History Main / DuelingProducts

28th Dec '16 10:12:12 AM nombretomado
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|| Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} || Creator/CartoonNetwork || Television networks with a primary focus on children's animation. Both networks are among the primary sources of {{UsefulNotes/Television}} animation, having been so for the last 20 years. They're also two of the major forces against the AnimationAgeGhetto. || {{Nickelodeon}} began in TheEighties as {{Pinwheel}}, with intent as the first kids' network. In 1990, it debuted its [[WesternAnimation/{{Doug}} first]] [[WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow original]] [[WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}} programs]]. Overall, Nick focuses more on general kids' entertainment, with the Creator/NickJr and Creator/TeenNick sub-networks focusing on preschoolers and teenagers, respectively. CartoonNetwork began on 1992, with Ted Turner's acquirement of the Creator/HannaBarbera, Creator/{{MGM}}, and Creator/WarnerBros animation libraries, eventually shifting focus to original content as well. Overall, CN focuses more on general animation, with the Creator/AdultSwim block cornering the market on adult animation, and the Creator/{{Toonami}} block introducing American audiences to {{Anime}}. || Currently, the animation {{fandom}} will give to CN, having recovered from its infamous tangle with NetworkDecay and put out great shows such as ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', while Nick is currently relying on constant reruns ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', any flavor-of-the-week cartoon they made as a successor to those two (''WesternAnimation/{{Breadwinners}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SanjayAndCraig'', ''WesternAnimation/FanboyAndChumChum''), and other live-action shows they have that don't exactly have the wit and sparkle of the older shows, like ''ClarissaExplainsItAll'', ''AllThat'', or ''AreYouAfraidOfTheDark''. Overall, both networks have had their ups and downs, have lasted long enough to [[Series/The90sAreAllThat appeal to the]] [[WesternAnimation/CartoonPlanet nostalgia market]], and just about every show in their libraries has its fans young and old. Currently, Nick sees more financial success whereas CN is a bigger hit with [[PeripheryDemographic older audiences]]. ||

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|| Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} || Creator/CartoonNetwork || Television networks with a primary focus on children's animation. Both networks are among the primary sources of {{UsefulNotes/Television}} animation, having been so for the last 20 years. They're also two of the major forces against the AnimationAgeGhetto. || {{Nickelodeon}} began in TheEighties as {{Pinwheel}}, with intent as the first kids' network. In 1990, it debuted its [[WesternAnimation/{{Doug}} first]] [[WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow original]] [[WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}} programs]]. Overall, Nick focuses more on general kids' entertainment, with the Creator/NickJr and Creator/TeenNick sub-networks focusing on preschoolers and teenagers, respectively. CartoonNetwork Creator/CartoonNetwork began on 1992, with Ted Turner's acquirement of the Creator/HannaBarbera, Creator/{{MGM}}, and Creator/WarnerBros animation libraries, eventually shifting focus to original content as well. Overall, CN focuses more on general animation, with the Creator/AdultSwim block cornering the market on adult animation, and the Creator/{{Toonami}} block introducing American audiences to {{Anime}}. || Currently, the animation {{fandom}} will give to CN, having recovered from its infamous tangle with NetworkDecay and put out great shows such as ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', while Nick is currently relying on constant reruns ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', any flavor-of-the-week cartoon they made as a successor to those two (''WesternAnimation/{{Breadwinners}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SanjayAndCraig'', ''WesternAnimation/FanboyAndChumChum''), and other live-action shows they have that don't exactly have the wit and sparkle of the older shows, like ''ClarissaExplainsItAll'', ''AllThat'', or ''AreYouAfraidOfTheDark''. Overall, both networks have had their ups and downs, have lasted long enough to [[Series/The90sAreAllThat appeal to the]] [[WesternAnimation/CartoonPlanet nostalgia market]], and just about every show in their libraries has its fans young and old. Currently, Nick sees more financial success whereas CN is a bigger hit with [[PeripheryDemographic older audiences]]. ||
15th Dec '16 10:31:14 PM Doug86
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|| ''{{LEGO}}'' || ''Kre-O'' || [[RuleOfThree Construction building toys using interlocking "studs and tubes" blocks]] || What makes this bout stand out is the Kre-O is owned by Creator/{{Hasbro}}, most likely to satisfy the demand for BuiltWithLego toys of their IPs, such as Franchise/{{Transformers}} and Franchise/GIJoe. {{Transformers}} seems to be the star player for Kre-O, thanks to [[WebAnimation/TransformersKreO a series of humorous animated shorts]] and [[Webcomic/TransformersKreO a series of humorous Manga pages]] [[ReferenceOverdosed loaded with]] {{Mythology Gag}}s. || Lego still maintains is foothold, but at least Kre-O has its place among {{Transformers}} fans, especially thanks to the [[http://tfwiki.net/wiki/Micro-Changer Micro-Changers]] [[note]] Blind-packed Kreons (Minifigures) with extra pieces allowing them to transform.[[/note]] ||

