History Main / EasyEvangelism

14th Aug '17 10:02:06 PM HighCrate
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** [[spoiler: Nux]] goes from a die-hard adherent of Immortan Joe's cult, sent into a fervor of religious ecstasy when Joe so much as made ''eye contact'' with him, to being willing to die to oppose his tyranny after a short pep talk from a pretty girl. A fine example of TropesAreTools: Nux had failed in a task personally given to him by his deity, and was indoctrinated to believe that he would be rejected in the afterlife as a result; Capable is able to convince him to pursue another purpose in life because he has ''nothing else'' to cling to anymore.

to:

** [[spoiler: Nux]] goes from a die-hard adherent of Immortan Joe's cult, sent into a fervor of religious ecstasy when Joe so much as made ''eye contact'' with him, to being willing to die to oppose his tyranny after a short pep talk from a pretty girl. A fine example of TropesAreTools: Nux had failed in a task personally given to him by his deity, and was indoctrinated to believe that he would be rejected in the afterlife as a result; Capable is able to convince him to pursue another purpose in life because he has ''nothing else'' to cling to anymore.
14th Aug '17 9:33:48 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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** [[spoiler: Nux]] goes from a die-hard adherent of Immortan Joe's cult, sent into a fervor of religious ecstasy when Joe so much as made ''eye contact'' with him, to being willing to die to oppose his tyranny after a short pep talk from a pretty girl.

to:

** [[spoiler: Nux]] goes from a die-hard adherent of Immortan Joe's cult, sent into a fervor of religious ecstasy when Joe so much as made ''eye contact'' with him, to being willing to die to oppose his tyranny after a short pep talk from a pretty girl. A fine example of TropesAreTools: Nux had failed in a task personally given to him by his deity, and was indoctrinated to believe that he would be rejected in the afterlife as a result; Capable is able to convince him to pursue another purpose in life because he has ''nothing else'' to cling to anymore.
14th Aug '17 9:22:36 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* Surprisingly averted in the last place you'd ever expect to see it: the educational short ''Film/GodsNotDead'' After being militantly atheistic throughout the entirety of the film, Professor Raddison converts to Christianity on his deathbed, even though there is little buildup to why he would ever choose to be a Christian.
''Film/ACaseOfSpringFever''. After our lumpy hero Gilbert is shown all the wonderful everyday uses for springs, he spends the remainder of the short explaining said uses to his golfing buddies. Rather than enthusiastically clucking along with Gilbert about their newfound love of elasticity and spring-related trivia, his friends obviously couldn't give 3/10ths of a shit about springs, constantly expressing their annoyance with Gilbert and falling asleep on the ride home as he drones on.

to:

* Surprisingly averted in the last place you'd ever expect to see it: the educational short ''Film/GodsNotDead'' After being militantly atheistic throughout the entirety of the film, Professor Raddison converts to Christianity on his deathbed, even though there is little buildup to why he would ever choose to be a Christian.
''Film/ACaseOfSpringFever''. After our lumpy hero Gilbert is shown all the wonderful everyday uses for springs, he spends the remainder of the short explaining said uses to his golfing buddies. Rather than enthusiastically clucking along with Gilbert about their newfound love of elasticity and spring-related trivia, his friends obviously couldn't give 3/10ths of a shit about springs, constantly expressing their annoyance with Gilbert and falling asleep on the ride home as he drones on.on.
* ''Film/GodsNotDead''. After being militantly atheistic throughout the entirety of the film, Professor Raddison converts to Christianity on his deathbed, even though there is little buildup to why he would ever choose to be a Christian.
14th Jul '17 4:11:21 AM BackgroundGuy
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** {{Inverted}} in the Old Testament, of all places. More specifically, in the BookOfExodus. In spite of being the chosen people of God, and receiving multiple proofs of divine support (Red Sea parting and later swallowing hostile army, food falling from the sky, rocks in the middle of the desert spouting water etc.) the people of Israel cannot be content with worshiping God, but in the end try to make their own... It's important to remember that the golden calf was meant as an idol to their god (and the God of Moses). The problem with it was that God had just told Moses that any idol was a false one. Though considering the Israelites ''didn't know that'' yet, Moses' reaction seems a bit [[DisproportionateRetribution out of proportion]].
** After King David, the Jews repeatedly "did evil in the eyes of the Lord." Kings and Chronicles both mention idolatry as a particular vice of the Jews. God was pretty swift in kicking the Jews in the butt for this, but apparently they were only easily evangelized in one direction... All through the Old Testament, the Jews would be wandering around the desert for a little while, conquering people, and just lapse out of nowhere into worshiping Baal or the rest of the Canaanite religion. That is, they only worshiped God in times of distress as is common with most people, but during times of ease and comfort lapsed into idolatry. Some historians believe this was due to the Hebrews originally worshiping many gods, and slowly transforming to followers of just Yahweh over time. This also explains the First Commandment, which says they should have no other gods ''before'' Yahweh, not only implying they believed the other gods existed, but that it was okay to worship them if he was considered first.
** The book of Jonah highlights Israel's unfaithfulness by contrasting it with the gentiles' quick conversion. The sailors headed for Tarshish immediately show respect for Jonah's god when they see how powerful he is, and the Ninehvites don't even need to see a miracle: they rush to repent the moment they hear Jonah's warning. (Jonah himself is actually ''disappointed'' with how easily they convert; he apparently was hoping to see Nineveh nuked by divine wrath. The story ends with a WhatTheHellHero lecture from God himself.)

