History Main / DiscOneNuke

11th Jun '16 6:21:23 PM gophergiggles
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** ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' has the Bunny Hood and the Blast Mask, both of which can be easily obtained in the same day cycle as soon as you're able to leave Clock Town. The former increases your speed by 1.5X and the latter amounts to a cost-free ([[GoodBadBug if you use your shield]]) infinite supply of bombs. These two items make the first dungeon laughably easy, and will continue to be useful throughout the entire game. Before starting the second dungeon you can take [[SequenceBreaking a little detour]] to Ikana Valley with the Lens of Truth and obtain the Stone Mask, which makes ''all enemies ignore you'' and makes dungeons and ''especially'' the Pirate's Fortress much easier.
19th May '16 4:32:06 PM pisacrap
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** In [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI the original game]] you can, with luck and perseverance, go into Level 1 with six hearts, the White Sword, the Blue Ring, and the big shield. In the second quest, you have to either get the Whistle from Level 2 or beat the first two dungeons before you can get the White Sword (which, for the record, requires you to have five heart containers). It's also worth noting that, with just the Bow from Level 1 of the first quest, you can take an (extremely dangerous) trek to Level 8 to get the Magical Key, which lets you bypass large portions of entire dungeons.

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** In From [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI the original game]] you can, with game]]:
*** With
luck and perseverance, you can go into Level 1 with six hearts, the White Sword, the Blue Ring, and the big shield. In the second quest, you have to either get the Whistle from Level 2 or beat the first two dungeons before you can get the White Sword (which, for the record, requires you to have five heart containers). It's also worth noting that, with just containers).
*** After obtaining
the Bow from in Level 1 of the first quest, 1, you can take an (extremely a (very dangerous) trek to Level 8 to and get the Magical Key, which lets you open an unlimited number of locked doors and thus bypass large portions of entire the dungeons.



** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', within an hour or two of becoming Adult Link you can get the Biggoron's Sword. While it does force you to sacrifice your shielding ability, it's considerably more powerful than the Master sword, has better reach, and is more useful in most situations.

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** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', you can get the Biggoron's Sword within an hour or two of becoming Adult Link you can get the Biggoron's Sword. Link. While it does force you to sacrifice your shielding ability, it's considerably more twice as powerful than as the Master sword, Sword, has better reach, and is more useful in most situations.
6th May '16 5:19:09 PM nombretomado
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* Formerly possible in ''[[GaiaOnline zOMG!]]''-- experience is tied to the rings, so at the time the game debuted it was possible to simply buy high-level rings off the Marketplace. GaiaOnline staff quickly realized the many problems with this and locked the rings.

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* Formerly possible in ''[[GaiaOnline ''[[Website/GaiaOnline zOMG!]]''-- experience is tied to the rings, so at the time the game debuted it was possible to simply buy high-level rings off the Marketplace. GaiaOnline Gaia Online staff quickly realized the many problems with this and locked the rings.
4th May '16 5:47:04 PM HighCrate
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** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', at the very first dungeon, you can collect Deku sticks, which are twice as powerful as the Kokiri sword (your main weapon). When used with the jump attack, they are ''four'' times as powerful, allowing you to 2-hit kill the first two or three major bosses, and 1-hit kill everything in between. Also, within an hour or two of becoming Adult Link you can get the Biggoron's Sword. While it does force you to sacrifice your shielding ability, it's considerably more powerful than the Master sword, has better reach, and is more useful in most situations.

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** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', at the very first dungeon, you can collect Deku sticks, which are twice as powerful as the Kokiri sword (your main weapon). When used with the jump attack, they are ''four'' times as powerful, allowing you to 2-hit kill the first two or three major bosses, and 1-hit kill everything in between. Also, within an hour or two of becoming Adult Link you can get the Biggoron's Sword. While it does force you to sacrifice your shielding ability, it's considerably more powerful than the Master sword, has better reach, and is more useful in most situations.



* ''VideoGame/MegaManLegends'' has the Machine Buster arm, a laughably weak rapid fire weapon that you can get as soon as you save City Hall (About a half-hour in). If you spend about three hours grinding the little bird Reaverbots in the newly accessable ruin (in the field before you fight the Marlwolf) that drop surprising amounts of Zenny and max out every stat of the weapon except "Special", the weapon turns ''deadly''. It'll destroy the Marlwolf so quickly that the dialogue will glitch out, and mow down every boss up until Bruno in mere minutes. Even ''then'' it's not useless, just outclassed by other weapons and your now upgraded buster gun.
* Franchise/TombRaider: In parts made by Core Design, there is always a shotgun or other equally powerful weapon hidden right where the game starts.

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* ''VideoGame/MegaManLegends'' has the Machine Buster arm, a laughably weak rapid fire weapon that you can get as soon as you save City Hall (About (about a half-hour in). If you spend about three hours grinding the little bird Reaverbots in the newly accessable accessible ruin (in the field before you fight the Marlwolf) that drop surprising amounts of Zenny and max out every stat of the weapon except "Special", the weapon turns ''deadly''. It'll destroy the Marlwolf so quickly that the dialogue will glitch out, and mow down every boss up until Bruno in mere minutes. Even ''then'' it's not useless, just outclassed by other weapons and your now upgraded buster gun.
* Franchise/TombRaider: In parts made by Core Design, there is always a shotgun or other equally powerful weapon hidden right where the game starts.
gun.



* ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'''s [[StaticStunGun stun rod]] is very much worthy of mention. Its shock packs a very heavy punch, prevents the plagas from manifesting after you kill the Majini, and there's hardly an enemy in the game that doesn't flinch when hit by it. And it can be bought as soon as the second mission for a meager 3000 gold, an amount of money you'll likely get on the first mission alone.
* ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil6'''s own Jake Mueller can be turned into this. Equip him with the Melee, Defense, and J'avo Killer skills (If you've played the chapters in order, you'll have gained enough points to have level 2 of each of these skills). He'll be strong enough now to run right up to enemies (while being SHOT no less) and beat them to death with his Hand To Hand, and since your health regenerates, you don't have to worry about scratch damage. Not only is it actually easier to kill your enemies like this than it is to shoot them, but it let's you stock up on ammo to battle the Ustanak.



** ''Gran Turismo 3'' allowed you to do the Rally license tests without needing to complete the other license tests. This means that, provided you got the gold on all of the tests, you had access to the Subaru Impreza Rally Car Prototype, allowing you to plow through most of the early game races, as well as some mid-game and rally races, too.
** ''Gran Turismo 2'' has the Grand Touring Event Series. All of the 3 races. Every race rewards you a JGTC car and JGTC cars in this game are unrealistically fast. The last one, which requires a 550HP car to have a chance of winning, rewards you a JGTC Skyline, which has no restrictor plate and thus makes around 700 horsepower instead of the 493 horsepower (500 PS) limit in JGTC. And it's a 4x4.

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** * ''Gran Turismo 3'' allowed you to do the Rally license tests without needing to complete the other license tests. This means that, provided you got the gold on all of the tests, you had access to the Subaru Impreza Rally Car Prototype, allowing you to plow through most of the early game races, as well as some mid-game and rally races, too.
** * ''Gran Turismo 2'' has the Grand Touring Event Series. All of the 3 races. Every race rewards you a JGTC car and JGTC cars in this game are unrealistically fast. The last one, which requires a 550HP car to have a chance of winning, rewards you a JGTC Skyline, which has no restrictor plate and thus makes around 700 horsepower instead of the 493 horsepower (500 PS) limit in JGTC. And it's a 4x4.



* ''VideoGame/DeusEx'':
** The GEP Gun. You can get it within a minute of starting the game, and it will allow you to breach locked doors and chests, take out security bots in one shot and [[spoiler:OneHitKill Anna Navarre, if you don't use her killphrase]]. Assuming that you explore a bit, rockets are easy to come by, although the Dragon's Tooth Sword takes over for the breaching potential a third of the way through the game. Notably, you don't have to [[SequenceBreaking sequence break]] or glitch anything to get it - just pick the right option in Paul's conversation (the other two options are a tranquilizer crossbow, which some of the {{mooks}} in the first level drop, or a sniper rifle, which is rarer but also easy to get in the first stage). Anyone who's played the game once knows what your answer should be.
** Even the humble pistol (which the player starts with) is a fearsome weapon. It's highly lethal, killing most human enemies with a single headshot and the more durable ones with two-three hits in the head. It's compatible with the laser sight and/or scope (both found on the first stage), making it viable for sniping even at a low skill level, and you get a free silenced pistol after completing the first stage. And the default skill level for the pistol is "Trained", unlike the other weapons ("Untrained").
** You can get a free Assault Rifle just by killing or incapacitating the UNATCO soldier walking up the stairs after dealing with the terrorist leader in the first stage. Combined with the mods you can get from this level (which include the aforementioned laser, as well as accuracy and range mods), it becomes a fearsome weapon by the time you get to Battery Park. Likewise, you can ''also'' get a Sawed-Off Shotgun by searching the sunken boat beside Harley Filben's shack, which comes in very handy over the next two stages.
** This is also the case in ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution''. After being augmented, the Zenith Pistol is carried by the first enemy you come across, is [[VendorTrash incredibly common]], uses cheap and easy to find (or farm) ammo, Can be upgraded with a [[HollywoodSilencer Silencer]], Laser Sight and the Armor Piercing mod (the latter of which is found in your own apartment) before leaving the first hub world. The armor piercing mod makes the Pistol's shots ignore all armor modifiers, allowing you to headshot any mook in the game for an instant kill. Due to the number of generic upgrades the pistol can take it is just as useful near the end of the game as it was early on, and it's so effective it's indeed perfectly possible to stick solely to it for the duration of the game. In fact, there's an achievement for doing so.



* ''VideoGame/SystemShock 2'' has a somewhat mild form of this. By abusing an exploit in the training rooms in the tutorial level, you can start the game proper with- among other things- a Laser Pistol in perfect condition, maintenance tools, an assortment of healing items, a Standard Pistol, and a PsiAmp. The weapons in perfect condition are the biggest boon, since it takes a while to fully upgrade the maintenance stat.

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* ''VideoGame/SystemShock 2'' has a somewhat mild form of this. 2'':
**
By abusing an exploit in the training rooms in the tutorial level, you can start the game proper with- among other things- a Laser Pistol in perfect condition, maintenance tools, an assortment of healing items, a Standard Pistol, and a PsiAmp. The weapons in perfect condition are the biggest boon, since it takes a while to fully upgrade the maintenance stat.



* To an extent ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'', because of a [[http://kotaku.com/5388050/borderlands-creative-boss-lives-up-to-his-loot-promises promise]] to play with and give loot to anyone who proved they preordered the game. This resulted in many low level people getting guns they couldn't even ''use'' yet, though they could sell them for plenty of money.
** ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' has similar issues:
*** Due to the random-gun spawning algorithms that generate loot, in any playthrough there's a decent chance of stumbling over a gun (usually legendary weapons) that are powerful enough to let the player steamroll through the next few story missions.
*** Gearbox's SH!FT service (which is an in-game code entry system) allows the players to enter codes to get additional skins and Golden Keys. [[http://borderlands.wikia.com/wiki/SHiFT Currently]], one can get ''130'' Golden Keys just by entering Golden Key Codes into the system, which usually aren't immensely powerful, but always allow the player to have a gun that's much more powerful than their current level.