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|| ''{{LEGO}}'' || ''Kre-O'' || [[RuleOfThree Construction building toys using interlocking "studs and tubes" blocks]] || What makes this bout stand out is the Kre-O is owned by Creator/{{Hasbro}}, most likely to satisfy the demand for BuiltWithLego toys of their IPs, such as Franchise/{{Transformers}} and Franchise/GIJoe. {{Transformers}} Transformers seems to be the star player for Kre-O, thanks to [[WebAnimation/TransformersKreO a series of humorous animated shorts]] and [[Webcomic/TransformersKreO a series of humorous Manga pages]] [[ReferenceOverdosed loaded with]] {{Mythology Gag}}s. || Lego still maintains is foothold, but at least Kre-O has its place among {{Transformers}} Transformers fans, especially thanks to the [[http://tfwiki.net/wiki/Micro-Changer Micro-Changers]] [[note]] Blind-packed Kreons (Minifigures) with extra pieces allowing them to transform.[[/note]] ||



|| ''WesternAnimation/ChallengeOfTheGoBots'' || ''Toys/{{Transformers}}'' || Rebranded western exports of Japanese [[TransformingMecha transforming robots]] toylines. Both lines [[WesternAnimation/DuelingWorks had a syndicated cartoon]] airing at the same time.|| Most ''Gobots'' were sized at 2/3 inches, with an handful of larger "Super Gobots", while ''Transformers''s scale was essentially the reverse. || Despite the ''Gobots'' toys being hyped as the winners early on and being considered by collectors to be superior to the similarly-sized ''Transformers'' Mini bots, ''Transformer'''s sleeker marketing and better fictional support lead it to gaining the upper hand, with the ''Gobots'' franchise petering out by 1987. ||

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|| ''WesternAnimation/ChallengeOfTheGoBots'' || ''Toys/{{Transformers}}'' ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' || Rebranded western exports of Japanese [[TransformingMecha transforming robots]] toylines. Both lines [[WesternAnimation/DuelingWorks had a syndicated cartoon]] airing at the same time.|| Most ''Gobots'' were sized at 2/3 inches, with an handful of larger "Super Gobots", while ''Transformers''s scale was essentially the reverse. || Despite the ''Gobots'' toys being hyped as the winners early on and being considered by collectors to be superior to the similarly-sized ''Transformers'' Mini bots, ''Transformer'''s sleeker marketing and better fictional support lead it to gaining the upper hand, with the ''Gobots'' franchise petering out by 1987. ||
26th Nov '16 5:09:50 AM OlfinBedwere
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|| Oculus Rift || HTC Vive; Sony [=PlayStation=] VR || Virtual reality devices, released in 2016. || The Rift and Vive are designed for high-end [=PCs=], while the [=PlayStation=] VR is an accessory for the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 4}}. The former two also have in-built motion tracking, while the PSVR relies on the [=PS4's=] camera to track head position. || As of writing, only the Rift and Vive have been released; no sales data is available as yet, but nearly all reviewers seem to agree that the Vive is the better of the two. The PSVR would appear to be the best-placed of the three, as the combined cost of the accessory and base [=PS4=] is less than what a Rift or Vive ''alone'' would cost (let alone the powerful PC needed to run them), though time will tell if this translates to actual success. ||

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|| Oculus Rift || HTC Vive; Sony [=PlayStation=] VR || Virtual reality devices, released in 2016. || The Rift and Vive are designed for high-end [=PCs=], while the [=PlayStation=] VR is an accessory for the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 4}}. The former two also have in-built motion tracking, while the PSVR relies on the [=PS4's=] camera to track head position. || As of writing, only the Rift and Vive have been released; no sales data is available as yet, but nearly all reviewers seem to agree that the The Vive is the better only one of the two. The three to include motion controllers as standard, with the other two having them as optional extras. || With all three systems out, it's looking like the PSVR would appear to be is already the best-placed of winner in sales terms, having quickly outpaced both its rivals thanks to the three, as the combined cost ''combined'' price of the accessory and base a [=PS4=] is less and PSVR being equal to or lower than what a them. That being said, the Vive has been near-unanimously deemed the best system of the three by critics. The Rift or Vive ''alone'' would cost (let alone seems to be suffering from MiddleChildSyndrome, not being as technologically impressive as the powerful PC needed to run them), though time will tell if this translates to actual success.Vive, and still far more expensive than the PSVR. ||
25th Oct '16 5:41:17 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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|| Columbia 33 1/3 rpm long-playing record || RCA 45 rpm single record || Vinyl microgroove discs with better, quieter sound and more durability than shellac-based 78 rpm records. || Creator/ColumbiaRecords introduced the 12-inch LP in 1948, but RCA was unwilling to license a competitor's technology and responded with the 7-inch 45 a year later. || This battle became a draw, with both formats flourishing for nearly four decades, until compact discs overtook the former and cassettes the latter. ||