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** {{Inverted}} in the Old Testament, of all places. More specifically, in the BookOfExodus. In spite of being the chosen people of God, and receiving multiple proofs of divine support (Red Sea parting and later swallowing hostile army, food falling from the sky, rocks in the middle of the desert spouting water etc.) the people of Israel cannot be content with worshiping God, but and in the end try to make their own... It's important to remember that the golden calf was meant as an idol to their god (and the God of Moses). The problem with it was that God had just told Moses that any idol was a false one. Though considering the Israelites ''didn't know that'' yet, Moses' reaction seems a bit [[DisproportionateRetribution out of proportion]].
** After King David, the Jews repeatedly "did evil in the eyes of the Lord." Kings and Chronicles both mention idolatry as a particular vice of the Jews. God was pretty swift in kicking the Jews in the butt for this, but apparently they were only easily evangelized in one direction... All through the Old Testament, the Jews would be wandering around the desert for a little while, conquering people, and just lapse out of nowhere into worshiping Baal or the rest of the Canaanite religion. That is, they only worshiped God in times of distress as is common with most people, but during times of ease and comfort lapsed into idolatry. Some historians believe this was due to the Hebrews originally worshiping many gods, and slowly transforming to followers of just Yahweh over time. This also explains has been hypothesized as an explanation for the First Commandment, which says they should have no other gods ''before'' Yahweh, implying (according to the theory, anyway) not only implying that they believed the other gods existed, but that it was okay to worship them if he was were considered first.
first.
** The book of Jonah highlights Israel's unfaithfulness by contrasting it with the gentiles' quick conversion. The sailors headed for Tarshish immediately show respect for Jonah's god when they see how powerful he is, and the Ninehvites don't even need to see a miracle: they rush to repent the moment they hear Jonah's warning. (Jonah Jonah himself is actually ''disappointed'' with how easily they convert; he apparently was hoping to see Nineveh nuked by divine wrath. The story ends with a WhatTheHellHero lecture from God himself.)
8th Jul '17 11:24:51 AM CurledUpWithDakka
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* Surprisingly averted in the last place you'd ever expect to see it: the educational short
''Film/God'sNotDead'' After being militantly atheistic throughout the entirety of the film, Professor Raddison converts to Christianity on his deathbed, even though there is little buildup to why he would ever choose to be a Christian.

to:

* Surprisingly averted in the last place you'd ever expect to see it: the educational short
''Film/God'sNotDead''
short ''Film/GodsNotDead'' After being militantly atheistic throughout the entirety of the film, Professor Raddison converts to Christianity on his deathbed, even though there is little buildup to why he would ever choose to be a Christian.
20th Jun '17 10:15:15 PM N1KF
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** The most well-known offender is probably "[[http://www.chick.com/reading/tracts/0055/0055_01.asp Big Daddy]]", in which after citing scientific evidence of questionable strength against evolution (the person that is cited for the arguments has been roundly criticized by other scientists as well as by ''other creationists''), ''everyone'' immediately agrees it's wrong. Even the biology teacher gives up teaching evolution. In the [[http://www.chick.com/reading/tracts/1051/1051_01.asp version for younger children]], Li'l Susy accuses her teacher of lying. Even if her teacher was wrong about evolution, she wouldn't be lying. She would simply be ''mistaken''. Apparently, in Jack Chick's world, teachers who teach evolution are intentionally misleading children. Even most Evangelical Christians (at least the minority of them who believe [[ScienceIsWrong that science is completely wrong about evolution]]) acknowledge that it's really not the case.