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* To an extent ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'', because of a [[http://kotaku.com/5388050/borderlands-creative-boss-lives-up-to-his-loot-promises promise]] to play with and give loot to anyone who proved they preordered the game. This resulted in many low level people getting guns they couldn't even ''use'' yet, though they could sell them for plenty of money.
**
''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'' has similar issues:
*** Due to the random-gun spawning algorithms that generate loot, in any playthrough there's a decent chance of stumbling over a gun (usually legendary weapons) that are powerful enough to let the player steamroll through the next few story missions.
***
2}}'':
**
Gearbox's SH!FT service (which is an in-game code entry system) allows the players to enter codes to get additional skins and Golden Keys. [[http://borderlands.wikia.com/wiki/SHiFT Currently]], one can get ''130'' Golden Keys just by entering Golden Key Codes into the system, which usually aren't immensely powerful, but always allow the player to have a gun that's much more powerful than their current level.



** ''VideoGame/{{Metroid Prime 2 Echoes}}'' gives you the "taste of power" variety of disc one nuke, except normally it's stripped away from you when you go to the dark world for the first time. Using a glitch called Infinite Speed and a bit of Secret World trekking, you can skip losing your powerups entirely. Beware, triggering the cutscene where you lose your powerups after actually collecting an item causes you to lose everything you've collected to that point ''permanently''.

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** * ''VideoGame/{{Metroid Prime 2 Echoes}}'' gives you the "taste of power" variety of disc one nuke, except normally it's stripped away from you when you go to the dark world for the first time. Using a glitch called Infinite Speed and a bit of Secret World trekking, you can skip losing your powerups entirely. Beware, triggering the cutscene where you lose your powerups after actually collecting an item causes you to lose everything you've collected to that point ''permanently''.



** In ''Last Light'', you get to pick your choice of weapons and attachments from the Ranger armory in D6. [[ATasteOfPower At the end of the first mission, you get captured by Nazis and your weapons are taken away.]] On regular difficulties, you have to make do with looted enemy weapons upon your inevitable and prompt escape from captivity. In Ranger mode (now DLC only, unfortunately) you can find your weapons on a rack not long after starting your escape, letting you rock out with silenced assault rifles and silenced six-round shotguns when the human enemies are packing cobbled-together submachine guns and pistols. Of course, this being [[NintendoHard Ranger Mode]], you're going to ''need'' the extra firepower.
* ''VideoGame/NosferatuTheWrathOfMalachi'':
** Father Aville is one of the first family members you'll probably rescue. He gives you the chalice of holy water, which is arguably the most powerful weapon in the game. It hits in a wide arc, can kill almost anything in ONE HIT, and the only things in the entire game that are immune to it are [[spoiler:the penultimate boss]], gypsies and devil dogs, the latter two being arguably the weakest enemies in the game anyway. Even the bosses fall after just 2 or 3 hits. Not to mention it can be refilled indefinitely at any water trough.
** There's a hidden revolver [[spoiler:in the very first room of the first major section of the game the player is going to enter]], long before you can save a family member that will give you a revolver.

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** * In ''Last Light'', you get to pick your choice of weapons and attachments from the Ranger armory in D6. [[ATasteOfPower At the end of the first mission, you get captured by Nazis and your weapons are taken away.]] On regular difficulties, you have to make do with looted enemy weapons upon your inevitable and prompt escape from captivity. In Ranger mode (now DLC only, unfortunately) you can find your weapons on a rack not long after starting your escape, letting you rock out with silenced assault rifles and silenced six-round shotguns when the human enemies are packing cobbled-together submachine guns and pistols. Of course, this being [[NintendoHard Ranger Mode]], you're going to ''need'' the extra firepower.
* ''VideoGame/NosferatuTheWrathOfMalachi'':
** Father Aville is one of the first family members you'll probably rescue. He gives you the chalice of holy water, which is arguably the most powerful weapon in the game. It hits in a wide arc, can kill almost anything in ONE HIT, and the only things in the entire game that are immune to it are [[spoiler:the penultimate boss]], gypsies and devil dogs, the latter two being arguably the weakest enemies in the game anyway. Even the bosses fall after just 2 or 3 hits. Not to mention it can be refilled indefinitely at any water trough.
**
''VideoGame/NosferatuTheWrathOfMalachi'': There's a hidden revolver [[spoiler:in the very first room of the first major section of the game the player is going to enter]], long before you can save a family member that will give you a revolver.



* ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}} 5'': Play as Persia. Go hell bent for bronze working to get Immortals. Build up an army and declare war on someone immediately; score as many great generals as you can. Start a golden age, which lasts twice as long as any other civ. Keep extending it with every great general you get. Sit back and laugh as you conquer the world, since the golden age also makes your military units stronger.
** Play as Greece and get hoplites, which replace spearmen and are only one point weaker(and much cheaper) than swordsmen, the default assault unit after basic warriors. Hoplites also have the added benefit of tearing apart cavalry.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}} 5'': 5'': Play as Persia. Go hell bent for bronze working to get Immortals. Build up an army and declare war on someone immediately; score as many great generals as you can. Start a golden age, which lasts twice as long as any other civ. Keep extending it with every great general you get. Sit back and laugh as you conquer the world, since the golden age also makes your military units stronger.
** Play as Greece and get hoplites, which replace spearmen and are only one point weaker(and much cheaper) than swordsmen, the default assault unit after basic warriors. Hoplites also have the added benefit of tearing apart cavalry.
stronger.



* ''VideoGame/GalacticCivilizations'': Finding a planet with a quality over twenty, which can support more than twenty buildings, nearby your homeworld. A player can use this to build a huge tech base and get useful technology early on, or as an economic base and have ludicrous amounts of cash.



** The game allows you to trade between your characters online. One neat trick is to make ''Khalim's Will'', which is usable by characters of any level (because it's a quest item) and provides obscene amounts of damage for most if not all characters below level 25 (when you acquire it, you're generally around level 21-24).
** Enchant Skill, while normally a relatively useless sorceress skill that adds fire damage to a target's weapon, with incredible amounts of + skills, can get fire damage added up to somewhere between 3000 and 9000. It's still somewhat useless by the time you can get it there barring a very specific build. However, joining a normal game and giving that much damage to a character in normal mode essentially means anyone can go through the whole of normal one or two-shotting every monster with a regular short bow. To put it in perspective, Diablo only has 14,000 HP on Normal (though fire resistance does factor in) and Baal, the boss of the expansion only about twice that. The most a regular enemy has is about 3000. Makes early level grinding in Hardcore a breeze.

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** The game allows you to [[{{Twinking}} trade between your characters online.online]]. One neat trick is to make ''Khalim's Will'', which is usable by characters of any level (because it's a quest item) and provides obscene amounts of damage for most if not all characters below level 25 (when you acquire it, you're generally around level 21-24).
** Enchant Skill, while normally a relatively useless sorceress skill that adds fire damage to a target's weapon, with incredible amounts of + skills, can get fire damage added up to somewhere between 3000 and 9000. It's still somewhat useless by the time you can get it there barring a very specific build. However, [[{{Twinking}} joining a normal game and giving that much damage to a character in normal mode mode]] essentially means anyone can go through the whole of normal one or two-shotting every monster with a regular short bow. To put it in perspective, Diablo only has 14,000 HP on Normal (though fire resistance does factor in) and Baal, the boss of the expansion only about twice that. The most a regular enemy has is about 3000. Makes early level grinding in Hardcore a breeze.



* ''VideoGame/MechWarrior 3'' had a salvage system which allowed you to get just about any enemy mech, provided you shot one of it's leg off (and anything could be equipped on any mech). As a result, you could end up with a 75 ton mech after mission 4 (that one is canonic, according to the novelization), and '''2''' 100 ton mechs after mission 8.

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* ''VideoGame/MechWarrior 3'' had a salvage system which allowed you to get just about any enemy mech, provided you shot one of it's leg its legs off (and anything could be equipped on any mech). As a result, you could end up with a 75 ton 75-ton mech after mission 4 (that one is canonic, according to the novelization), and '''2''' 100 ton ''2'' 100-ton mechs after mission 8.



* ''VideoGame/{{Starsiege}}'' gives a copy of the game's strongest (well, most damaging at least) weapon right from start during the Human campaign. Of course, at this stage it takes up half your mech's allowed weight and drains energy like mad... but it melts any early-game enemy, and remains useful until the end (where you can end up with a total of 4 of these weapons, though your personal mech can only ever have two)



* It was more common in older games to allow high-level characters to give high-powered equipment and {{Status Buff}}s to low-level characters (aka ''{{twinking}}''). Newer games generally try to prevent this by having minimum experience requirements.
* Heirloom items in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' can make leveling [[{{Altitis}} alts]] ridiculously easy, as they scale with character level and have stats appropriate to rare items. The weapons can also be enchanted with level-60 endgame enchants such as Fiery Weapon, +90 Spellpower, and Crusader (+200 strength proc, which is overkill at low levels). This is intentional, as you have to already have a level 80 character and spend a fair amount of justice points to acquire them.

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* It was more common in older games to allow high-level characters to give high-powered equipment and {{Status Buff}}s to low-level characters (aka ''{{twinking}}''). Newer games generally try to prevent this by having minimum experience requirements.
*
''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'':
**
Heirloom items in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' can make leveling [[{{Altitis}} alts]] ridiculously easy, as they scale with character level and have stats appropriate to rare items. The weapons can also be enchanted with level-60 endgame enchants such as Fiery Weapon, +90 Spellpower, and Crusader (+200 strength proc, which is overkill at low levels). This is intentional, as [[{{Twinking}} you have to already have a level 80 character character]] and spend a fair amount of justice points to acquire them.



* In the original ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' campaign, there was a lively economy of high level players who would party up, for a price, with low level players and run their party from the first non-tutorial town (or, more commonly from the last outpost before the high level enemies show up) to the [[SequenceBreaking last large town]] where they could get the best armor in the game. Both the running service and the armor would cost much more money than a beginning character has, but since you can freely transfer money from all other characters on your account this was not much of a problem.
* In ''VideoGame/RuneScape'', grinding your mining and smithing levels while selling off the goods gets you not only a good amount of cash, but also some very powerful weapons and armor-- and since the enemies around the first couple of towns generally don't aggro on sight, it's easy for your fighting levels to be too low to use said weapons and armor. Likewise, grinding your fishing and cooking stats can give you lots of powerful food items for health recovery, enabling you to tank around monsters with a significantly higher danger rating.