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|| Columbia 33 1/3 rpm long-playing record || RCA 45 rpm single record || Vinyl microgroove discs with better, quieter sound and more durability than shellac-based 78 rpm records. || Creator/ColumbiaRecords introduced the 12-inch LP in 1948, but RCA was with Creator/RCARecords responding with the 7" 45 a year later. Both companies were unwilling to license a competitor's the other's technology and responded with at first; Columbia released 7" 33 1/3 rpm singles while RCA released 45 rpm albums on multiple discs packaged like the 7-inch 45 a year later. old 78 rpm albums. || This battle became ended up being a draw, tie, with both formats flourishing flourishing: the LP became the standard format for nearly four decades, until compact discs overtook albums while the former 45 rpm speed became the standard for singles. RCA began issuing LP albums in March 1950 and cassettes the latter.Columbia started releasing singles on 45 in August 1950. ||
21st May '16 9:16:55 PM nombretomado
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|| HD UsefulNotes/{{DVD}} || UsefulNotes/BluRay || A high definition optical disc format. || Toshiba led the design of HD DVD and Sony launched Blu-ray, after the two companies had failed to agree on a common standard. Both formats debuted in 2006, with the first HD DVD discs and players appearing in April and beating Blu-ray rivals by two months. HD DVD equipment and movies initially were cheaper to produce and sell, but Blu-ray discs had more capacity (up to 50 gigabytes versus a 30GB maximum for HD DVD) for video, hi-fi soundtracks and special features. || Toshiba discontinued its format on Feb 19, 2008. Three key factors in HD DVD's defeat: Sony securing retailer support over time, Creator/WarnerBros announcing that it would cease HD DVD support on Jan. 4, 2008 (after having been the only movie studio to issue discs in both formats), and finally Wal-Mart announcing exclusive support. The {{PS3}} is assumed to be a factor, although the two other decisions were based on player sales ''other'' than the [=PS3=].[[note]]This might have been a PyrrhicVictory, as Wal-Mart has recently announced DVD and Blu-ray movies will not be displayed on aisle caps due to slowing sales.[[/note]] Conventional wisdom is that in 2006 the public wasn't ready for another new format so soon after DVD, and that Blu-ray will probably never replace DVD in any significant manner, with streaming video a much more likely successor.[[note]](though Blu-ray may get a stay of execution thanks to countries outside North America generally having much lower internet connection speeds, together with the release of an updated version which supports 4K/Ultra HD content)[[/note]] ||

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|| HD UsefulNotes/{{DVD}} || UsefulNotes/BluRay || A high definition optical disc format. || Toshiba led the design of HD DVD and Sony launched Blu-ray, after the two companies had failed to agree on a common standard. Both formats debuted in 2006, with the first HD DVD discs and players appearing in April and beating Blu-ray rivals by two months. HD DVD equipment and movies initially were cheaper to produce and sell, but Blu-ray discs had more capacity (up to 50 gigabytes versus a 30GB maximum for HD DVD) for video, hi-fi soundtracks and special features. || Toshiba discontinued its format on Feb 19, 2008. Three key factors in HD DVD's defeat: Sony securing retailer support over time, Creator/WarnerBros announcing that it would cease HD DVD support on Jan. 4, 2008 (after having been the only movie studio to issue discs in both formats), and finally Wal-Mart announcing exclusive support. The {{PS3}} UsefulNotes/{{PS3}} is assumed to be a factor, although the two other decisions were based on player sales ''other'' than the [=PS3=].[[note]]This might have been a PyrrhicVictory, as Wal-Mart has recently announced DVD and Blu-ray movies will not be displayed on aisle caps due to slowing sales.[[/note]] Conventional wisdom is that in 2006 the public wasn't ready for another new format so soon after DVD, and that Blu-ray will probably never replace DVD in any significant manner, with streaming video a much more likely successor.[[note]](though Blu-ray may get a stay of execution thanks to countries outside North America generally having much lower internet connection speeds, together with the release of an updated version which supports 4K/Ultra HD content)[[/note]] ||
22nd Apr '16 11:02:28 AM OlfinBedwere
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|| Oculus Rift || HTC Vive; Sony [=PlayStation=] VR || Virtual reality devices, released in 2016. || The Rift and Vive are designed for high-end [=PCs=], while the [=PlayStation=] VR is an accessory for the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 4}}. The former two also have in-built motion tracking, while the PSVR relies on the [=PS4's=] camera to track head position. || As of writing, only the Rift has been released, albeit to a generally positive reception. The PSVR would appear to be the best-placed of the three, as the combined cost of the accessory and base [=PS4=] is less than what a Rift or Vive ''alone'' would cost (let alone the powerful PC needed to run them), though time will tell if this translates to actual success. ||

