History Main / DesignatedVillain

23rd Jun '16 11:33:16 PM hoggardhigh
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Compare and contrast RootingForTheEmpire, PokeThePoodle (this trope PlayedForLaughs), VillainBallMagnet, HateSink, InformedWrongness, FelonyMisdemeanor and VillainyFreeVillain.

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Compare and contrast RootingForTheEmpire, PokeThePoodle (this trope PlayedForLaughs), VillainBallMagnet, HateSink, InformedWrongness, FelonyMisdemeanor FelonyMisdemeanor, and VillainyFreeVillain.
22nd Jun '16 2:53:07 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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*** Though to be fair, he had been explicitly stated of having done that for years and was annoying people in both his house and workplace who had asked him several times to not be so loud, all of which he ignored. It wasn't just making too much noise it was also being so inconsiderate of others who were understandably annoyed by constant earsplitting sounds.
22nd Jun '16 2:50:50 PM TotalDramaRox97
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*** Though to be fair, he had been explicitly stated of having done that for years and was annoying people in both his house and workplace who had asked him several times to not be so loud, all of which he ignored. It wasn't just making too much noise it was also being so inconsiderate of others who were understandably annoyed by constant earsplitting sounds.



* Azula from ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' is portrayed as pure evil, despite being an abused and somewhat brainwashed 14-year-old. Interestingly, she never does anything truly evil on screen. Zuko claims she abuses animals, yet he is the only one we see actually throwing rocks at turtleducks. Also, Zuko is the one who burns down villages and generally acts in underhanded ways early on. Azula is a surprisingly ethical soldier, treating her prisoners of war quite humanely. She overthrows Ba Sing Se with only one supposed death (the Fire Nation's Most Wanted); contrast this with Iroh's bloody, multi-year siege against the city, complete with him joking the city might be burned down in the process. Even while becoming unhinged, Azula only attacks Katara once she runs into the agni kai arena and not a moment before.
17th Jun '16 12:16:01 PM stillalive213
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* Azula from ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' is portrayed as pure evil, despite being an abused and somewhat brainwashed 14-year-old. Interestingly, she never does anything truly evil on screen. Zuko claims she abuses animals, yet he is the only one we see actually throwing rocks at turtleducks. Also, Zuko is the one who burns down villages and generally acts in underhanded ways early on. Azula is a surprisingly ethical soldier, treating her prisoners of war quite humanely. She overthrows Ba Sing Se with only one supposed death (the Fire Nation's Most Wanted); contrast this with Iroh's bloody, multi-year siege against the city, complete with him joking the city might be burned down in the process. Even while becoming unhinged, Azula only attacks Katara once she runs into the agni kai arena and not a moment before.
10th Jun '16 1:52:58 PM Eddy1215
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** Inverted with Gladys Sharp and the Verminator. On the surface, they seem like the leader of homeowner who just wants her town rid of bothersome pests and an exterminator [[JustFollowingOrders just doing his job]], if it weren't for the fact that she's clearly a pompous, arrogant control freak who willingly buys an illegal pest control device and demand that said pests by eliminated inhumanely as possible and he was someone who clearly enjoyed hunting down animals and setting up dangerous traps.

