History Main / DeaderThanDisco

21st Feb '18 1:49:10 PM HighCrate
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[[AC:Series]]
** Seth MacFarlane started out as one of the most respected animators in television. He got his start writing for the shows that were the staple of Cartoon Network in the 1990s under the "Hanna Barbera" label (Cow and Chicken, Johnny Bravo and Dexter's Laboratory). He would later step down to create "Family Guy" for the FOX network, which would end up being cancelled twice due to scheduling inconsistencies (The first being 2000 and the second being 2002. When it was brought back the first time, FOX had placed it on a Thursday night lineup, making it harder for people who followed the show to watch it) and ExecutiveMeddling. The show would later find an audience on CartoonNetwork and TBS, where cable reruns would usually outrank "Conan" and it was the second highest selling show on DVD only behind "Chappelle's Show". This caught so much fire that MacFarlane would produce another animated series for them entitled ("American Dad", which was greenlit before "Family Guy" was revived but would end up airing alongside it) it) and end up recommissioning "Family Guy" for a second time. time. Despite fans from the original run being unhappy with changes being made to the show (which included characters undergoing Flanderization), the show had won over the hearts of the general public and exploded in massive popularity in the late 2000s. With the show's ability to deconstruct movies from the 1980s and taking jabs at pop culture, the show was seen as "innovative", "groundbreaking" and "smart" and even rescued obscure media back into the mainstream (such as "Surfin' Bird" - which wound up having a place at number 3 in the UK charts in 2010, as a result of a Facebook campaign to fight for the song to beat The X Factor winner Matt Cardle's "When Worlds Collide" cover as the Christmas. Clips from the series would bring in high numbers on YouTube, people would recite lines from the show in everyday conversations and the series was on a real upswing. There wasn't a singular time in 2008-2011, where you couldn't just as much run into a supermarket without hearing "Shut Up, Meg!", or see someone walking around with a Stewie T-Shirt. "Family Guy" mania was everywhere. The success of the series opened the door for shows that shared the same random, slapstick humor such as Phineas and Ferb (Created by FamilyGuy alumnus DanPovenmire. The reason why the series was picked up after a decade in DevelopmentHell was because the executive was a fan of Dan's work on FamilyGuy and ended up becoming the most successful cartoon of the late 2000s, second to only it's adult cousin), iCarly and TheBigBangTheory. and liberalized edgier media crossing the mainstream. By 2008, it was enough to do what was once unthinkable: Push "The Simpsons" to the back of the bus and stepping in as FOX's network darling, even earning a Primetime Emmy award for "Outstanding Comedy Series" which hasn't been awarded to an animated sitcom since The Flintstones. Not even The Simpsons at its peak was able to win this award. SethMacFarlane became the highest paid writer in 2008, and was assigned by Google to make a series of animated shorts for them based on the overwhelming recognition of "Family Guy" (Also known as "Cavalcade of Cartoon Comedy". FOX took advantage of the "MacFarlane" boom, and greenlit a spin-off in The Cleveland Show (although it got a lukewarm reception and was cancelled after four seasons) and a possible theatrical movie (which is still in development to this day, despite the show warranting an entry on this page). By the end of the 2000s, SethMacFarlane was seen by the entire millennial generation to be the 2000s answer to John Cleese and Mel Brooks and there was nothing getting in his way. \n** His triumph continued well into The New Tens, with a theatrical movie announced (Which would become Ted), having a cameo in "Tooth Fairy", propelling MacFarlane to be the first (and so far only) animator to be also deemed a "Hollywood" celebrity and was called on by FOX to do a reboot of TheFlintstones. Towards the end of 2011, the end of the road was near. The first sign was that "Family Guy" fan sites were shut down after years of operating (Some of which were there as far back as the initial run). The second sign was that the ratings had started to tank in it's tenth season, compared to the high ratings it had been enjoying before and in 2012, the cracks would really start to show. People were getting fed up of its oversaturation on FOX's schedule, as well as the Animation Domination lineup being cluttered with mostly SethMacFarlane shows that looked way too similar and followed the same formula (and it appeared that FOX felt the same way , as The Cleveland Show was pushed back to 7:30 pm in the fall of 2011 and its ratings eventually plummeted, resulting in the show's cancellation in 2013, with American Dad!'s cancellation following suit, only to be uncancelled as well once it Channel Hopped to TBS). Ted was a success commercially and financially, but that was the only thing keeping the momentum going. TheFlintstones reboot was cancelled after FOX executives didn't approve of the script. Seth MacFarlane was tapped to be the host of the 2013 Oscars, but his performance received backlash for the offensive routines and song lyrics. Moreover, other cartoons started to come out that focused on character interactions and story archs (Such as AdventureTime, RegularShow, GravityFalls, StevenUniverse, Rick and Morty and WanderOverYonder) and people gravitated towards them, and casual viewers moved onto other shows like TheWalkingDead and Game of Thrones, feeling that they handled adult subject matters better than FamilyGuy did. Fans got tired of the patronizing tendency to explain the jokes, lack of character development, fourth wall breaking and the cruel semblance plaguing the series. Not helping was that later episodes started to essentially became SethMacFarlane's personal Author Tracts, and its attempts at social and political commentary came off as either incredibly heavy-handed, ineffective, or just plain badly handled to the point of being downright offensive (episodes like "Family Gay", "Not All Dogs Go to Heaven", "Screams of Silence: The Story of Brenda Q" and "Quagmire's Dad" in particular come to mind). During the 12th season, the writers attempted to revive ratings by killing off Brian in "Life of Brian", only to bring him Back from the Dead two episodes later in "Christmas Guy". This was a temporary victory, as this had gotten fans interested in the series again and in droves, petitioned to bring him back and threatened to boycott the series. They ended up bringing him back, but this move seemed to seal the deal - many completely lost respect for the show, seeing it as a shallow and desperate ratings grab. It also turned people away from not only Family Guy, but most of MacFarlane's future projects, as evidenced by the one-two punch of A Million Ways to Die in the West and Ted 2 failing critically and commercially. Even American Dad (Which had a short stint of popularity in the early 2010s, around the time FamilyGuy started to drop off and was considered by detractors of the former to be the superior alternative) started to drop in viewership once it moved to TBS. Other heavily criticized episodes aired after "Life of Brian" like "Fresh Heir", "Brian's a Bad Father" and "Herpe, The Love Sore", didn't help matters at all. Other ratings traps (Such as Liam Neeson guest starring in the episode "Fighting Irish" and the crossover with "The Simpsons Guy", which was seen as SnarkBait as viewers felt it was a frantic bid to get people interested in the series again) had very little effect on former viewers and in 2016, SethMacFarlane's new show "Bordertown" (Which was actually created by "Family Guy" showrunner and writer Mark Hentemann but Seth's name was still attached as producer) failed to produce solid ratings enough to be renewed for another season and was universally panned. To add insult to injury that year, fellow AdultSwim show Rick and Morty had taken over over FamilyGuy's spot as the most popular adult animated sitcom. While FamilyGuy and AmericanDad both continue to air today, it's only because of syndication deals with AdultSwim and the two are incredibly cheap to produce, than maintaining the popularity either shows had. SethMacFarlane made another series for FOX called TheOrville in 2017, but time will tell if it becomes successful enough to make MacFarlane bounce back.
** The main reason is that MacFarlane's work (Mostly FamilyGuy, but AmericanDad gravitated towards this audience in TheNewTens), unlike most of FOX's animated output made until that point such as TheSimpsons, Futurama or King of the Hill), had no crossover appeal with adults despite being labeled as such. His work was made and marketed exclusively for teenagers, especially teenagers who followed current trends and liked random humor. When the pop culture that his shows referenced was out of style and the primary audience grew up, MacFarlane's shows became an Unintentional Period Piece more frequently the butt of jokes than remembered fondly in the face of pop culture.