to:

|| Oculus Rift || HTC Vive; Sony [=PlayStation=] VR || Virtual reality devices, released in 2016. || The Rift and Vive are designed for high-end [=PCs=], while the [=PlayStation=] VR is an accessory for the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 4}}. The former two also have in-built motion tracking, while the PSVR relies on the [=PS4's=] camera to track head position. || As of writing, only the Rift has and Vive have been released, albeit released; no sales data is available as yet, but nearly all reviewers seem to a generally positive reception.agree that the Vive is the better of the two. The PSVR would appear to be the best-placed of the three, as the combined cost of the accessory and base [=PS4=] is less than what a Rift or Vive ''alone'' would cost (let alone the powerful PC needed to run them), though time will tell if this translates to actual success. ||
11th Apr '16 2:21:59 PM KakuradyDrakenar
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|| UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} || Direct2Drive, Impulse, Origin (formerly EA Store), Games for Windows Live marketplace, Gog.com, many others. || Internet-based game delivery and content management systems. || Steam was the brainchild of Valve, [=Direct2Drive=] was created by IGN[[note]]and later bought out by [=GameFly=][[/note]], Impulse was founded by Stardock[[note]]but is now owned by [=GameStop=][[/note]], Origin is run by ElectronicArts, and Games for Windows Live marketplace, unsurprisingly, is run by Microsoft. || Steam benefited from having a series of [[KillerApp Killer Apps]] (first ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', then ''VideoGame/CounterStrike: Source'', and most recently ''VideoGame/Left4Dead''), and currently holds a commanding lead. Origin has quickly taken over the second place spot thanks to EA making nearly all their new PC releases exclusive to the service, while third place is held by Gog.com, thanks to its large, DRM-free catalogue of indie and classic games. The other services scrap over a fairly minimal remaining marketshare. The Games for Windows Live marketplace crashed and burned pretty badly (eventually being discontinued in August 2013), and so was replaced by an integrated app store with more of a focus on indie and casual titles in Windows 8. ||

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|| UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} || Direct2Drive, Impulse, Origin (formerly EA Store), Games for Windows Live marketplace, [[Website/GOGDotCom Gog.com, com]], many others. || Internet-based game delivery and content management systems. || Steam was the brainchild of Valve, [=Direct2Drive=] was created by IGN[[note]]and later bought out by [=GameFly=][[/note]], Impulse was founded by Stardock[[note]]but is now owned by [=GameStop=][[/note]], Origin is run by ElectronicArts, Gog.com is built by {{Creator/CDProjektRED}}, and Games for Windows Live marketplace, unsurprisingly, is run by Microsoft. || Steam benefited from having a series of [[KillerApp Killer Apps]] (first ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', then ''VideoGame/CounterStrike: Source'', and most recently ''VideoGame/Left4Dead''), and currently holds a commanding lead. Origin has quickly taken over the second place spot thanks to EA making nearly all their new PC releases exclusive to the service, while third place is held by Gog.com, thanks to its large, DRM-free catalogue of indie and classic games. The other services scrap over a fairly minimal remaining marketshare. The Games for Windows Live marketplace crashed and burned pretty badly (eventually being discontinued in August 2013), and so was replaced by an integrated app store with more of a focus on indie and casual titles in Windows 8. ||
29th Mar '16 8:17:37 AM OlfinBedwere
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|| Kindle || Nook || E-book readers, which are tablet-like devices that display digital versions of books in a smaller, water-resistant form. || Amazon came out with their Kindle back in 2007, while Barnes & Noble's Nook came out two years later. || Hard to tell at this point, but the Kindle seems to have more exposure. ||

