History Main / DuelToTheDeath

6th Oct '17 8:59:04 AM BeerBaron
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** Another backstory example is Pelinal Whitestrake, the legendary 1st Era hero of mankind/[[FantasticRacism racist]] [[TheBerserker berserker]]. Pelinal came to [[FounderOfTheKingdom St. Alessia]] to serve as her [[PhysicalGod divine champion]] in the war against the [[AbusivePrecursors Ayleids]]. Pelinal would fly into fits of UnstoppableRage (''mostly'' directed at the Ayleids) during which he [[BloodSplatteredWarrior would be stained with their blood]] and [[PaintTheTownRed left so much carnage in his wake]] that Kyne, one of the [[OurGodsAreDifferent Divines]], would have to [[CueTheRain send in her rain]] to cleanse Ayleid forts and village before they could be used by Alessia's forces. When dealing with Ayleid lords, however, Pelinal liked to challenge them to individual combat and then [[NoHoldsBarredBeatDown mercilessly slaughter them]]. At the end of the war, he battled the Ayleid leader, Umaril the Unfeathered, in this fashion. He defeated, but could not kill, Umaril who had divine protection from the Daedric Prince Meridia. Umaril's minions then cut the wounded Pelinal [[CruelAndUnusualDeath into eight pieces]] as a mockery of the [[OurGodsAreDifferent Eight Divines]].
4th Oct '17 8:13:26 AM BeerBaron
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** Also from the backstory, King Joile of Daggerfall convinced Gaiden Shinji, the legendary Redguard hero and leader of the [[TheOrder Order of Diagna]], to join him in the Siege of Orsinium (the home city-state/fortress of the [[OurOrcsAreDifferent Orcs]]). Joile then convinced Shinji, the [[MasterSwordsman Blademaster]] and founder of the Imperial City [[GladiatorSubquest Arena]], to participate in a CombatByChampion-style Duel To The Death against the Orc leader, Baloth Bloodtusk. As Shinji and Baloth were fighting, [[CavalryBetrayal Joile ordered his archers to open fire on both of them]], killing them both. As it turned out, Joile not only wanted to sack Orsinium, but planned to invade Hammerfell after and knew that Shinji would have been a major obstacle. (Joile would get his comeuppance, dying during what would be a failed invasion of Hammerfell.)
3rd Oct '17 11:48:16 AM BeerBaron
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** The ancient Yokudan ({{Precursors}} of the Redguards) MasterSwordsman Frandar Hunding had participated in 90 duels by the time he was 30, never once having been defeated. This led him to believe that he was invincible, causing him to retire to Mount Hattu where he would write the Book of Circles to pass along his insights.
3rd Oct '17 8:02:34 AM BeerBaron
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** In the backstory of the ActionAdventure spin-off game ''Redguard'', the hero, Cyrus, slew his brother-in-law, Hakan, in a duel after Hakan drunkenly struck Cyrus' sister Iszara. Though such duels are a perfectly legitimate means to settle disputes in [[MasterSwordsman Redguard]] society, Cyrus is the son of a prominent Crown (a conservative Redguard political party with ties to old [[{{Precursors}} Yokudan]] nobility) while Hakan is one of the leaders of the Forebears (a more progressive Redguard political party with ties to the "[[BadassArmy Warrior Wave]]" of Redguards who first settled Hammerfell and made it safe for the rest of the Yokudans to settle there). The Crowns and Forebears are violently opposed, and Hakan marrying Iszara was an ArrangedMarriage to hopefully bring peace. Thus, Cyrus was forced to flee, becoming a pirate.
1st Sep '17 6:43:35 AM Doug86
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* The entire premise of ''WesternAnimation/AGentlemansDuel.'' Two gentlemen come courting the same lady at the same time, naturally something is going to go down. With [[HumongousMecha giant]] [[SteamPunk steam-powered]] [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot kung-fu robots]]. Of course.
* Storm's duel with Calisto was adapted and {{Bowdlerise}}d for the ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' cartoon. (They used energy batons instead of knives.

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* The entire premise of ''WesternAnimation/AGentlemansDuel.'' ''WesternAnimation/AGentlemansDuel''. Two gentlemen come courting the same lady at the same time, naturally something is going to go down. With [[HumongousMecha giant]] [[SteamPunk steam-powered]] [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot kung-fu robots]]. Of course.
* Storm's duel with Calisto was adapted and {{Bowdlerise}}d for the ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' cartoon. (They used energy batons instead of knives.
28th Aug '17 3:29:29 PM Sharlee
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* In his first appearance in the ''Literature/BrotherCadfael'' novels, High Beringer challenges the murderer of Nicholas Faintree to one of these. Ostensibly it's a TrialByCombat, to let God favor the combatant who's telling the truth; privately, Hugh mainly wants to kill the man without giving him the chance to testify, because shameful information about the brother of Hugh's new LoveInterest's will be revealed if the culprit speaks in his own defense.

