History Main / EsotericHappyEnding

14th Apr '16 6:46:48 PM HamburgerTime
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* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' has Sakura Haruno's ending, which sees her married to her longtime crush Sasuke Uchiha with a daughter, Sarada. Great! Except for the fact that in the intervening years Sasuke had pulled a FaceHeelTurn, abused Sakura both physically and psychologically on several occasions, tried to murder her friends, and even after [[HeelFaceRevolvingDoor turning Face again]] and marrying her he abandoned her while she was pregnant with a rather flimsy justification and has never even met Sarada. Many fans felt this plot point came uncomfortably close to an endorsement of DomesticAbuse, especially after a WordOfGod statement said that if Sakura had gotten over her crush on Sasuke even after all he'd done, ''she'' would be the one at fault.

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* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' has ''Manga/{{Naruto}}''
**
Sakura Haruno's ending, which ending sees her married to her longtime crush Sasuke Uchiha with a daughter, Sarada. Great! Except for the fact that in the intervening years Sasuke had pulled a FaceHeelTurn, abused Sakura both physically and psychologically on several occasions, tried to murder her friends, and even after [[HeelFaceRevolvingDoor turning Face again]] and marrying her he abandoned her while she was pregnant with a rather flimsy justification and has never even met Sarada. Many fans felt this plot point came uncomfortably close to an endorsement of DomesticAbuse, especially after a WordOfGod statement said that if Sakura had gotten over her crush on Sasuke even after all he'd done, ''she'' would be the one at fault.fault.
** Many fans were also unsatisfied with the fates of the villains. Of the BigBadEnsemble members, only [[WellIntentionedExtremist Danzo]], [[GenericDoomsdayVillain Kaguya and Zetsu]] receive severe punishments; the rest are either [[RedemptionEqualsDeath forgiven in death]] ([[DragonInChief Nagato]], [[TheManBehindTheMan Obito]], [[PredecessorVillain Madara]]), get a slap on the wrist ([[MadScientist Orochimaru]], [[DangerousDeserter the aforementioned Sasuke]]), or [[KarmaHoudini just plain aren't punished at all]] ([[DragonAscendant Kabuto]]).
10th Apr '16 6:56:12 AM SharkToast
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9th Apr '16 1:13:41 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/HouseOnHauntedHill1999'': The movie ends with the final two survivors escaping the evil ghosts of the house by climbing the tower and leaving through a window. Cue the sunshine and "we're alive!" hugs. They're still both stranded on top of a haunted house which is ''itself'' alive and will devour them the moment they go back inside, with no way down except a 200 foot drop off a cliff and no one coming to their rescue. How are they getting out of there again?
7th Apr '16 9:52:12 AM WanderingBrowser
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* Roald Dahl's ''TheWitches''. The protagonist learns that he's stuck as a mouse and that mice don't live very long, but he's happy because he'll probably die near the same time as his elderly grandmother and doesn't care about living if he's not with her; they will live out their lives tracking down and destroying other witches together. The two also ponder Bruno's fate. One states that his mouse-hating mother probably drowned him in a bucket, but nobody seems very disturbed by this possibility. The movie has an unabashed happy ending where the last witch, who had undergone a HeelFaceTurn, undoes the mouse spell on the protagonist and is implied to do the same to Bruno. While many were appreciative of this happier ending, Roald Dahl was infamously ''not''.

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* Roald Dahl's Creator/{{Roald Dahl}}'s ''TheWitches''. The protagonist learns that he's stuck as a mouse and that mice don't live very long, but he's happy because he'll probably die near the same time as his elderly grandmother and doesn't care about living if he's not with her; they will live out their lives tracking down and destroying other witches together. The two also ponder Bruno's fate. One states that his mouse-hating mother probably drowned him in a bucket, but nobody seems very disturbed by this possibility. The movie has an unabashed happy ending where the last witch, who had undergone a HeelFaceTurn, undoes the mouse spell on the protagonist and is implied to do the same to Bruno. While many were appreciative of this happier ending, Roald Dahl was infamously ''not''.


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** The sheer ValuesDissonance of applying this trope to "The Street" is why it's almost impossible to find it in print, as it involves treating the spontaneous collapse of an overcrowded slum that [[KillEmAll kills everybody living there]] as a good thing. Why? Because A: it used to be a beautiful Colonial country lane line with rosebushes and is now a dirty slum, and B: all of the people living in it are [[EvilForeigner dirty non-WASP immigrants ungratefully plotting revolution against America for taking them in]]... at least, [[TakeOurWordForIt so the narration says they are]].
7th Apr '16 7:20:17 AM erforce
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* WordOfGod describes ''Film/{{Oldboy}}'' as having a happy ending that's sad or a sad ending that's happy. Either way, the implication is that the protagonist continues to carry on an incestful relationship with his own unwitting daughter, and that he may or may not know himself.

