History Main / DuelingProducts

14th Jan '18 12:21:06 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


|| LaserDisc || Video UsefulNotes/{{CD}}; UsefulNotes/{{CED}} || Early disc-based video systems. || [=LaserDisc=] hit the market first, and used humongous discs with an analogue data format. CED arrived a few years later (despite having been in development for longer than [=LaserDisc=]) and was basically a phonographic disc with video and a protective plastic cover. Video CD was the last to hit, boasting the smallest discs and digital technology, but also had the lowest picture quality (worse than VHS, in fact). || None of the formats ever became particularly popular outside of the A/V enthusiast market, though [=LaserDisc=] was the most successful overall ([[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff especially in Japan]]). CED crashed and burned pretty hard, losing developers RCA nearly a '''billion''' dollars and contributing to the demise of the company in 1986. Video CD never became especially successful outside of a few niche applications (and in Asian countries other than Japan), but its SpiritualSuccessor, UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}, would finally achieve mass-market popularity. ||

to:

|| LaserDisc UsefulNotes/LaserDisc || Video UsefulNotes/{{CD}}; UsefulNotes/{{CED}} || Early disc-based video systems. || [=LaserDisc=] hit the market first, and used humongous discs with an analogue data format. CED arrived a few years later (despite having been in development for longer than [=LaserDisc=]) and was basically a phonographic disc with video and a protective plastic cover. Video CD was the last to hit, boasting the smallest discs and digital technology, but also had the lowest picture quality (worse than VHS, in fact). || None of the formats ever became particularly popular outside of the A/V enthusiast market, though [=LaserDisc=] was the most successful overall ([[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff especially in Japan]]). CED crashed and burned pretty hard, losing developers RCA nearly a '''billion''' dollars and contributing to the demise of the company in 1986. Video CD never became especially successful outside of a few niche applications (and in Asian countries other than Japan), but its SpiritualSuccessor, UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}, would finally achieve mass-market popularity. ||
22nd Dec '17 6:16:08 AM Glowsquid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


|| ''WesternAnimation/ChallengeOfTheGoBots'' || ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' || Rebranded western exports of Japanese [[TransformingMecha transforming robots]] toylines. Both lines [[WesternAnimation/DuelingWorks had a syndicated cartoon]] airing at the same time.|| Most ''Gobots'' were sized at 2/3 inches, with a small subset of larger "Super Gobots", while the ''Transformers'' scale was essentially the reverse. || Despite the ''Gobots'' toys being hyped as the winners early on and being considered by collectors to be superior to the similarly-sized ''Transformers'' Mini bots, ''Transformer'''s slick marketing and better fictional support lead it to gaining the upper hand, with the ''Gobots'' franchise petering out by 1987. ||

|| ''Franchise/GIJoeARealAmericanHero'' || ''The Corps!'' || Military action figure toylines produced in a 3/4 scale. || The original ''The Corps!'' line was an obvious low-budget [[FollowTheLeader clone]] of ''G.I. Joe'', enough that Hasbro threatened to sue Lanard over the original name of the toyline, ''Gung-Ho!''. The main differences were that the original ''Corps'' line did not have any "bad guy" characters and that the line was slow to introduce new toys, instead rereleasing a small number of figures and vehicles over and over. Going into the new millenium, ''The Corps!'' started to differentiate itself with a more colourful and futuristic style. || ''G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero'' is historically the more successful toyline and the franchise has much more pop-culture visibility, having multiple comic books, animated series and feature films to its name (By contrast, ''The Corps!'' only media tie-ins are two comic books, one of which lasted one issue.) That being said, ''The Corps!'' eventually built itself a solid niche due to good business decisions around the same time the ''G.I. Joe'' toyline completely collapsed into TheNewTens ||


to:

|| ''WesternAnimation/ChallengeOfTheGoBots'' || ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' || Rebranded western exports of Japanese [[TransformingMecha transforming robots]] toylines. Both lines [[WesternAnimation/DuelingWorks had a syndicated cartoon]] airing at the same time.|| Most ''Gobots'' were sized at 2/3 inches, with a small subset of larger "Super Gobots", while the ''Transformers'' scale was essentially the reverse. || Despite the ''Gobots'' toys being hyped as the winners early on by industry analysts due to their cheaper price point, less violent imagery, and being considered by collectors lack of [[KibblesAndBits easily lost small parts]] making them more attractive to be superior to the similarly-sized ''Transformers'' Mini bots, parents, ''Transformer'''s slick marketing marketing[[note]]Transformers had "cool" and evocative names, and detailled bios and tech specs that gave the character represented personalities and abilities even if the character did not appear in the tie-in media, while Gobots mostly had goofy punny names, no bios or faction sigil, and no strong themes to each faction[[/note]] and better fictional support lead it to gaining the upper hand, with the ''Gobots'' franchise petering out by 1987. ||

