History Main / DuelingProducts

10th May '18 4:26:33 AM jormis29
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|| UsefulNotes/OculusRift || HTC Vive; Sony [=PlayStation=] VR || VirtualReality devices, released in 2016. || The Rift and Vive are designed for high-end [=PCs=], while the [=PlayStation=] VR is an accessory for the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 4}}. The former two also have in-built motion tracking, while the PSVR relies on the [=PS4's=] camera to track head position. The Vive is the only one of the three to include motion controllers as standard, with the other two having them as optional extras. || With all three systems out, it's looking like the PSVR is already the winner in sales terms, having quickly outpaced both its rivals thanks to the ''combined'' price of a [=PS4=] and PSVR being equal to or lower than them. That being said, the Vive has been near-unanimously deemed the best system of the three by critics due to its precise Lighthouse tracking system and included motion controllers. The Rift suffered from tracking issues for the first three months of Oculus Touch's availability, making it look technologically inferior to the Vive while being far more expensive than the PSVR, but a recent software update that fixed the tracking problems and a significant price cut to $600 for Rift and Touch combined could help redeem Oculus in the VR market.||

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|| UsefulNotes/OculusRift || HTC Vive; UsefulNotes/HTCVive; Sony [=PlayStation=] VR || VirtualReality devices, released in 2016. || The Rift and Vive are designed for high-end [=PCs=], while the [=PlayStation=] VR is an accessory for the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 4}}. The former two also have in-built motion tracking, while the PSVR relies on the [=PS4's=] camera to track head position. The Vive is the only one of the three to include motion controllers as standard, with the other two having them as optional extras. || With all three systems out, it's looking like the PSVR is already the winner in sales terms, having quickly outpaced both its rivals thanks to the ''combined'' price of a [=PS4=] and PSVR being equal to or lower than them. That being said, the Vive has been near-unanimously deemed the best system of the three by critics due to its precise Lighthouse tracking system and included motion controllers. The Rift suffered from tracking issues for the first three months of Oculus Touch's availability, making it look technologically inferior to the Vive while being far more expensive than the PSVR, but a recent software update that fixed the tracking problems and a significant price cut to $600 for Rift and Touch combined could help redeem Oculus in the VR market.||
5th Apr '18 3:29:02 PM marciabradypink78
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|| ''Toys/LegoFriends'' || ''Mega Bloks'' Barbie || The interlocking brick toys develop specialized lines for girls || Lego Friends not the first female-oriented line from the iconic toy-maker, as lines for girls were introduced as far back as the early 1970s was introduced in an effort to draw more girls to the toy. A new line of characters in fact, new mini figure styles, called "Mini-Dolls" was introduced to go with the set. When the Friends shook off early controversy to become a huge success, Mega Bloks collaborated with Mattel to introduce a lower-cost "construction set for girls" line using the iconic doll line as its basis, hoping to draw customers who wanted a more familiar doll line to play with girls who've been around for years instead of unfamiliar characters. Like regular Mega Bloks and other Lego rivals, they're often seen in discount and non-superstore stores. || Lego Friends became a huge success and as is the case with its other products vs. competing brands sell far better than Mega Bloks' rival line, although the Barbie sets are frequently seen on toy store shelves near the Friends sets, ironically enough. The success of Friends even inspired Lego to collaborate with Disney to introduce a second line of girl-oriented sets, based on Franchise/DisneyPrincess movies such as ''{{Disney/Cinderella}}'', ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', and ''Disney/{{Frozen}}''. ||