to:

[[AC:Series]]
** Seth MacFarlane started out as one of the most respected animators in television. He got his start writing for the shows that were the staple of Cartoon Network in the 1990s under the "Hanna Barbera" label (Cow and Chicken, Johnny Bravo and Dexter's Laboratory). He would later step down to create "Family Guy" for the FOX network, which would end up being cancelled twice due to scheduling inconsistencies (The first being 2000 and the second being 2002. When it was brought back the first time, FOX had placed it on a Thursday night lineup, making it harder for people who followed the show to watch it) and ExecutiveMeddling. The show would later find an audience on CartoonNetwork and TBS, where cable reruns would usually outrank "Conan" and it was the second highest selling show on DVD only behind "Chappelle's Show". This caught so much fire that MacFarlane would produce another animated series for them entitled ("American Dad", which was greenlit before "Family Guy" was revived but would end up airing alongside it) it) and end up recommissioning "Family Guy" for a second time. time. Despite fans from the original run being unhappy with changes being made to the show (which included characters undergoing Flanderization), the show had won over the hearts of the general public and exploded in massive popularity in the late 2000s. With the show's ability to deconstruct movies from the 1980s and taking jabs at pop culture, the show was seen as "innovative", "groundbreaking" and "smart" and even rescued obscure media back into the mainstream (such as "Surfin' Bird" - which wound up having a place at number 3 in the UK charts in 2010, as a result of a Facebook campaign to fight for the song to beat The X Factor winner Matt Cardle's "When Worlds Collide" cover as the Christmas. Clips from the series would bring in high numbers on YouTube, people would recite lines from the show in everyday conversations and the series was on a real upswing. There wasn't a singular time in 2008-2011, where you couldn't just as much run into a supermarket without hearing "Shut Up, Meg!", or see someone walking around with a Stewie T-Shirt. "Family Guy" mania was everywhere. The success of the series opened the door for shows that shared the same random, slapstick humor such as Phineas and Ferb (Created by FamilyGuy alumnus DanPovenmire. The reason why the series was picked up after a decade in DevelopmentHell was because the executive was a fan of Dan's work on FamilyGuy and ended up becoming the most successful cartoon of the late 2000s, second to only it's adult cousin), iCarly and TheBigBangTheory. and liberalized edgier media crossing the mainstream. By 2008, it was enough to do what was once unthinkable: Push "The Simpsons" to the back of the bus and stepping in as FOX's network darling, even earning a Primetime Emmy award for "Outstanding Comedy Series" which hasn't been awarded to an animated sitcom since The Flintstones. Not even The Simpsons at its peak was able to win this award. SethMacFarlane became the highest paid writer in 2008, and was assigned by Google to make a series of animated shorts for them based on the overwhelming recognition of "Family Guy" (Also known as "Cavalcade of Cartoon Comedy". FOX took advantage of the "MacFarlane" boom, and greenlit a spin-off in The Cleveland Show (although it got a lukewarm reception and was cancelled after four seasons) and a possible theatrical movie (which is still in development to this day, despite the show warranting an entry on this page). By the end of the 2000s, SethMacFarlane was seen by the entire millennial generation to be the 2000s answer to John Cleese and Mel Brooks and there was nothing getting in his way. \n** His triumph continued well into The New Tens, with a theatrical movie announced (Which would become Ted), having a cameo in "Tooth Fairy", propelling MacFarlane to be the first (and so far only) animator to be also deemed a "Hollywood" celebrity and was called on by FOX to do a reboot of TheFlintstones. Towards the end of 2011, the end of the road was near. The first sign was that "Family Guy" fan sites were shut down after years of operating (Some of which were there as far back as the initial run). The second sign was that the ratings had started to tank in it's tenth season, compared to the high ratings it had been enjoying before and in 2012, the cracks would really start to show. People were getting fed up of its oversaturation on FOX's schedule, as well as the Animation Domination lineup being cluttered with mostly SethMacFarlane shows that looked way too similar and followed the same formula (and it appeared that FOX felt the same way , as The Cleveland Show was pushed back to 7:30 pm in the fall of 2011 and its ratings eventually plummeted, resulting in the show's cancellation in 2013, with American Dad!'s cancellation following suit, only to be uncancelled as well once it Channel Hopped to TBS). Ted was a success commercially and financially, but that was the only thing keeping the momentum going. TheFlintstones reboot was cancelled after FOX executives didn't approve of the script. Seth MacFarlane was tapped to be the host of the 2013 Oscars, but his performance received backlash for the offensive routines and song lyrics. Moreover, other cartoons started to come out that focused on character interactions and story archs (Such as AdventureTime, RegularShow, GravityFalls, StevenUniverse, Rick and Morty and WanderOverYonder) and people gravitated towards them, and casual viewers moved onto other shows like TheWalkingDead and Game of Thrones, feeling that they handled adult subject matters better than FamilyGuy did. Fans got tired of the patronizing tendency to explain the jokes, lack of character development, fourth wall breaking and the cruel semblance plaguing the series. Not helping was that later episodes started to essentially became SethMacFarlane's personal Author Tracts, and its attempts at social and political commentary came off as either incredibly heavy-handed, ineffective, or just plain badly handled to the point of being downright offensive (episodes like "Family Gay", "Not All Dogs Go to Heaven", "Screams of Silence: The Story of Brenda Q" and "Quagmire's Dad" in particular come to mind). During the 12th season, the writers attempted to revive ratings by killing off Brian in "Life of Brian", only to bring him Back from the Dead two episodes later in "Christmas Guy". This was a temporary victory, as this had gotten fans interested in the series again and in droves, petitioned to bring him back and threatened to boycott the series. They ended up bringing him back, but this move seemed to seal the deal - many completely lost respect for the show, seeing it as a shallow and desperate ratings grab. It also turned people away from not only Family Guy, but most of MacFarlane's future projects, as evidenced by the one-two punch of A Million Ways to Die in the West and Ted 2 failing critically and commercially. Even American Dad (Which had a short stint of popularity in the early 2010s, around the time FamilyGuy started to drop off and was considered by detractors of the former to be the superior alternative) started to drop in viewership once it moved to TBS. Other heavily criticized episodes aired after "Life of Brian" like "Fresh Heir", "Brian's a Bad Father" and "Herpe, The Love Sore", didn't help matters at all. Other ratings traps (Such as Liam Neeson guest starring in the episode "Fighting Irish" and the crossover with "The Simpsons Guy", which was seen as SnarkBait as viewers felt it was a frantic bid to get people interested in the series again) had very little effect on former viewers and in 2016, SethMacFarlane's new show "Bordertown" (Which was actually created by "Family Guy" showrunner and writer Mark Hentemann but Seth's name was still attached as producer) failed to produce solid ratings enough to be renewed for another season and was universally panned. To add insult to injury that year, fellow AdultSwim show Rick and Morty had taken over over FamilyGuy's spot as the most popular adult animated sitcom. While FamilyGuy and AmericanDad both continue to air today, it's only because of syndication deals with AdultSwim and the two are incredibly cheap to produce, than maintaining the popularity either shows had. SethMacFarlane made another series for FOX called TheOrville in 2017, but time will tell if it becomes successful enough to make MacFarlane bounce back.
** The main reason is that MacFarlane's work (Mostly FamilyGuy, but AmericanDad gravitated towards this audience in TheNewTens), unlike most of FOX's animated output made until that point such as TheSimpsons, Futurama or King of the Hill), had no crossover appeal with adults despite being labeled as such. His work was made and marketed exclusively for teenagers, especially teenagers who followed current trends and liked random humor. When the pop culture that his shows referenced was out of style and the primary audience grew up, MacFarlane's shows became an Unintentional Period Piece more frequently the butt of jokes than remembered fondly in the face of pop culture.
[[AC: Series]]