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* In the original ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' campaign, there was a lively economy of high level players who would [[{{Twinking}} party up, up]], for a price, with low level players and run their party from the first non-tutorial town (or, more commonly from the last outpost before the high level enemies show up) to the [[SequenceBreaking last large town]] where they could get the best armor in the game. Both the running service and the armor would cost much more money than a beginning character has, but since you can freely transfer money from all other characters on your account this was not much of a problem.
* In ''VideoGame/RuneScape'', grinding ''VideoGame/RuneScape'':
** Grinding
your mining and smithing levels while selling off the goods gets you not only a good amount of cash, but also some very powerful weapons and armor-- and since the enemies around the first couple of towns generally don't aggro on sight, it's easy for your fighting levels to be too low to use said weapons and armor. Likewise, grinding your fishing and cooking stats can give you lots of powerful food items for health recovery, enabling you to tank around monsters with a significantly higher danger rating.



* Intrepid ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' players often abuse the open-endedness of the game's levels to get new weapons or items [[SequenceBreaking much earlier than intended]].
** In ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'', this was practically encouraged by the inclusion of the obvious but difficult-to-master Wall Jump technique, which lets Samus climb walls and jump way higher than intended very early on in the game.
** And in ''VideoGame/MetroidZeroMission'' this actually was encouraged, as there are pictures obtainable only by completing the game with a minimum percentage.
** By the time ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' came out, Nintendo was well aware of the sequence breaking that had occurred in earlier games -- so much so that there is a certain cutscene in ''Fusion'' that can only be obtained by sequence breaking.
** ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' also has an example hidden right before the first boss. Almost right above where you find your first Energy Tank, you can missile open the roof and find a ''second'' Energy Tank, effectively doubling the ammount of health you would normally have at that part of the game.

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* Intrepid ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' players often abuse the open-endedness of the game's levels to get new weapons or items [[SequenceBreaking much earlier than intended]].
** In ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'', this was practically encouraged by the inclusion of the obvious but difficult-to-master Wall Jump technique, which lets Samus climb walls and jump way higher than intended very early on in the game.
** And in ''VideoGame/MetroidZeroMission'' this actually was encouraged, as there are pictures obtainable only by completing the game with a minimum percentage.
** By the time
''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' came out, Nintendo was well aware of the sequence breaking that had occurred in earlier games -- so much so that there is a certain cutscene in ''Fusion'' that can only be obtained by sequence breaking.
** ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' also
has an example hidden right before the first boss. Almost right above where you find your first Energy Tank, you can missile open the roof and find a ''second'' Energy Tank, effectively doubling the ammount amount of health you would normally have at that part of the game.



* One of the most famous examples is the Metal Blade from ''VideoGame/MegaMan2''; it is unquestionably the most powerful weapon in the game, and one of the most powerful in the entire series; besides being very easy to acquire from the start due to it's [[WarmUpBoss easy to beat robot master]], it delivers high damage and can cut through multiple mooks at a time, has a machine gun rate of fire, fast speed and long range, the ability to shoot in eight directions, and an ammo capacity so ridiculously large that would take a conscious effort to deplete it! And on top of that, it's the only weapon in the game that, some more than others, works effectively against half the robot masters (it deals good-to-decent damage to four of them, ''including'' the boss you get it from in the rematch, and it's also the weakness of one of the Wily bosses). If it weren't for it's ''sole'' handicap of several enemies being completely immune to it, it would make the Mega Buster all but obsolete!

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* One of the most famous examples is the Metal Blade from ''VideoGame/MegaMan2''; it is unquestionably the most powerful weapon in the game, and one of the most powerful in the entire series; besides being very easy to acquire from the start due to it's its [[WarmUpBoss easy to beat easy-to-beat robot master]], it delivers high damage and can cut through multiple mooks at a time, has a machine gun rate of fire, fast speed and long range, the ability to shoot in eight directions, and an ammo capacity so ridiculously large that would take a conscious effort to deplete it! And on top of that, it's the only weapon in the game that, some more than others, works effectively against half the robot masters (it deals good-to-decent damage to four of them, ''including'' the boss you get it from in the rematch, and it's also the weakness of one of the Wily bosses). If it weren't for it's ''sole'' handicap of several enemies being completely immune to it, it would make the Mega Buster all but obsolete!



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' has the Top Secret Area, found in only the second world and easily accessable [[GuideDangIt if you're aware of how to unlock it]]. Each time you enter it provides two fire flowers, two feathers, and a Yoshi egg. Being able to come here as often as you like to easily gather items is good enough, but the ''true'' nuke comes from the free 1-up you get ''every time'' you come here with Yoshi.

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* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' has the Top Secret Area, found in only the second world and easily accessable accessible [[GuideDangIt if you're aware of how to unlock it]]. Each time you enter it provides two fire flowers, two feathers, and a Yoshi egg. Being able to come here as often as you like to easily gather items is good enough, but the ''true'' nuke comes from the free 1-up you get ''every time'' you come here with Yoshi.



* ''VideoGame/PuzzleQuest: Challenge of the Warlords'' has the Knight class. Abusing the Divine Right spell (which collects every Purple Star on the board for + 1 EXP each) and putting all the upgrade points into Battle (Attack power) and Morale (HP and spell resistance) allows you to easily create a [[{{Cap}} Level 50]] death dealer, before even reaching the Dragon Realms, the game's halfway point. And that's even if you don't get lucky with which Runes are being offered in the shops (in the PC version, at least).

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* ''VideoGame/PuzzleQuest: Challenge of the Warlords'' has the Knight class. Warlords'':
**
Abusing the Divine Right spell (which collects every Purple Star on the board for + 1 EXP each) and putting all the upgrade points into Battle (Attack power) and Morale (HP and spell resistance) allows you to easily create a [[{{Cap}} Level 50]] death dealer, before even reaching the Dragon Realms, the game's halfway point. And that's even if you don't get lucky with which Runes are being offered in the shops (in the PC version, at least).



** Another skill combo that can be a GameBreaker is the ''Warrior'' skill ''Berserker Rage'' combined with ''Conflagration''. The former converts all red gems into skulls, and the latter changes all gems of a particular colour into red gems. With proper items it's possible to achieve turn one kills from level 20 onward, making for very disappointing boss and multiplayer battles.
* The first two 5 star monsters, the first being Amaterasu that players get in ''VideoGame/ElementalStory'' serve this role for a while until the player can amass enough resources to do a roll which may drop another 5 star monster. However, Amaterasu, being a healer, is less useful compared to the other monster.

to:

** Another skill combo that can be a GameBreaker is the ''Warrior'' skill ''Berserker Rage'' combined with ''Conflagration''. The former converts all red gems into skulls, and the latter changes all gems of a particular colour color into red gems. With proper items it's possible to achieve turn one kills from level 20 onward, making for very disappointing boss and multiplayer battles.
* The first two 5 star 5-star monsters, the first being Amaterasu that players get in ''VideoGame/ElementalStory'' serve this role for a while until the player can amass enough resources to do a roll which may drop another 5 star monster. However, Amaterasu, being a healer, is less useful compared to the other monster.



* Unusual for a strategy game, completing the second mission of James in ''VideoGame/{{Sacrifice}}'' in the 'good' (and most obvious) way gets you the support of [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Sirocco]], a hero-version of Persephone's strongest unit, in further missions. The fact that the player's avatar is needed to [[KeystoneArmy permanently beat enemy wizards]] is pretty much the only reason why you can't point Sirocco in the general direction of the enemy and win the next 3 missions while you go and get a drink.
* In ''VideoGame/MechCommander 1'', the game allows you to salvage fallen enemy mechs, provided they aren't written off (i.e.: power core explodes) It's possible to salvage a Mad Cat mech in the 3rd mission of the game. The Mad Cat is one of the best mechs available - in the Heavy class, but with a speed of 24 m/s it can outpace most medium mechs. Having it makes the game a lot easier (although it's kinda pot luck in terms of getting it - at the time of the level, your mechs are unlikely to beat it normally - you have to detonate some explosive gas silos that the Mad Cat runs by).
** The developers did release a patch that gave you a Mad Cat at the start to reflect the opening cinematic (though that looked like a power core breach). Getting the second Mad Cat through sheer persistence (20th time lucky...no, 21st time lucky...no...) was still important though to split the enemy fire between two targets.

to:

* Unusual for a strategy game, completing the second mission of James in ''VideoGame/{{Sacrifice}}'' in the 'good' (and most obvious) way gets you the support of [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Sirocco]], a hero-version of Persephone's strongest unit, in further missions. The fact that the player's avatar is needed to [[KeystoneArmy permanently beat enemy wizards]] is pretty much the only reason why you can't point Sirocco in the general direction of the enemy and win the next 3 missions while you go and get a drink.
* In ''VideoGame/MechCommander 1'', the game allows you to salvage fallen enemy mechs, provided they aren't written off (i.e.: power core explodes) It's possible to salvage a Mad Cat mech in the 3rd mission of the game. The Mad Cat is one of the best mechs available - in the Heavy class, but with a speed of 24 m/s it can outpace most medium mechs. Having it makes the game a lot easier (although it's kinda pot luck in terms of getting it - at the time of the level, your mechs are unlikely to beat it normally - you have to detonate some explosive gas silos that the Mad Cat runs by).
**
by). The developers did release a patch that gave you a Mad Cat at the start to reflect the opening cinematic (though that looked like a power core breach). Getting the second Mad Cat through sheer persistence (20th time lucky...no, 21st time lucky...no...) was still important though to split the enemy fire between two targets.



* ''VideoGame/ShogunTotalWar'' has {{Warrior Monk}}s, provided you didn't start the 1580 Scenario, or the Mongol Scenario. The Warrior monks are amongst the strongest melee units in the game, and to top it off, they also give a [[BreakMeter morale penalty]] to any non-christian unit they encounter. They can be got simply by building a garden (which trains emissaries) and then a temple. On top of this, most early factions deploy large numbers of ashigaru, which have terrible morale; the result is that one unit of these monks can potentially scatter armies if judiciously deployed. They can also unlock the No-Dachis, which gives the single strongest offensive infantry unit in the game. The Warrior monks main listed weakness is that if the opposition is christian, they lose their morale debuff. However, the main balance against warrior monks is in fact the humble Samurai Archer, which can bring them down by the dozens and potentially scatter them if combined by a judicious flank assault.



** In the desert landmass of Syrianna, some provinces allow you to hire a Monster Bombard as a mercenary unit. It costs a whopping amount of upkeep to maintain, and [[CaptainObvious you need to actually get to Syrianna and back if your civilisation isn't already on it]], but... It's a ''Monster Bombard''! It's an elephant-sized superweapon that flings half-ton cannonballs! It's the final word in anti-fortification fire-power, and it renders any fortress or city wall a sad joke.

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** In the desert landmass of Syrianna, some provinces allow you to hire a Monster Bombard as a mercenary unit. It costs a whopping amount of upkeep to maintain, and [[CaptainObvious you need to actually get to Syrianna and back if your civilisation civilization isn't already on it]], but... It's a ''Monster Bombard''! It's an elephant-sized superweapon that flings half-ton cannonballs! It's the final word in anti-fortification fire-power, and it renders any fortress or city wall a sad joke.