|| ''Franchise/GIJoeARealAmericanHero'' || ''The Corps!'' || Military action figure toylines produced in a 3/4 scale. || The original ''The Corps!'' line was an obvious low-budget [[FollowTheLeader clone]] of ''G.I. Joe'', enough that Hasbro threatened to sue successfully sued Lanard over the original name of the toyline, ''Gung-Ho!''. The main differences were that the original ''Corps'' line did not have any "bad guy" characters and that the line was slow to introduce new toys, instead rereleasing a small number of figures and vehicles over and over. Going into the new millenium, ''The Corps!'' started to differentiate itself with a more colourful and futuristic style. || ''G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero'' is historically by far the more successful toyline and the franchise has much more pop-culture visibility, having multiple comic books, animated series and feature films to its name (By contrast, ''The Corps!'' only media tie-ins fiction are two short webcomics on its official website and a a comic books, one of which book that lasted one issue.) a single issue) That being said, ''The Corps!'' eventually built itself a solid niche due to good business decisions at retail around the same time the ''G.I. Joe'' toyline completely collapsed into TheNewTens ||

4th Dec '17 6:05:15 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


|| Kino International || TheCriterionCollection || Film distribution companies that specialize in arthouse and historically important films. Both release films regularly with a slew of supplemental material. || Kino was founded in 1977 with The Criterion Collection being founded in 1984 || The Criterion Collection seems to be the more recognizable name, so it wins in terms of financial success. However, both companies have met great acclaim for helping keep old films alive, especially silents. Kino helped fund the restoration when a complete print of the silent classic ''Metropolis'' was found, getting them much attention and praise. In reality, nobody is a loser here. ||

to:

|| Kino International || TheCriterionCollection Creator/TheCriterionCollection || Film distribution companies that specialize in arthouse and historically important films. Both release films regularly with a slew of supplemental material. || Kino was founded in 1977 with The Criterion Collection being founded in 1984 || The Criterion Collection seems to be the more recognizable name, so it wins in terms of financial success. However, both companies have met great acclaim for helping keep old films alive, especially silents. Kino helped fund the restoration when a complete print of the silent classic ''Metropolis'' was found, getting them much attention and praise. In reality, nobody is a loser here. ||
22nd Nov '17 9:32:14 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


|| UsefulNotes/XboxLiveArcade || Playstation Store, UsefulNotes/WiiWare Marketplace || "Casual gaming" marketplaces for home gaming consoles. || Xbox Live Arcade debuted on the original Xbox, but really took off with the UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}. The other two debuted on the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 3}} and UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} respectively, and later expanded their range to include the UsefulNotes/PlaystationPortable and [[UsefulNotes/NintendoDS DSi]]. || Xbox Live Arcade is currently the most successful and has the best overall reputation, likely due to the fact that it was the first out and the Xbox 360 is currently selling better than the Playstation 3. The Playstation Store is also quite successful, albeit not to the same extent. On its own terms the [=WiiWare=] Marketplace would be in last place by an embarrassingly huge margin, but as an offshoot to Nintendo's already-successful Virtual Console service, they can probably live with that. That being said, all three services are rapidly losing support from indie developers due to much more open digital distribution services such as the iPhone app store, UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, {{Desura}}, and so on -- XBLA has been under fire by developers for years as being much less indie-friendly than it should be -- such as ludicrous fees (in the tens of thousands) for ''patches'' of all things. ||

to:

|| UsefulNotes/XboxLiveArcade || Playstation Store, UsefulNotes/WiiWare Marketplace || "Casual gaming" marketplaces for home gaming consoles. || Xbox Live Arcade debuted on the original Xbox, but really took off with the UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}. The other two debuted on the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 3}} and UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} respectively, and later expanded their range to include the UsefulNotes/PlaystationPortable and [[UsefulNotes/NintendoDS DSi]]. || Xbox Live Arcade is currently the most successful and has the best overall reputation, likely due to the fact that it was the first out and the Xbox 360 is currently selling better than the Playstation 3. The Playstation Store is also quite successful, albeit not to the same extent. On its own terms the [=WiiWare=] Marketplace would be in last place by an embarrassingly huge margin, but as an offshoot to Nintendo's already-successful Virtual Console service, they can probably live with that. That being said, all three services are rapidly losing support from indie developers due to much more open digital distribution services such as the iPhone app store, UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}, {{Desura}}, UsefulNotes/{{Desura}}, and so on -- XBLA has been under fire by developers for years as being much less indie-friendly than it should be -- such as ludicrous fees (in the tens of thousands) for ''patches'' of all things. ||
22nd Oct '17 2:37:24 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