21st Feb '18 12:25:05 PM IAmDaWalrus22
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[AC:Series]]** Seth MacFarlane started out as one of the most respected animators in television. He got his start writing for the shows that were the staple of Cartoon Network in the 1990s under the "Hanna Barbera" label (Cow and Chicken, Johnny Bravo and Dexter's Laboratory). He would later step down to create "Family Guy" for the FOX network, which would end up being cancelled twice due to scheduling inconsistencies (The first being 2000 and the second being 2002. When it was brought back the first time, FOX had placed it on a Thursday night lineup, making it harder for people who followed the show to watch it) and ExecutiveMeddling. The show would later find an audience on CartoonNetwork and TBS, where cable reruns would usually outrank "Conan" and it was the second highest selling show on DVD only behind "Chappelle's Show". This caught so much fire that MacFarlane would produce another animated series for them entitled ("American Dad", which was greenlit before "Family Guy" was revived but would end up airing alongside it) it) and end up recommissioning "Family Guy" for a second time. time. Despite fans from the original run being unhappy with changes being made to the show (which included characters undergoing Flanderization), the show had won over the hearts of the general public and exploded in massive popularity in the late 2000s. With the show's ability to deconstruct movies from the 1980s and taking jabs at pop culture, the show was seen as "innovative", "groundbreaking" and "smart" and even rescued obscure media back into the mainstream (such as "Surfin' Bird" - which wound up having a place at number 3 in the UK charts in 2010, as a result of a Facebook campaign to fight for the song to beat The X Factor winner Matt Cardle's "When Worlds Collide" cover as the Christmas. Clips from the series would bring in high numbers on YouTube, people would recite lines from the show in everyday conversations and the series was on a real upswing. There wasn't a singular time in 2008-2011, where you couldn't just as much run into a supermarket without hearing "Shut Up, Meg!", or see someone walking around with a Stewie T-Shirt. "Family Guy" mania was everywhere. The success of the series opened the door for shows that shared the same random, slapstick humor such as Phineas and Ferb (Created by FamilyGuy alumnus DanPovenmire. The reason why the series was picked up after a decade in DevelopmentHell was because the executive was a fan of Dan's work on FamilyGuy and ended up becoming the most successful cartoon of the late 2000s, second to only it's adult cousin), iCarly and TheBigBangTheory. and liberalized edgier media crossing the mainstream. By 2008, it was enough to do what was once unthinkable: Push "The Simpsons" to the back of the bus and stepping in as FOX's network darling, even earning a Primetime Emmy award for "Outstanding Comedy Series" which hasn't been awarded to an animated sitcom since The Flintstones. Not even The Simpsons at its peak was able to win this award. SethMacFarlane became the highest paid writer in 2008, and was assigned by Google to make a series of animated shorts for them based on the overwhelming recognition of "Family Guy" (Also known as "Cavalcade of Cartoon Comedy". FOX took advantage of the "MacFarlane" boom, and greenlit a spin-off in The Cleveland Show (although it got a lukewarm reception and was cancelled after four seasons) and a possible theatrical movie (which is still in development to this day, despite the show warranting an entry on this page). By the end of the 2000s, SethMacFarlane was seen by the entire millennial generation to be the 2000s answer to John Cleese and Mel Brooks and there was nothing getting in his way. \n** His triumph continued well into The New Tens, with a theatrical movie announced (Which would become Ted), having a cameo in "Tooth Fairy", propelling MacFarlane to be the first (and so far only) animator to be also deemed a "Hollywood" celebrity and was called on by FOX to do a reboot of TheFlintstones. Towards the end of 2011, the end of the road was near. The first sign was that "Family Guy" fan sites were shut down after years of operating (Some of which were there as far back as the initial run). The second sign was that the ratings had started to tank in it's tenth season, compared to the high ratings it had been enjoying before and in 2012, the cracks would really start to show. People were getting fed up of its oversaturation on FOX's schedule, as well as the Animation Domination lineup being cluttered with mostly SethMacFarlane shows that looked way too similar and followed the same formula (and it appeared that FOX felt the same way , as The Cleveland Show was pushed back to 7:30 pm in the fall of 2011 and its ratings eventually plummeted, resulting in the show's cancellation in 2013, with American Dad!'s cancellation following suit, only to be uncancelled as well once it Channel Hopped to TBS). Ted was a success commercially and financially, but that was the only thing keeping the momentum going. TheFlintstones reboot was cancelled after FOX executives didn't approve of the script. Seth MacFarlane was tapped to be the host of the 2013 Oscars, but his performance received backlash for the offensive routines and song lyrics. Moreover, other cartoons started to come out that focused on character interactions and story archs (Such as AdventureTime, RegularShow, GravityFalls, StevenUniverse, Rick and Morty and WanderOverYonder) and people gravitated towards them, and casual viewers moved onto other shows like TheWalkingDead and Game of Thrones, feeling that they handled adult subject matters better than FamilyGuy did. Fans got tired of the patronizing tendency to explain the jokes, lack of character development, fourth wall breaking and the cruel semblance plaguing the series. Not helping was that later episodes started to essentially became SethMacFarlane's personal Author Tracts, and its attempts at social and political commentary came off as either incredibly heavy-handed, ineffective, or just plain badly handled to the point of being downright offensive (episodes like "Family Gay", "Not All Dogs Go to Heaven", "Screams of Silence: The Story of Brenda Q" and "Quagmire's Dad" in particular come to mind). During the 12th season, the writers attempted to revive ratings by killing off Brian in "Life of Brian", only to bring him Back from the Dead two episodes later in "Christmas Guy". This was a temporary victory, as this had gotten fans interested in the series again and in droves, petitioned to bring him back and threatened to boycott the series. They ended up bringing him back, but this move seemed to seal the deal - many completely lost respect for the show, seeing it as a shallow and desperate ratings grab. It also turned people away from not only Family Guy, but most of MacFarlane's future projects, as evidenced by the one-two punch of A Million Ways to Die in the West and Ted 2 failing critically and commercially. Even American Dad (Which had a short stint of popularity in the early 2010s, around the time FamilyGuy started to drop off and was considered by detractors of the former to be the superior alternative) started to drop in viewership once it moved to TBS. Other heavily criticized episodes aired after "Life of Brian" like "Fresh Heir", "Brian's a Bad Father" and "Herpe, The Love Sore", didn't help matters at all. Other ratings traps (Such as Liam Neeson guest starring in the episode "Fighting Irish" and the crossover with "The Simpsons Guy", which was seen as SnarkBait as viewers felt it was a frantic bid to get people interested in the series again) had very little effect on former viewers and in 2016, SethMacFarlane's new show "Bordertown" (Which was actually created by "Family Guy" showrunner and writer Mark Hentemann but Seth's name was still attached as producer) failed to produce solid ratings enough to be renewed for another season and was universally panned. To add insult to injury that year, fellow AdultSwim show Rick and Morty had taken over over FamilyGuy's spot as the most popular adult animated sitcom. While FamilyGuy and AmericanDad both continue to air today, it's only because of syndication deals with AdultSwim and the two are incredibly cheap to produce, than maintaining the popularity either shows had. SethMacFarlane made another series for FOX called TheOrville in 2017, but time will tell if it becomes successful enough to make MacFarlane bounce back.