** The Alliance used to have one, where you could build a town hall near the enemy's base, continuously building peasants and making them into militia (same damage, twice the armor, half the health and cost of a footman) to swarm the enemy. [[{{Nerf}} Now only the starting town hall can convert them.]]
* In ''VideoGame/LordsOfTheRealm2'', armies consisting solely of macemen. Though they don't have much defense, they are a LightningBruiser, able to move nearly as fast as knights, and are dirt cheap to produce. You can often win most non-siege fights with nothing but macemen, and even a small group of them can whittle down and soften up a stronger enemy army for your main army to then take care of.

to:

** The Alliance used to have one, where you could build a town hall near the enemy's base, continuously building peasants and making them into militia (same damage, twice the armor, half the health and cost of a footman) to swarm the enemy. [[{{Nerf}} Now only the starting town hall can convert them.]]
* In ''VideoGame/LordsOfTheRealm2'', armies consisting solely of macemen. Though they don't have much defense, they are a LightningBruiser, [[FragileSpeedster fast]] and [[GlassCannon powerful]], able to move nearly as fast as knights, and are dirt cheap to produce. You can often win most non-siege fights with nothing but macemen, and even a small group of them can whittle down and soften up a stronger enemy army for your main army to then take care of.



* ''Videogame/TheBindingOfIsaac''
** Due to the random item spawning and the large variety of items inside the treasure rooms, it is possible to get an insanely powerful item right at the beginning of the game, nullifying a lot of the early bosses and potentially carrying you through the game.



** The spell of Charm Monster for a Tourist (their special spell) or Wizard. No one ever does it because it requires spell-friendly armor to cast during combat, getting the spellbook is not guaranteed, and it takes even more patience than normal ''[=NetHack=]'' play. (Which requires a lot of patience.)



* In the ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon'' games, some starter pokemon fall under DiscOneNuke territory. Pikachu, Treecko and Machop are this in the first two games, Skitty only in the second, and Axew in the third:
** Pikachu gains [[StandardStatusEffects Thunder Wave]] extremely early in the game, which neuters any opposition that doesn't resist it and even works on bosses due to a lack of ContractualBossImmunity. Quick Attack lets him attack from two squares away, useful as most early-game {{Mooks}} lack a distance move, and can be used from behind a teammate, allowing Pikachu to spam Quick Attack while using a teammate as a [[HumanShield Pokemon Shield.]] In [[PokemonMysteryDungeonExplorers the second games,]] right around the time Thunder Wave and Quick Attack start becoming obsolete, he gets the room-clearing Discharge ability, which hits every enemy hard and has a chance to paralyze the survivors, and Agility, the undisputed best move in the game. Agility gives Pikachu and all allies two moves per turn at no cost, and the boosts ''stack'', allowing for up to four moves per turn by each ally!
** Treecko also gets Quick Attack early game and learns Absorb to drain HP from his targets, boosting his survivability. Pursuit, which he also learns early, reflects enemy damage back at the attacker for full. The move is a known boss-wrecker that is viable well into post-game. With a bit of luck, you can snag a Bullet Seed TM early, which gives him a strong multi-hit move that can hit from across the room. Like Pikachu, he also picks up Agility when his tricks start to wear out.
** A reasonably well level Machop can often solo bosses such as Groudon and Rayquaza with a few well placed low kicks. Machop also has the best stats of all the starters (and out classes the majority of wild mons of the same level) allowing him to wreck pretty much every mook you come across. If you link his hard hitting moves together and avoid using them in a dungeon, and use focus energy before a boss fight you can often kill bosses in a handful of turns turns
** Skitty is this thanks to her Normalize ability, which turns all moves into Normal-type. This includes her standard attack, which is normally typeless, and it gives the move a damage boost which makes it deal out damage on par with actual typed moves, but without a PP requirement. This makes her a monster early game and eases PP loss, which can be a major issue in some of the tougher early dungeons. Unlike Pikachu and Treecko, she cannot stay viable all game due to the early edge given by Normalize and is in fact one of the worst party members lategame, verging on CrutchCharacter.
** In ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonGatesToInfinity'', Axew is the best starter. His Dragon typing gives him immunity to [[ShockAndAwe four]] [[PlayingWithFire very]] [[GreenThumb common]] [[MakingASplash attacking]] types and his base attack is much higher than that of his fellow starters. He learns Dual Chop, a strong dual-hit move, very early in the game, and not long after learns Dragon Dance, which raises his attack ''and'' gives him an extra move--which he can use to use Dragon Dance again, maxing his attack and giving himself four moves per turn in a single action. With Dual Chop, that means eight max-attack hits per turn. Even the FinalBoss will go down in a handful of turns to this strategy, and Axew can pull it off barely a third of the way into the game.



* In the tank-based ''[[VideoGame/SeekAndDestroy2002 Seek And Destroy]]'' [[BritsWithBattleShips The Challenger]] is unlockable in the third town. It just happens to be one of the best armoured tanks in the game second only to the [[NazisWithGnarlyWeapons Maus]] (unlocked at the endgame), and has a large amount of carry weight meaning that it can be upgraded with sufficient weaponry and armour to make the game something of a cakewalk...
* ''VideoGame/JamestownLegendOfTheLostColony'' has the Gunner ship, which moves fast and has a rapid-fire cannon that can be aimed in any direction; no other ship is capable of attacking through the full 360 degrees around itself. And it's the ''first'' unlockable ship.

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* In the tank-based ''[[VideoGame/SeekAndDestroy2002 Seek And Destroy]]'' [[BritsWithBattleShips The Challenger]] is unlockable in the third town. It just happens to be one of the best armoured armored tanks in the game second only to the [[NazisWithGnarlyWeapons Maus]] (unlocked at the endgame), and has a large amount of carry weight meaning that it can be upgraded with sufficient weaponry and armour armor to make the game something of a cakewalk...
* ''VideoGame/JamestownLegendOfTheLostColony'' has the Gunner ship, which moves fast and has a rapid-fire cannon that can be aimed in any direction; no other ship is capable of attacking through the full 360 degrees around itself. And it's the ''first'' unlockable ship.
cakewalk...



** ''VideoGame/RuneFactory'' does it one better by making it possible to mine high-quality sapphires in the second dungeon. The sapphires reset once you come out and go back in, leading to a lot of players becoming millionaires in no time at all. House and farm upgrades became an instant piece of cake.
** No ''Harvest Moon'' embodies the Disc One Nuke better than ''Harvest Moon DS''. With clever SaveScumming while mining, the right guides, and a fair bit of patience, it's possible to become a multi-millionaire who can work past exhaustion without penalty, have access to the ultimate crop-growing area, AND have all of the legendary tools ''within the first two days of the game.''

to:

** * ''VideoGame/RuneFactory'' does it one better by making it possible to mine high-quality sapphires in the second dungeon. The sapphires reset once you come out and go back in, leading to a lot of players becoming millionaires in no time at all. House and farm upgrades became an instant piece of cake.
** * No ''Harvest Moon'' embodies the Disc One Nuke better than ''Harvest Moon DS''. With clever SaveScumming while mining, the right guides, and a fair bit of patience, it's possible to become a multi-millionaire who can work past exhaustion without penalty, have access to the ultimate crop-growing area, AND have all of the legendary tools ''within the first two days of the game.''



** In the original ''VideoGame/SimCity'', a player could completely ignore roads and build only rail lines. While they cost twice as much to build per tile, the citizens don't seem to care about the inconvenience and it eliminates an enormous chunk of your pollution and all of your traffic.



*** ''Madden'' games also have "money plays" [[AIBreaker plays which will always work against even an All-Madden level computer-controlled team]] for a guaranteed five yards, at least. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXEYAiVp3Hg Here's an example play from Madden 10]].
*** The games from the early 2000s had a nuke in the form of any "play action" play. Safeties, even with maximum awareness on the highest difficulty settings, would bite on the play fake with near 100% consistency, leaving the corner one-on-one with the receiver (and usually a step behind him) deep down the field. It was not unheard of to set NFL passing records with an otherwise mediocre offense simply by abusing this exploit. (This became less and less prominent in the latter part of the decade as the overall AI of the games began to improve.)

to:

*** ''Madden'' games also have "money plays" [[AIBreaker plays which will always work against even an All-Madden level computer-controlled team]] for a guaranteed five yards, at least. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXEYAiVp3Hg Here's an example play from Madden 10]].
***
** The games from the early 2000s had a nuke in the form of any "play action" play. Safeties, even with maximum awareness on the highest difficulty settings, would bite on the play fake with near 100% consistency, leaving the corner one-on-one with the receiver (and usually a step behind him) deep down the field. It was not unheard of to set NFL passing records with an otherwise mediocre offense simply by abusing this exploit. (This became less and less prominent in the latter part of the decade as the overall AI of the games began to improve.)



* ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' games have the Hidden Blade and its CounterAttack. It's DifficultButAwesome, but if you master it early enough you can OneHitKill everyone.

to:

* ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' games have the ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'':
** The
Hidden Blade and its CounterAttack. It's DifficultButAwesome, but if you master it early enough you can OneHitKill everyone.



* ''VideoGame/TheEvilWithin'': The Agony Crossbow. An elemental-type crossbow acquired early in the game that can shoot harpoon bolts, explosive bolts, flashbang bolts, electric bolts, or freeze bolts. The best part? ''You can craft ammo in the middle of combat''.
** Harpoon bolts deal more damage than a sniper rifle, especially when upgraded. At level 5, they set enemies on FIRE. This is especially useful since fire is a key weakness of almost all enemies in the game, and only a few things deal fire damage.
** Explosive bolts are mines that are specially coded to the crossbow that they were shot from, so you can run through your own minefield and lure hordes into the blast radius.
** Flashbang bolts don't work that well on bosses, but leaves grunts and some bosses open to a damage-multiplying sneak attack. This attack is a one-hit kill against mooks and more damaging than a shotgun to the face.
** Electric bolts will stun ANY enemy for a long period of time, as long as you don't accidentally destroy them. They're also traps, so they are best used against agile enemies.
** Freeze bolts are the most expensive but cause the enemy to stop moving, allowing you to hit their weak spots repeatedly.
** Poison Bolts are a DLC specialty that poison the enemy.
** Incendiary Bolts are a DLC specialty that are the most expensive but set enemies on fire. These become obsolete if you upgrade the harpoon bolts to deal fire damage.