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* WordOfGod describes ''Film/{{Oldboy}}'' ''Film/{{Oldboy 2003}}'' as having a happy ending that's sad or a sad ending that's happy. Either way, the implication is that the protagonist continues to carry on an incestful relationship with his own unwitting daughter, and that he may or may not know himself.
27th Mar '16 10:41:27 AM Sapphirea2
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*** Clara can never return to her old life and family on Earth; though by this point in the series they meant little to her compared to a life of adventure, it's still pretty sad for her loved ones and colleagues, who only know her to have died a mysterious death. And since the universe ''is'' holding together, what will finally gets Clara to return to her '''extremely painful death?''' Will she remember she has to go back? Will she have to be forced into it?

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*** Clara can never return to her old life and family on Earth; though by this point in the series they meant little to her compared to a life of adventure, it's still pretty sad for her loved ones and colleagues, who only know her to have died a mysterious death. And since the universe ''is'' holding together, what will finally gets get Clara to return to her '''extremely painful death?''' Will she remember she has to go back? Will she have to be forced into it?it? Will she screw up so badly that death seems the only way to atone?
27th Mar '16 10:39:50 AM Sapphirea2
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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]" (the Series 9 finale) has the Doctor defy his people and risk all time and space to save Clara from her fixed-point death by removing her from her timestream just before she dies, intending to mind wipe her of memories of him and return her to Earth. In the BittersweetEnding, the Doctor repents and ends up being mind wiped of memories of her, leaving him free to move on with his life, while the now-functionally immortal Clara ends up with her own TARDIS. Accompanied by fellow functional immortal Ashildr/Me, she decides to go back to Gallifrey and her death "the long way 'round" -- the universe will hold together so long as she returns at ''some'' point. '''But''' the Doctor would not take Ashildr on as a companion because as a virtual immortal himself both of them would become emotionally distant from mortals and even villainous, a problem she was already struggling with. Thus, the women could become what the Doctor -- who does not know what happened to them -- feared unless they acquire mortal companions for their new adventures. And since the universe ''is'' holding together, what presumably awful event will finally gets Clara to return to her '''extremely painful death?''' Meanwhile, the Doctor is now a fugitive from his people and homeworld -- again -- for his actions during his SanitySlippage, the exiled Rassilon and his cronies are the types who would seek {{Revenge}} for his bloodlessly overthrowing them, and he's left a power vacuum at the top by abandoning his Lord President post in favor of trying to save Clara! It's inevitable later seasons will at least reveal the probably-ugly fallout of the Doctor's actions with regard to Gallifrey and the Time Lords, but until then, all one can do is ponder the FridgeHorror.

to:

** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]" (the Series 9 finale) has the Doctor defy his people and risk all time and space to save Clara from her fixed-point death by removing her from her timestream just before she dies, intending to mind wipe her of memories of him and return her to Earth. In the BittersweetEnding, the Doctor repents and ends up being mind wiped of memories of her, leaving him free to move on with his life, while the now-functionally immortal Clara ends up with her own TARDIS. Accompanied by fellow functional immortal Ashildr/Me, she decides to go back to Gallifrey and her death "the long way 'round" in pursuit of new adventures -- the universe will hold together so long as she returns at ''some'' point. '''But''' The problems with this ending come from several angles.
*** Clara can never return to her old life and family on Earth; though by this point in
the series they meant little to her compared to a life of adventure, it's still pretty sad for her loved ones and colleagues, who only know her to have died a mysterious death. And since the universe ''is'' holding together, what will finally gets Clara to return to her '''extremely painful death?''' Will she remember she has to go back? Will she have to be forced into it?
*** The
Doctor would not take Ashildr on as a companion because as a virtual immortal himself both of them would become emotionally distant from mortals and even villainous, a problem she was already struggling with. Thus, the women could become what the Doctor -- who does not know what happened to them -- feared -- and he doesn't know they're gallavanting around the universe, so he can't stop them if they go bad -- unless they acquire mortal companions for their new adventures. And since the universe ''is'' holding together, what presumably awful event will finally gets companions. As well, can Clara be happy with a traveling companion who's virtually an anti-Doctor, given how much she came to return to her '''extremely painful death?''' Meanwhile, love and need him?
*** In the meantime, after millennia spent pining for them and defending them,
the Doctor is now a fugitive from his people and homeworld -- again -- for his actions during his SanitySlippage, the SanitySlippage. The exiled Rassilon and his cronies are the types who would seek {{Revenge}} for his bloodlessly overthrowing them, and he's left a power vacuum at the top by abandoning his Lord President post in favor of trying to save Clara! post. It's inevitable later seasons will at least reveal the probably-ugly fallout outcome of the Doctor's actions with regard to Gallifrey and the Time Lords, these events at least but until then, all one can do is ponder the FridgeHorror.then...
27th Mar '16 10:27:00 AM Sapphirea2
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* Roald Dahl's ''TheWitches''. The protagonist learns that he's stuck as a mouse and that mice don't live very long, but he's happy because he'll probably die near the same time as his elderly grandmother and doesn't care about living if he's not with her. The two also ponder Bruno's fate. One states that his mouse-hating mother probably drowned him in a bucket, but nobody seems very disturbed by this possibility. The movie has an unabashed happy ending where the last witch, who had undergone a HeelFaceTurn, undoes the mouse spell on the protagonist and is implied to do the same to Bruno. While many were appreciative of this happier ending, Roald Dahl was infamously ''not''.