to:

[[AC:Series]]** [[AC:Series]]
**
Seth MacFarlane started out as one of the most respected animators in television. He got his start writing for the shows that were the staple of Cartoon Network in the 1990s under the "Hanna Barbera" label (Cow and Chicken, Johnny Bravo and Dexter's Laboratory). He would later step down to create "Family Guy" for the FOX network, which would end up being cancelled twice due to scheduling inconsistencies (The first being 2000 and the second being 2002. When it was brought back the first time, FOX had placed it on a Thursday night lineup, making it harder for people who followed the show to watch it) and ExecutiveMeddling. The show would later find an audience on CartoonNetwork and TBS, where cable reruns would usually outrank "Conan" and it was the second highest selling show on DVD only behind "Chappelle's Show". This caught so much fire that MacFarlane would produce another animated series for them entitled ("American Dad", which was greenlit before "Family Guy" was revived but would end up airing alongside it) it) and end up recommissioning "Family Guy" for a second time. time. Despite fans from the original run being unhappy with changes being made to the show (which included characters undergoing Flanderization), the show had won over the hearts of the general public and exploded in massive popularity in the late 2000s. With the show's ability to deconstruct movies from the 1980s and taking jabs at pop culture, the show was seen as "innovative", "groundbreaking" and "smart" and even rescued obscure media back into the mainstream (such as "Surfin' Bird" - which wound up having a place at number 3 in the UK charts in 2010, as a result of a Facebook campaign to fight for the song to beat The X Factor winner Matt Cardle's "When Worlds Collide" cover as the Christmas. Clips from the series would bring in high numbers on YouTube, people would recite lines from the show in everyday conversations and the series was on a real upswing. There wasn't a singular time in 2008-2011, where you couldn't just as much run into a supermarket without hearing "Shut Up, Meg!", or see someone walking around with a Stewie T-Shirt. "Family Guy" mania was everywhere. The success of the series opened the door for shows that shared the same random, slapstick humor such as Phineas and Ferb (Created by FamilyGuy alumnus DanPovenmire. The reason why the series was picked up after a decade in DevelopmentHell was because the executive was a fan of Dan's work on FamilyGuy and ended up becoming the most successful cartoon of the late 2000s, second to only it's adult cousin), iCarly and TheBigBangTheory. and liberalized edgier media crossing the mainstream. By 2008, it was enough to do what was once unthinkable: Push "The Simpsons" to the back of the bus and stepping in as FOX's network darling, even earning a Primetime Emmy award for "Outstanding Comedy Series" which hasn't been awarded to an animated sitcom since The Flintstones. Not even The Simpsons at its peak was able to win this award. SethMacFarlane became the highest paid writer in 2008, and was assigned by Google to make a series of animated shorts for them based on the overwhelming recognition of "Family Guy" (Also known as "Cavalcade of Cartoon Comedy". FOX took advantage of the "MacFarlane" boom, and greenlit a spin-off in The Cleveland Show (although it got a lukewarm reception and was cancelled after four seasons) and a possible theatrical movie (which is still in development to this day, despite the show warranting an entry on this page). By the end of the 2000s, SethMacFarlane was seen by the entire millennial generation to be the 2000s answer to John Cleese and Mel Brooks and there was nothing getting in his way. \n** His triumph continued well into The New Tens, with a theatrical movie announced (Which would become Ted), having a cameo in "Tooth Fairy", propelling MacFarlane to be the first (and so far only) animator to be also deemed a "Hollywood" celebrity and was called on by FOX to do a reboot of TheFlintstones. Towards the end of 2011, the end of the road was near. The first sign was that "Family Guy" fan sites were shut down after years of operating (Some of which were there as far back as the initial run). The second sign was that the ratings had started to tank in it's tenth season, compared to the high ratings it had been enjoying before and in 2012, the cracks would really start to show. People were getting fed up of its oversaturation on FOX's schedule, as well as the Animation Domination lineup being cluttered with mostly SethMacFarlane shows that looked way too similar and followed the same formula (and it appeared that FOX felt the same way , as The Cleveland Show was pushed back to 7:30 pm in the fall of 2011 and its ratings eventually plummeted, resulting in the show's cancellation in 2013, with American Dad!'s cancellation following suit, only to be uncancelled as well once it Channel Hopped to TBS). Ted was a success commercially and financially, but that was the only thing keeping the momentum going. TheFlintstones reboot was cancelled after FOX executives didn't approve of the script. Seth MacFarlane was tapped to be the host of the 2013 Oscars, but his performance received backlash for the offensive routines and song lyrics. Moreover, other cartoons started to come out that focused on character interactions and story archs (Such as AdventureTime, RegularShow, GravityFalls, StevenUniverse, Rick and Morty and WanderOverYonder) and people gravitated towards them, and casual viewers moved onto other shows like TheWalkingDead and Game of Thrones, feeling that they handled adult subject matters better than FamilyGuy did. Fans got tired of the patronizing tendency to explain the jokes, lack of character development, fourth wall breaking and the cruel semblance plaguing the series. Not helping was that later episodes started to essentially became SethMacFarlane's personal Author Tracts, and its attempts at social and political commentary came off as either incredibly heavy-handed, ineffective, or just plain badly handled to the point of being downright offensive (episodes like "Family Gay", "Not All Dogs Go to Heaven", "Screams of Silence: The Story of Brenda Q" and "Quagmire's Dad" in particular come to mind). During the 12th season, the writers attempted to revive ratings by killing off Brian in "Life of Brian", only to bring him Back from the Dead two episodes later in "Christmas Guy". This was a temporary victory, as this had gotten fans interested in the series again and in droves, petitioned to bring him back and threatened to boycott the series. They ended up bringing him back, but this move seemed to seal the deal - many completely lost respect for the show, seeing it as a shallow and desperate ratings grab. It also turned people away from not only Family Guy, but most of MacFarlane's future projects, as evidenced by the one-two punch of A Million Ways to Die in the West and Ted 2 failing critically and commercially. Even American Dad (Which had a short stint of popularity in the early 2010s, around the time FamilyGuy started to drop off and was considered by detractors of the former to be the superior alternative) started to drop in viewership once it moved to TBS. Other heavily criticized episodes aired after "Life of Brian" like "Fresh Heir", "Brian's a Bad Father" and "Herpe, The Love Sore", didn't help matters at all. Other ratings traps (Such as Liam Neeson guest starring in the episode "Fighting Irish" and the crossover with "The Simpsons Guy", which was seen as SnarkBait as viewers felt it was a frantic bid to get people interested in the series again) had very little effect on former viewers and in 2016, SethMacFarlane's new show "Bordertown" (Which was actually created by "Family Guy" showrunner and writer Mark Hentemann but Seth's name was still attached as producer) failed to produce solid ratings enough to be renewed for another season and was universally panned. To add insult to injury that year, fellow AdultSwim show Rick and Morty had taken over over FamilyGuy's spot as the most popular adult animated sitcom. While FamilyGuy and AmericanDad both continue to air today, it's only because of syndication deals with AdultSwim and the two are incredibly cheap to produce, than maintaining the popularity either shows had. SethMacFarlane made another series for FOX called TheOrville in 2017, but time will tell if it becomes successful enough to make MacFarlane bounce back.
21st Feb '18 12:24:16 PM IAmDaWalrus22
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[[AC:Series]]

