or that the people who committed the prank should confess themselves. Hmm...
6th Apr '16 2:13:29 PM bassforte123
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** Another episode was about Helga performing a stand-up comedy act in which she made insulting jokes about her friends. This upset them, so she stopped, but then her act wasn't funny. Arnold encouraged her to go back to doing the insult routine, and the audience loved it. The moral: It's OK to insult people if you're funny enough. When going back to the insult routine, she added a bit of SelfDeprecation humor to warm her audience up to the idea. The moral could therefore be "it's okay to insult people as long as you insult yourself first."

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** Another episode was about Helga performing a stand-up comedy act in which she made insulting jokes about her friends. This upset them, so she stopped, but then her act wasn't funny. Arnold encouraged her to go back to doing the insult routine, and the audience loved it. The moral: It's OK to insult people if you're funny enough. When going back to the insult routine, she added a bit of SelfDeprecation humor to warm her audience up to the idea. idea and it was something they all expected to see. The moral could therefore be "it's okay to insult people "insults can be funny as long as you insult yourself first.everyone gets a chance to laugh."
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