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* In his first appearance in the ''Literature/BrotherCadfael'' novels, High Beringer challenges the murderer of Nicholas Faintree to one of these. Ostensibly it's a TrialByCombat, to let God favor the combatant who's telling the truth; privately, Hugh mainly wants needs to kill the man without giving him the chance to testify, because shameful information about the brother of Hugh's new LoveInterest's LoveInterest will be revealed if the culprit speaks in his own defense.
28th Aug '17 3:28:31 PM Sharlee
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* In his first appearance in the ''Literature/BrotherCadfael'' novels, High Beringer challenges the murderer of Nicholas Faintree to one of these. Ostensibly it's a TrialByCombat, to let God favor the combatant who's telling the truth; privately, Hugh mainly wants to kill the man without giving him the chance to testify, because shameful information about the brother of Hugh's new LoveInterest's will be revealed if the culprit speaks in his own defense.
27th Aug '17 1:35:24 PM Dravencour
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* In ''FanFic/CodeGeassMegiddo'', Lelouch enters one with Suzaku during the Battle of Pearl Harbor after regaining his memories and returning to his role as Zero, leader of the Black Knights. The duel was an end result of eight years of hatred and resentment, in which both men finally let out their rage on each other. The battle itself was for the most part even, but Suzaku stunned Lelouch with a WhamLine towards the end that essentially sapped his opponent of his will to fight, and would've killed him had it not been for Kallen. Suzaku's declaration at the end during their escape makes it quite clear that any battle between them in the future will also be this.

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* In ''FanFic/CodeGeassMegiddo'', Lelouch enters one with Suzaku during the Battle of Pearl Harbor after regaining his memories and returning to his role as Zero, leader of the Black Knights. The duel was an the end result of eight years of hatred and resentment, in which both men finally let out their rage on each other. The battle itself was for the most part even, but Suzaku stunned Lelouch with a WhamLine towards the end that essentially sapped his opponent of his will to fight, and would've killed him had it not been for Kallen. Suzaku's declaration at the end during their escape makes it quite clear that any battle between them in the future will also be this.



* The fourth novel of the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series goes as far to allude to it in the title, ''Field of Dishonor''. Dueling is legal in the Star Kingdom of Manticore, and tends to be used by the aristocracy more often than the commoners. On Grayson it goes far enough you can request a trial by combat against the protectors champion.
** Honor engages in two of these in ''Field Of Dishonor'', the first being against a professional duelist who killed her lover in a duel to goad her into challenging him, on the assumption that, as a Naval officer, she wouldn't have the same level of skill as he does. Unfortunately for him, her uncle's involvement in the Beowulf Society for Creative Anachronism made her very familiar with the chemical-propellant guns used in duels, and her genetic enhancements and cybernetic eye sharpened her hand-eye co-ordination to the point that she could simply shoot from the hip. The end result was the she hit her opponent four times before he could even raise his gun.
** The second duel in ''Field of Dishonor'' was against the man who hired the previous duelist, a cowardly, amoral aristocrat. He was so terrified that he turned and fired early... but failed to kill Honor. He was promptly splattered by both Honor and the Marshall of the Field. She is later heavily criticized by aristocrats for, in their opinion, shooting an unarmed man (he had expended all his ammo by that point), conveniently ignoring that, the moment his violated the rules of the duel, his life was legally forfeit. Even if Honor hadn't fired, the marshall would still have killed him on the spot.

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* The fourth novel of the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series goes as far to allude to it in the title, ''Field of Dishonor''. Dueling is legal in the Star Kingdom of Manticore, and tends to be used by the aristocracy more often than the commoners. On Grayson it goes far enough you can request a trial by combat against the protectors Protector's champion.
** Honor engages in two of these in ''Field Of Dishonor'', the first being against a professional duelist who killed her lover in a duel to goad her into challenging him, on the assumption that, as a Naval officer, she wouldn't have the same level of skill as he does. Unfortunately for him, her uncle's involvement in the Beowulf Society for Creative Anachronism made her very familiar with the chemical-propellant guns used in duels, and her genetic enhancements and cybernetic eye sharpened her hand-eye co-ordination to the point that she could simply shoot from the hip. The end result was the that she hit her opponent four times before he could even raise his gun.
** The second duel in ''Field of Dishonor'' was against the man who hired the previous duelist, a cowardly, amoral aristocrat. He was so terrified that he turned and fired early... but failed to kill Honor. He was promptly splattered by both Honor and the Marshall of the Field. She is later heavily criticized by aristocrats for, in their opinion, shooting an unarmed man (he had expended all his ammo by that point), conveniently ignoring that, that the moment his he violated the rules of the duel, his life was legally forfeit. Even if Honor hadn't fired, the marshall Marshall would still have killed him on the spot.