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|| Kindle || Nook || E-book readers, which are tablet-like devices that display digital versions of books in a smaller, water-resistant form. || Amazon came out with their Kindle back in 2007, while Barnes & Noble's Nook came out two years later. || Hard The Kindle, which has spawned a range of different models, and even spun off into Amazon's own tablet brand. The Nook is still going, but sales have declined significantly in recent years, to the point where by late 2015 only one actual model was on sale, alongside a bunch of "tablet" versions that were just rebranded Samsung Galaxy Tabs. ||

|| Oculus Rift || HTC Vive; Sony [=PlayStation=] VR || Virtual reality devices, released in 2016. || The Rift and Vive are designed for high-end [=PCs=], while the [=PlayStation=] VR is an accessory for the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 4}}. The former two also have in-built motion tracking, while the PSVR relies on the [=PS4's=] camera to track head position. || As of writing, only the Rift has been released, albeit to a generally positive reception. The PSVR would appear to be the best-placed of the three, as the combined cost of the accessory and base [=PS4=] is less than what a Rift or Vive ''alone'' would cost (let alone the powerful PC needed to run them), though time will
tell at if this point, but the Kindle seems translates to have more exposure.actual success. ||
21st Feb '16 1:16:22 PM GrammarNavi
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|| SkyDigital || ONDigital (later ITV Digital), NTL & Blueyonder Digital (later Virgin Media) || Subscription-based digital TV delivery systems in the UK, all launching in around 1998. || Sky Digital and NTL/Blueyonder were new versions of their existing analogue products, with all previous customers being upgraded to the digital versions by late 2001. [=ONDigital=] was an entirely new service based on digital terrestrial technology, and in mid-2001 was rebranded as ITV Digital in a marketing move (ITV already partly owned [=ONDigital=]). || Sky Digital was virtually guaranteed to win this war from Day 1, due to its existing subscriber base and the KillerApp of live [[EnglishPremierLeague Premier League]] football. NTL/Blueyonder did quite well, though the UK's rather limited cable network correspondingly limited their success. [=ONDigital=] barely kept their heads above water from 1998 to 2001, and ITV Digital later became arguably the most notorious corporate failure in UK history, as plummeting subscriber numbers and a vastly overpriced Football League[[note]]The divisions below the Premier League, which absolutely no-one was interested in because the supporters of those teams generally tend to ''go to the matches themselves''[[/note]] contract saw the company disintegrate spectacularly in early 2002. ||

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|| SkyDigital || ONDigital (later ITV Digital), NTL & Blueyonder Digital (later Virgin Media) || Subscription-based digital TV delivery systems in the UK, all launching in around 1998. || Sky Digital and NTL/Blueyonder were new versions of their existing analogue products, with all previous customers being upgraded to the digital versions by late 2001. [=ONDigital=] was an entirely new service based on digital terrestrial technology, and in mid-2001 was rebranded as ITV Digital in a marketing move (ITV already partly owned [=ONDigital=]). || Sky Digital was virtually guaranteed to win this war from Day 1, due to its existing subscriber base and the KillerApp of live [[EnglishPremierLeague [[UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague Premier League]] football. NTL/Blueyonder did quite well, though the UK's rather limited cable network correspondingly limited their success. [=ONDigital=] barely kept their heads above water from 1998 to 2001, and ITV Digital later became arguably the most notorious corporate failure in UK history, as plummeting subscriber numbers and a vastly overpriced Football League[[note]]The divisions below the Premier League, which absolutely no-one was interested in because the supporters of those teams generally tend to ''go to the matches themselves''[[/note]] contract saw the company disintegrate spectacularly in early 2002. ||
29th Jan '16 12:21:47 PM Glowsquid
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Added DiffLines:

|| ''WesternAnimation/ChallengeOfTheGoBots'' || ''Toys/{{Transformers}}'' || Rebranded western exports of Japanese [[TransformingMecha transforming robots]] toylines. Both lines [[WesternAnimation/DuelingWorks had a syndicated cartoon]] airing at the same time.|| Most ''Gobots'' were sized at 2/3 inches, with an handful of larger "Super Gobots", while ''Transformers''s scale was essentially the reverse. || Despite the ''Gobots'' toys being hyped as the winners early on and being considered by collectors to be superior to the similarly-sized ''Transformers'' Mini bots, ''Transformer'''s sleeker marketing and better fictional support lead it to gaining the upper hand, with the ''Gobots'' franchise petering out by 1987. ||
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