|| LaserDisc || Video {{CD}}; UsefulNotes/{{CED}} || Early disc-based video systems. || [=LaserDisc=] hit the market first, and used humongous discs with an analogue data format. CED arrived a few years later (despite having been in development for longer than [=LaserDisc=]) and was basically a phonographic disc with video and a protective plastic cover. Video CD was the last to hit, boasting the smallest discs and digital technology, but also had the lowest picture quality (worse than VHS, in fact). || None of the formats ever became particularly popular outside of the A/V enthusiast market, though [=LaserDisc=] was the most successful overall ([[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff especially in Japan]]). CED crashed and burned pretty hard, losing developers RCA nearly a '''billion''' dollars and contributing to the demise of the company in 1986. Video CD never became especially successful outside of a few niche applications (and in Asian countries other than Japan), but its SpiritualSuccessor, UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}, would finally achieve mass-market popularity. ||

to:

|| LaserDisc || Video {{CD}}; UsefulNotes/{{CD}}; UsefulNotes/{{CED}} || Early disc-based video systems. || [=LaserDisc=] hit the market first, and used humongous discs with an analogue data format. CED arrived a few years later (despite having been in development for longer than [=LaserDisc=]) and was basically a phonographic disc with video and a protective plastic cover. Video CD was the last to hit, boasting the smallest discs and digital technology, but also had the lowest picture quality (worse than VHS, in fact). || None of the formats ever became particularly popular outside of the A/V enthusiast market, though [=LaserDisc=] was the most successful overall ([[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff especially in Japan]]). CED crashed and burned pretty hard, losing developers RCA nearly a '''billion''' dollars and contributing to the demise of the company in 1986. Video CD never became especially successful outside of a few niche applications (and in Asian countries other than Japan), but its SpiritualSuccessor, UsefulNotes/{{DVD}}, would finally achieve mass-market popularity. ||
15th Oct '17 12:21:34 PM Malady
Is there an issue? Send a Message


|| Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} || Creator/CartoonNetwork || Television networks with a primary focus on children's animation. Both networks are among the primary sources of {{UsefulNotes/Television}} animation, having been so for the last 20 years. They're also two of the major forces against the AnimationAgeGhetto. || {{Creator/Nickelodeon}} began in TheEighties as {{Pinwheel}}, with intent as the first kids' network. In 1990, it debuted its [[WesternAnimation/{{Doug}} first]] [[WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow original]] [[WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}} programs]]. Overall, Nick focuses more on general kids' entertainment, with the Creator/NickJr and Creator/TeenNick sub-networks focusing on preschoolers and teenagers, respectively. Creator/CartoonNetwork began on 1992, with Ted Turner's acquirement of the Creator/HannaBarbera, Creator/{{MGM}}, and Creator/WarnerBros animation libraries, eventually shifting focus to original content as well. Overall, CN focuses more on general animation, with the Creator/AdultSwim block cornering the market on adult animation, and the Creator/{{Toonami}} block introducing American audiences to {{Anime}}. || Currently, the animation {{fandom}} will give to CN, having recovered from its infamous tangle with NetworkDecay and put out great shows such as ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', while Nick is currently relying on constant reruns ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', any flavor-of-the-week cartoon they made as a successor to those two (''WesternAnimation/{{Breadwinners}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SanjayAndCraig'', ''WesternAnimation/FanboyAndChumChum''), and other live-action shows they have that don't exactly have the wit and sparkle of the older shows, like ''Series/ClarissaExplainsItAll'', ''Series/AllThat'', or ''Series/AreYouAfraidOfTheDark''. Overall, both networks have had their ups and downs, have lasted long enough to [[Series/The90sAreAllThat appeal to the]] [[WesternAnimation/CartoonPlanet nostalgia market]], and just about every show in their libraries has its fans young and old. Currently, Nick sees more financial success whereas CN is a bigger hit with [[PeripheryDemographic older audiences]]. ||

to:

|| Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} || Creator/CartoonNetwork || Television networks with a primary focus on children's animation. Both networks are among the primary sources of {{UsefulNotes/Television}} animation, having been so for the last 20 years. They're also two of the major forces against the AnimationAgeGhetto. || {{Creator/Nickelodeon}} began in TheEighties as {{Pinwheel}}, Series/{{Pinwheel}}, with intent as the first kids' network. In 1990, it debuted its [[WesternAnimation/{{Doug}} first]] [[WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow original]] [[WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}} programs]]. Overall, Nick focuses more on general kids' entertainment, with the Creator/NickJr and Creator/TeenNick sub-networks focusing on preschoolers and teenagers, respectively. Creator/CartoonNetwork began on 1992, with Ted Turner's acquirement of the Creator/HannaBarbera, Creator/{{MGM}}, and Creator/WarnerBros animation libraries, eventually shifting focus to original content as well. Overall, CN focuses more on general animation, with the Creator/AdultSwim block cornering the market on adult animation, and the Creator/{{Toonami}} block introducing American audiences to {{Anime}}. || Currently, the animation {{fandom}} will give to CN, having recovered from its infamous tangle with NetworkDecay and put out great shows such as ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', while Nick is currently relying on constant reruns ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', any flavor-of-the-week cartoon they made as a successor to those two (''WesternAnimation/{{Breadwinners}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SanjayAndCraig'', ''WesternAnimation/FanboyAndChumChum''), and other live-action shows they have that don't exactly have the wit and sparkle of the older shows, like ''Series/ClarissaExplainsItAll'', ''Series/AllThat'', or ''Series/AreYouAfraidOfTheDark''. Overall, both networks have had their ups and downs, have lasted long enough to [[Series/The90sAreAllThat appeal to the]] [[WesternAnimation/CartoonPlanet nostalgia market]], and just about every show in their libraries has its fans young and old. Currently, Nick sees more financial success whereas CN is a bigger hit with [[PeripheryDemographic older audiences]]. ||
12th Oct '17 5:06:09 PM rotheryAM
Is there an issue? Send a Message


|| Walgreens || CVS Pharmacy, Rite Aid || Drugstore chain || Walgreens began in UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} in 1901. CVS began in Massachusetts in 1967, and was part of the former Melville Corporation[[note]]former owners of the off-price clothing store Marshalls, plus several defunct retail chains such as Thom [=McAn=], Foxmoor Casuals, Wilsons Leather, KB Toys, and Linens 'n Things[[/note]] for many years. Rite Aid began as Thrif D Discount, a health and beauty store, in Pennsylvania in 1962 and added pharmacies six years later. || Walgreens is the only one of the three to operate in all 50 states, while CVS is the most profitable of the three. Rite Aid is a distant third in all aspects. ||

to:

|| Walgreens || CVS Pharmacy, Rite Aid || Drugstore chain || Walgreens began in UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} in 1901. CVS began in Massachusetts in 1967, and was part of the former Melville Corporation[[note]]former owners of the off-price clothing store Marshalls, plus several defunct retail chains such as Thom [=McAn=], Foxmoor Casuals, Wilsons Leather, KB Toys, and Linens 'n Things[[/note]] for many years. Rite Aid began as Thrif D Discount, a health and beauty store, in Pennsylvania in 1962 and added pharmacies parmacies six years later. || Walgreens is the only one of the three to operate in all 50 states, while CVS is the most profitable of the three. Rite Aid is a distant third in all aspects. ||
||

||Wontgomery Ward || Sears, Roebuck and Co. || 19th Century mail-order companies that developed physical department stores in the 20th Century. || Montgomery Ward was founded in 1873, and opened their first physical store in 1926. Sears published their first catalogs in 1888, and the first stores were opened in 1925. || Sears, on both the catalog and store fronts. Montgomery Ward discontinued their catalogs in 1985 and went out of business in 2001 (the website that bears its name launched in 2004 and was founded by a company that bought the trademark). The Sears catalog lasted until 1993 (and wewasre relaunched in 2007), and despite a number of business setbacks many of their stores remain open as of October 2017. ||
10th Oct '17 1:31:28 PM WildKatGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


|| Oreo || Hydrox || Chocolate sandwich cookies with cream filling. || Sunshine Biscuits rolled out Hydrox back in 1908, while Nabisco produced Oreo four years later. || Oreo still thrives today. Hydrox was reformulated as Droxies in 1996, and then discontinued in 2001. Hydrox was briefly revived by Kellogg's in 2008 to celebrate the cookie's 100th anniversary, and is set to make a full-on return in autumn 2014, courtesy of Leaf Brands (who now owns the trademark). It still has a strong cult following, and is said to be far superior to Oreo. ||

to:

|| Oreo || Hydrox || Oreo || Chocolate sandwich cookies with cream filling. || Sunshine Biscuits rolled out Hydrox back in 1908, while Nabisco produced Oreo four years later. || Oreo still thrives today. Hydrox was reformulated as Droxies in 1996, and then discontinued in 2001. Hydrox was briefly revived by Kellogg's in 2008 to celebrate the cookie's 100th anniversary, and is set to make a full-on return in autumn 2014, courtesy of Leaf Brands (who now owns the trademark). It still has a strong cult following, and is said to be far superior to Oreo. ||
9th Oct '17 5:21:50 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


|| UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} || Direct2Drive, Impulse, Origin (formerly EA Store), Games for Windows Live marketplace, [[Website/GOGDotCom Gog.com]], many others. || Internet-based game delivery and content management systems. || Steam was the brainchild of Valve, [=Direct2Drive=] was created by IGN[[note]]and later bought out by [=GameFly=][[/note]], Impulse was founded by Stardock[[note]]but is now owned by [=GameStop=][[/note]], Origin is run by ElectronicArts, Gog.com is built by {{Creator/CDProjektRED}}, and Games for Windows Live marketplace, unsurprisingly, is run by Microsoft. || Steam benefited from having a series of [[KillerApp Killer Apps]] (first ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', then ''VideoGame/CounterStrike: Source'', and most recently ''VideoGame/Left4Dead''), and currently holds a commanding lead. Origin has quickly taken over the second place spot thanks to EA making nearly all their new PC releases exclusive to the service, while third place is held by Gog.com, thanks to its large, DRM-free catalogue of indie and classic games. The other services scrap over a fairly minimal remaining marketshare. The Games for Windows Live marketplace crashed and burned pretty badly (eventually being discontinued in August 2013), and so was replaced by an integrated app store with more of a focus on indie and casual titles in Windows 8. ||

to:

|| UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} || Direct2Drive, Impulse, Origin (formerly EA Store), Games for Windows Live marketplace, [[Website/GOGDotCom Gog.com]], many others. || Internet-based game delivery and content management systems. || Steam was the brainchild of Valve, [=Direct2Drive=] was created by IGN[[note]]and later bought out by [=GameFly=][[/note]], Impulse was founded by Stardock[[note]]but is now owned by [=GameStop=][[/note]], Origin is run by ElectronicArts, Creator/ElectronicArts, Gog.com is built by {{Creator/CDProjektRED}}, and Games for Windows Live marketplace, unsurprisingly, is run by Microsoft. || Steam benefited from having a series of [[KillerApp Killer Apps]] (first ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', then ''VideoGame/CounterStrike: Source'', and most recently ''VideoGame/Left4Dead''), and currently holds a commanding lead. Origin has quickly taken over the second place spot thanks to EA making nearly all their new PC releases exclusive to the service, while third place is held by Gog.com, thanks to its large, DRM-free catalogue of indie and classic games. The other services scrap over a fairly minimal remaining marketshare. The Games for Windows Live marketplace crashed and burned pretty badly (eventually being discontinued in August 2013), and so was replaced by an integrated app store with more of a focus on indie and casual titles in Windows 8. ||
9th Oct '17 6:15:31 AM Malady
Is there an issue? Send a Message


|| UsefulNotes/{{Betamax}} || Video Home System UsefulNotes/({{VHS}}); Video 2000 || Devices to watch movies at home. || ''Marketing books have been written on the subject''. || VHS recovered from a slow first few years to win out, thanks to its lower price and longer record times. Betamax is now synonymous with technological failure in the market, despite having better video/audio quality and durability. See also TheRuleOfFirstAdopters. Video 2000, meanwhile, ended up essentially dead-on-arrival after co-developers Philips and Grundig messed up their first line of [=VCRs=], rendering recordings on one company's machines incompatible with those of the other. ||

to:

|| UsefulNotes/{{Betamax}} || Video Home System UsefulNotes/({{VHS}}); (UsefulNotes/{{VHS}}); Video 2000 || Devices to watch movies at home. || ''Marketing books have been written on the subject''. || VHS recovered from a slow first few years to win out, thanks to its lower price and longer record times. Betamax is now synonymous with technological failure in the market, despite having better video/audio quality and durability. See also TheRuleOfFirstAdopters. Video 2000, meanwhile, ended up essentially dead-on-arrival after co-developers Philips and Grundig messed up their first line of [=VCRs=], rendering recordings on one company's machines incompatible with those of the other. ||
This list shows the last 10 events of 210. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DuelingProducts