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|| ''Toys/LegoFriends'' || ''Mega Bloks'' Barbie / American Girl || The interlocking brick toys develop specialized lines for girls || Lego Friends not the first female-oriented line from the iconic toy-maker, as lines for girls were introduced as far back as the early 1970s was introduced in an effort to draw more girls to the toy. A new line of characters in fact, new mini figure styles, called "Mini-Dolls" was introduced to go with the set. When the Friends shook off early controversy to become a huge success, Mega Bloks collaborated with Mattel to introduce a lower-cost "construction set for girls" line using the iconic doll line as its basis, hoping to draw customers who wanted a more familiar doll line to play with girls who've been around for years instead of unfamiliar characters. Like regular Mega Bloks and other Lego rivals, they're often seen in discount and non-superstore stores. || Lego Friends became a huge success and as is the case with its other products vs. competing brands sell far better than Mega Bloks' rival line, although the Barbie sets are frequently seen on toy store shelves near the Friends sets, ironically enough. The success of Friends even inspired Lego to collaborate with Disney to introduce a second line of girl-oriented sets, based on Franchise/DisneyPrincess movies such as ''{{Disney/Cinderella}}'', ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', and ''Disney/{{Frozen}}''. ||
15th Feb '18 9:25:48 PM NamelessFragger
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|| Pontiac Fiero || Toyota [=MR2=] || Mid-engine, rear-wheel-drive (RMR layout) sports cars of TheEighties, packing the style of a contemporary Ferrari or Lamborghini with an affordable price and good fuel economy. || The Fiero was released first in 1984, the first (and only) mass-produced American mid-engine car, but ExecutiveMeddling at GM had it nerfed with the "Iron Duke" 4-cylinder engine and marketed as an economy car to avoid cannibalizing the Chevrolet Corvette, as opposed to John [=DeLorean=]'s original vision for a Corvette-beating supercar. Toyota released the [=MR2=] the following model year, to much acclaim, but the 1985 Fiero now offered a GT version with a more powerful V6 engine. || [=MR2=] won by a mile. The original 1984 Fieros had an engine manufacturing flaw that could result in the car [[EveryCarIsAPinto catching fire,]] which gave the Fiero a black eye for reliability [[NeverLiveItDown despite all subsequent model years not having the fault.]] Pontiac eventually retired the Fiero after 1988, right after it received considerable upgrades to the suspension and other key components, and GM would discontinue the Pontiac marque entirely decades later. Meanwhile, the [=MR2=] continued Toyota's tradition of [[TonkaTough sheer reliability]] while offering another sporty alternative to the Celica and Supra with superbly tuned handling, and was produced for another decade for two more generations. Ultimately, while the [=MR2=] won out, Toyota no longer produces them, making the only affordable options for mid-engine cars without supercar prices all second-hand examples that are now steadily climbing up in price. ||
14th Jan '18 12:21:06 PM nombretomado
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|| LaserDisc || Video UsefulNotes/{{CD}}; UsefulNotes/{{CED}} || Early disc-based video systems. || [=LaserDisc=] hit the market first, and used humongous discs with an analogue data format. CED arrived a few years later (despite having been in development for longer than [=LaserDisc=]) and was basically a phonographic disc with video and a protective plastic cover. Video CD was the last to hit, boasting the smallest discs and digital technology, but also had the lowest picture quality (worse than VHS, in fact). || None of the formats ever became particularly popular outside of the A/V enthusiast market, though [=LaserDisc=] was the most successful overall ([[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff especially in Japan]]). CED crashed and burned pretty hard, losing developers RCA nearly a '''billion''' dollars and contributing to the demise of the company in 1986. Video CD never became especially successful outside of a few niche applications (and in Asian countries other than Japan), but its SpiritualSuccessor, UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}, would finally achieve mass-market popularity. ||

