History Main / FamilyUnfriendlyAesop

24th Mar '17 10:28:32 PM Nakuyabi
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' has a fair number of these. One notable example is the fifth season episode "Prize Fighters" in which Daria is formally interviewed as part of her competing for a scholarship. Along the way, she learns the company offering the prize has a rather sexist and racist history, so she's rather hesitant to deal with its people. Furthermore, she considers it dishonest to attempt to behave differently from her usual manner; which is to say, to act as if she were friendly, attentive, and interesting.\\

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' has a fair number of these. One notable example is the fifth season episode "Prize Fighters" in which Daria is formally interviewed as part of her competing for a scholarship. Along the way, she learns the company offering the prize has a rather sexist and racist history, so she's rather hesitant reluctant to deal with its people. Furthermore, she considers it dishonest to attempt to behave differently from her usual manner; which is to say, to act as if she were friendly, attentive, and interesting.\\



** The most brazen lampshading of this trope occurs in the episode "Saddlesore Galactica." The sub-plot involves Lisa's bitterness over her school's band losing a competition against Ogdenville Elementary. She complains to anyone who will listen, even calling the White House. In the end, President Clinton stops by and announces he has decided to strip Ogdenville of their title. "Thank you, Lisa," he says, "for teaching kids everywhere a valuable lesson: If things don't go your way, just keep complaining until your dreams come true." Marge replies "that's a pretty lousy lesson," and Clinton shrugs, "well, I'm a pretty lousy president."

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** The most brazen lampshading of this trope occurs in the episode "Saddlesore Galactica." The sub-plot involves Lisa's bitterness over her school's band losing a competition against Ogdenville Elementary. She complains to anyone who will listen, even calling the White House. In the end, President Clinton stops by and announces he has decided to strip Ogdenville of their title. "Thank you, Lisa," he says, "for teaching kids everywhere a valuable lesson: If things don't go your way, just keep complaining until your dreams come true." Marge replies "that's a pretty lousy lesson," and Clinton shrugs, "well, shrugs. "[[ICanLiveWithThat Well, I'm a pretty pretty]] [[TakeThat lousy president." ]]"
24th Mar '17 9:19:20 PM Nakuyabi
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* The oldest version of ''Literature/SleepingBeauty'', ''Literature/SunMoonAndTalia'', features the titular heroine getting raped by the king, which results in a pregnancy and leads to her being awoken. When the king returns, he proceeds to sneak Talia and their twin children into his castle so that his ''wife'' won't find out, which she does and tries to kill all three but is found out and put to death, allowing the king to marry Talia, which is presented as a happy ending. So, apparently, raping someone and cheating on your wife is fine so long as you marry your victim, you should marry your rapist, and if your husband cheats on you, and you want revenge, you're the bad person.
** It's made worse by the fact the moral is supposed to be "Lucky people, so ítis said, Are blessed by Fortune whilst in bed". So, apparently, getting raped is considered fortunate as long as it's a king who is willing to marry you.

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* The oldest version of ''Literature/SleepingBeauty'', ''Literature/SunMoonAndTalia'', ''Literature/SleepingBeauty'' (''Literature/SunMoonAndTalia'') features the titular heroine getting raped by the king, which results in a pregnancy and leads to that ultimately results in her being awoken. When the king returns, returns and finds her awake, he proceeds to sneak Talia and their twin children into his castle so that his current ''wife'' won't find out, which out; but she does does, and [[DisproportionateRetribution tries to kill all three three]] but is found out foiled and put to death, allowing executed for the attempted murders, leaving the king free to marry Talia, which Talia. [[EsotericHappyEnding This is presented as allegedly a happy ending. So, apparently, raping someone and ending.]]\\
\\
To summarize what we learn from this tale:
cheating on your wife to rape somebody is fine so long as your victim [[DudeShesLikeInAComa isn't conscious to experience any of it]] and [[ShotgunWedding you marry your victim, her to legitimize her children]]; if someone who raped and impregnated you while you were in a coma is rich and powerful, his offer to marry you is a good deal and you should marry your rapist, accept it; and if you go seeking revenge on your husband cheats for cheating on you, and [[HeWhoFightsMonsters your jealousy will turn you want revenge, you're into]] an AxeCrazy shrew who'll let RevengeBeforeReason overtake her.
** To make matters worse,
the bad person.
** It's made worse by the fact the
original moral is supposed stated to be be: "Lucky people, so ítis said, Are blessed by Fortune whilst in bed". So, apparently, bed." In other words, getting raped is considered fortunate allegedly ''fortunate'' as long as it's a king who [[DudeShesLikeInAComa you're not conscious to experience your virginity being taken]] and your rapist is a rich and powerful ruler willing to marry you.remove any social stigmas his subjects might place on you and raise your public standing in his kingdom by marrying you. ValuesDissonance much?
24th Mar '17 8:53:49 PM Nakuyabi
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' has a fair number of these. One notable example is the fifth season episode "Prize Fighters" in which Daria is formally interviewed as part of her competing for a scholarship. Along the way, she learns the company offering the prize has a rather sexist and racist history, so she's rather hesitant to deal with its people. Furthermore, she considers it dishonest to attempt to behave differently from her usual manner; which is to say, acting friendly, attentive, and interesting.\\

