History Main / EveryTenThousandPoints

22nd Apr '17 6:58:21 PM nombretomado
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** In SuperPaperMario your high score is actually your ExperiencePoints so achieving a high score would lead you to be more powerful.

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** In SuperPaperMario ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'' your high score is actually your ExperiencePoints so achieving a high score would lead you to be more powerful.
23rd Jan '17 7:00:24 PM WillKeaton
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** In ''VideoGame/StarFox64'', your shield meter doubled if you collected three gold rings in a stage. Collecting another three gold rings within that same stage earns you an extra Arwing (extra life.)

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** In ''VideoGame/StarFox64'', your shield meter doubled if you collected three gold rings in a stage. Collecting another three gold rings within that same stage earns you an extra Arwing (extra life.)
23rd Jan '17 6:59:53 PM WillKeaton
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* In ''VideoGame/ArmedPoliceBatrider'', by default, every 1.5 million points you get an extra life. Depending on the game version, it's either an instant OneUp, or the next item that you generate once you cross the point boundary becomes a 1-up item. Fail to grab the 1-up and the announcer lets out a BigNo.

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* In ''VideoGame/ArmedPoliceBatrider'', by default, every 1.5 million points you get an extra life. Depending on the game version, it's either an instant OneUp, or the next item that you generate once you cross the point boundary becomes a 1-up item. Fail to grab the 1-up and the announcer lets out a BigNo.BigNo
23rd Jan '17 11:22:32 AM ZombieAladdin
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Usually in games, the goal is to have the most points, in order to win. Yet when a game [[EndlessGame can go on indefinitely]], the goal is to get as many points as possible. This likely started with pinball, but is more famous for VideoGames, particularly [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames Golden Age]] video games and puzzle games like VideoGame/{{Tetris}}.

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Usually in games, the goal is to have the most points, in order to win. Yet when a game [[EndlessGame can go on indefinitely]], the goal is to get as many points as possible. This likely started with pinball, {{pinball}}, but is more famous for VideoGames, particularly [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames Golden Age]] video games and puzzle games like VideoGame/{{Tetris}}.



* {{Pinball}} machines in general use this to its fullest potential. Every modern machine will display a value which awards a free game to the player once it is surpassed, and most will also award additional games for earning enough points to appear on the high score list. Newer games can also be set to give out extra balls for points as well. (pinball 2000 used that as the default settings)

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* {{Pinball}} machines in general use this to its fullest potential. Every modern machine will display a value which awards a free game to the player once it is surpassed, and most will also award additional games for earning enough points to appear on the high score list. These are signified by a loud knock from inside the machine, using an aptly-named solenoid called a "knocker," an artifact from before pre-recorded audio (and thus was the only good way to alert the player to something). Newer games can also be set to give out extra balls for points as well. (pinball well, making it a straighter example of this trope. (Pinball 2000 used that as the default settings)settings.) Whereas video game makers refer to them as "extends," as seen at the description up top, pinball people call them "replays."
28th Oct '16 8:04:35 PM colBoh
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* The later ''VideoGame/CommanderKeen'' games doubled up on this trope--you could get twenty thousand, then forty thousand, then eighty thousand, then a hundred and sixty thousand, and so on (up to at least 2,560,000 points, which is impossible to achieve without cheating), ''as well as'' collecting little items to get a hundred of them to gain an extra life. Of course, you could save mid-level anyway [[MeaninglessLives so it didn't matter]].
** Early ''VideoGame/CommanderKeen'' games simply gave you one life for every 20,000 points, and had several levels containing enough points in an easily obtainable location to make infinite lives a cinch.

