History Main / DigitalDestruction

19th Nov '17 8:28:15 AM Malady
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Shout Factory yet again has a tokusatsu release issue- GekisouSentaiCarranger features noticeable artifacting in scenes where significant usage of video editing is made such as the eyecatches, chroma key and character cards. However, this can mainly be blamed on Toei's usage of subpar sources like with the Orange Box example.

to:

* Shout Factory yet again has a tokusatsu release issue- GekisouSentaiCarranger Series/GekisouSentaiCarranger features noticeable artifacting in scenes where significant usage of video editing is made such as the eyecatches, chroma key and character cards. However, this can mainly be blamed on Toei's usage of subpar sources like with the Orange Box example.
6th Nov '17 7:28:35 PM MisterBeeg
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Viz claims that the original film no longer exists, but the plausibility of that has been called into question by a lot of people, some of whom work in the restoration business themselves. Does it make sense that Toei, a company that still has the original film for its series going back at least to the 80s, would have lost the film for one of its most iconic franchises? Especially considering that many countries have great-looking Sailor Moon sets on the market? Was Viz lying? Was Toei lying? Or was there a miscommunication between the two companies? No one really knows for sure. Later on it was revealed in an interview with Towers Entertainment, the company that produced the (Very good) Mexican Sailor Moon sets, that Toei actually has two masters, one of which is nice and remastered (And expensive) and one of which is old and deteriorated (And not so expensive). In the end it seems that Viz cheaped out and licensed the inferior master, then told the American fans that it was the best one available (at least for the moment). Not only that, but it seems that they went with an inexperienced company (Subatomic Digital, Inc.) for the IVTC and upscale work, most likely to save money. In addition, the German DVD sets, which interestingly contain the German broadcast version and original version of each episode, look pretty stunning video-wise (partly due to the fact that it wasn't upscaled for [=BD=]). It's telling that unlike KAZÉ Anime, which is far smaller and on a tighter budget, Viz was not exactly willing paying for the other master. And to make things more complicated, it was later announced in February that Toei is actually doing an HD transfer of ''Sailor Moon'' that is airing in Japan in April of 2015 (though that is also upscaled and is only a marginal improvement). Only time will tell if Viz will pull off what Funimation did when it brought out the actual restored ''Dragon Ball Z'' Dragon Box versions as well after the initial release.

to:

** Viz claims that the original film no longer exists, but the plausibility of that has been called into question by a lot of people, some of whom work in the restoration business themselves. Does it make sense that Toei, a company that still has the original film for its series going back at least to the 80s, 1960s, would have lost the film for one of its most iconic franchises? Especially considering that many countries have great-looking Sailor Moon sets on the market? Was Viz lying? Was Toei lying? Or was there a miscommunication between the two companies? No one really knows for sure. Later on it was revealed in an interview with Towers Entertainment, the company that produced the (Very good) Mexican Sailor Moon sets, that Toei actually has two masters, one of which is nice and remastered (And expensive) and one of which is old and deteriorated (And not so expensive). In the end it seems that Viz cheaped out and licensed the inferior master, then told the American fans that it was the best one available (at least for the moment). Not only that, but it seems that they went with an inexperienced company (Subatomic Digital, Inc.) for the IVTC and upscale work, most likely to save money. In addition, the German DVD sets, which interestingly contain the German broadcast version and original version of each episode, look pretty stunning video-wise (partly due to the fact that it wasn't upscaled for [=BD=]). It's telling that unlike KAZÉ Anime, which is far smaller and on a tighter budget, Viz was not exactly willing paying for the other master. And to make things more complicated, it was later announced in February that Toei is actually doing an HD transfer of ''Sailor Moon'' that is airing in Japan in April of 2015 (though that is also upscaled and is only a marginal improvement). Only time will tell if Viz will pull off what Funimation did when it brought out the actual restored ''Dragon Ball Z'' Dragon Box versions as well after the initial release.
13th Oct '17 7:21:52 PM DavidDelony
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Compare {{Remaster}}. For the video game equivalent of this trope, see PortingDisaster. In particularly bad instances of this, to preserve the way the footage originally looked you gotta KeepCirculatingTheTapes. Also see VisualCompression, GeorgeLucasAlteredVersion.

to:

Compare {{Remaster}}. For the video game equivalent of this trope, see PortingDisaster. For the musical equivalent, see LoudnessWar. In particularly bad instances of this, to preserve the way the footage originally looked you gotta KeepCirculatingTheTapes. Also see VisualCompression, GeorgeLucasAlteredVersion.
8th Oct '17 7:24:37 PM dsneybuf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Anime/KikisDeliveryService'' had its 1998 dub tweaked for its 2010 North American DVD re-release, reverting the music to match the Japanese version, and removing some dialogue that created LullDestruction (namely, a lot of Creator/PhilHartman's lines as Jiji, which many felt was disrespectful as this was his last movie role before his death). Unfortunately, what dialogue does remain now sounds as hard-to-hear as if the characters spoke through a fan. This is not an issue on the later 2014 Blu-ray, however.

to:

* ''Anime/KikisDeliveryService'' had its 1998 dub tweaked for its 2010 North American DVD re-release, reverting the music to match the Japanese version, and removing some dialogue that created LullDestruction (namely, LullDestruction[[note]]namely, a lot of Creator/PhilHartman's lines as Jiji, which many felt was disrespectful as this was his last movie role before his death).death[[/note]]. Unfortunately, what dialogue does remain now sounds as hard-to-hear as if the characters spoke through a fan. This is not an issue on the later 2014 Blu-ray, however.
23rd Sep '17 12:56:55 PM MarioandSmurfs
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** After Mowgli saves Bagheera from Kaa by kicking the latter out of the tree, there was originally music playing from when Mowgli snaps Bagheera out of the trance to when Kaa says "Just you wait 'til I get you in my coils!" The music was not only removed for some reason for the 1990 re-release audio, but somehow also not heard for the post-2007 editions. However, it can still be heard on some foreign-language dubs, particularly the ones made around the film's original release (or at least before 1990) including French, German, Dutch, Italian, Hungarian, Swedish, Danish, and Hebrew.

to:

*** After Mowgli saves Bagheera from Kaa by kicking the latter out of the tree, there was originally music playing from when Mowgli snaps Bagheera out of the trance to when Kaa says "Just you wait 'til I get you in my coils!" The music was not only removed for some reason for the 1990 re-release audio, but somehow also not heard for the post-2007 editions. However, it can still be heard on some foreign-language dubs, particularly the ones made around the film's original release (or at least before 1990) including French, German, Dutch, Italian, Hungarian, Swedish, Danish, and Hebrew. Interestingly though, two of those dubs, Latin Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese 1968, ended up using the 1990 re-release audio mix for their home video releases (probably because the original speech recordings for those dubs were preserved).



*** During "I Wanna Be Like You" while Baloo and Bagheera are talking, there is a trumpet solo that plays in the background. This was somehow not heard in the 1990 re-release audio mix (possibly due to editing problems), but can be heard on the soundtrack and was also brought back for the post-2007 DVD and Blu-Ray releases. Interestingly though, two of those dubs, Latin Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese 1968, ended up using the 1990 re-release audio mix for their home video releases (probably because the original speech recordings for those dubs were preserved). The 1990 audio mix was also used for foreign-language dubs made between the 1990 and 2007 releases, including Bulgarian, Czech, Greek, Polish, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian, Finnish, Cantonese, and Thai.

to:

*** During "I Wanna Be Like You" while Baloo and Bagheera are talking, there is a trumpet solo that plays in the background. This was somehow not heard in the 1990 re-release audio mix (possibly due to editing problems), but can be heard on the soundtrack and was also brought back for the post-2007 DVD and Blu-Ray releases. Interestingly though, two of those dubs, Latin Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese 1968, ended up using the 1990 re-release audio mix for their home video releases (probably because the original speech recordings for those dubs were preserved). The 1990 audio mix was also used for foreign-language dubs made between the 1990 and 2007 releases, including Bulgarian, Czech, Greek, Polish, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian, Finnish, Cantonese, and Thai.
23rd Sep '17 12:54:46 PM MarioandSmurfs
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Disney/TheJungleBook''
** For the 1990 re-release audio mix (used on home video releases before 2007), three scenes are affected:
*** After Mowgli saves Bagheera from Kaa by kicking the latter out of the tree, there was originally music playing from when Mowgli snaps Bagheera out of the trance to when Kaa says "Just you wait 'til I get you in my coils!" The music was not only removed for some reason for the 1990 re-release audio, but somehow also not heard for the post-2007 editions. However, it can still be heard on some foreign-language dubs, particularly the ones made around the film's original release (or at least before 1990) including French, German, Dutch, Italian, Hungarian, Swedish, Danish, and Hebrew.
*** When Baloo gets pelted with fruit by the monkeys, he yells "Now, just try that again, you---!" but is interrupted with a pumpkin splatting in his face. Here, there is a piece of "reaction" music that plays when this happens. Oddly, this was heard not on the original theatrical version, but was used on the 1990 re-release audio mix instead. It is unknown if the music was originally intended to be included, but it's also not heard on the post-2007 DVD and Blu-Ray editions either.
*** During "I Wanna Be Like You" while Baloo and Bagheera are talking, there is a trumpet solo that plays in the background. This was somehow not heard in the 1990 re-release audio mix (possibly due to editing problems), but can be heard on the soundtrack and was also brought back for the post-2007 DVD and Blu-Ray releases. Interestingly though, two of those dubs, Latin Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese 1968, ended up using the 1990 re-release audio mix for their home video releases (probably because the original speech recordings for those dubs were preserved). The 1990 audio mix was also used for foreign-language dubs made between the 1990 and 2007 releases, including Bulgarian, Czech, Greek, Polish, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian, Finnish, Cantonese, and Thai.
*** In terms of quality, the 1990 re-release audio version is clearly a stereo mix and sounds very clean and crispy compared to the other versions. The post-2007 audio mix used for the Platinum Edition and Diamond Edition Blu-Ray uses some elements from the 1990 version, albeit slightly "mono-ized". Unfortunately, the 2007 audio mix also has a few continuity problems, particularly with "I Wanna Be Like You". During the first part of the song while Louie tells Mowgli he can help him stay in the jungle, the 1990 audio edit is used. However, when Louie begins singing "Now I'm the king of the swingers..." the rest of the instrumental is used from the original theatrical audio (since the 1990 version is missing the trumpet solo) and you can clearly notice the quality change.
22nd Sep '17 2:14:16 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The 2006 Platinum Edition [=DVD=] has a few unique instances of DigitalDestruction (which have actually been undone on the Diamond restoration): the clamshells the sisters came out of were changed to green interiors, and Grimsby's hand at the start of the tour of the kingdom was removed.

to:

** The 2006 Platinum Edition [=DVD=] has a few unique instances of DigitalDestruction Digital Destruction (which have actually been undone on the Diamond restoration): the clamshells the sisters came out of were changed to green interiors, and Grimsby's hand at the start of the tour of the kingdom was removed.
20th Sep '17 10:26:31 PM gjjones
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' "orange brick" season sets by Funimation are the worst offenders. They were "restored" by cropping, oversaturating, and using too much Digital Video Noise Reduction (DVNR); while leaving all the dust and scratches on the film intact. Creator/FUNimation's marketing even lied about some of the changes, like representing the original footage on the DVD extras using some of the remastered footage with artificial grain added; they also were convinced that viewers would enjoy 10% of overscan instead of 25% of the original image. Fans were outraged because not only were Japanese [=DVD=]s remastered frame by frame from first generation masters, but this was the first consistent video release by Creator/FUNimation ([=FUNi=] had actually cancelled the final releases of the previous [=DVD=]s to make way for the new remastered sets).

to:

** The ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' "orange brick" season sets by Funimation are the worst offenders. They were "restored" by cropping, oversaturating, and using too much Digital Video Noise Reduction (DVNR); while leaving all the dust and scratches on the film intact. Creator/FUNimation's marketing even lied about some of the changes, like representing the original footage on the DVD extras using some of the remastered footage with artificial grain added; they also were convinced that viewers would enjoy 10% of overscan instead of 25% of the original image. Fans were outraged because not only were Japanese [=DVD=]s remastered frame by frame from first generation 16mm masters, but this was the first consistent video release by Creator/FUNimation ([=FUNi=] had actually cancelled the final releases of the previous [=DVD=]s to make way for the new remastered sets).