** It's mentioned that there are two protocols for duels on Manticore. One is of the "first blood" variety, although death is still possible. The other is of the "until one is dead or both out of ammo" variety.

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** It's mentioned that there are two protocols for duels on Manticore. One is of the "first blood" variety, although death is still possible. The other is of the "until one is dead or both are out of ammo" variety.
19th Aug '17 1:48:50 PM ClintEastwood
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** ''Film/{{Shane}}'': The titular gunslinger against gun-for-fire Wilson.

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** * ''Film/{{Shane}}'': The titular gunslinger against gun-for-fire Wilson.
6th Aug '17 3:10:55 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Brick fights. It's a duel that ''cannot be refused'' in which each person hits the other on the head with a brick until someone dies.
* Dueling (of the type we think of today) originates from the time period when a squabble between two men could easily and rapidly blow up into a huge, ruinous family feud (no, not [[Series/FamilyFeud that kind]]). Dueling contained the dispute between two/four men, and kept collateral damage to a minimum. Further rules included men of superior social status being able to refuse challenges by lesser men, as well as a social stigma around forcing one's inferiors into accepting challenges. The practice died out around the end of the 19th century, as societies began getting tired of their most educated and powerful men killing each other off.
** It's worth noting that duels to the death have always been relatively rare. First blood, or in the case of pistols, one-shot, duels have always been more common. Even in a place as notoriously rough-and-tumble as 17th century Venice, only one in forty duels ended in the death of either combatant, and even then deaths were more the result of unlucky first cuts than anything else. And in pistol duels it was common for one or both duelists to shoot into the air or into the ground at the feet of their opponent; willingness to risk one's life in the duel was supposed to be sufficient for honor to be satisfied. When a duel was ''intentionally'' to the death, it was usually because a feud between the participants went deeper than just the specific dispute that was officially the subject of the duel.

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* Brick fights. It's a duel that ''cannot be refused'' in which each person hits the other on the head with a brick until someone dies.
* Dueling (of the type we think of today) originates from the time period when a squabble between two men could easily and rapidly blow up into a huge, ruinous family feud (no, not [[Series/FamilyFeud that kind]]).feud. Dueling contained the dispute between two/four men, and kept collateral damage to a minimum. Further rules included men of superior social status being able to refuse challenges by lesser men, as well as a social stigma around forcing one's inferiors into accepting challenges. The practice died out around the end of the 19th century, as societies began getting tired of their most educated and powerful men killing each other off.
** It's worth noting that
However, duels to the death have always been relatively rare. First blood, or in the case of pistols, one-shot, duels have always been more common. Even in a place as notoriously rough-and-tumble as 17th century Venice, only one in forty duels ended in the death of either combatant, and even then deaths were more the result of unlucky first cuts than anything else. And in pistol duels it was common for one or both duelists to shoot into the air or into the ground at the feet of their opponent; willingness to risk one's life in the duel was supposed to be sufficient for honor to be satisfied. When a duel was ''intentionally'' to the death, it was usually because a feud between the participants went deeper than just the specific dispute that was officially the subject of the duel.



** Executive summary: Hamilton and Burr were competing for influence in New York, with Hamilton being a Federalist, the former Secretary of the Treasury, and a bit of a snobby prick, and Burr being a Democratic-Republican and the Vice President of the United States, but such slimeball that even the President, UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson, allied with Hamilton against him.[[note]]The Election of 1800 had Jefferson and Burr ''tied'' for Electoral votes because the system wasn't built for a ticket campaign. Burr started pursuing the President's spot even though Jefferson was clearly supposed to be at the top of the ticket. Hamilton had to talk his Federalist allies in Congress to back Jefferson, because while Hamilton hated Jefferson he knew Jefferson still had some ethics while Burr had none[[/note]] They hated each others' guts, even though [[WeUsedToBeFriends the two were close allies during the Revolution and pre-Constitutional politics]]. Eventually there was some kind of personal-political kerfuffle[[note]]Hamilton made defamatory remarks about Burr at a dinner party, no record remains of what was said but by all accounts it was ''nasty''[[/note]] that led to Burr challenging Hamilton to a duel. Hamilton accepts. They get on boats to UsefulNotes/NewJersey to duel (in the classic "pistols at dawn" manner; they picked New Jersey because though dueling was illegal in both New York and New Jersey, it was more aggressively prosecuted in New York). Under confused circumstances, Hamilton shoots in the air (it's not clear why); Burr retaliates by shooting Hamilton in the chest. Hamilton dies, and Burr, after being indicted for murder in both New York and New Jersey, flees first to South Carolina and then to Washington, DC (to serve out his last months as Veep), before traveling west to engage in some harebrained scheme to establish a new country out there (or something like that), leading to a treason trial that got nowhere because the government couldn't provide the Constitutionally required two witnesses.[[note]]After that, he returned to New York to practice law. [[KarmaHoudini He somehow managed to die in obscurity]].[[/note]]
*** The dueling pistols still exist, and are on display at New York's JP Morgan Chase bank.
** During the UsefulNoted/AmericanRevolution, Washington forbade dueling between officers - Burr and Hamilton included - because the War Effort took priority and he needed every able-bodied officer for that.