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[[AC:Series]][[AC:Series]]** Seth MacFarlane started out as one of the most respected animators in television. He got his start writing for the shows that were the staple of Cartoon Network in the 1990s under the "Hanna Barbera" label (Cow and Chicken, Johnny Bravo and Dexter's Laboratory). He would later step down to create "Family Guy" for the FOX network, which would end up being cancelled twice due to scheduling inconsistencies (The first being 2000 and the second being 2002. When it was brought back the first time, FOX had placed it on a Thursday night lineup, making it harder for people who followed the show to watch it) and ExecutiveMeddling. The show would later find an audience on CartoonNetwork and TBS, where cable reruns would usually outrank "Conan" and it was the second highest selling show on DVD only behind "Chappelle's Show". This caught so much fire that MacFarlane would produce another animated series for them entitled ("American Dad", which was greenlit before "Family Guy" was revived but would end up airing alongside it) it) and end up recommissioning "Family Guy" for a second time. time. Despite fans from the original run being unhappy with changes being made to the show (which included characters undergoing Flanderization), the show had won over the hearts of the general public and exploded in massive popularity in the late 2000s. With the show's ability to deconstruct movies from the 1980s and taking jabs at pop culture, the show was seen as "innovative", "groundbreaking" and "smart" and even rescued obscure media back into the mainstream (such as "Surfin' Bird" - which wound up having a place at number 3 in the UK charts in 2010, as a result of a Facebook campaign to fight for the song to beat The X Factor winner Matt Cardle's "When Worlds Collide" cover as the Christmas. Clips from the series would bring in high numbers on YouTube, people would recite lines from the show in everyday conversations and the series was on a real upswing. There wasn't a singular time in 2008-2011, where you couldn't just as much run into a supermarket without hearing "Shut Up, Meg!", or see someone walking around with a Stewie T-Shirt. "Family Guy" mania was everywhere. The success of the series opened the door for shows that shared the same random, slapstick humor such as Phineas and Ferb (Created by FamilyGuy alumnus DanPovenmire. The reason why the series was picked up after a decade in DevelopmentHell was because the executive was a fan of Dan's work on FamilyGuy and ended up becoming the most successful cartoon of the late 2000s, second to only it's adult cousin), iCarly and TheBigBangTheory. and liberalized edgier media crossing the mainstream. By 2008, it was enough to do what was once unthinkable: Push "The Simpsons" to the back of the bus and stepping in as FOX's network darling, even earning a Primetime Emmy award for "Outstanding Comedy Series" which hasn't been awarded to an animated sitcom since The Flintstones. Not even The Simpsons at its peak was able to win this award. SethMacFarlane became the highest paid writer in 2008, and was assigned by Google to make a series of animated shorts for them based on the overwhelming recognition of "Family Guy" (Also known as "Cavalcade of Cartoon Comedy". FOX took advantage of the "MacFarlane" boom, and greenlit a spin-off in The Cleveland Show (although it got a lukewarm reception and was cancelled after four seasons) and a possible theatrical movie (which is still in development to this day, despite the show warranting an entry on this page). By the end of the 2000s, SethMacFarlane was seen by the entire millennial generation to be the 2000s answer to John Cleese and Mel Brooks and there was nothing getting in his way. \n** His triumph continued well into The New Tens, with a theatrical movie announced (Which would become Ted), having a cameo in "Tooth Fairy", propelling MacFarlane to be the first (and so far only) animator to be also deemed a "Hollywood" celebrity and was called on by FOX to do a reboot of TheFlintstones. Towards the end of 2011, the end of the road was near. The first sign was that "Family Guy" fan sites were shut down after years of operating (Some of which were there as far back as the initial run). The second sign was that the ratings had started to tank in it's tenth season, compared to the high ratings it had been enjoying before and in 2012, the cracks would really start to show. People were getting fed up of its oversaturation on FOX's schedule, as well as the Animation Domination lineup being cluttered with mostly SethMacFarlane shows that looked way too similar and followed the same formula (and it appeared that FOX felt the same way , as The Cleveland Show was pushed back to 7:30 pm in the fall of 2011 and its ratings eventually plummeted, resulting in the show's cancellation in 2013, with American Dad!'s cancellation following suit, only to be uncancelled as well once it Channel Hopped to TBS). Ted was a success commercially and financially, but that was the only thing keeping the momentum going. TheFlintstones reboot was cancelled after FOX executives didn't approve of the script. Seth MacFarlane was tapped to be the host of the 2013 Oscars, but his performance received backlash for the offensive routines and song lyrics. Moreover, other cartoons started to come out that focused on character interactions and story archs (Such as AdventureTime, RegularShow, GravityFalls, StevenUniverse, Rick and Morty and WanderOverYonder) and people gravitated towards them, and casual viewers moved onto other shows like TheWalkingDead and Game of Thrones, feeling that they handled adult subject matters better than FamilyGuy did. Fans got tired of the patronizing tendency to explain the jokes, lack of character development, fourth wall breaking and the cruel semblance plaguing the series. Not helping was that later episodes started to essentially became SethMacFarlane's personal Author Tracts, and its attempts at social and political commentary came off as either incredibly heavy-handed, ineffective, or just plain badly handled to the point of being downright offensive (episodes like "Family Gay", "Not All Dogs Go to Heaven", "Screams of Silence: The Story of Brenda Q" and "Quagmire's Dad" in particular come to mind). During the 12th season, the writers attempted to revive ratings by killing off Brian in "Life of Brian", only to bring him Back from the Dead two episodes later in "Christmas Guy". This was a temporary victory, as this had gotten fans interested in the series again and in droves, petitioned to bring him back and threatened to boycott the series. They ended up bringing him back, but this move seemed to seal the deal - many completely lost respect for the show, seeing it as a shallow and desperate ratings grab. It also turned people away from not only Family Guy, but most of MacFarlane's future projects, as evidenced by the one-two punch of A Million Ways to Die in the West and Ted 2 failing critically and commercially. Even American Dad (Which had a short stint of popularity in the early 2010s, around the time FamilyGuy started to drop off and was considered by detractors of the former to be the superior alternative) started to drop in viewership once it moved to TBS. Other heavily criticized episodes aired after "Life of Brian" like "Fresh Heir", "Brian's a Bad Father" and "Herpe, The Love Sore", didn't help matters at all. Other ratings traps (Such as Liam Neeson guest starring in the episode "Fighting Irish" and the crossover with "The Simpsons Guy", which was seen as SnarkBait as viewers felt it was a frantic bid to get people interested in the series again) had very little effect on former viewers and in 2016, SethMacFarlane's new show "Bordertown" (Which was actually created by "Family Guy" showrunner and writer Mark Hentemann but Seth's name was still attached as producer) failed to produce solid ratings enough to be renewed for another season and was universally panned. To add insult to injury that year, fellow AdultSwim show Rick and Morty had taken over over FamilyGuy's spot as the most popular adult animated sitcom. While FamilyGuy and AmericanDad both continue to air today, it's only because of syndication deals with AdultSwim and the two are incredibly cheap to produce, than maintaining the popularity either shows had. SethMacFarlane made another series for FOX called TheOrville in 2017, but time will tell if it becomes successful enough to make MacFarlane bounce back.
** The main reason is that MacFarlane's work (Mostly FamilyGuy, but AmericanDad gravitated towards this audience in TheNewTens), unlike most of FOX's animated output made until that point such as TheSimpsons, Futurama or King of the Hill), had no crossover appeal with adults despite being labeled as such. His work was made and marketed exclusively for teenagers, especially teenagers who followed current trends and liked random humor. When the pop culture that his shows referenced was out of style and the primary audience grew up, MacFarlane's shows became an Unintentional Period Piece more frequently the butt of jokes than remembered fondly in the face of pop culture.
6th Feb '18 6:43:25 PM Vilui
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* Back in the 1960's, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminum_Christmas_tree Aluminum Christmas trees]] were a very popular decoration in the USA. Their demise is usually attributed to the famous 1965 cartoon ''WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownChristmas'', where they were used as a symbol for kitsch and commercialization of Christmas, causing the general public to view them as tacky and embarrassing; the aluminum tree was pretty much dead by the time the 1970's rolled in. Today, they're almost entirely forgotten (there's a reason why "AluminumChristmasTrees" is used on this very wiki as a term for something that modern audiences cannot believe actually existed), except as a reminder of how kitschy TheSixties could be.