* In ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'', it is entirely possible to create a character capable of hitting anyone, aywhere, with the spell "Total Annihilation". Or how about being able to create a curse that kills off everyone who falls within a broad category - say, humans? Or any number of combinations of spells, charms, artefacts and/or backgrounds that will make your character able to do one thing, and one thing only - but that thing will most likely involve a LOT of pain for whoever gets hit. In fact, most of the effort when creating a character goes into resisting the urge to crank up your favourite attack before you even begin playing.
* Pretty much the defining characteristic of ''TabletopGame/MageTheAscension'' in the minds of most players. A game where the progression and power limits were entirely defined in terms of a single character, with a loosely-written "cooperative casting" mechanic written in about five minutes before publication that essentially allows you to add mage statistics together with a spell and keep rolling until it was as powerful as you want? That definitely won't be a problem at all.
** For reference, you put build points into schools of magic, and most effects need a couple points in several schools (for instance, you need a few dots in forces to start a fire, but can't hit a person with said fire without life, and have to aim it manually without space). So on an individual level dumping all of your initial points into a single sphere is crippling. Not so much with rituals and cooperative casting, a group of four or five players can essentially throw the sun on top of anyone on the planet they've ever met while sitting safely on the Moon from session one.
* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' has the infamous Pun-Pun, a kobold (or other reptilian creature, but kobolds are traditional) "SquishyWizard" who is able to have any special ability, and has "arbitrarily high" stats -- most players treat this as Pun-Pun having ascended to ''godhood'', and for good reason. Strict mechanics allow this as early as 11th-level, but technically it ''could'' be done as early as 1st with the right magic item, or [[GenreSavvy demonic knowledge]]. The key to this is one random (but official) splatbook for the Forgotten Realms setting.
** The game has plenty of more mundane examples and in fact a number of mechanics have been used at various times with low level survivability in mind. But third edition had some doozies, not the least of which was Haste, which was a result of the dev team not understanding the change in action economy from 2nd edition to 3rd, allowing wizards to cast two spells per round without suffering the second edition drawback of aging more rapidly (which itself could be mitigated somewhat by playing an elf but 3rd edition made that part unnecessary.) Of course the trade off is you blow through your spells that much faster but you can usually talk your party into letting you recoup after an intense battle.

to:

* In ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'', it is entirely possible to create a character capable of hitting anyone, aywhere, anywhere, with the spell "Total Annihilation". Or how about being able to create a curse that kills off everyone who falls within a broad category - say, humans? Or any number of combinations of spells, charms, artefacts and/or backgrounds that will make your character able to do one thing, and one thing only - but that thing will most likely involve a LOT of pain for whoever gets hit. In fact, most of the effort when creating a character goes into resisting the urge to crank up your favourite favorite attack before you even begin playing.
* Pretty much the defining characteristic of ''TabletopGame/MageTheAscension'' in the minds of most players. A game where the progression and power limits were entirely defined in terms of a single character, with a loosely-written "cooperative casting" mechanic written in about five minutes before publication that essentially allows you to add mage statistics together with a spell and keep rolling until it was as powerful as you want? That definitely won't be a problem at all.
**
all. For reference, you put build points into schools of magic, and most effects need a couple points in several schools (for instance, you need a few dots in forces to start a fire, but can't hit a person with said fire without life, and have to aim it manually without space). So on an individual level dumping all of your initial points into a single sphere is crippling. Not so much with rituals and cooperative casting, a group of four or five players can essentially throw the sun on top of anyone on the planet they've ever met while sitting safely on the Moon from session one.
* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' has the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':
** The
infamous Pun-Pun, a kobold (or other reptilian creature, but kobolds are traditional) "SquishyWizard" who is able to have any special ability, and has "arbitrarily high" stats -- most players treat this as Pun-Pun having ascended to ''godhood'', and for good reason. Strict mechanics allow this as early as 11th-level, but technically it ''could'' be done as early as 1st with the right magic item, or [[GenreSavvy demonic knowledge]]. The key to this is one random (but official) splatbook for the Forgotten Realms setting.
** The game has plenty of more mundane examples and in fact a number of mechanics have been used at various times with low level survivability in mind. But third edition had some doozies, not the least of which was Haste, which was a result of the dev team not understanding the change in action economy from 2nd edition to 3rd, allowing wizards to cast two spells per round without suffering the second edition drawback of aging more rapidly (which itself could be mitigated somewhat by playing an elf but 3rd edition made that part unnecessary.) Of course the trade off trade-off is you blow through your spells that much faster more quickly but you can usually talk your party into letting you recoup after an intense battle.



* In ''[[VideoGame/SOCOMUSNavySeals SOCOM Fireteam Bravo 3]]'' on PSP, the OC-14 or [[AKA47 RA-14]] mentioned above is also a relatively easy to get and useful gun. Although to get it you have to score 750 kills, but you can just bang away in the first mission or custom missions with the lowest difficulty. It uses 7.62x39 rounds which is abundant in the 3rd and last mission, kills with 3 body shots at most, and had better overall stats than the [=AK103=] used by EliteMooks. Plus, it also can be fitted with a silencer which the [=AK103=] can't.

to:

* In ''[[VideoGame/SOCOMUSNavySeals SOCOM Fireteam Bravo 3]]'' on PSP, the OC-14 or [[AKA47 RA-14]] mentioned above is also a relatively easy to get and a useful gun. Although to get it you have to score 750 kills, but you can just bang away in the first mission or custom missions with the lowest difficulty. It uses 7.62x39 rounds which is abundant in the 3rd and last mission, kills with 3 body shots at most, and had better overall stats than the [=AK103=] used by EliteMooks. Plus, it also can be fitted with a silencer which the [=AK103=] can't.



* In ''VideoGame/DisgaeaHourOfDarkness'', it's possible to exploit the hospital prizes and the Dark Assembly's promotion exams to get very powerful equipment, a huge amount of money, and all your units above level 20 before so much as setting foot on the first non-tutorial map.
** That's still lots of grinding, and still somewhat ineffectual as it only carries you to about episode 5 or 6 depending upon the amount of people you did get to 20. It's much easier to abuse the random dungeons in ''PhantomBrave'', mostly due to the entire fusion system. Getting to level 100 takes only a couple hours if you know what you're doing with your weapons, and in fact in that time you can also create a weapon that will demolish everyone up to and including the final boss, as once you have about level 70 or 80 and a good beefed-up weapon, you can pop a 'bad' title on a level 400-500 dungeon, stealing high mana items with your bottlemail, and supercharge that weapon to be totally invincible. Just remember to stay away from those fraggin' weapon-stealing mushrooms! (Or select a weapon whose final abilities have insanely large areas of effect to kill them all at once, like a bomb, egg, or vase. RES weapons work the best as they can complement Marona's own gigantic RES stat which renders her nigh-invulnerable to damage.) Also you gain much more experience for tilted-level kills, the only grinding necessary in the game is for facing down the final three EX bosses and building up the amount of attacks you can do. (Instead of SP your amount of attacks is tied to weapon experience level.) But with a + 28000ATK weapon in the first few hours of the game, who needs that! (At least to complete the initial game)
** The level 20 thing is a relatively small bonus, though, in comparision to having the funds to buy end-game quality equipment before the first map. Not to mention the the Muscle Star, Chaos Orb, and Testament, which will send the Attack, Magic, HP, and SP of whoever equips all three that early on through the roof, which makes all grinding until level 50 or so ridiculously easy. And it takes only about six promotion exams per chartacter to get that grinding over with, so it doesn't take ''that'' much time.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/DisgaeaHourOfDarkness'', it's ''VideoGame/DisgaeaHourOfDarkness'':
** It's
possible to exploit the hospital prizes and the Dark Assembly's promotion exams to get very powerful equipment, a huge amount of money, and all your units above level 20 before so much as setting foot on the first non-tutorial map.
** That's still lots of grinding, and still somewhat ineffectual as it only carries you to about episode 5 or 6 depending upon the amount of people you did get to 20. It's much easier to abuse the random dungeons in ''PhantomBrave'', mostly due to the entire fusion system. Getting to level 100 takes only a couple hours if you know what you're doing with your weapons, and in fact in that time you can also create a weapon that will demolish everyone up to and including the final boss, as once you have about level 70 or 80 and a good beefed-up weapon, you can pop a 'bad' title on a level 400-500 dungeon, stealing high mana items with your bottlemail, and supercharge that weapon to be totally invincible. Just remember to stay away from those fraggin' weapon-stealing mushrooms! (Or select a weapon whose final abilities have insanely large areas of effect to kill them all at once, like a bomb, egg, or vase. RES weapons work the best as they can complement Marona's own gigantic RES stat which renders her nigh-invulnerable to damage.) Also you gain much more experience for tilted-level kills, the only grinding necessary in the game is for facing down the final three EX bosses and building up the amount of attacks you can do. (Instead of SP your amount of attacks is tied to weapon experience level.) But with a + 28000ATK weapon in the first few hours of the game, who needs that! (At least to complete the initial game)
** The level 20 thing is a relatively small bonus, though, in comparision to having the funds to buy end-game quality equipment before the first map. Not to mention the the Muscle Star, Chaos Orb, and Testament, which will send the Attack, Magic, HP, and SP of whoever equips all three that early on through the roof, which makes all grinding until level 50 or so ridiculously easy. And it takes only about six promotion exams per chartacter to get that grinding over with, so it doesn't take ''that'' much time.
game)



*** In the PSP version of Disgaea 2, the game just gives you a level 100 Pleinair at the start of a new game if you've downloaded the free DLC pack she comes in. You can then use Pleinair to easily beat level 100 Sapphire (also a free DLC download) and have her join as well. Presumably this could be done with paid DLC characters as well.
** ''Disgaea'' has yet another easily abuseable method of game breaking. Go to the item world until you find one with an invincible geo panel. Level up Laharl's spear mastery to 25 -- takes about an hour if you're lucky. You can then get the second best spear in the game, Longinus. Using the aformentioned lose-to-Mid-Boss trick, you can get it AGAIN, and sell it to make a TON of money.

to:

*** ** In the PSP version of Disgaea 2, the game just gives you a level 100 Pleinair at the start of a new game if you've downloaded the free DLC pack she comes in. You can then use Pleinair to easily beat level 100 Sapphire (also a free DLC download) and have her join as well. Presumably this could be done with paid DLC characters as well.
** ''Disgaea'' has yet another easily abuseable abusable method of game breaking. Go to the item world until you find one with an invincible geo panel. Level up Laharl's spear mastery to 25 -- takes about an hour if you're lucky. You can then get the second best spear in the game, Longinus. Using the aformentioned lose-to-Mid-Boss trick, you can get it AGAIN, and sell it to make a TON of money.