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* The later first three ''VideoGame/CommanderKeen'' games doubled up on this trope--you could get twenty thousand, games, as well as the GaidenGame, ''Keen Dreams'', gave Keen an extra life every 20,000 points. There were several levels containing enough points in an easily obtainable location to make infinite lives a cinch.
** In the later games, the score you needed would double instead: first 20,000,
then forty thousand, 40,000, then eighty thousand, 80,000, then a hundred and sixty thousand, 160,000, and so on (up to at least 2,560,000 points, which is impossible to achieve without cheating), ''as well as'' collecting little items to get a hundred of them and the games ''also'' had the LawOfOneHundred to gain an extra life. Of course, you could save mid-level anyway [[MeaninglessLives so it didn't matter]].
** Early ''VideoGame/CommanderKeen'' games simply gave you one life for every 20,000 points, and had several levels containing enough points in an easily obtainable location to make infinite lives a cinch.
matter]].
28th Oct '16 2:02:16 PM nombretomado
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Usually in games, the goal is to have the most points, in order to win. Yet when a game [[EndlessGame can go on indefinitely]], the goal is to get as many points as possible. This likely started with pinball, but is more famous for VideoGames, particularly [[TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames Golden Age]] video games and puzzle games like VideoGame/{{Tetris}}.

to:

Usually in games, the goal is to have the most points, in order to win. Yet when a game [[EndlessGame can go on indefinitely]], the goal is to get as many points as possible. This likely started with pinball, but is more famous for VideoGames, particularly [[TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames Golden Age]] video games and puzzle games like VideoGame/{{Tetris}}.
19th Jul '16 8:42:41 PM PaulA
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* In the ''LegoStarWars'' games, if you collect enough studs (points) in each level, you get a part of an unlockable item.
** Really, in any of the Lego videogames you pretty much do the same thing within the featured franchises. It's just that ''LegoStarWars'' [[FollowTheLeader pretty much started the trend]].

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* In the ''LegoStarWars'' games, VideoGame/{{LEGO Adaptation Game}}s, beginning with ''VideoGame/LEGOStarWars'', if you collect enough studs (points) in each level, you get a part of an unlockable item.
** Really, in any of the Lego videogames you pretty much do the same thing within the featured franchises. It's just that ''LegoStarWars'' [[FollowTheLeader pretty much started the trend]].
17th Jun '16 10:37:04 AM Saurubiker
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* The early ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' games tended to follow the same pattern: on [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaI the first NES game]] you'd get your first extra life when you got 30,000 points, the second one at 50,000 points, and each subsequent extra life for every 50,000 points afterward. The game had a ton of hidden treasures worth a lot of points to help you in this task, including one before you even enter the castle.

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* The early ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' games tended to follow the same pattern: on [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaI the first NES game]] you'd get your first extra life when you got at 30,000 points, the second one at 50,000 points, points and each subsequent extra life for every 50,000 points afterward. The game had a ton of hidden treasures worth a lot of points to help you in this task, including one before you even enter the castle.
17th Jun '16 9:47:51 AM Saurubiker
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* In ''VideoGame/FinalFight'', this was only way to get another lives:

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* In ''VideoGame/FinalFight'', this was only way to get another lives:lives in most versions of the game (except the ''Guy'' and ''One'' version on the SNES and GBA respectively, which introduced a 1-up item):



* The early ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' games tended to follow the same pattern: you'd get your first extra life when you got 10,000 points, and another extra life for each subsequent additional 20,000 after that. The first ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'' had a ton of hidden treasures worth a lot of points to help you in this task, including one before you even enter the castle.

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* The early ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' games tended to follow the same pattern: on [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaI the first NES game]] you'd get your first extra life when you got 10,000 30,000 points, the second one at 50,000 points, and another extra life for each subsequent additional 20,000 after that. extra life for every 50,000 points afterward. The first ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'' game had a ton of hidden treasures worth a lot of points to help you in this task, including one before you even enter the castle.
24th Apr '16 6:41:51 PM Prfnoff
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Guardic'' for the UsefulNotes/{{MSX}} gives an extra Guardic every 20,000 points. The jingle that plays when you get this is not the OneUp jingle familiar from other Creator/{{Compile}} games.
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