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' has a fair number of these. One notable example is the fifth season episode "Prize Fighters" in which Daria is formally interviewed as part of her competing for a scholarship. Along the way, she learns the company offering the prize has a rather sexist and racist history, so she's rather hesitant to deal with its people. Furthermore, she considers it dishonest to attempt to behave differently from her usual manner; which is to say, acting to act as if she were friendly, attentive, and interesting.\\



The episode's real Aesop? "Complete honesty does not go well with diplomacy." For the show in general, the lesson one learns is "People are all flawed in their own way, and growing up is not a panacea for mental and emotional immaturity."

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The episode's real Aesop? "Complete honesty does not go well with diplomacy." For the show in general, the lesson one learns is "People "[[HumansAreFlawed People are all flawed in their own way, way]], and growing up adulthood is not a panacea for mental and emotional immaturity."
24th Mar '17 8:50:02 PM Nakuyabi
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' has a lot of these. Notable is the fifth season episode "Prize Fighters," in which Daria has to be interviewed in order to gain a scholarship. However, she learns the company offering the prize has a rather sexist and racist history, so she feels uncertain about dealing with these people. Furthermore, she doesn't want to obtain the money by acting in a false manner: acting friendly, attentive, and interesting. When she is finally interviewed, she behaves as she always does: honest, sarcastic, and clipped. One might expect her to win the scholarship based on an Aesop of being true to oneself and not putting on false pretenses. But no, the interviewer is shocked by her crass behaviour and she is refused the money after all, but so are the two friends she was competing against: the intelligent but obnoxious, irritating butt-kisser, and the scripted-response-spouting black, female valedictorian. The real Aesop runs along the lines that in the real world, which is often unethical and imperfect, you cannot always expect to win out even if you stick to your principles... and sometimes, even if you don't. The entire show had a basic principle of "Everyone sucks in their own way, and adulthood is not a cure for immaturity." What's even more telling is that the interviewer already had his mind made up to give Daria the scholarship out of the three, but changed his mind after he saw her anti-social behavior.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' has a lot fair number of these. Notable One notable example is the fifth season episode "Prize Fighters," Fighters" in which Daria has to be is formally interviewed in order to gain as part of her competing for a scholarship. However, Along the way, she learns the company offering the prize has a rather sexist and racist history, so she feels uncertain about dealing she's rather hesitant to deal with these its people. Furthermore, she doesn't want considers it dishonest to obtain the money by acting in a false manner: attempt to behave differently from her usual manner; which is to say, acting friendly, attentive, and interesting. When interesting.\\
\\
At her actual interview, therefore,
she is finally interviewed, she generally behaves the same as she always does: honest, ever: [[BrutalHonesty brutally honest]], sarcastic, and clipped. One might expect her to win the scholarship based on an Aesop the old StockAesop of [[BeYourself being true to oneself oneself]] and not putting on false pretenses. But no, a masquerade, but that's not what happens: the interviewer is shocked by finds her crass behaviour behavior rude and she is refused insulting and the money after all, company refuses her the scholarship. More to the point, though the interviewer had already made up his mind that Daria was the most qualified of the three contestants, her anti-social personality convinced him not that one of the other contestants deserved the prize, but so are that ''no one'' did: the other two friends she was competing against: the were an intelligent but obnoxious, irritating butt-kisser, obnoxious butt-kisser and the a scripted-response-spouting black, black and female valedictorian. valedictorian (who seemed to presume she was entitled to the prize simply ''because'' she was black and female).\\
\\
The episode's real Aesop runs along Aesop? "Complete honesty does not go well with diplomacy." For the lines that in the real world, which is often unethical and imperfect, you cannot always expect to win out even if you stick to your principles... and sometimes, even if you don't. The entire show had a basic principle of "Everyone sucks in general, the lesson one learns is "People are all flawed in their own way, and adulthood growing up is not a cure panacea for mental and emotional immaturity." What's even more telling is that the interviewer already had his mind made up to give Daria the scholarship out of the three, but changed his mind after he saw her anti-social behavior.
17th Mar '17 6:21:33 PM KhadgarJones1
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* ''Film/Case39''. Sometimes, parents are totally justified in abusing their child. (The astonishing number of children in RealLife who suffer physical and mental abuse because their parents think they're possessed by demons may have a bone to pick with this movie. The ones who survive the abuse, anyway.)
** Other honourable mentions her should go to ''Film/TheExorcist'',''Film/ThePossession'', ''Film/TheExorcismOfEmilyRose'' and every other horror film ever made about exorcisms. Exorcisms kill people, and glorifying them for the sake of cheap scares isn't exactly socially responsible.