*** But wait, there's more. At the end of the third chapter, you are thrown into a HopelessBossFight against an enemy who is on average one hundred times your current level, with the gear to show for it. Typically, you would now be resigning yourself to getting mercilessly ground into pixellated paste or trying to line up the odd FastballSpecial maneuver to nab a few treasure chests. However, due to the way the item stealing probabilities are calculated, even the most basic stealing item used by the most recently-generated thief will always, always, always have a 1% chance to steal one (and only one) item from said opponent. Now, the item to go for here is something called a Testament. It gives any character equipped with it a whopping 200 points in every single stat, apart from health, which gets twice that bonus. At a time when your average attack stat is roughly 100. Add to that the fact that character equip multipliers add another ten percent at least on top of that, and you have yourself a character whose curent level is 12, but whose effective level (i.e. the level at which he would possess stats of this kind without equipment) is pushing '''50'''. Just keep reloading, and sweet sweet overpoweredness is all yours.
*** And then, coming off that honking stat jack, we have the Item World. Summarising briefly, it is a completely randomly generated dungeon created entirely off an item, and is crucial to postgame powerlevelling. Early on, it is mostly where you go to build up Felonies. But there's a twist: infrequently, you might be attacked by enemies called pirates - retitled versions of normal enemies. These are usually well above your current level, but your main character is now not only more than a match for them (thanks to having endgame gear at the start of your adventure), but also has an ability which does a percentage damage boost as long as his level is below that of his opponent. Proceed to demolish pirate booty with extreme prejudice, and appropriately massive experience points are all yours. Do it all right, and we have ourselves a level 25 character with nearing a thousand [=HP=], easily 600 attack, and one metric shedload of Mana to pour into creating better PlayerMooks... while the rest of your team is woefully underpowered in comparison. Mind you, considering that this is ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'' we're talking about, this'll save you about 0.0003% of your actual levelgrinding time.

to:

*** ** But wait, there's more. At the end of the third chapter, you are thrown into a HopelessBossFight against an enemy who is on average one hundred times your current level, with the gear to show for it. Typically, you would now be resigning yourself to getting mercilessly ground into pixellated paste or trying to line up the odd FastballSpecial maneuver to nab a few treasure chests. However, due to the way the item stealing probabilities are calculated, even the most basic stealing item used by the most recently-generated thief will always, always, always have a 1% chance to steal one (and only one) item from said opponent. Now, the item to go for here is something called a Testament. It gives any character equipped with it a whopping 200 points in every single stat, apart from health, which gets twice that bonus. At a time when your average attack stat is roughly 100. Add to that the fact that character equip multipliers add another ten percent at least on top of that, and you have yourself a character whose curent level is 12, but whose effective level (i.e. the level at which he would possess stats of this kind without equipment) is pushing '''50'''. Just keep reloading, and sweet sweet overpoweredness is all yours.
*** ** And then, coming off that honking stat jack, we have the Item World. Summarising Summarizing briefly, it is a completely randomly generated dungeon created entirely off an item, and is crucial to postgame powerlevelling.power-leveling. Early on, it is mostly where you go to build up Felonies. But there's a twist: infrequently, you might be attacked by enemies called pirates - retitled versions of normal enemies. These are usually well above your current level, but your main character is now not only more than a match for them (thanks to having endgame gear at the start of your adventure), but also has an ability which does a percentage damage boost as long as his level is below that of his opponent. Proceed to demolish pirate booty with extreme prejudice, and appropriately massive experience points are all yours. Do it all right, and we have ourselves a level 25 character with nearing a thousand [=HP=], easily 600 attack, and one metric shedload of Mana to pour into creating better PlayerMooks... while the rest of your team is woefully underpowered in comparison. Mind you, considering that this is ''Franchise/{{Disgaea}}'' we're talking about, this'll save you about 0.0003% of your actual levelgrinding level-grinding time.



** Then there's the trolley -- an [[ImprobableWeaponUser improbable weapon]] that boosts Speed and [[LightningBruiser uses Speed to determine the strength of its attacks]]. Since Speed ''also'' determines [[ExtraTurn how often you get to go]], grabbing a high-level trolley through "failure dungeon" grinding breaks the game in half and lets you clear all the main story stages without the enemies getting a single turn.

to:

** Then there's the trolley -- an [[ImprobableWeaponUser improbable weapon]] that boosts Speed and [[LightningBruiser uses Speed to determine the strength of its attacks]].attacks. Since Speed ''also'' determines [[ExtraTurn how often you get to go]], grabbing a high-level trolley through "failure dungeon" grinding breaks the game in half and lets you clear all the main story stages without the enemies getting a single turn.



** From the first game and its remakes, the Excalibur tome. It's obtained in Chapter 4 and only Merric can use it at that point. It is powerful and also has a high critical hit stat and is also effective against any flying enemy. Couple that with most of the enemies not having any resistance...



*** Ares's Mystletainn is a DoubleSubversion. He arrives midway through Chapter 7, and he already has his legendary weapon, so it'll be one of your first and should kill just about anything. However, when he first arrives, it's almost a liability as it provides no bonuses to dodging or physical defense, it can't attack at range, and the AI seems to love to target Ares, not to mention the fact that since it ''will'' kill almost any enemy on the counterattack and enemies tend to come in large groups in this game, he's going to get mobbed and can easily be attacked 10-15 times in a single enemy phase. However, the final two chapters are filled to the brim with enemies that wield long-distance magic and/or Sleep staves (which in this game automatically hit if the target's magic resistance is lower than the wielder's magic), and many of the bosses are also magic-wielders, making Ares one of the most useful units in the game--Mystletainn gives a healthy boost to magic resistance.
** The same game has Sigurd recieving a Silver Sword in the prologue chapter, at a point where everyone else has Iron weapons. In fact, this Silver Sword is good enough to last him until he gets his legendary weapon (which is right at the end of his story). Especially since sticking with one weapon is recommended in this game: once a weapon gets 50 kills, it gains an increased critical rate. Sigurd's Silver Sword is likely the first weapon that will attain this status.
** ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'':
*** Birthright gives you Reina and Takumi. Reina is a prepromote, and despite being outclassed will be able to really wreak havoc on the map she joins. Takumi has the Fuujin Yumi - considered to be a total GameBreaker. He also joins on a map where bows are useful, and unlike a lot of examples of this trope remains useful until endgame.
*** Camilla in Conquest is this. She joins prepromoted, gets some good growths and a nice skill set for the time of the game she joins in.
*** You yourself become one in ''Revelation'' - as the only one capable of fighting enemies for a couple maps, the avatar will end up rather overleveled by chapter 8 and 9. If that isn't enough, Takumi is another early joiner, but his joining point is ''even earlier'' than it was in Birthright!
* In ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsZ'' save your money until stage 10. Full upgrade [[Anime/SuperDimensionCenturyOrguss Kei's Bronco II weapons after this stage.]](upgradeing his Bronco is cheaper) When you get him back in his Orguss a few stages later, congratulations! [[GameBreaker You now have the most powerful character in the entire game.]]

to:

*** Ares's Mystletainn is a DoubleSubversion. He arrives midway through Chapter 7, and he already has his legendary weapon, so it'll be one of your first and should kill just about anything. However, when he first arrives, it's almost a liability as it provides no bonuses to dodging or physical defense, it can't attack at range, and the AI seems to love to target Ares, not to mention the fact that since it ''will'' kill almost any enemy on the counterattack and enemies tend to come in large groups in this game, he's going to get mobbed and can easily be attacked 10-15 times in a single enemy phase. However, the final two chapters are filled to the brim with enemies that wield long-distance magic and/or Sleep staves (which in this game automatically hit if the target's magic resistance is lower than the wielder's magic), and many of the bosses are also magic-wielders, making Ares one of the most useful units in the game--Mystletainn gives a healthy boost to magic resistance.
** The same game has Sigurd recieving a Silver Sword in the prologue chapter, at a point where everyone else has Iron weapons. In fact, this Silver Sword is good enough to last him until he gets his legendary weapon (which is right at the end of his story). Especially since sticking with one weapon is recommended in this game: once a weapon gets 50 kills, it gains an increased critical rate. Sigurd's Silver Sword is likely the first weapon that will attain this status.
** ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'':
*** Birthright gives you Reina and Takumi. Reina is a prepromote, and despite being outclassed will be able to really wreak havoc on the map she joins. Takumi has the Fuujin Yumi - considered to be a total GameBreaker. He also joins on a map where bows are useful, and unlike a lot of examples of this trope remains useful until endgame.
*** Camilla in Conquest is this. She joins prepromoted, gets some good growths and a nice skill set for the time of the game she joins in.
*** You yourself become one in ''Revelation'' - as the only one capable of fighting enemies for a couple maps, the avatar will end up rather overleveled by chapter 8 and 9. If that isn't enough, Takumi is another early joiner, but his joining point is ''even earlier'' than it was in Birthright!
* In ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsZ'' save ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsZ'':
** Save
your money until stage 10. Full upgrade [[Anime/SuperDimensionCenturyOrguss Kei's Bronco II weapons after this stage.]](upgradeing his Bronco is cheaper) When you get him back in his Orguss a few stages later, congratulations! [[GameBreaker You now have the most powerful character in the entire game.]]



** In ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsJudgment'', the OriginalGeneration are ''insanely'' powerful, especially [[MightyGlacier Granteed]]; you get them on the first (Toya's route) or second (Calvina's route) stage and never lose them.
** One of the problem that the Mazinger units has(in term of balancing), is the fact that they are acquired early, and really often also has one of the, if not THE highest offensive power in the entire game, while also having the highest raw Armor out of any unit in the game. This is at its worst in ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsReversal'' where they acquired an extremely overpowered Finisher move WAY too early(not long after Tetsuya's GameBreakingInjury is cured), at the point where the other MidSeasonUpgrade is nowhere in sight, while also having a numerous amount of extremely useful CombinationAttack, and favored by the game's RelationshipValues. Sometimes it make you wonder why they even bother giving the other MidSeasonUpgrade that late.
** Aside form the CrutchCharacter in ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsL'', Anime/KotetsushinJeeg started with Jeeg Bazooka and the Mach Drill, both of which is an extremely powerful CombinationAttack beetwen Jeeg and Big Shooter that cost Ammo instead of EN. Just like the Mazingers in ''R'', they acquired their final MidSeasonUpgrade midway through the game in form of slightly more powerful (Old)Jeeg which comes with an even more powerful CombinationAttack with beetwen both Jeeg. Put simply, the only thing that stopped them from being the best unit in the game is [[Anime/GaikingLegendOfDaikuMaryu Gaiking The Great]], and [[Anime/{{Mazinkaiser}} Koji/Tetsuya]].
** While Kaiking is a relatively mediocre mecha, its first early game upgrade, Gaiking is a powerful L Size mecha with Armor/Hit/Evasion/Critical boosting ability, essentialy turning it into a LightningBruiser. Midway through the game(unlike ''K'' where it is a late game upgrade), you can combine it with Raiking and Vulking into Gaiking the Great, who is even more powerful, has S Rank on every terrain, and have amazing stats, well worth the deployment slot that you need to spent to deploy it.
** In ''Jigoku-hen'', the [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamUnicorn Delta Plus]], with its decent stats and a post-movement Range-5 ALL attack, is a godsend for your UC pilots, especially [[Anime/MobileSuitZetaGundam Kamille]] and [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamCharsCounterattack Amuro]], who are stuck with really crummy mook units for half of the game.

to:

** In ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsJudgment'', the OriginalGeneration are ''insanely'' powerful, especially [[MightyGlacier Granteed]]; you get them on the first (Toya's route) or second (Calvina's route) stage and never lose them.
** One of the problem that the Mazinger units has(in term of balancing), is the fact that they are acquired early, and really often also has one of the, if not THE highest offensive power in the entire game, while also having the highest raw Armor out of any unit in the game. This is at its worst in ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsReversal'' where they acquired an extremely overpowered Finisher move WAY too early(not long after Tetsuya's GameBreakingInjury is cured), at the point where the other MidSeasonUpgrade is nowhere in sight, while also having a numerous amount of extremely useful CombinationAttack, and favored by the game's RelationshipValues. Sometimes it make you wonder why they even bother giving the other MidSeasonUpgrade that late.
** Aside form from the CrutchCharacter in ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsL'', Anime/KotetsushinJeeg started with Jeeg Bazooka and the Mach Drill, both of which is an extremely powerful CombinationAttack beetwen Jeeg and Big Shooter that cost Ammo instead of EN. Just like the Mazingers in ''R'', they acquired their final MidSeasonUpgrade midway through the game in form of slightly more powerful (Old)Jeeg which comes with an even more powerful CombinationAttack with beetwen both Jeeg. Put simply, the only thing that stopped them from being the best unit in the game is [[Anime/GaikingLegendOfDaikuMaryu Gaiking The Great]], and [[Anime/{{Mazinkaiser}} Koji/Tetsuya]].
** While Kaiking is a relatively mediocre mecha, its first early game upgrade, Gaiking is a powerful L Size mecha with Armor/Hit/Evasion/Critical boosting ability, essentialy essentially turning it into a LightningBruiser. Midway through the game(unlike game (unlike ''K'' where it is a late game upgrade), you can combine it with Raiking and Vulking into Gaiking the Great, who is even more powerful, has S Rank on every terrain, and have amazing stats, well worth the deployment slot that you need to spent to deploy it.
** In ''Jigoku-hen'', the [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamUnicorn Delta Plus]], with its decent stats and a post-movement Range-5 ALL attack, is a godsend for your UC pilots, especially [[Anime/MobileSuitZetaGundam Kamille]] and [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamCharsCounterattack Amuro]], who are stuck with really crummy mook units for half of the game.
it.