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** Inverted with Gladys Sharp and the Verminator. On the surface, they seem like the leader of homeowner a homeowner's association who just wants her town rid of bothersome pests and an exterminator [[JustFollowingOrders just doing his job]], if it weren't for the fact that she's clearly a pompous, arrogant control freak who willingly buys an illegal pest control device and demand that said pests by eliminated inhumanely as possible and he was someone who clearly enjoyed hunting down animals and setting up dangerous traps.
10th Jun '16 1:51:55 PM Eddy1215
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** Inverted with Gladys Sharp and the Verminator. On the surface, they seem like the leader of homeowner who just wants her town rid of bothersome pests and an exterminator [[JustFollowingOrders just doing his job]], if it weren't for the fact that she's clearly a pompous, arrogant control freak who willingly buys an illegal pest control device and demand that said pests by eliminated inhumanely as possible and he was someone who clearly enjoyed hunting down animals and setting up dangerous traps.
10th Jun '16 4:54:13 AM SatoshiBakura
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* In ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'':
** Secret groups of children are locked in war with teenagers and adults. Yet aging inevitably happens, so to prevent former KND agents who have aged past 13 from knowing KND secrets, they are supposed to willingly subject themselves to LaserGuidedAmnesia, thus becoming clueless and hopefully harmless. Anyone who does not to do this turns evil at that very second, a type of evil that includes insults and fighting dirty. There are undercover exceptions but this is usually the rule. In the KND 'verse, [[GrowingUpSucks puberty makes you evil]]. This is explicitly the case. While not all adults are evil, ''all'' their enemies are adults, and kids are mostly good. (There are exceptions on both sides.) The kid's parents are good, but perhaps that's because none of them were agents (that we know), and thus not subject to TheDarkSide tempting them.
** [[spoiler:Numbah 86's father is Mr. Boss]]. Unusual because he loves his own child, but is one of the greatest and oldest enemies of the present KND and is the leader of some of the lesser villains.
** Some villains don't even display malice toward the KND after their introductory episodes. The holding of events like villain barbecues and award ceremonies seems to indicate that fighting the KND is a hobby as well as a crusade.
** However, [[spoiler:Numbah 1's dad]] was once the greatest KND agent who had his memory erased and has shown no signs of being evil (though he does seem rather dippy). There's also the fact that Chad's parents only were villains on the show ''because'' Chad was a member of KND (they thought that he had "such a high number" and wanted to pick off the other agents so that he could be Numbuh 1).
** Chad's turn to evil was also in part due to his own ego and selfishness. As the best KND agent and oldest (he's being decommissioned after all) he felt he put too much time and effort into his accomplishments to let the organization just kick him out to the point that he was betraying anyone he could. He eventually starts directing his anger away from the cruelty of the decommission rule toward the whole organization itself. In the finale it turns out [[spoiler:he was a double agent secretly working against the teenagers and adults, though his animosity towards Numbuh 1 and nearly killing him was very real]].
** Done intentionally in earlier episodes, where the KND were more self righteous rebels who played themselves as heroes against any sort of enforced rule or annoyance an authority figure put against them (eg. the adult swim in a public pool, a delivery of tuneless pianos, ice cream reserved for a private meeting). The majority of these cases played the KND more as {{Unsympathetic Comedy Protagonist}}s and usually ended in comedic failure.
25th May '16 8:08:53 AM SpinAttaxx
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* Crossing over slightly with AdaptationalVillainy, ''VideoGame/DisneysVillainsRevenge'' features the Ringmaster from ''Disney/{{Dumbo}}'' as one of the main antagonists. In the original film, he was hardly evil and the worst he did was lock up Mrs. Jumbo after she had a violent rampage, but one can hardly blame him for this given that elephants are ''dangerous'' and he didn't know any better. Even in-game, the worst he does is perform an act in which Dumbo is dropped into water to entertain his audience (who laugh at heinous things).
19th May '16 12:23:58 PM Westing1992
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* Walt Ferris, the inspector, from WeBoughtAZoo. The most 'evil' thing he does is give as surprise, unofficial inspection a few weeks early... allowing the family to fix the problems he points out, so they can pass the REAL inspection.
16th May '16 12:26:01 PM Gravidef
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* Another played-with Shakespearean example comes in ''Theatre/KingLear'' with Goneril and Regan, Lear's elder two daughters. They're portrayed as villains because they lie to their father about how much they love him and later tell him that he has to send away some of his retinue of knights if he's going to stay with them. While it's true that they did exaggerate about their affection for Lear, they were doing so ''because he wanted them to''--he was quite literally deciding how much of his kingdom they would get based on their answers, and Cordelia, who does genuinely love him, ends up being banished forever because she wouldn't kiss up to him. Furthermore, Lear acts like a completely spoiled brat while he stays with Goneril and Regan, hunting and living it up all day, then coming home (with ''a hundred men'') and demanding to be waited on hand and foot while he and his knights carouse all night--which completely ignores the fact that the princesses are trying to run the kingdom he left them. Granted, Goneril and Regan are far from saints, but they often seem more sympathetic and frustrated than evil.
* The ultimate Shakespeare example might be Shylock from ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice''. His name has become a slur synonymous with villainy, and the phrase "pound of flesh" has come to refer to anything given unfairly--but the thing of it is, within the play, Shylock ''didn't do anything wrong.'' The contract that he and Antonio form is honest and legally binding; there's no coercion involved. Of course, Shylock could have taken the other characters' offer to buy out the contract for double its worth, but that doesn't make his insistence on sticking to the bond illegal. So why is he such a villain? [[ValuesDissonance Because he's Jewish]]; when the play was written, Christianity was the dominant religion of England. That fact even explains his less-than-clear thinking on the matter: his only daughter elopes with a Christian man and converts to do so, leaving him without any descendants whatsoever. His insistence on clinging to the contract seems less like a villain scheming to hurt people and more like [[TheWoobie a broken, scared man desperately clutching at some semblance of order to keep himself sane.]] Virtually every modern production of ''Venice'' addresses this problem, and tries to find a way to reconcile the intense anti-Semitism of Shakespeare's time with contemporary values.

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* Another played-with Shakespearean example comes in ''Theatre/KingLear'' with Goneril and Regan, Lear's elder two daughters. They're portrayed as villains because they lie to their father about how much they love him and later tell him that he has to send away some of his retinue of knights if he's going to stay with them. While it's true that they did exaggerate about their affection for Lear, they were doing so ''because he wanted them to''--he was quite literally deciding how much of his kingdom they would get based on their answers, and Cordelia, who does genuinely love him, ends up being banished forever because she wouldn't kiss up to him. Furthermore, Lear acts like a completely spoiled brat while he stays with Goneril and Regan, hunting and living it up all day, then coming home (with ''a hundred men'') and demanding to be waited on hand and foot while he and his knights carouse all night--which completely ignores evening--completely ignoring the fact that the princesses are trying to run the kingdom he left them. Granted, Goneril and Regan are far from saints, but they often seem more sympathetic and frustrated than evil.
* The ultimate Shakespeare example might be Shylock from ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice''. His name has become a slur synonymous with villainy, and the phrase "pound of flesh" has come to refer to anything given unfairly--but the thing of it is, within the play, Shylock ''didn't do anything wrong.'' The contract that he and Antonio form is honest and legally binding; there's no coercion involved. Of course, Shylock could have taken the other characters' offer to buy out the contract for double its worth, but that doesn't make his insistence on sticking to the bond illegal. So why is he such a villain? [[ValuesDissonance Because he's Jewish]]; Jewish]], and when the play was written, Christianity was the dominant religion of England. That fact even explains his less-than-clear thinking on the matter: his only daughter elopes with a Christian man and converts to do so, leaving him without any descendants whatsoever. His insistence on clinging to the contract seems less like a villain scheming to hurt people and more like [[TheWoobie a broken, scared man desperately clutching at some semblance of order to keep himself sane.]] Virtually every modern contemporary production of ''Venice'' addresses this problem, and tries to find a way to reconcile the intense anti-Semitism antisemitism of Shakespeare's time with contemporary more tolerant/open values.
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