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** The most well-known offender is probably "[[http://www.chick.com/reading/tracts/0055/0055_01.asp Big Daddy]]", in which after citing scientific evidence of questionable strength against evolution (the evolution,[[note]]the person that is cited for the arguments has been roundly criticized by other scientists as well as by ''other creationists''), creationists''[[/note]] ''everyone'' immediately agrees it's wrong. Even the biology teacher gives up teaching evolution. In the [[http://www.chick.com/reading/tracts/1051/1051_01.asp version for younger children]], Li'l Susy accuses her teacher of lying. Even if her teacher was wrong about evolution, she wouldn't be lying. She would simply be ''mistaken''. Apparently, in Jack Chick's world, teachers who teach evolution are intentionally misleading children. Even most Evangelical Christians (at least the minority of them who believe that [[ScienceIsWrong that science is completely wrong about evolution]]) evolution]] acknowledge that it's really not the case.



* The song "End Of The Beginning" by David Phelps plays this one painfully straight. The protagonist is reading ''Literature/TheBible'' on a long flight when his cynical seatmate asks him about it-he claims he has "heard it all before" about religion, but it's revealed that he doesn't know [[spoiler:Jesus doesn't stay dead]].

to:

* The song "End Of The Beginning" by David Phelps plays this one painfully straight. The protagonist is reading ''Literature/TheBible'' Literature/TheBible on a long flight when his cynical seatmate asks him about it-he claims he has "heard it all before" about religion, but it's revealed that he doesn't know [[spoiler:Jesus doesn't stay dead]].



** {{Inverted}} in the '''Old Testament''', of all places. More specifically, in ''Exodus''. In spite of being the chosen people of God, and receiving multiple proofs of divine support (Red Sea parting and later swallowing hostile army, food falling from the sky, rocks in the middle of the desert spouting water etc.) the people of Israel cannot be content with worshiping God, but in the end try to make their own... It's important to remember that the golden calf was meant as an idol to their god (and the God of Moses). The problem with it was that God had just told Moses that any idol was a false one. Though considering the Israelites ''didn't know that'' yet, Moses' reaction seems a bit [[DisproportionateRetribution out of proportion]].

to:

** {{Inverted}} in the '''Old Testament''', Old Testament, of all places. More specifically, in ''Exodus''.the BookOfExodus. In spite of being the chosen people of God, and receiving multiple proofs of divine support (Red Sea parting and later swallowing hostile army, food falling from the sky, rocks in the middle of the desert spouting water etc.) the people of Israel cannot be content with worshiping God, but in the end try to make their own... It's important to remember that the golden calf was meant as an idol to their god (and the God of Moses). The problem with it was that God had just told Moses that any idol was a false one. Though considering the Israelites ''didn't know that'' yet, Moses' reaction seems a bit [[DisproportionateRetribution out of proportion]].



* There are cases of this in other religions as well; for example, one common evangelical Christian rebuttal to claims that their religion can't be universally appealing if people left from it is that those people [[NoTrueScotsman must not have been "truly saved"]].

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* There are cases of this in other religions as well; for example, one common evangelical Christian rebuttal to claims that their religion can't be universally appealing if people left from it is that those people [[NoTrueScotsman must not have been "truly saved"]].truly saved]].



* Creator/ChristopherEccleston claims his views on religion were changed by the Archbishop of Canterbury asking him to read aloud from [[http://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/Job-Chapter-38/ Job 38]].