* In ''VideoGame/ProjectXZone'', [[VideoGame/DeadRising Frank]]-[[VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} Lei-lei/Hsien-ko]] and [[VideoGame/StreetFighterII Chun-li]]-[[VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} Morrigan]] are the two units who probably will blast through the early-middle stages of the game. Frank and Lei-lei learn their Multi-hit attack at a a really early level which can make them blast through {{Mooks}} really easily, and they're attacks are also easy to chain. In Chun-li and Morrigan's case, the first attack skill they learn is Chun-li's [[ChargedAttack Focus Attack]] that obliterates an enemy's barrier, which is perfect for ''almost everything'' in this game. And they learn their Multi-attack faster (but not as fast as the former mentioned unit) than anyone else and they learn their final attack skill a lot earlier while everybody else is learning their Multi-attack skill. The only problem is that Frank and Lei-lei are more of the MightyGlacier people though this is almost easily remedied by placing [[VideoGame/{{Tekken}} Alisa]] with them to let her cast her spell that doubles the speed of the unit plus Frank's skill that enables them to move 2 more squares. Plus ''triple'' the ChainsawGood usage!
* In Mission 5 of ''VideoGame/FrontMission'' Driscoll and his ''very'' powerful and overlevelled [[HumongousMecha Wanzer]] are at the edge of the battlefield but won't attack unless you target him first. Normally attacking him is suicide, but by intentionally blowing off the limbs of a few {{Mooks}} (rendering them unable to attack) and positioning them so they're between you and Driscoll, you can [[CherryTapping Cherry Tap]] him to death with the Grenade weapon while he can't counterattack or escape. It'll take a while but he gives 7xp for each turn and a whopping 1000xp and 7000 dollars when you finally blow him up. This will, guaranteed, level up Lloyd to learn both Guide and Duel ''much'' earlier than intended which will turn him into an overpowered CrutchCharacter for quite a while.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/ProjectXZone'', [[VideoGame/DeadRising Frank]]-[[VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} Lei-lei/Hsien-ko]] and [[VideoGame/StreetFighterII Chun-li]]-[[VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} Morrigan]] are the two units who probably will blast through the early-middle stages of the game. Frank and Lei-lei learn their Multi-hit attack at a a really early level which can make them blast through {{Mooks}} really easily, and they're attacks are also easy to chain. In Chun-li and Morrigan's case, the first attack skill they learn is Chun-li's [[ChargedAttack Focus Attack]] that obliterates an enemy's barrier, which is perfect for ''almost everything'' in this game. And they learn their Multi-attack faster (but not as fast as the former mentioned unit) than anyone else and they learn their final attack skill a lot earlier while everybody else is learning their Multi-attack skill. The only problem is that Frank and Lei-lei are more of the MightyGlacier people though this is almost easily remedied by placing [[VideoGame/{{Tekken}} Alisa]] with them to let her cast her spell that doubles the speed of the unit plus Frank's skill that enables them to move 2 more squares. Plus ''triple'' the ChainsawGood usage!
* In Mission 5 of ''VideoGame/FrontMission'' Driscoll and his ''very'' powerful and overlevelled overleveled [[HumongousMecha Wanzer]] are at the edge of the battlefield but won't attack unless you target him first. Normally attacking him is suicide, but by intentionally blowing off the limbs of a few {{Mooks}} (rendering them unable to attack) and positioning them so they're between you and Driscoll, you can [[CherryTapping Cherry Tap]] him to death with the Grenade weapon while he can't counterattack or escape. It'll take a while but he gives 7xp for each turn and a whopping 1000xp and 7000 dollars when you finally blow him up. This will, guaranteed, level up Lloyd to learn both Guide and Duel ''much'' earlier than intended which will turn him into an overpowered CrutchCharacter for quite a while.



* In ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'', the "Slingshot" DLC is this. You get to capture an alien battleship early in the game. Which means: Plenty of [[AppliedPhlebotinum alien alloys and elerium]] to build weapons, enough alien computers to build your satellite control network, enough Alien Power sources to build the most powerful power plants, and two fusion cores that unlock research for the most powerful aircraft weapon (which you won't be able to research due to high cost in alien weapon fragments and won't be able to install on your regular aircrafts as it only goes n a late game craft, but at least you won't have to hunt down a battleship when you'll want to make this research), as well as for a guided rocket launcher that never misses (that once again has a high cost for research that you won't be able to afford for a while, but at least you won't have to hunt down a notoriously hard to shoot down battleship). The rest of the Slingshot DLC also has powerful enemy spawning at predetermined places, allowing you to intercept them and [[IWantThemAlive take them alive for interrogation and to loot their weapons]] without triggering their SelfDestructMechanism.

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* In ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'', the "Slingshot" DLC is this. You get to capture an alien battleship early in the game. Which means: Plenty It's a tough mission and there's no penalty for skipping it, but doing so will get you plenty of [[AppliedPhlebotinum alien alloys and elerium]] to build weapons, enough alien computers to build your satellite control network, enough Alien Power sources to build the most powerful power plants, and two fusion cores that unlock research for the most powerful aircraft weapon (which you won't be able to research due to high cost in alien weapon fragments and won't be able to install on your regular aircrafts as it only goes n a late game craft, but at least you won't have to hunt down a battleship when you'll want to make this research), as well as for a guided rocket launcher that never misses (that once again has a high cost for research that you won't be able to afford for a while, but at least you won't have to hunt down a notoriously hard to shoot down battleship). The rest of the Slingshot DLC also has powerful enemy spawning at predetermined places, allowing you to intercept them and [[IWantThemAlive take them alive for interrogation and to loot their weapons]] without triggering their SelfDestructMechanism.



* In ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2'' right from the get-go you can hire the best mercs in the rooster armed with high-end weapons. Sure, with your starting funds you can only afford a couple of days of their service, but that'll suffice. They'll curb stomp through the first several missions, and then you can strip them of all their fancy gear, hire some more affordable mercs and carry on with a substantial edge.



[[folder: Turn Based Tactics]]
* In ''XCOM'', focusing your early game research on weapons tech can let you field Heavy Lasers in the second or third month. Since you'll still be up against Sectoids and Floaters at this point, your Heavies are nearly unstoppable. If you go a different way, and play with Operation Slingshot enabled, you can even unlock Blaster Launchers by month three. This is terrifying and wonderful. The Blaster Launchers are made slightly less useful by the scarcity of the resources needed to build one (chances are you'll only have the equipment you get from Operation Slingshot for quite a while), but even one can take out clusters of weaker enemies in a single shot.
* In ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2'' right from the get-go you can hire the best mercs in the rooster armed with high-end weapons. Sure, with your starting funds you can only afford a couple of days of their service, but that'll suffice. They'll curb stomp through the first several missions, and then you can strip them of all their fancy gear, hire some more affordable mercs and carry on with a substantial edge.
[[/folder]]



** Finding a NPC village also counts, as you get a safe place, a source of food and a way to get rare items all in one.



*** Or, if you have something else to do, in ''San Andreas'' you can go to a strip club near your starting location, and stand on the stage, where patrons will throw money. As long as you don't touch the stripper, you can stand there, collecting money (albeit at the slow rate of like 5-20 dollars a minute). This adds up after a day or so of leaving the game on, however...
*** You can also simply save the game, go to the horse track, bet everything on the long odds, reload if you loose, save if you win, and rinse and repeat until you're filthy stinking rich.
*** Same can be done at the Casino, but that doesn't come until later in the game.
*** Hands down the best one is the Hunter helicopter (basically an Apache). It flies, it has a machinegun, it has missiles, it's insanely hard to kill, and ''you can do Vigilante missions in it''. Take the Vigilante Missions to Level 150 or so and you'll have in excess of $40,000,000 in about an hour. Oh, and you can do this in Vice City as well.
*** Drug dealers are often hanging out around Grove Street and usually have around $1000 and a gun on them. If you get a wanted level killing them, just save back at CJ's crib to erase that. $5,000-$10,000 will be more than enough to carry you through the early stages of the game

to:

*** ** Or, if you have something else to do, in ''San Andreas'' you can go to a strip club near your starting location, and stand on the stage, where patrons will throw money. As long as you don't touch the stripper, you can stand there, collecting money (albeit at the slow rate of like 5-20 dollars a minute). This adds up after a day or so of leaving the game on, however...
*** ** You can also simply save the game, go to the horse track, bet everything on the long odds, reload if you loose, save if you win, and rinse and repeat until you're filthy stinking rich.
*** Same can be done at the Casino, but that doesn't come until later in the game.
*** Hands down the best one is the Hunter helicopter (basically an Apache). It flies, it has a machinegun, it has missiles, it's insanely hard to kill, and ''you can do Vigilante missions in it''. Take the Vigilante Missions to Level 150 or so and you'll have in excess of $40,000,000 in about an hour. Oh, and you can do this in Vice City as well.
***
** Drug dealers are often hanging out around Grove Street and usually have around $1000 and a gun on them. If you get a wanted level killing them, just save back at CJ's crib to erase that. $5,000-$10,000 will be more than enough to carry you through the early stages of the game



* ''{{Crackdown}}'' has two major Disc...erm...Island One Nukes. First off, [[BribingYourWayToVictory buying the DLC]] gives your character some ridiclously powerful weapons accessible at any time - including your first loadout screen. However, you can also get the most powerful weapons in the game by driving to the third island first and killing basic street thugs that have them - once you reach a Supply Point with them in hand, they're yours for the rest of the now significantly easier game.

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* ''{{Crackdown}}'' has two major Disc...erm...Island One Nukes. First off, [[BribingYourWayToVictory buying the DLC]] gives your character some ridiclously ridiculously powerful weapons accessible at any time - including your first loadout screen. However, you can also get the most powerful weapons in the game by driving to the third island first and killing basic street thugs that have them - once you reach a Supply Point with them in hand, they're yours for the rest of the now significantly easier game.