* Endemic in most of Europe for quite a while, roughly from the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century.
* A particularly famous 16th century French duel was waged after the young, minor nobleman Guy de Chabot, Baron of Jarnac, quarrelled with the Dauphin (the heir apparent to the throne). Because the Dauphin was too important to duel himself, the veteran soldier and highly skilled duellist François Vivonne stood in his place. Knowing that he had little hope of defeating Vivonne, Jarnac hired the services of the Italian fencing master Captain Caize, who trained him to perfect a little-used cut to the back of the knee. On the day of the duel, Jarnac quickly landed two blows on Vivonne's legs, crippling him. The enraged king ended the duel immediately. Vivonne refused medical attention and eventually bled to death. The duel shocked the French court due to the unexpected result, the ease at which Jarnac seemed to win, and the bad implication it had on the royal family. Dueling was quickly outlawed in France thereafter. To this day, a ''Coup de Jarnac'' is a tricky or unexpected attack.

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* Endemic in most of Europe for quite a while, roughly from the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century.
* A particularly famous 16th century French duel was waged after the young, minor nobleman Guy de Chabot, Baron of Jarnac, quarrelled quarreled with the Dauphin (the heir apparent to the throne). Because the Dauphin was too important to duel himself, the veteran soldier and highly skilled duellist duelist François Vivonne stood in his place. Knowing that he had little hope of defeating Vivonne, Jarnac hired the services of the Italian fencing master Captain Caize, who trained him to perfect a little-used cut to the back of the knee. On the day of the duel, Jarnac quickly landed two blows on Vivonne's legs, crippling him. The enraged king ended the duel immediately. Vivonne refused medical attention and eventually bled to death. The duel shocked the French court due to the unexpected result, the ease at which Jarnac seemed to win, and the bad implication it had on the royal family. Dueling was quickly outlawed in France thereafter. To this day, a ''Coup de Jarnac'' is a tricky or unexpected attack.



* Preston Brooks gained [[strike:fame]] infamy for bludgeoning Senator Charles Sumner half to death on the floor of the Senate after deciding that the man was not his social equal and did not deserve to be called out to a duel. Another congressman, Anson Burlingame of New York, accused Brooks of cowardice for his actions and received a prompt challenge by Brooks. Burlingame, a marksman, accepted the duel and chose ''rifles''. To avoid anti-dueling laws, he demanded that the duel be held in Canada. Surprised by Burlingame's enthusiasm for the duel and aware of his reputation as a crack shot, Brooks claimed that he did not want to go into "hostile territory" to reach Canada, so he withdrew the challenge. The North mocked him for a coward for the rest of his life.

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* Preston Brooks gained [[strike:fame]] infamy for bludgeoning Senator Charles Sumner half to death on the floor of the Senate after deciding that the man was not his social equal and did not deserve to be called out to a duel. Another congressman, Anson Burlingame of New York, accused Brooks of cowardice for his actions and received a prompt challenge by Brooks. Burlingame, a marksman, accepted the duel and chose ''rifles''. To avoid anti-dueling laws, he demanded that the duel be held in Canada. Surprised by Burlingame's enthusiasm for the duel and aware of his reputation as a crack shot, Brooks claimed that he did not want to go into "hostile territory" to reach Canada, so he withdrew the challenge. The North mocked him for a coward for the rest of his life.



* Still happens today. A duel between two British Army officers - in July 2016 - using flares in lieu of pistols resulted in [[http://www.forces.tv/98339400 burning down the Officers' Mess at their base in Dorset]].

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* Still happens today. A duel between two British Army officers - in July 2016 - using flares in lieu of pistols resulted in [[http://www.forces.tv/98339400 burning down the Officers' Mess at their base in Dorset]].
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