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* Creator/ChristopherEccleston claims says his views on religion were changed by the Archbishop of Canterbury asking him to read aloud from [[http://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/Job-Chapter-38/ Job 38]].
20th Jun '17 9:56:22 PM Breadplane
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* Surprisingly averted in the last place you'd ever expect to see it: the educational short ''Film/ACaseOfSpringFever''. After our lumpy hero Gilbert is shown all the wonderful everyday uses for springs, he spends the remainder of the short explaining said uses to his golfing buddies. Rather than enthusiastically clucking along with Gilbert about their newfound love of elasticity and spring-related trivia, his friends obviously couldn't give 3/10ths of a shit about springs, constantly expressing their annoyance with Gilbert and falling asleep on the ride home as he drones on.

to:

* Surprisingly averted in the last place you'd ever expect to see it: the educational short short
''Film/God'sNotDead'' After being militantly atheistic throughout the entirety of the film, Professor Raddison converts to Christianity on his deathbed, even though there is little buildup to why he would ever choose to be a Christian.
''Film/ACaseOfSpringFever''. After our lumpy hero Gilbert is shown all the wonderful everyday uses for springs, he spends the remainder of the short explaining said uses to his golfing buddies. Rather than enthusiastically clucking along with Gilbert about their newfound love of elasticity and spring-related trivia, his friends obviously couldn't give 3/10ths of a shit about springs, constantly expressing their annoyance with Gilbert and falling asleep on the ride home as he drones on.
20th Jun '17 9:49:45 PM N1KF
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''Attempting'' EasyEvangelism in a story that isn't an AuthorTract (or is one, but not for the character's faith) is likely to devolve into ActivistFundamentalistAntics instead.

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''Attempting'' EasyEvangelism Easy Evangelism in a story that isn't an AuthorTract (or is one, but not for the character's faith) is likely to devolve into ActivistFundamentalistAntics instead.



* In the first arc of the ''ComicBook/UltimateXMen'' comic by Mark Millar, Wolverine joins the X-Men under false pretenses, actually intending to infiltrate and kill Xavier per Magneto's instructions. After meeting Jean Grey and sleeping with her a few times, he tells her that he had intended to kill Xavier but that Xavier had turned him around to the X-Men's way of thinking. This is not another ruse -- apparently, with absolutely no event to give Wolverine such an epiphany, he's suddenly playing for the home team. Given the fact that Charles Xavier, the world's most powerful telepath, is involved, EasyEvangelism seems a lot more plausible. Or he just decided that Jean's [[MostCommonSuperPower personality]] was worth it.

to:

* In the first arc of the ''ComicBook/UltimateXMen'' comic by Mark Millar, Wolverine joins the X-Men under false pretenses, actually intending to infiltrate and kill Xavier per Magneto's instructions. After meeting Jean Grey and sleeping with her a few times, he tells her that he had intended to kill Xavier but that Xavier had turned him around to the X-Men's way of thinking. This is not another ruse -- apparently, with absolutely no event to give Wolverine such an epiphany, he's suddenly playing for the home team. Given the fact that Charles Xavier, the world's most powerful telepath, is involved, EasyEvangelism Easy Evangelism seems a lot more plausible. Or he just decided that Jean's [[MostCommonSuperPower personality]] was worth it.



* Scott Adams of ''Dilbert'' fame wrote a book called ''God's Debris: A Thought Experiment'' in which the protagonist (the Avatar) advocates a flavor of UsefulNotes/{{Pandeism}} (in which {{God}} blew himself up to become the universe). EasyEvangelism comes into play with the sequel to this book, ''The Religion Wars'', in which a ''very'' [[TheThemeParkVersion simplified]] world war between Christians and Muslims takes place in contemporary times. The Avatar ends the war with a simple phrase: "If God is so smart, why do you fart?" Everyone on Earth practically [[ContemplateOurNavels Contemplates Their Navels]] and [[OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions Outgrows Their Silly Superstitions]] overnight.

to:

* Scott Adams of ''Dilbert'' fame wrote a book called ''God's Debris: A Thought Experiment'' in which the protagonist (the Avatar) advocates a flavor of UsefulNotes/{{Pandeism}} (in which {{God}} blew himself up to become the universe). EasyEvangelism Easy Evangelism comes into play with the sequel to this book, ''The Religion Wars'', in which a ''very'' [[TheThemeParkVersion simplified]] world war between Christians and Muslims takes place in contemporary times. The Avatar ends the war with a simple phrase: "If God is so smart, why do you fart?" Everyone on Earth practically [[ContemplateOurNavels Contemplates Their Navels]] and [[OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions Outgrows Their Silly Superstitions]] overnight.