** The sequel has BrokenBridge preventing you from getting the best henchmen and weapons early on, but you can still earn the cash needed to fully upgrade yourself not far from the start.



** Or, for the more feeble among you, simply head to the top of the police station and nick one. They don't always spawn though.
** Side quests that gives you infinite ammo perks. Doesn't really matter which one. Pick one that's the easiest.
* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird'' follows similar suit. Once you gain a garage, and access back to the National Guard Depot, you can enter the depot, and hang around until you gain enough wanted stars to spawn tanks, then you can steal the tank and take it to a garage. You also have the option of using your own vehicle on some of the side missions, which means you can do drug runs in tanks, operating the mounted machine gun (or laser gun, at later tanks) while the dealer drives around the city in the tank.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird'':
** Or, for the more feeble among you, simply head to the top of the police station and nick one. They don't always spawn though.
** Side quests that gives you infinite ammo perks. Doesn't really matter which one. Pick one that's the easiest.
* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird'' follows similar suit.
Once you gain a garage, and access back to the National Guard Depot, you can enter the depot, and hang around until you gain enough wanted stars to spawn tanks, then you can steal the tank and take it to a garage. You also have the option of using your own vehicle on some of the side missions, which means you can do drug runs in tanks, operating the mounted machine gun (or laser gun, at later tanks) while the dealer drives around the city in the tank.



** Depending on world size, you could find iron, silver, maybe even gold as soon as you spawn. There's also a small amount of demonite that can be found throughout the world. Another way to nuke is to join any multiplayer server. Someone in the server WILL be either fighting a boss (who usually drop loads of items used in the making of the third best metal armor, or some better weapons/tools) or just giving out random things. One other way to nuke is to head to the dungeon. You usually have to drop down a few feet before you're really in trouble, so stay up in the lobby. You might find anything between a water candle (which are common), a water bolt (a pretty cool spell), or even a chest with dungeon loot.

to:

** Depending on world size, you could find iron, silver, maybe even gold as soon as you spawn. There's also a small amount of demonite that can be found throughout the world. Another way to nuke is to [[{{Twinking}} join any multiplayer server.server]]. Someone in the server WILL be either fighting a boss (who usually drop loads of items used in the making of the third best metal armor, or some better weapons/tools) or just giving out random things. One other way to nuke is to head to the dungeon. You usually have to drop down a few feet before you're really in trouble, so stay up in the lobby. You might find anything between a water candle (which are common), a water bolt (a pretty cool spell), or even a chest with dungeon loot.



* In ''VideoGame/DeadRising'', if you get the Zombie Genocide achievement early, the game rewards you with the [[VideoGame/MegaManClassic Mega Buster]]. It's insanely powerful, capable of downing most psychopaths in 5-10 shots. On top of that, it has a massive clip (300 shots) and if you use it up, it respawns. It is ''very'' tempting to just plow through the entire game with the Mega Buster alone.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/DeadRising'', if ''VideoGame/DeadRising'':
** If
you get the Zombie Genocide achievement early, the game rewards you with the [[VideoGame/MegaManClassic Mega Buster]]. It's insanely powerful, capable of downing most psychopaths in 5-10 shots. On top of that, it has a massive clip (300 shots) and if you use it up, it respawns. It is ''very'' tempting to just plow through the entire game with the Mega Buster alone.



* ''ProjectZomboid'' has zombies that are quite tough in a fight, and the smarter tactic is to avoid them rather than fight them; however, from the very first house the player spawns in, they can potentially find numerous Kitchen Knives, which turn the player from a terrified survivor into a full-on {{Knife Nut}}. Kitchen Knives break easily, but are very common, are the only melee weapon that reliably one-hit-kills zombies, and to top it all off, the one-hit-kill special attack it almost always performs leaves you immune to individual zombie damage for several seconds.
** There's also a chance to find the [[AxCrazy Fire Axe]], one of the rarest and strongest weapons in the game, on any zombie corpse, meaning the player can potentially find one within minutes of beginning the game. It's highly durable, can frequently insta-kill zombies, and can chop down any door in the game with ease.

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* ''ProjectZomboid'' has zombies that are quite tough in a fight, and the smarter tactic is to avoid them rather than fight them; however, from the very first house the player spawns in, they can potentially find numerous Kitchen Knives, which turn the player from a terrified survivor into a full-on {{Knife Nut}}. Kitchen Knives break easily, but are very common, are the only melee weapon that reliably one-hit-kills zombies, and to top it all off, the one-hit-kill special attack it almost always performs leaves you immune to individual zombie damage for several seconds.
**
seconds. There's also a chance to find the [[AxCrazy Fire Axe]], one of the rarest and strongest weapons in the game, on any zombie corpse, meaning the player can potentially find one within minutes of beginning the game. It's highly durable, can frequently insta-kill zombies, and can chop down any door in the game with ease.
22nd Apr '16 4:35:31 PM AndyTheDrifter
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* Thanks to the incredibly open-ended gameplay structure of the ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' games, you can complete many sidequests, and in doing so, acquire extremely high-powered weapons and accumulate hundreds of thousands of dollars ? all before even accessing the game's opening tutorial missions.

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* Thanks to the incredibly open-ended gameplay structure of the ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' games, you can complete many sidequests, and in doing so, acquire extremely high-powered weapons and accumulate hundreds of thousands of dollars ? - all before even accessing the game's opening tutorial missions.
14th Apr '16 10:33:36 PM ReyKenobi
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** ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'':
*** Birthright gives you Reina and Takumi. Reina is a prepromote, and despite being outclassed will be able to really wreak havoc on the map she joins. Takumi has the Fuujin Yumi - considered to be a total GameBreaker. He also joins on a map where bows are useful, and unlike a lot of examples of this trope remains useful until endgame.
*** Camilla in Conquest is this. She joins prepromoted, gets some good growths and a nice skill set for the time of the game she joins in.
*** You yourself become one in ''Revelation'' - as the only one capable of fighting enemies for a couple maps, the avatar will end up rather overleveled by chapter 8 and 9. If that isn't enough, Takumi is another early joiner, but his joining point is ''even earlier'' than it was in Birthright!
5th Apr '16 5:25:17 AM MegaMarioMan
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* If you keep going through the first level of ''[[VideoGame/ScottPilgrim Scott Pilgrim Vs The World]]'', you'll eventually have enough money to buy tonnes of upgrades from the shops in the first level. In particular though, if you stockpile the money to a ridiculous amount (just over $500, a lot in a game where most enemies have at most $1.50 on them), you can go to the video store, pay off Scott's late fees, and unlock some fantastic stat boosts for just $4.95 each. Once you've done this, you can easily unlock all the combat moves that make the game easier, not to mention enhance your stats to be able to one-hit kill most enemies, and even the first boss.
** There's also a hidden shop on level one that has some items that give ungodly boosts to your stats without having to pay 500 bucks first. There's also a secret passage that you can reach that is filled with flying piggy banks that you can break for cash. Combined, you can attain high levels with ease. Of course, the shop's location is revealed in one of the trailers that promoted the game, so anyone who was watching the game before it came out would know exactly where it was. [[spoiler: Look for stars.]]

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* If you keep going through the first level of ''[[VideoGame/ScottPilgrim Scott Pilgrim Vs The World]]'', World]]''
** If you keep going through the first level of the game,
you'll eventually have enough money to buy tonnes of upgrades from the shops in the first level. In particular though, if you stockpile the money to a ridiculous amount (just over $500, a lot in a game where most enemies have at most $1.50 on them), you can go to the video store, pay off Scott's late fees, and unlock buy some fantastic stat boosts for just $4.95 each. Once you've done this, you can easily unlock pretty broken things: they sell extra lives, 1,500 XP, and +10 to all the combat moves that make the game easier, not to mention enhance 4 of your stats to be able to one-hit kill most enemies, and even the first boss.
for only $4.95 each!
** There's also a hidden shop on level one that has some items that give ungodly boosts to your stats without having to pay 500 bucks first. There's also a secret passage that you can reach that is filled with flying piggy banks that you can break for cash. Combined, you can attain high levels with ease. Of course, the shop's location is revealed in one of the trailers that promoted the game, so anyone who was watching the game before it came out would know exactly where it was. [[spoiler: Look [[spoiler:Look for stars.]]]]
** There's a cheat that lets you commit suicide and spawn $50 at your death. However, if you have a snack with you, you won't lose a life because the snack will AutoRevive you. Since you can buy snacks once you get halfway through the first stage and reach the shopping district, you can break the game almost immediately by buying the cheapest snack with the money you no doubt have accumulated over the course of the first half of the level, and since you get roughly $50 at your death, you'll definitely have the funds to buy another snack and repeat the process to get the money necessary to abuse both of the aforementioned shops.
** There's a cheat that gives you [[spoiler:The Power of Love (the sword with a heart handle that you find near the end of the game)]] at the start of every level. If you use the infinite money to get to a high-enough level that you can use the Grand Slam move (swinging any held item 3 times in succession) and level up your strength (allowing you to swing held items faster), you can then steamroll through the game.
3rd Apr '16 12:35:37 PM kikiandlala
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* Having difficulty even in the first stage of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots''? Want to be able to afford every gun in the game? Well in the first level, there's an area where a group of militants are facing some mercs and a Stryker. Hidden in the area is a sniper who will pick off the militants who are exposed to him. So look for the militant carrying an rpg and then run into him. He'll get angry and stand up to yell at Snake. This exposes him to the sniper, who kills him and then you can pick up his weapon which is worth $6000. Since the militants respawn, you can easily accumulate enough money to buy everything that Drebin can sell you (including all his rocket launchers and the .50 sniper rifle in the next Act).
19th Mar '16 5:53:49 AM Hossmeister
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18th Mar '16 8:09:40 PM MyFinalEdits
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* All the various ''VideoGame/{{Lego Adaptation Game}}s'' all have several unlockable characters that can be accessed by entering a cheat into the extra menu (some also have cheats to unlock red bricks). Usually at least a couple of these characters will have abilities you aren't supposed to access until ''much'' later, allowing you to access secrets in the Hub World and Free Play modes earlier than intended. The Laser Swat (lets you break gold bricks much earlier) from ''Film/TheLegoMovie'' and [=InGen=] Hunter 1 (has the shoot and grapple abilities) from ''Film/JurassicWorld'' are even borderline {{Game Breaker}}s for what they give you access to and are both unlockable via a cheat code.

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* All the various ''VideoGame/{{Lego Adaptation Game}}s'' ''VideoGame/LegoAdaptationGame'' titles all have several unlockable characters that can be accessed by entering a cheat into the extra menu (some also have cheats to unlock red bricks). Usually at least a couple of these characters will have abilities you aren't supposed to access until ''much'' later, allowing you to access secrets in the Hub World and Free Play modes earlier than intended. The Laser Swat (lets you break gold bricks much earlier) from ''Film/TheLegoMovie'' and [=InGen=] Hunter 1 (has the shoot and grapple abilities) from ''Film/JurassicWorld'' are even borderline {{Game Breaker}}s for what they give you access to and are both unlockable via a cheat code.
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