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* Back in the 1960's, 1960s, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminum_Christmas_tree Aluminum Christmas trees]] were a very popular decoration in the USA. Their demise is usually attributed to the famous 1965 cartoon ''WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownChristmas'', where they were used as a symbol for kitsch and commercialization of Christmas, causing the general public to view them as tacky and embarrassing; the aluminum tree was pretty much dead by the time the 1970's 1970s rolled in. Today, they're almost entirely forgotten (there's a reason why "AluminumChristmasTrees" is used on this very wiki as a term for something that modern audiences cannot believe actually existed), except as a reminder of how kitschy TheSixties could be.
1st Feb '18 5:32:58 PM HighCrate
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* Likewise, the second-generation Ford Mustang introduced in 1974, more commonly known as the "Mustang II". At the time, it won Motor Trend's Car of the Year award, the only Mustang to do so until 1994, and it sold like hotcakes, with many acclaiming it as a car that returned the Mustang to its compact performance roots after the 1971-73 models grew increasingly bloated and distinctly less-than-sporty (special performance editions like the Mach 1 and the Boss 302/427 notwithstanding) -- and that compact size and resulting improvements to fuel economy and handling became deciding factors for sports car buyers in the age of the OPEC oil embargo in 1973-74. Today, however, it's remembered as the Mustang's DorkAge and an under-powered disgrace to the brand, a testament to the damage that the oil crisis ravaged on American muscle cars as a whole. Despite its high sales, few examples are still on the road today and usually go unloved by collectors, and even its defenders usually argue that the car was FairForItsDay and the only Mustang that would've sold at that time. The launch of the [[WinBackTheCrowd third-generation "Fox body" Mustang]] in 1978 couldn't come fast enough for many enthusiasts.
1st Feb '18 5:27:40 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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Added DiffLines:

* Likewise, the second-generation Ford Mustang introduced in 1974, more commonly known as the "Mustang II". At the time, it won Motor Trend's Car of the Year award, the only Mustang to do so until 1994, and it sold like hotcakes, with many acclaiming it as a car that returned the Mustang to its compact performance roots after the 1971-73 models grew increasingly bloated and distinctly less-than-sporty (special performance editions like the Mach 1 and the Boss 302/427 notwithstanding) -- and that compact size and resulting improvements to fuel economy and handling became deciding factors for sports car buyers in the age of the OPEC oil embargo in 1973-74. Today, however, it's remembered as the Mustang's DorkAge and an under-powered disgrace to the brand, a testament to the damage that the oil crisis ravaged on American muscle cars as a whole. Despite its high sales, few examples are still on the road today and usually go unloved by collectors, and even its defenders usually argue that the car was FairForItsDay and the only Mustang that would've sold at that time. The launch of the [[WinBackTheCrowd third-generation "Fox body" Mustang]] in 1978 couldn't come fast enough for many enthusiasts.
29th Jan '18 6:51:40 PM RADIX
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* The "scene" and "emo" subcultures as practiced by many a Website/{{MySpace}}-using EmoTeen are similarly dead in the water. When [=MySpace=] and emo music were big, MoralGuardians around the world took potshots at "emo and scene kids" as the look was ''everywhere'' on the Internet. [[FleetingDemographic Then those teens became young adults and grew out of it.]] The bands at the heart of the subculture have either broken up or moved on, and the genre itself is now [[DeaderThanDisco/{{Music}} buried deeper than disco]] too. [=MySpace=] and other online services that catered to scene/emo kids have either folded or lost users who moved on as well. The whole thing became synonymous with [[{{Wangst}} wrist-slitting whiners]], and by TheNewTens, the labels 'emo' and 'scenester' were only being used as insults.