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* ''Film/Case39''. Sometimes, parents are totally justified in abusing their child. (The astonishing number of children in RealLife who suffer physical and mental abuse because their parents think they're possessed by demons may have a bone to pick with this movie. The ones who survive the abuse, anyway.)
** Other honourable mentions her should go to ''Film/TheExorcist'',''Film/ThePossession'', ''Film/TheExorcismOfEmilyRose'' and every other horror film ever made about exorcisms. Exorcisms
) Some types of exorcisms kill people, and glorifying them those ones for the sake of cheap scares isn't exactly socially responsible.
16th Mar '17 10:26:08 PM twingle93
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* The plot of the ''Series/AmazingStories'' episode: "Gather Ye Acorns". A small elf tells a kid to forget about studying to be a doctor and that hard work is not a virtue. "There's doctors aplenty is this world," he says, "What we could truly do with is a few more dreamers." We switch from 1932 to 1938 and he winds up spending all his hard-earned money on a fancy car. His dad is a little peeved, to say the least, and boots him out of the house. Years go by and the boy is now old, broke, friendless, homeless and trying to beg for enough money to gas up his car to commit suicide with it. But a wealthy lady notices some collector's piece in his collection of junk and offers him $10,000 for it. Cut to him now wealthy from selling all his childhood collectables. It turns out that all his artifacts are worth millions. He's now WealthyEverAfter, but it has cost him most of his life and now has only a short amount of time to enjoy it. This is treated as a happy ending, with the message: Don't work, don't make plans, don't have relationships with friends or family, and most of all: hoard. Money is the most important thing in life, and someday you may become rich when you're extremely old which will make up for the poverty, loneliness and misery you have made for yourself up to that point. Maybe he would have lived a more fulfilling life as a doctor helping people? Or perhaps he could still have worked and maintained relationships and held onto his keepsakes?
15th Mar '17 12:59:58 AM rufusluciusivan
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* After using ThePowerOfFriendship and ThePowerOfLove during the first two seasons of ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', Steven learns in Season 3 through his confrontations with [[spoiler:Bismuth, Jasper and Eyeball]] the very harsh Aesop that, sometimes, reasoning and showing kindness won't be enough to convince someone to do a HeelFaceTurn. Later in Season 4, [[spoiler:Navy's betrayal]] goes one step further by showing that [[TheFarmerAndTheViper some people will even take advantage of your kindness, only to stab you in the back later]].
12th Mar '17 7:34:18 AM Troperinik
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* Episode 63 of ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'' teaches kids that they should put up a fight if someone tries bullying them.
6th Mar '17 5:33:30 PM Briguy52748
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** "Bart the Lover," where Bart is virtually not punished for playing a cruel joke on his teacher (writing prank love letters from a non-existent person named Woodrow to Mrs. Krabappel), in [[DisproportionateRetribution retribution]] for damaging the classroom aquarium through his reckless behavior. Instead of making him man up and 1. Accept the consequences of his original punishment (detention and restitution); 2. After he admitted to his parents his ruse, never made to confess to Mrs. Krabappel, Principal Skinner and Superintendent Chalmers, and then accept surely far more severe consequences (which in the real world would likely include permanent expulsion, counseling and enrollment in an alternative school ('''''if''''' they would accept him)) ... he is merely assisted in writing a farewell letter from "Woodrow," Homer and Marge agreeing that letting down the lonely Mrs. Krabappel easy is better than making Bart tell the truth. Bart learns virtually nothing (actions have consequences) and does similar unforgivable stunts in the future.
4th Mar '17 8:46:20 AM mario0987
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** Some -- but not all -- of these aesops are in the process of being reversed now that [[spoiler: Rumplestiltskin has lost nearly everything he had because he refused to change. He and Regina even discuss the "if you're sneaky about it, you can get everything" aesop shortly before Rumples point of view is proven wrong]].

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** Some -- but not all -- of these aesops are in the process of being reversed now that [[spoiler: Rumplestiltskin has lost nearly everything he had because he refused to change. He and Regina even discuss the "if you're sneaky about it, you can get everything" aesop shortly before Rumples point of view is proven wrong]]. Regina also suffers from a repeated failure to get permanent happiness which is implied to be the work of LaserGuidedKarma.
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