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|| LaserDisc UsefulNotes/LaserDisc || Video UsefulNotes/{{CD}}; UsefulNotes/{{CED}} || Early disc-based video systems. || [=LaserDisc=] hit the market first, and used humongous discs with an analogue data format. CED arrived a few years later (despite having been in development for longer than [=LaserDisc=]) and was basically a phonographic disc with video and a protective plastic cover. Video CD was the last to hit, boasting the smallest discs and digital technology, but also had the lowest picture quality (worse than VHS, in fact). || None of the formats ever became particularly popular outside of the A/V enthusiast market, though [=LaserDisc=] was the most successful overall ([[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff especially in Japan]]). CED crashed and burned pretty hard, losing developers RCA nearly a '''billion''' dollars and contributing to the demise of the company in 1986. Video CD never became especially successful outside of a few niche applications (and in Asian countries other than Japan), but its SpiritualSuccessor, UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}, would finally achieve mass-market popularity. ||
22nd Dec '17 6:16:08 AM Glowsquid
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|| ''WesternAnimation/ChallengeOfTheGoBots'' || ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' || Rebranded western exports of Japanese [[TransformingMecha transforming robots]] toylines. Both lines [[WesternAnimation/DuelingWorks had a syndicated cartoon]] airing at the same time.|| Most ''Gobots'' were sized at 2/3 inches, with a small subset of larger "Super Gobots", while the ''Transformers'' scale was essentially the reverse. || Despite the ''Gobots'' toys being hyped as the winners early on and being considered by collectors to be superior to the similarly-sized ''Transformers'' Mini bots, ''Transformer'''s slick marketing and better fictional support lead it to gaining the upper hand, with the ''Gobots'' franchise petering out by 1987. ||

|| ''Franchise/GIJoeARealAmericanHero'' || ''The Corps!'' || Military action figure toylines produced in a 3/4 scale. || The original ''The Corps!'' line was an obvious low-budget [[FollowTheLeader clone]] of ''G.I. Joe'', enough that Hasbro threatened to sue Lanard over the original name of the toyline, ''Gung-Ho!''. The main differences were that the original ''Corps'' line did not have any "bad guy" characters and that the line was slow to introduce new toys, instead rereleasing a small number of figures and vehicles over and over. Going into the new millenium, ''The Corps!'' started to differentiate itself with a more colourful and futuristic style. || ''G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero'' is historically the more successful toyline and the franchise has much more pop-culture visibility, having multiple comic books, animated series and feature films to its name (By contrast, ''The Corps!'' only media tie-ins are two comic books, one of which lasted one issue.) That being said, ''The Corps!'' eventually built itself a solid niche due to good business decisions around the same time the ''G.I. Joe'' toyline completely collapsed into TheNewTens ||


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|| ''WesternAnimation/ChallengeOfTheGoBots'' || ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' || Rebranded western exports of Japanese [[TransformingMecha transforming robots]] toylines. Both lines [[WesternAnimation/DuelingWorks had a syndicated cartoon]] airing at the same time.|| Most ''Gobots'' were sized at 2/3 inches, with a small subset of larger "Super Gobots", while the ''Transformers'' scale was essentially the reverse. || Despite the ''Gobots'' toys being hyped as the winners early on by industry analysts due to their cheaper price point, less violent imagery, and being considered by collectors lack of [[KibblesAndBits easily lost small parts]] making them more attractive to be superior to the similarly-sized ''Transformers'' Mini bots, parents, ''Transformer'''s slick marketing marketing[[note]]Transformers had "cool" and evocative names, and detailled bios and tech specs that gave the character represented personalities and abilities even if the character did not appear in the tie-in media, while Gobots mostly had goofy punny names, no bios or faction sigil, and no strong themes to each faction[[/note]] and better fictional support lead it to gaining the upper hand, with the ''Gobots'' franchise petering out by 1987. ||

|| ''Franchise/GIJoeARealAmericanHero'' || ''The Corps!'' || Military action figure toylines produced in a 3/4 scale. || The original ''The Corps!'' line was an obvious low-budget [[FollowTheLeader clone]] of ''G.I. Joe'', enough that Hasbro threatened to sue successfully sued Lanard over the original name of the toyline, ''Gung-Ho!''. The main differences were that the original ''Corps'' line did not have any "bad guy" characters and that the line was slow to introduce new toys, instead rereleasing a small number of figures and vehicles over and over. Going into the new millenium, ''The Corps!'' started to differentiate itself with a more colourful and futuristic style. || ''G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero'' is historically by far the more successful toyline and the franchise has much more pop-culture visibility, having multiple comic books, animated series and feature films to its name (By contrast, ''The Corps!'' only media tie-ins fiction are two short webcomics on its official website and a a comic books, one of which book that lasted one issue.) a single issue) That being said, ''The Corps!'' eventually built itself a solid niche due to good business decisions at retail around the same time the ''G.I. Joe'' toyline completely collapsed into TheNewTens ||