to:

* Roald Dahl's ''TheWitches''. The protagonist learns that he's stuck as a mouse and that mice don't live very long, but he's happy because he'll probably die near the same time as his elderly grandmother and doesn't care about living if he's not with her.her; they will live out their lives tracking down and destroying other witches together. The two also ponder Bruno's fate. One states that his mouse-hating mother probably drowned him in a bucket, but nobody seems very disturbed by this possibility. The movie has an unabashed happy ending where the last witch, who had undergone a HeelFaceTurn, undoes the mouse spell on the protagonist and is implied to do the same to Bruno. While many were appreciative of this happier ending, Roald Dahl was infamously ''not''.



** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]" (the Series 9 finale) has the Doctor defy his people and risk all time and space to save Clara from her fixed-point death by removing her from her timestream just before she dies, intending to mind wipe her of memories of him and return her to Earth. In the BittersweetEnding, the Doctor repents and ends up being mind wiped of memories of her instead, leaving him free to move on with his life, while Clara -- who is now functionally immortal -- ends up with her own TARDIS and, accompanied by another functional immortal in Ashildr/Me, decides to return to Gallifrey and her death "the long way 'round", enjoying more adventures until then. '''But''' the Doctor would not take Ashildr on as a companion because as a virtual immortal himself both of them would become emotionally distant from mortals and from there villainous, a problem she was already struggling with on her own. Thus, Clara and she could become what the Doctor -- who does not know what happened to them -- feared unless they acquire mortal companions. And given that the universe is holding together, what event finally gets Clara to return to her '''death'''? Meanwhile, the Doctor is now a fugitive from his people and homeworld -- again -- for his actions during his SanitySlippage; the exiled Rassilon and his cronies are the types who would seek {{Revenge}} for his bloodlessly overthrowing them; and he's left a power vacuum at the top by abandoning his Lord President post! It's nigh-inevitable later seasons will reveal the potentially disastrous fallout of the Doctor's actions with regard to Gallifrey and the Time Lords, but until definitive answers are given, all this ending leaves is a lot of FridgeHorror.

to:

** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]" (the Series 9 finale) has the Doctor defy his people and risk all time and space to save Clara from her fixed-point death by removing her from her timestream just before she dies, intending to mind wipe her of memories of him and return her to Earth. In the BittersweetEnding, the Doctor repents and ends up being mind wiped of memories of her instead, her, leaving him free to move on with his life, while Clara -- who is now functionally the now-functionally immortal -- Clara ends up with her own TARDIS and, accompanied TARDIS. Accompanied by another fellow functional immortal in Ashildr/Me, she decides to return go back to Gallifrey and her death "the long way 'round", enjoying more adventures until then. 'round" -- the universe will hold together so long as she returns at ''some'' point. '''But''' the Doctor would not take Ashildr on as a companion because as a virtual immortal himself both of them would become emotionally distant from mortals and from there even villainous, a problem she was already struggling with on her own. with. Thus, Clara and she the women could become what the Doctor -- who does not know what happened to them -- feared unless they acquire mortal companions. companions for their new adventures. And given that since the universe is ''is'' holding together, what presumably awful event will finally gets Clara to return to her '''death'''? '''extremely painful death?''' Meanwhile, the Doctor is now a fugitive from his people and homeworld -- again -- for his actions during his SanitySlippage; SanitySlippage, the exiled Rassilon and his cronies are the types who would seek {{Revenge}} for his bloodlessly overthrowing them; them, and he's left a power vacuum at the top by abandoning his Lord President post! post in favor of trying to save Clara! It's nigh-inevitable inevitable later seasons will at least reveal the potentially disastrous probably-ugly fallout of the Doctor's actions with regard to Gallifrey and the Time Lords, but until definitive answers are given, then, all this ending leaves one can do is a lot of ponder the FridgeHorror.
23rd Mar '16 8:19:57 AM onyhow
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* [[WordOfGod The director claims]] that the ending of ''Anime/FiveCentimetersPerSecond'' is supposed to be uplifting, because Takaki smiles as he walks away in the last scene, indicating that he has moved on. But most viewers see it as a DownerEnding because he DidNotGetTheGirl. ''Anime/VoicesOfADistantStar'' has the opposite issue; it's easy to miss the subtle implication that Mikako and Noboru will eventually be reunited, [[LostInTranslation especially in poorly translated versions.]]