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* The "scene" and "emo" subcultures as practiced by many a Website/{{MySpace}}-using EmoTeen are similarly dead in the water. When [=MySpace=] and emo music were big, MoralGuardians around the world took potshots at "emo and scene kids" as the look was ''everywhere'' on the Internet. [[FleetingDemographic Then those teens became young adults and grew out of it.]] The bands at the heart of the subculture have either broken up or moved on, and the genre itself is now [[DeaderThanDisco/{{Music}} buried deeper than disco]] too. [=MySpace=] and other online services that catered to scene/emo kids have either folded or lost users who moved on as well. The whole thing became synonymous with [[{{Wangst}} wrist-slitting whiners]], frequent indulgence of ineffectual angst]], and by TheNewTens, the labels 'emo' and 'scenester' were only being used as insults.
28th Jan '18 1:00:03 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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{{Disco}} itself gets a mention in the chapter on popular music, in which Klosterman examines the rivalry between disco and PunkRock in TheSeventies and how, while disco was far more commercially successful in the short term, it was soon written off as a stupid dance craze while punk rockers like the Music/SexPistols stood the test of time... at least, before disco saw a reappraisal in the '10s ([[DeaderThanDisco/{{Music}} as discussed on the music subpage]]), which he argues could lead to the two genres' positions in the popular consensus flipping at some point (and possibly flipping again down the line). In the same chapter, he notes how the mass culture's memory of the rise of RockAndRoll essentially pushed from popular memory all of the non-rock musicians of TheFifties who were not named Music/FrankSinatra, and argues that there's a good chance that many of the musicians and bands that we now view as the standard-bearers for rock music may well be forgotten once their fans grow old and die off. In his view, the canon of artists who define rock in a hundred years (like John Philip Sousa for {{march}}es or Music/BobMarley for {{reggae}}) will likely exclude some legends that we in the 2010s are ''sure'' will stand the test of time -- and may include some second-string bands that are dismissed as fluff today.

to:

{{Disco}} itself gets a mention in the chapter on popular music, in which Klosterman examines the rivalry between disco and PunkRock in TheSeventies and how, while disco was far more commercially successful in the short term, it was soon written off as a stupid dance craze while punk rockers like the Music/SexPistols stood the test of time... at least, before disco saw a reappraisal in the '10s ([[DeaderThanDisco/{{Music}} as discussed on the music subpage]]), which he argues could lead to the two genres' positions in the popular consensus flipping at some point (and possibly flipping again down the line). In the same chapter, he notes how the mass culture's memory of the rise of RockAndRoll essentially pushed from popular memory all of the non-rock musicians of TheFifties who were not named Music/FrankSinatra, and argues that there's a good chance that many of the musicians and bands that we now view as the standard-bearers for rock music may well be forgotten once their fans grow old and die off. In his view, the canon of artists who define rock in a hundred years (like John Philip Sousa for {{march}}es or Music/BobMarley for {{reggae}}) will likely may well exclude some legends legends, like Music/ElvisPresley or Music/BobDylan, that we in the 2010s are ''sure'' will stand the test of time -- and may include some second-string bands that are dismissed as fluff today.today, like Music/{{Journey}} or Music/{{ACDC}}.



However, sales for the brand started to plummet in the summer of 2008 during the oil crisis (they were notorious for guzzling gas even at the height of their popularity[[note]]Even the "compact" H3 model got 14 mpg in city driving and 18 on the highway, while the H2 scored a miserable 10 city / 13 highway[[/note]], and stayed low once the financial crisis and subsequent recession hit later that year. Production was halted when GM declared bankruptcy in June of 2009, and after the company emerged from bankruptcy a month later attempts were made to re-brand the Hummer as a more eco-friendly vehicle with a smaller hybrid electric/gas version, which didn't get very far. After GM's attempt to sell the brand to the Sichuan Tengzhong Automobile company in China failed, they completely discontinued the Hummer brand in late 2009. Today, the brand is remembered as a poster child for the excesses of TurnOfTheMillennium consumerism, and not many people will admit to having owned one. Only the original H1 model still gets any respect nowadays, and even that comes almost entirely from off-road enthusiasts, while its H2 and H3 siblings are seen as pure style-over-substance road boats that were basically {{nerf}}ed versions of the H1, cheapening the brand and giving it its current reputation. William Clavey of ''Jalopnik'', looking back on the H2 years later, [[http://jalopnik.com/the-hummer-h2-is-a-grand-and-opulent-bad-idea-1796613645 described it]] as "an automotive equivalent to the phrase 'we’ve gone too far.'"