** There is a known character build that eventually results in being able to substitute any other skill for a Diplomacy check. Combine this with the Jumplomancer build which raises your Jump skill to obscene levels and you can instantly turn an army of enemies in frothing fanatics by jumping really high. EasyEvangelism indeed.

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** There is a known character build that eventually results in being able to substitute any other skill for a Diplomacy check. Combine this with the Jumplomancer build which raises your Jump skill to obscene levels and you can instantly turn an army of enemies in frothing fanatics by jumping really high. EasyEvangelism Easy Evangelism indeed.
28th May '17 3:23:25 PM Ninja857142
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What drove people away was that Jesus kept telling people that he wasn't going to be TheNapoleon they were looking for. Even most of his disciples left (except the original Twelve) when he talked about believers "eating [his] flesh and drinking [his] blood"; not just because they were {{Squick}}ed out by the idea, but because it was a clear statement that he was going to die, which the Messiah wasn't supposed to do. {{Deconstructed}} specifically by Jesus in the parable of the sower. In the story, some people simply refuse to hear the message, while others happily respond right away only to give up just as quickly when the going gets tough. [[AnAesop The moral of the story is]] that real faith requires a solid foundation and genuine understanding, and will truly endure the trials to come.

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What drove people away was that Jesus kept telling people that he wasn't going to be TheNapoleon the RebelLeader they were looking for. Even most of his disciples left (except the original Twelve) when he talked about believers "eating [his] flesh and drinking [his] blood"; not just because they were {{Squick}}ed out by the idea, but because it was a clear statement that he was going to die, which the Messiah wasn't supposed to do. {{Deconstructed}} specifically by Jesus in the parable of the sower. In the story, some people simply refuse to hear the message, while others happily respond right away only to give up just as quickly when the going gets tough. [[AnAesop The moral of the story is]] that real faith requires a solid foundation and genuine understanding, and will truly endure the trials to come.
9th Apr '17 4:39:16 PM Venatius
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** Similarly, in 3rd edition, the result of a failing to resist the "bluff" skill was that the target actually believed the claim. This wouldn't have been a huge problem, since the penalties and bonuses make truly ridiculous claims almost impossible to pull off, save for a potion called "glibness" which made it literally impossible to fail a bluff check against the vast majority of targets. This meant that you could tell people that they'd been a life-long follower of whatever and, following a six-second one-liner, they'd automatically believe you.\\\
This is addressed in most d20 systems by making bluff a matter of sincerity and intent, if the source of the problem is unclear. In most systems if you tell someone that you're Napoleon reincarnated and win the bluff check, the target will accept that you genuinely think you're Napoleon, and probably have you committed. In 3.0, they'll immediately salute and start planning the return from Elba.
%% Guys, seriously, if you see an issue with the example, EDIT THE EXAMPLE rather than adding paragraphs of back-and-forth arguing and naysaying. Five long paragraphs by D&D players arguing about circumstantial things like "a good DM will prevent this from happening" is NOT what this trope is about.

to:

** Similarly, in 3rd edition, the result of a failing to resist the "bluff" skill was that the target actually believed the claim. This wouldn't have been a huge problem, since the penalties and bonuses make truly ridiculous claims almost impossible to pull off, save for a potion called "glibness" which made it literally impossible to fail a bluff check against the vast majority of targets. This meant that you could tell people that they'd been a life-long follower of whatever and, following a six-second one-liner, they'd automatically believe you.\\\
This is addressed in most d20 systems by making bluff a matter of sincerity and intent, if
The rules for the source of the problem is unclear. In most systems if you tell someone skill, however, do specify that you're Napoleon reincarnated and win the bluff check, the target will accept that you genuinely think you're Napoleon, and probably have you committed. In 3.0, they'll immediately salute and start planning the return from Elba.
%% Guys, seriously, if you see an issue with the example, EDIT THE EXAMPLE rather than adding paragraphs of back-and-forth arguing and naysaying. Five long paragraphs by D&D players arguing about circumstantial things like "a good DM will prevent
this from happening" is NOT what this trope is about.belief only persists for "at least for a short time (usually 1 round or less)."
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