** While the quality of the remasters for ''Anime/DragonBallKai'' are largely up to debate, it's quite obvious that Creator/QTec was working on the cheap when they were made; opinions on [[Creator/ToeiAnimation Toei's]] in-house remaster of ''The Final Chapters'' are much more unanimous, with many criticizing how the remaster is done solely in cropped 16:9 and how the picture features a noticeable green tint compared to the ''Dragon Ball Z'' Blu-rays.

to:

** While the quality of the remasters for ''Anime/DragonBallKai'' are largely up to debate, it's quite obvious that Creator/QTec was working on the cheap 16mm masters when they were made; opinions on [[Creator/ToeiAnimation Toei's]] in-house remaster of ''The Final Chapters'' are much more unanimous, with many criticizing how the remaster is done solely in cropped 16:9 and how the picture features a noticeable green tint compared to the ''Dragon Ball Z'' Blu-rays.



* In 2014, Creator/VizMedia announced that they would become the first studio worldwide to release ''Manga/SailorMoon'' on Blu-Ray. Since the film elements for at least two seasons no longer exist, they had to work with the same masters used for the 2009 Japanese [=DVDs=], remastered frame by frame from first generation masters. Unfortunately, comparisons between the first set of Blu-Ray Discs and these [=DVDs=] reveal the former to have more DNR and ghosting. Additionally, Viz's [=DVDs=] encoded the 4:3 picture into 16:9 with black bars on the left and right sides, making it appear low-quality by even DVD standards. (Viewers with 4:3 [=TVs=] will see a windowboxed presentation, instead of one that fills the screen.) Fans were understandably outraged by this.

to:

* In 2014, Creator/VizMedia announced that they would become the first studio worldwide to release ''Manga/SailorMoon'' on Blu-Ray. Since the 16mm film elements for at least the first two seasons no longer exist, they had to work with the same masters used for the Toei's 2009 Japanese [=DVDs=], remastered frame by frame from first generation masters.[=DVDs=]. Unfortunately, comparisons between the first set of Blu-Ray Discs and these [=DVDs=] reveal the former to have more DNR and ghosting. Additionally, Viz's [=DVDs=] encoded the 4:3 picture into 16:9 with black bars on the left and right sides, making it appear low-quality by even DVD standards. (Viewers with 4:3 [=TVs=] will see a windowboxed presentation, instead of one that fills the screen.) Fans were understandably outraged by this.outraged.
20th Sep '17 10:23:28 PM gjjones
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** For a little while it looked like Creator/FUNimation were finally going to release a lasting remastered version of the series with their surprisingly well-transferred blu-ray 'Level' releases, but these were put on hold after just two volumes. Two years later Creator/FUNimation once again began releasing Dragon ball Z on Blu-ray. [[HistoryRepeats This time with cropped video, over-saturated colors and noise reduction.]]

to:

** For a little while it looked like Creator/FUNimation {{Creator/Funimation}} were finally going to release a lasting remastered version of the series with their surprisingly well-transferred blu-ray Blu-ray 'Level' releases, but these were put on hold after just two volumes. Two years later later, Creator/FUNimation once again began releasing Dragon ball Z ''Dragon Ball Z'' on Blu-ray. [[HistoryRepeats This time with cropped video, over-saturated colors and noise reduction.]]



