History Main / DuelTotheDeath

16th Aug '16 5:13:30 PM Adeon
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** Honor engages in two of these in ''Field Of Dishonor'', the first being against a professional duelist who killed her lover in a duel to goad her into challenging him, on the assumption that, as a Naval officer, she wouldn't have the same level of skill as he does. Unfortunately for him, her uncle's involvement in the Manticoran Society for Creative Anachronism made her very familiar with the chemical-propellant guns used in duels, and her genetic enhancements sharpened her hand-eye co-ordination to the point that she could simply shoot from the hip. The end result was the she hit her opponent four times before he could even raise his gun.
** The second duel in ''Field of Dishonor'' was against the man who hired the previous duellist, a cowardly, amoral aristocrat. He was so terrified that he turned and fired early...but failed to kill Honor. He was promptly splattered by Honor, her bodyguard, and the marshall of the field. She is later heavily criticized by aristocrats for, in their opinion, shooting an unarmed man (he had expended all his ammo by that point), conveniently ignoring that, the moment his violated the rules of the duel, his life was legally forfeit. Even if Honor hadn't fired, the marshall would still have killed him on the spot.

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** Honor engages in two of these in ''Field Of Dishonor'', the first being against a professional duelist who killed her lover in a duel to goad her into challenging him, on the assumption that, as a Naval officer, she wouldn't have the same level of skill as he does. Unfortunately for him, her uncle's involvement in the Manticoran Beowulf Society for Creative Anachronism made her very familiar with the chemical-propellant guns used in duels, and her genetic enhancements sharpened her hand-eye co-ordination to the point that she could simply shoot from the hip. The end result was the she hit her opponent four times before he could even raise his gun.
** The second duel in ''Field of Dishonor'' was against the man who hired the previous duellist, duelist, a cowardly, amoral aristocrat. He was so terrified that he turned and fired early...but failed to kill Honor. He was promptly splattered by Honor, her bodyguard, both Honor and the marshall Marshall of the field.Field. She is later heavily criticized by aristocrats for, in their opinion, shooting an unarmed man (he had expended all his ammo by that point), conveniently ignoring that, the moment his violated the rules of the duel, his life was legally forfeit. Even if Honor hadn't fired, the marshall would still have killed him on the spot.
1st Aug '16 2:44:56 PM CumbersomeTercel
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** Speaking of Creator/ErrolFlynn and Creator/BasilRathbone, they rematch as Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne in ''Film/TheAdventuresOfRobinHood''. And it is glorious.


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* ''Film/{{Dune}}'' climaxes in a knife fight between Paul Arteides and Feyd-Ruatha.
* ''Film/{{Troy}}'' has a great one between Achilles and Hector.

26th Jul '16 5:40:39 AM AgProv
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* Still happens today. A duel between two British Army officers - in July 2016 - using flares in lieu of pistols resulted in [[http://www.forces.tv/98339400 burning down the Officers' Mess at their base in Dorset]].


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20th Jul '16 3:46:07 AM M84
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** In ''Warlords of Draenor'', Thrall challenges Garrosh. Garrosh gains the upper hand at first, but then Thrall unleashes his shaman magic. [[spoiler:Thrall wins, and Garrosh loses his life.]]

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** In ''Warlords of Draenor'', Thrall challenges Garrosh. Garrosh gains the upper hand at first, but then Thrall unleashes his shaman magic. [[spoiler:Thrall wins, and Garrosh loses his life.]] This has consequences in ''Legion''. [[spoiler:Since shaman magic invokes the power of the Elemental spirits, Thrall essentially cheated by calling on their power to win. The spirits themselves disapproved and have cut off Thrall in response.]]
20th Jul '16 12:05:52 AM Alkochochlik
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* AvertedTrope in ''Literature/{{Zemsta}}'' - the challenge is issued, but the challenger forgets about it. There was a lot going on.

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* AvertedTrope in ''Literature/{{Zemsta}}'' ''Theatre/{{Zemsta}}'' - the challenge is issued, but the challenger forgets about it. There was a lot going on.
14th Jul '16 12:30:54 PM Willbyr
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* SamuraiDeeperKyo ended with a duel to the death between the two principle characters.

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* SamuraiDeeperKyo ''Manga/SamuraiDeeperKyo'' ended with a duel to the death between the two principle characters.



* In ''OnePiece'', this is what happened between Akainu and Aokiji during the TimeSkip. The two had the first ever feud between Admirals, and it was over the Fleet Admiral position. The conflict escalated to the point of a ''death match'' on the barren island of Punk Hazard, lasting ten days and permanently altering the climate of the island, making one half a frozen wasteland, the other half permanently on fire. In the end, the winner was Akainu, but, in a rare moment of sympathy, spared Aokiji's life, and the latter proceeded to ditch the marines, not wanting to serve under Akainu.

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* In ''OnePiece'', ''Manga/OnePiece'', this is what happened between Akainu and Aokiji during the TimeSkip. The two had the first ever feud between Admirals, and it was over the Fleet Admiral position. The conflict escalated to the point of a ''death match'' on the barren island of Punk Hazard, lasting ten days and permanently altering the climate of the island, making one half a frozen wasteland, the other half permanently on fire. In the end, the winner was Akainu, but, in a rare moment of sympathy, spared Aokiji's life, and the latter proceeded to ditch the marines, not wanting to serve under Akainu.