4th Dec '17 6:05:15 PM nombretomado
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|| Kino International || TheCriterionCollection || Film distribution companies that specialize in arthouse and historically important films. Both release films regularly with a slew of supplemental material. || Kino was founded in 1977 with The Criterion Collection being founded in 1984 || The Criterion Collection seems to be the more recognizable name, so it wins in terms of financial success. However, both companies have met great acclaim for helping keep old films alive, especially silents. Kino helped fund the restoration when a complete print of the silent classic ''Metropolis'' was found, getting them much attention and praise. In reality, nobody is a loser here. ||

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|| Kino International || TheCriterionCollection Creator/TheCriterionCollection || Film distribution companies that specialize in arthouse and historically important films. Both release films regularly with a slew of supplemental material. || Kino was founded in 1977 with The Criterion Collection being founded in 1984 || The Criterion Collection seems to be the more recognizable name, so it wins in terms of financial success. However, both companies have met great acclaim for helping keep old films alive, especially silents. Kino helped fund the restoration when a complete print of the silent classic ''Metropolis'' was found, getting them much attention and praise. In reality, nobody is a loser here. ||
22nd Nov '17 9:32:14 PM nombretomado
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|| UsefulNotes/XboxLiveArcade || Playstation Store, UsefulNotes/WiiWare Marketplace || "Casual gaming" marketplaces for home gaming consoles. || Xbox Live Arcade debuted on the original Xbox, but really took off with the UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}. The other two debuted on the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 3}} and UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} respectively, and later expanded their range to include the UsefulNotes/PlaystationPortable and [[UsefulNotes/NintendoDS DSi]]. || Xbox Live Arcade is currently the most successful and has the best overall reputation, likely due to the fact that it was the first out and the Xbox 360 is currently selling better than the Playstation 3. The Playstation Store is also quite successful, albeit not to the same extent. On its own terms the [=WiiWare=] Marketplace would be in last place by an embarrassingly huge margin, but as an offshoot to Nintendo's already-successful Virtual Console service, they can probably live with that. That being said, all three services are rapidly losing support from indie developers due to much more open digital distribution services such as the iPhone app store, UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, {{Desura}}, and so on -- XBLA has been under fire by developers for years as being much less indie-friendly than it should be -- such as ludicrous fees (in the tens of thousands) for ''patches'' of all things. ||

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|| UsefulNotes/XboxLiveArcade || Playstation Store, UsefulNotes/WiiWare Marketplace || "Casual gaming" marketplaces for home gaming consoles. || Xbox Live Arcade debuted on the original Xbox, but really took off with the UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}. The other two debuted on the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 3}} and UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} respectively, and later expanded their range to include the UsefulNotes/PlaystationPortable and [[UsefulNotes/NintendoDS DSi]]. || Xbox Live Arcade is currently the most successful and has the best overall reputation, likely due to the fact that it was the first out and the Xbox 360 is currently selling better than the Playstation 3. The Playstation Store is also quite successful, albeit not to the same extent. On its own terms the [=WiiWare=] Marketplace would be in last place by an embarrassingly huge margin, but as an offshoot to Nintendo's already-successful Virtual Console service, they can probably live with that. That being said, all three services are rapidly losing support from indie developers due to much more open digital distribution services such as the iPhone app store, UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, {{Desura}}, UsefulNotes/{{Desura}}, and so on -- XBLA has been under fire by developers for years as being much less indie-friendly than it should be -- such as ludicrous fees (in the tens of thousands) for ''patches'' of all things. ||
22nd Oct '17 2:37:24 PM nombretomado
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|| LaserDisc || Video {{CD}}; UsefulNotes/{{CED}} || Early disc-based video systems. || [=LaserDisc=] hit the market first, and used humongous discs with an analogue data format. CED arrived a few years later (despite having been in development for longer than [=LaserDisc=]) and was basically a phonographic disc with video and a protective plastic cover. Video CD was the last to hit, boasting the smallest discs and digital technology, but also had the lowest picture quality (worse than VHS, in fact). || None of the formats ever became particularly popular outside of the A/V enthusiast market, though [=LaserDisc=] was the most successful overall ([[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff especially in Japan]]). CED crashed and burned pretty hard, losing developers RCA nearly a '''billion''' dollars and contributing to the demise of the company in 1986. Video CD never became especially successful outside of a few niche applications (and in Asian countries other than Japan), but its SpiritualSuccessor, UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}, would finally achieve mass-market popularity. ||