* When Creator/{{FUNimation}} rereleased ''[[Anime/TenchiUniverse Tenchi Muyo! in Love]]'' as part of a box set with the other two ''Tenchi'' films on Blu-ray and DVD, they ended up releasing a version of the film that has '''horrific''' color-correction issues. All of the blues have been turned green (which also affects Sasami and Kiyone's hair colors; Lord knows how Creator/FUNimation overlooked that), the sepia-toned scene near the start of the film has been turned '''piss yellow''', and somebody seems to have punched up the color quite a considerable amount, making the whole film eye-gougingly bright. The original 1997 DVD release from [[Creator/{{Geneon}} Pioneer Home Entertainment]], however, had none of these issues, being a direct transfer from the original film negatives. For those interested, [[http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af241/CCharmanderK/tenchi01_zps5753de2f.png here]] [[http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af241/CCharmanderK/tenchi02_zps68ca1f50.png are]] [[http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af241/CCharmanderK/tenchi03_zps3638bd83.png some]] [[http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af241/CCharmanderK/tenchi04_zps0854ed33.png comparisons.]]
* In 2014, Creator/VizMedia announced that they would become the first studio worldwide to release ''Manga/SailorMoon'' on Blu-Ray. Since the film elements for at least two seasons no longer exist, they had to work with the same masters used for 2009 Japanese [=DVDs=]. Unfortunately, comparisons between the first set of Blu-Ray Discs and these [=DVDs=] reveal the former to have more DNR and ghosting. Additionally, Viz's [=DVDs=] encoded the 4:3 picture into 16:9 with black bars on the left and right sides, making it appear low-quality by even DVD standards. (Viewers with 4:3 [=TVs=] will see a windowboxed presentation, instead of one that fills the screen.)
** Viz claims that the original film no longer exists, but the plausibility of that has been called into question by a lot of people, some of whom work in the restoration business themselves. Does it make sense that Toei, a company that still has the original film for its series going back at least to the 80s, would have lost the film for one of its most iconic franchises? Especially considering that many countries have great-looking Sailor Moon sets on the market? Was Viz lying? Was Toei lying? Or was there a miscommunication between the two companies? No one really knows for sure. Later on it was revealed in an interview with Towers Entertainment, the company that produced the (Very good) Mexican Sailor Moon sets, that Toei actually has two masters, one of which is nice and remastered (And expensive) and one of which is old and deteriorated (And not so expensive). In the end it seems that Viz cheaped out and licensed the inferior master, then told the American fans that it was the best one available (at least for the moment). Not only that, but it seems that they went with an inexperienced company (Subatomic Digital, Inc.) for the IVTC and upscale work, most likely to save money. In addition, the German DVD sets, which interestingly contain the German broadcast version and original version of each episode, look pretty stunning video-wise (partly due to the fact that it wasn't upscaled for [=BD=]). It's telling that unlike KAZÉ Anime, which is far smaller and on a tighter budget, Viz was not exactly willing paying for the other master. And to make things more complicated, it was later announced in February that Toei is actually doing an HD transfer of Sailor Moon that is airing in Japan in April of 2015 (though that is also upscaled and is only a marginal improvement). Only time will tell if Viz will pull off what Funimation did when it brought out the actual restored ''Dragon Ball Z'' Dragon Box versions as well after the initial release.

to:

* When Creator/{{FUNimation}} Creator/{{Funimation}} rereleased ''[[Anime/TenchiUniverse Tenchi Muyo! in Love]]'' as part of a box set with the other two ''Tenchi'' films on Blu-ray and DVD, they ended up releasing a version of the film that has '''horrific''' color-correction issues. All of the blues have been turned green (which also affects Sasami and Kiyone's hair colors; Lord knows how Creator/FUNimation {{Creator/Funimation}} overlooked that), the sepia-toned scene near the start of the film has been turned '''piss yellow''', and somebody seems to have punched up the color quite a considerable amount, making the whole film eye-gougingly bright. The original 1997 DVD release from [[Creator/{{Geneon}} Pioneer Home Entertainment]], however, had none of these issues, being a direct transfer from the original film negatives. For those interested, [[http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af241/CCharmanderK/tenchi01_zps5753de2f.png here]] [[http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af241/CCharmanderK/tenchi02_zps68ca1f50.png are]] [[http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af241/CCharmanderK/tenchi03_zps3638bd83.png some]] [[http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af241/CCharmanderK/tenchi04_zps0854ed33.png comparisons.]]
* In 2014, Creator/VizMedia announced that they would become the first studio worldwide to release ''Manga/SailorMoon'' on Blu-Ray. Since the film elements for at least two seasons no longer exist, they had to work with the same masters used for the 2009 Japanese [=DVDs=].[=DVDs=], remastered frame by frame from first generation masters. Unfortunately, comparisons between the first set of Blu-Ray Discs and these [=DVDs=] reveal the former to have more DNR and ghosting. Additionally, Viz's [=DVDs=] encoded the 4:3 picture into 16:9 with black bars on the left and right sides, making it appear low-quality by even DVD standards. (Viewers with 4:3 [=TVs=] will see a windowboxed presentation, instead of one that fills the screen.)
) Fans were understandably outraged by this.
** Viz claims that the original film no longer exists, but the plausibility of that has been called into question by a lot of people, some of whom work in the restoration business themselves. Does it make sense that Toei, a company that still has the original film for its series going back at least to the 80s, would have lost the film for one of its most iconic franchises? Especially considering that many countries have great-looking Sailor Moon sets on the market? Was Viz lying? Was Toei lying? Or was there a miscommunication between the two companies? No one really knows for sure. Later on it was revealed in an interview with Towers Entertainment, the company that produced the (Very good) Mexican Sailor Moon sets, that Toei actually has two masters, one of which is nice and remastered (And expensive) and one of which is old and deteriorated (And not so expensive). In the end it seems that Viz cheaped out and licensed the inferior master, then told the American fans that it was the best one available (at least for the moment). Not only that, but it seems that they went with an inexperienced company (Subatomic Digital, Inc.) for the IVTC and upscale work, most likely to save money. In addition, the German DVD sets, which interestingly contain the German broadcast version and original version of each episode, look pretty stunning video-wise (partly due to the fact that it wasn't upscaled for [=BD=]). It's telling that unlike KAZÉ Anime, which is far smaller and on a tighter budget, Viz was not exactly willing paying for the other master. And to make things more complicated, it was later announced in February that Toei is actually doing an HD transfer of Sailor Moon ''Sailor Moon'' that is airing in Japan in April of 2015 (though that is also upscaled and is only a marginal improvement). Only time will tell if Viz will pull off what Funimation did when it brought out the actual restored ''Dragon Ball Z'' Dragon Box versions as well after the initial release.
19th Sep '17 8:12:34 PM Pichu-kun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Happy about your WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes [[LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition Golden Collection sets]] and [[WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts Walt Disney Treasures]] stuff, as well as Disney's restorations of their films? If you're a hardcore animation fan, you probably aren't. The short collections by both studios frequently abuse the infamous DVNR process, which either thins out or erases lines of artwork, and oversaturates the colors to the point where they lose their original contrast and/or start bleeding into each other. And while Disney's films don't use the DVNR process, they do have many noticeable problems ''Disney/{{Bambi}}'' in particular has had the dark pumped up considerably, which destroys much of the original color contrasts. The blu-ray release also has some bizarre color alterations, and some shots have obvious grain-smoothing problems.
** The Looney Tunes Golden Collection sets have a lot of issues with line thinning and even full blown art erasing (ElmersCandidCamera on vol. 1 has some really bad examples of this that you don't even need to still frame to notice) and the colors are ''way'' too saturated. The few shorts that seemed to remotely escape this are "Transylvania 6-5000" and "What's Opera, Doc?" (and the latter still suffers from line thinning and horribly compressed sound). Vol. 1 and 2 in particular suffer from digital compression issues, particularly during a crowd shot in ''OneFroggyEvening''. Vol. 2 also used digital interlacing for a handful of shorts on disc 4, resulting in very flickery picture. Fortunately, a replacement program was issued for that particular disc. Fortunately, the Blu-Ray Platinum Collection sets manage to rectify the DVNR (save with one of the Road Runner shorts on the first set, which is inexplicably DVNRed like crazy), compression issues and oversaturated colors, but the contrast is still pumped up higher than normal on occasion, and some of the cartoons on disc 2 of the vol. 2 Platinum Collection DVD have issues with digital interlacing.

to:

* Happy about your WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' [[LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition Golden Collection sets]] and [[WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts Walt Disney Treasures]] stuff, as well as Disney's restorations of their films? If you're a hardcore animation fan, you probably aren't. The short collections by both studios frequently abuse the infamous DVNR process, which either thins out or erases lines of artwork, and oversaturates the colors to the point where they lose their original contrast and/or start bleeding into each other. And while Disney's films don't use the DVNR process, they do have many noticeable problems ''Disney/{{Bambi}}'' in particular has had the dark pumped up considerably, which destroys much of the original color contrasts. The blu-ray release also has some bizarre color alterations, and some shots have obvious grain-smoothing problems.
** The Looney Tunes ''Looney Tunes'' Golden Collection sets have a lot of issues with line thinning and even full blown art erasing (ElmersCandidCamera on vol. 1 has some really bad examples of this that you don't even need to still frame to notice) and the colors are ''way'' too saturated. The few shorts that seemed to remotely escape this are "Transylvania 6-5000" and "What's Opera, Doc?" (and the latter still suffers from line thinning and horribly compressed sound). Vol. 1 and 2 in particular suffer from digital compression issues, particularly during a crowd shot in ''OneFroggyEvening''. Vol. 2 also used digital interlacing for a handful of shorts on disc 4, resulting in very flickery picture. Fortunately, a replacement program was issued for that particular disc. Fortunately, the Blu-Ray Platinum Collection sets manage to rectify the DVNR (save with one of the Road Runner shorts on the first set, which is inexplicably DVNRed like crazy), compression issues and oversaturated colors, but the contrast is still pumped up higher than normal on occasion, and some of the cartoons on disc 2 of the vol. 2 Platinum Collection DVD have issues with digital interlacing.



* A stunning aversion of this trope would be the first official PopeyeTheSailor DVD set, almost completely averting this Trope. Yes, ''almost'' if one looks very carefully in certain bits of the shorts, there is some very mild line thinning and/or erasing that you would usually need to purposely look for in order to spot. The only short that seemed to suffer obvious DVNR problems was "I Like Babies and Infinks", where problems with artwork erasing pop up very frequently. And as John K. pointed out in his blog, the color specials have had some bizarre altering "Popeye Meets Sindbad" has had the pink, purple and turquoise turned up considerably, and while "Popeye Meets Ali Baba" is very close to actual 1930s colors, the purple bits in the cave have been pulled up into a bluish look. Also, when the Vol. 2 DVD set was released, they goofed up on recreating some of the title cards, and some of the shorts suffered from digital interlacing. This seems to have been rectified by a disc replacement program, thankfully.
* One particularly notorious example of Digital Destruction would be the infamous ''BettyBoop: The Definitive Collection'' series of VHS tapes and Laserdiscs. In ''every single short'' there is blatantly obvious, horrendous line thinning and erasing. Fortunately, Olive Films came to the rescue in late 2013 by re-releasing Betty Boop shorts with exquisite restorations that are completely devoid of DVNR--the only downside being that some of the pre-1933 shorts have their aspect ratio slightly cropped, most notably ''Snow White'', which has a good chunk of the top of the screen cropped for no good reason.

to:

* A stunning aversion of this trope would be the first official PopeyeTheSailor ''ComicStrip/{{Popeye}}'' DVD set, almost completely averting this Trope. Yes, ''almost'' if one looks very carefully in certain bits of the shorts, there is some very mild line thinning and/or erasing that you would usually need to purposely look for in order to spot. The only short that seemed to suffer obvious DVNR problems was "I Like Babies and Infinks", where problems with artwork erasing pop up very frequently. And as John K. pointed out in his blog, the color specials have had some bizarre altering "Popeye Meets Sindbad" has had the pink, purple and turquoise turned up considerably, and while "Popeye Meets Ali Baba" is very close to actual 1930s colors, the purple bits in the cave have been pulled up into a bluish look. Also, when the Vol. 2 DVD set was released, they goofed up on recreating some of the title cards, and some of the shorts suffered from digital interlacing. This seems to have been rectified by a disc replacement program, thankfully.
* One particularly notorious example of Digital Destruction would be the infamous ''BettyBoop: ''WesternAnimation/BettyBoop: The Definitive Collection'' series of VHS tapes and Laserdiscs. In ''every single short'' there is blatantly obvious, horrendous line thinning and erasing. Fortunately, Olive Films came to the rescue in late 2013 by re-releasing Betty Boop shorts with exquisite restorations that are completely devoid of DVNR--the only downside being that some of the pre-1933 shorts have their aspect ratio slightly cropped, most notably ''Snow White'', which has a good chunk of the top of the screen cropped for no good reason.



* Like with Speed Racer, the DVD releases for ''It's the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown! ComicStrip/Peanuts'' suffers from the audio being pitch shifted up than it normally is.

to:

* Like with Speed Racer, the DVD releases for ''It's the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown! ComicStrip/Peanuts'' ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' suffers from the audio being pitch shifted up than it normally is.
This list shows the last 10 events of 495. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DigitalDestruction