* In Manga/ThereBeyondTheBeyond, the two Virids--identical twins--have been expected to do this from birth in order to avoid an otherwise bloody dispute over the throne, as the survivor obviously gets to inherit. Should a victor not be decided, then they're both to be killed. Oh, and the duel's to take place on their ''thirteenth'' birthday. Needless to say, their kingdom's a bit messed up.

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* In Manga/ThereBeyondTheBeyond, ''Manga/ThereBeyondTheBeyond'', the two Virids--identical twins--have been expected to do this from birth in order to avoid an otherwise bloody dispute over the throne, as the survivor obviously gets to inherit. Should a victor not be decided, then they're both to be killed. Oh, and the duel's to take place on their ''thirteenth'' birthday. Needless to say, their kingdom's a bit messed up.
10th Jul '16 8:20:00 PM M84
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* The orcs in ''Film/WarCraft2016'' have a tradition of mak'gora, a formal duel in which two orcs try to kill one another. It's considered sacred and the participants are pretty much untouchable - Blackhand refuses to stop a mak'gora in progress in an emergency situation and when Lothar wins his mak'gora, other orcs disobey Gul'dan when he wants to have the human murdered, letting Lothar leave unharmed.

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* The orcs in ''Film/WarCraft2016'' have a tradition of mak'gora, a formal duel in which two orcs try to kill one another. It's considered sacred and the participants are pretty much untouchable - Blackhand refuses to stop a mak'gora in progress in an emergency situation and when Lothar wins his mak'gora, other orcs disobey Gul'dan when he wants to have the human murdered, letting Lothar leave unharmed. Gul'dan also loses a lot of points with the Horde when he "wins" a mak'gora by draining the life out of his opponent with fel magic (using magic in a mak'gora is considered cheating).
1st Jul '16 8:10:48 AM ChronoLegion
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* ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow''
** The team travels to TheWildWest to hide from the Time Masters but happens upon a gang terrorizing a town. They manage to capture the leader of the gang, but the gang takes one of theirs prisoner as well. ComicBook/JonahHex suggests someone duel the gang leader at high noon. Ray, having been named the town sheriff, volunteers, despite having no experience with a revolver, but Rip decides to go himself, being a crack shot (and his own blaster is even shaped like a revolver). Rip ends up winning, and the remaining members of the gang release Jefferson and flee the town, abiding by the terms of the duel.
** Earlier, Ray, Kendra, and Sara are accidentally left behind in 1958. After a while, Sara leaves the couple and goes to Nanda Parbat to (re)join the League of Assassins. By the time the rest of the team return, Sara's mind has mostly forgotten her origins, and she has become a true member of the League. An attempt to rescue her goes awry, and everyone is captured. Knowing the rules of the League, Rip challenges Ra's al Ghul to a duel for the fate of the prisoners. Presumably, Rip has no intention of actually killing Ra's decades before his fated death at Oliver's hands, but he probably assumes that Ra's can be healed in the Lazarus Pit. However, unknown to Rip, both he and Ra's are able to choose a challenger to take their place. Ra's chooses Sara. Reworking his plan, Rip chooses Kendra, Sara's friend and frequent sparring partner, hoping that Kendra can reach Sara during the fight. It works. Sara bests Kendra but snaps back before dealing the killing blow. [[spoiler:Then Chronos attacks, and the duel is forgotten]].
1st Jul '16 7:58:42 AM ChronoLegion
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* An episode of ''Series/{{Sliders}}'' has them end up in a world where the Republic of Texas never became part of the US and takes up most of the former Mexican states. As such, duels (of the quick draw variety) are a common way of settling disputes, and there are professional duelists frequently hired by businessmen to remove rivals and conduct hostile takeovers. Quinn is challenged by one but drops his gun, refusing to participate. Not being a complete monster, the professional duelist can't bring himself to shoot an unarmed man.
1st Jul '16 7:54:03 AM ChronoLegion
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** The second duel in ''Field of Dishonor'' was against the man who hired the previous duellist, a cowardly, amoral aristocrat. He was so terrified that he turned and fired early...but failed to kill Honor. He was promptly splattered by Honor, her bodyguard, and the marshall of the field.

to:

** The second duel in ''Field of Dishonor'' was against the man who hired the previous duellist, a cowardly, amoral aristocrat. He was so terrified that he turned and fired early...but failed to kill Honor. He was promptly splattered by Honor, her bodyguard, and the marshall of the field. She is later heavily criticized by aristocrats for, in their opinion, shooting an unarmed man (he had expended all his ammo by that point), conveniently ignoring that, the moment his violated the rules of the duel, his life was legally forfeit. Even if Honor hadn't fired, the marshall would still have killed him on the spot.


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** It's mentioned that there are two protocols for duels on Manticore. One is of the "first blood" variety, although death is still possible. The other is of the "until one is dead or both out of ammo" variety.
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