to:

|| LaserDisc || Video {{CD}}; UsefulNotes/{{CD}}; UsefulNotes/{{CED}} || Early disc-based video systems. || [=LaserDisc=] hit the market first, and used humongous discs with an analogue data format. CED arrived a few years later (despite having been in development for longer than [=LaserDisc=]) and was basically a phonographic disc with video and a protective plastic cover. Video CD was the last to hit, boasting the smallest discs and digital technology, but also had the lowest picture quality (worse than VHS, in fact). || None of the formats ever became particularly popular outside of the A/V enthusiast market, though [=LaserDisc=] was the most successful overall ([[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff especially in Japan]]). CED crashed and burned pretty hard, losing developers RCA nearly a '''billion''' dollars and contributing to the demise of the company in 1986. Video CD never became especially successful outside of a few niche applications (and in Asian countries other than Japan), but its SpiritualSuccessor, UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}, would finally achieve mass-market popularity. ||
15th Oct '17 12:21:34 PM Malady
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|| Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} || Creator/CartoonNetwork || Television networks with a primary focus on children's animation. Both networks are among the primary sources of {{UsefulNotes/Television}} animation, having been so for the last 20 years. They're also two of the major forces against the AnimationAgeGhetto. || {{Creator/Nickelodeon}} began in TheEighties as {{Pinwheel}}, with intent as the first kids' network. In 1990, it debuted its [[WesternAnimation/{{Doug}} first]] [[WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow original]] [[WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}} programs]]. Overall, Nick focuses more on general kids' entertainment, with the Creator/NickJr and Creator/TeenNick sub-networks focusing on preschoolers and teenagers, respectively. Creator/CartoonNetwork began on 1992, with Ted Turner's acquirement of the Creator/HannaBarbera, Creator/{{MGM}}, and Creator/WarnerBros animation libraries, eventually shifting focus to original content as well. Overall, CN focuses more on general animation, with the Creator/AdultSwim block cornering the market on adult animation, and the Creator/{{Toonami}} block introducing American audiences to {{Anime}}. || Currently, the animation {{fandom}} will give to CN, having recovered from its infamous tangle with NetworkDecay and put out great shows such as ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', while Nick is currently relying on constant reruns ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', any flavor-of-the-week cartoon they made as a successor to those two (''WesternAnimation/{{Breadwinners}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SanjayAndCraig'', ''WesternAnimation/FanboyAndChumChum''), and other live-action shows they have that don't exactly have the wit and sparkle of the older shows, like ''Series/ClarissaExplainsItAll'', ''Series/AllThat'', or ''Series/AreYouAfraidOfTheDark''. Overall, both networks have had their ups and downs, have lasted long enough to [[Series/The90sAreAllThat appeal to the]] [[WesternAnimation/CartoonPlanet nostalgia market]], and just about every show in their libraries has its fans young and old. Currently, Nick sees more financial success whereas CN is a bigger hit with [[PeripheryDemographic older audiences]]. ||