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* [[WordOfGod The director claims]] that the ending of ''Anime/FiveCentimetersPerSecond'' is supposed to be uplifting, because Takaki smiles as he walks away in the last scene, indicating that he has moved on. But most viewers see it as a DownerEnding because he DidNotGetTheGirl. ''Anime/VoicesOfADistantStar'' has the opposite issue; it's easy to miss the subtle implication that Mikako and Noboru will eventually be reunited, [[LostInTranslation especially in poorly translated versions.]]versions]] (though the manga adaptation is more explicit on said implication).
17th Mar '16 6:26:34 AM Sapphirea2
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** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]" (the Series 9 finale) has the Doctor risk all time and space to save Clara from her fixed-point death by removing her from her timestream just before she dies, intending to mind wipe her of memories of him and return her to Earth. In the BittersweetEnding, the Doctor repents and ends up being mind wiped of memories of her instead, leaving him free to move on with his life, while Clara -- who is functionally immortal in this state -- ends up with her own TARDIS and, accompanied by another functional immortal in Ashildr/Me, decides to return to Gallifrey and her death "the long way 'round", enjoying more adventures. The problem? It was established earlier in the season that the Doctor would not take Ashildr on as a companion because as a virtual immortal himself it would be easy from both of them to become emotionally distant from mortals and from there villainous, a problem she was already struggling with on her own. Thus, Clara and Ashildr could just become what the Doctor -- who does not know what happened to them -- feared, making for a most unhappy ending somewhere down the line unless they acquire mortal companions the way the Doctor does. Meanwhile, the Doctor is now a fugitive from his people and homeworld once again for his actions during his SanitySlippage, and the exiled Rassilon and his cronies might be tracking him down seeking {{Revenge}}. Bizarrely, the setup could easily have had a '''non'''-esoteric bittersweet ending: The Doctor and Clara return to Gallifrey together, she meets her fate, and he could then reconcile with the Time Lords and Ohila before moving on with his life. It's nigh-inevitable later seasons will reveal the fallout of the Doctor's actions with regard to Gallifrey and the Time Lords, if not Clara and Ashildr, but until definitive answers are given, all this ending leaves is a lot of FridgeHorror.

to:

** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]" (the Series 9 finale) has the Doctor defy his people and risk all time and space to save Clara from her fixed-point death by removing her from her timestream just before she dies, intending to mind wipe her of memories of him and return her to Earth. In the BittersweetEnding, the Doctor repents and ends up being mind wiped of memories of her instead, leaving him free to move on with his life, while Clara -- who is now functionally immortal in this state -- ends up with her own TARDIS and, accompanied by another functional immortal in Ashildr/Me, decides to return to Gallifrey and her death "the long way 'round", enjoying more adventures. The problem? It was established earlier in the season that adventures until then. '''But''' the Doctor would not take Ashildr on as a companion because as a virtual immortal himself it would be easy from both of them to would become emotionally distant from mortals and from there villainous, a problem she was already struggling with on her own. Thus, Clara and Ashildr she could just become what the Doctor -- who does not know what happened to them -- feared, making for a most unhappy ending somewhere down the line feared unless they acquire mortal companions companions. And given that the way the Doctor does. universe is holding together, what event finally gets Clara to return to her '''death'''? Meanwhile, the Doctor is now a fugitive from his people and homeworld once -- again -- for his actions during his SanitySlippage, and SanitySlippage; the exiled Rassilon and his cronies might be tracking him down seeking {{Revenge}}. Bizarrely, are the setup could easily have had a '''non'''-esoteric bittersweet ending: The Doctor types who would seek {{Revenge}} for his bloodlessly overthrowing them; and Clara return to Gallifrey together, she meets her fate, and he could then reconcile with he's left a power vacuum at the Time Lords and Ohila before moving on with top by abandoning his life. Lord President post! It's nigh-inevitable later seasons will reveal the potentially disastrous fallout of the Doctor's actions with regard to Gallifrey and the Time Lords, if not Clara and Ashildr, but until definitive answers are given, all this ending leaves is a lot of FridgeHorror.
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