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|| Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} || Creator/CartoonNetwork || Television networks with a primary focus on children's animation. Both networks are among the primary sources of {{UsefulNotes/Television}} animation, having been so for the last 20 years. They're also two of the major forces against the AnimationAgeGhetto. || {{Creator/Nickelodeon}} began in TheEighties as {{Pinwheel}}, Series/{{Pinwheel}}, with intent as the first kids' network. In 1990, it debuted its [[WesternAnimation/{{Doug}} first]] [[WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow original]] [[WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}} programs]]. Overall, Nick focuses more on general kids' entertainment, with the Creator/NickJr and Creator/TeenNick sub-networks focusing on preschoolers and teenagers, respectively. Creator/CartoonNetwork began on 1992, with Ted Turner's acquirement of the Creator/HannaBarbera, Creator/{{MGM}}, and Creator/WarnerBros animation libraries, eventually shifting focus to original content as well. Overall, CN focuses more on general animation, with the Creator/AdultSwim block cornering the market on adult animation, and the Creator/{{Toonami}} block introducing American audiences to {{Anime}}. || Currently, the animation {{fandom}} will give to CN, having recovered from its infamous tangle with NetworkDecay and put out great shows such as ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', while Nick is currently relying on constant reruns ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', any flavor-of-the-week cartoon they made as a successor to those two (''WesternAnimation/{{Breadwinners}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SanjayAndCraig'', ''WesternAnimation/FanboyAndChumChum''), and other live-action shows they have that don't exactly have the wit and sparkle of the older shows, like ''Series/ClarissaExplainsItAll'', ''Series/AllThat'', or ''Series/AreYouAfraidOfTheDark''. Overall, both networks have had their ups and downs, have lasted long enough to [[Series/The90sAreAllThat appeal to the]] [[WesternAnimation/CartoonPlanet nostalgia market]], and just about every show in their libraries has its fans young and old. Currently, Nick sees more financial success whereas CN is a bigger hit with [[PeripheryDemographic older audiences]]. ||
12th Oct '17 5:06:09 PM rotheryAM
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|| Walgreens || CVS Pharmacy, Rite Aid || Drugstore chain || Walgreens began in UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} in 1901. CVS began in Massachusetts in 1967, and was part of the former Melville Corporation[[note]]former owners of the off-price clothing store Marshalls, plus several defunct retail chains such as Thom [=McAn=], Foxmoor Casuals, Wilsons Leather, KB Toys, and Linens 'n Things[[/note]] for many years. Rite Aid began as Thrif D Discount, a health and beauty store, in Pennsylvania in 1962 and added pharmacies six years later. || Walgreens is the only one of the three to operate in all 50 states, while CVS is the most profitable of the three. Rite Aid is a distant third in all aspects. ||

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|| Walgreens || CVS Pharmacy, Rite Aid || Drugstore chain || Walgreens began in UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} in 1901. CVS began in Massachusetts in 1967, and was part of the former Melville Corporation[[note]]former owners of the off-price clothing store Marshalls, plus several defunct retail chains such as Thom [=McAn=], Foxmoor Casuals, Wilsons Leather, KB Toys, and Linens 'n Things[[/note]] for many years. Rite Aid began as Thrif D Discount, a health and beauty store, in Pennsylvania in 1962 and added pharmacies parmacies six years later. || Walgreens is the only one of the three to operate in all 50 states, while CVS is the most profitable of the three. Rite Aid is a distant third in all aspects. ||
||

||Wontgomery Ward || Sears, Roebuck and Co. || 19th Century mail-order companies that developed physical department stores in the 20th Century. || Montgomery Ward was founded in 1873, and opened their first physical store in 1926. Sears published their first catalogs in 1888, and the first stores were opened in 1925. || Sears, on both the catalog and store fronts. Montgomery Ward discontinued their catalogs in 1985 and went out of business in 2001 (the website that bears its name launched in 2004 and was founded by a company that bought the trademark). The Sears catalog lasted until 1993 (and wewasre relaunched in 2007), and despite a number of business setbacks many of their stores remain open as of October 2017. ||
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