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However, sales for the brand started to plummet in the summer of 2008 during the oil crisis (they were notorious for guzzling gas even at the height of their popularity[[note]]Even the "compact" H3 model got 14 mpg in city driving and 18 on the highway, while the H2 scored a miserable 10 city / 13 highway[[/note]], highway[[/note]]), and stayed low once the financial crisis and subsequent recession hit later that year. Production was halted when GM declared bankruptcy in June of 2009, and after the company emerged from bankruptcy a month later attempts were made to re-brand the Hummer as a more eco-friendly vehicle with a smaller hybrid electric/gas version, which didn't get very far. After GM's attempt to sell the brand to the Sichuan Tengzhong Automobile company in China failed, they completely discontinued the Hummer brand in late 2009. Today, the brand is remembered as a poster child for the excesses of TurnOfTheMillennium consumerism, and not many people will admit to having owned one. Only the original H1 model still gets any respect nowadays, and even that comes almost entirely from off-road enthusiasts, while its H2 and H3 siblings are seen as pure style-over-substance road boats that were basically {{nerf}}ed versions of the H1, cheapening the brand and giving it its current reputation. William Clavey of ''Jalopnik'', looking back on the H2 years later, [[http://jalopnik.com/the-hummer-h2-is-a-grand-and-opulent-bad-idea-1796613645 described it]] as "an automotive equivalent to the phrase 'we’ve gone too far.'"
20th Jan '18 7:07:50 PM ADrago
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* When Disney Channel debuted Phineas and Ferb in 2007, it received praise from critics and did extremely well in the ratings from the get-go, to the point that Disney ordered additional episodes before its first season even finished production and became the most popular cartoon of the late 2000s, second to only WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy. By 2010, the show's popularity with children and adults was enough for Disney to consider turning the show into a Cash Cow Franchise (in the vein of Nickelodeon's SpongeBob SquarePants) with merchandise, theme park attractions, and spinoffs all on the drawing board. The 2011 TV Movie "Across The Second Dimension" scored high enough in the ratings – better than any other TV-movie of an animated show – that a fourth season and theatrical movie were both greenlit. Even with the encroachment of other popular cartoons in The New Tens (My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, Adventure Time, Regular Show), the show's road to success seemed unstoppable.
** Things started to turn ugly in 2012. After airing over a hundred episodes (beating out Kim Possible's record for longest-running Disney cartoon), people began to tire of the show's Strictly Formula, declaring it had lost its novelty and feeling that it had overstayed its welcome. Also hurting it, albeit unintentionally, was Gravity Falls – a cartoon made in the wake of Phineas & Ferb's success, but gaining far more critical acclaim (to the point some critics would praise it in direct contrast to P&F), which made Phineas and Ferb's flaws that many people overlooked before stick out more. Many viewers also got annoyed by trivial aspects that the show carried, such as the lack of character development, the show's animation style, the tendency to constantly break the fourth wall and most of all, the musical numbers featured in every episode (Despite the fact that this happened under Executive Meddling, and was one of the major reasons why the show got noticed back in the day). It didn't help that the fanbase had come under fire for being one of the most notorious fanbases (back when it was still airing) in history later on during it's popularity fall (Attacking fans of the show that hated certain episodes), which was enough to turn certain fans away for good (it got to the point of where they were even sending Dan Povenmire and Jeff "Swampy" Marsh death threats for not enclosing the air date of "Act Your Age". If the fanbase is sending death threats to the show's own creators, you know that a fanbase is notorious). By 2013, the Hype Backlash had grown to where when "Mission Marvel" (A crossover between the Phineas and Ferb characters and the Marvel universe) was announced and the trailer debuted, it was subject to negative reactions and people boycotting against it before it even debuted. That was enough for Disney to not only cancel the proposed theatrical movie shortly after Mission Marvel premiered, but to move all three of their (then) cartoons to Disney XD, and barely promoting the Star Wars crossover… and for the writers to put a disclaimer at the beginning assuring viewers it was not canon to the Star Wars universe). By 2015, it was no longer considered acceptable to admit if you liked it publically and when the series ended (Albeit on Dan Povenmire's and Jeff Swampy Marsh's own terms), very few people cared and even cast member Ashley Tisdale distanced herself away from it, as she was so busy promoting her (then) new show Clipped, that she didn't even take the time to acknowledge the series finale of Phineas and Ferb. Dan Povenmire and Jeff "Swampy" Marsh attempted to claw their way through a comeback by producing a new animated show entitled "Milo Murphy's Law" in 2016, but gained ratings so abysmal that Disney XD had to move it to Disney Channel to bolster the enthusiasm for it, though that did very little to help. Many people wrote it off as an even "blander, more formulaic" Phineas and Ferb clone and felt it suffered from many of the same problems Phineas and Ferb did. It got to the point of where Dan and Jeff had the "Milo" characters mix with the characters from their previous hit in the upcoming episode just to fix the situation, but it was too late as shortly after the second season wrapped, it was announced that the show would be wrapping production in 2018. Today, Phineas and Ferb is universally seen as a mediocre, bland, forgettable cartoon that only got lucky because it was riding the coattails of Family Guy and because it came out at a time where there was very little cartoons on any of the main kids networks, and if there were, they mostly appealed to children only instead of appealing to both kids and adults like cartoons in the past. It's telling that even Hannah Montana and High School Musical (Both of which were seen as "second rate" compared to Phineas and Ferb, when all three shows were airing, by people outside of their target demographic) are more fondly remembered nostalgically than Phineas and Ferb, and Disney Channel celebrated the tenth anniversary for the former two, while passing on celebrating Phineas and Ferb's anniversary.
20th Jan '18 6:01:34 PM gjjones
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The hatred garnered from their dubs would be worn out as the company became significantly less prominent than it used to be, and its fan following became the only people who still cared. As the 2000s anime boom wore down, [=4Kids=] sold the rights to their biggest CashCowFranchise, ''Pokémon'', to The Pokémon Company International in 2006. After [=4Kids=] legally dropped the license to ''One Piece'' in 2006, Creator/FUNimation [[note]]which ironically enough was the company's home video partner from 2002 to 2009, with exceptions being ''Pokémon'' and ''One Piece''[[/note]] picked up the rights one year later and redubbed the whole series far more faithfully to the original. Meanwhile, 4Kids' focus shifted away from anime to homegrown properties and acquisitions from other countries, which generally fit the company's creative philosophy much better and have obtained much more faithful treatment. What anime they still dubbed was generally well-received — or, at least, drew less ire. With Creator/KidsWB's demise in 2008, 4Kids became — for better or for worse — the last remnant of what was once an institution. In 2009, the series and merchandising rights to ''Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles'' were bought out by Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} as a component of their purchase of [[Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles the franchise]]. Nick would also snatch up the ''WesternAnimation/WinxClub'' franchise in the following year. With only ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' and a few lesser shows left, 4Kids filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April 2011 months after the departure of longtime CEO Alfred R. Kahn. Creator/TVTokyo and Nihon Ad Systems then filed a lawsuit against 4Kids over ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'', accusing them of underpaying anime licensors and conspiring with Funimation to avoid royalty payments by hiding the income. Later, an auction resulted in the company being sold in pieces; Creator/{{Konami}} picked up the ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' franchise and placed it under the 4K Media division, while Creator/SabanBrands acquired the rest of [=4Kids=]' anime and cartoons.\\\

to:

The hatred garnered from their dubs would be worn out as the company became significantly less prominent than it used to be, and its fan following became the only people who still cared. As the 2000s anime boom wore down, [=4Kids=] sold the rights to their biggest CashCowFranchise, ''Pokémon'', to The Pokémon Company International in 2006. After [=4Kids=] legally dropped the license to ''One Piece'' in 2006, Creator/FUNimation Creator/{{Funimation}} [[note]]which ironically enough was the company's home video partner from 2002 to 2009, with exceptions being ''Pokémon'' and ''One Piece''[[/note]] picked up the rights one year later and redubbed the whole series far more faithfully to the original.original; Funimation is still producing the dub as of 2018. Meanwhile, 4Kids' focus shifted away from anime to homegrown properties and acquisitions from other countries, which generally fit the company's creative philosophy much better and have obtained much more faithful treatment. What anime they still dubbed was generally well-received — or, at least, drew less ire. With Creator/KidsWB's demise in 2008, 4Kids became — for better or for worse — the last remnant of what was once an institution. In 2009, the series and merchandising rights to ''Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles'' were bought out by Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} as a component of their purchase of [[Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles the franchise]]. Nick would also snatch up the ''WesternAnimation/WinxClub'' franchise in the following year. With only ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' and a few lesser shows left, 4Kids filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April 2011 months after the departure of longtime CEO Alfred R. Kahn. Creator/TVTokyo and Nihon Ad Systems then filed a lawsuit against 4Kids over ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'', accusing them of underpaying anime licensors and conspiring with Funimation to avoid royalty payments by hiding the income. Later, an auction resulted in the company being sold in pieces; Creator/{{Konami}} picked up the ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' franchise and placed it under the 4K Media division, while Creator/SabanBrands acquired the rest of [=4Kids=]' anime and cartoons.\\\



* When Disney Channel debuted Phineas and Ferb in 2007, it received praise from critics and did extremely well in the ratings from the get-go, to the point that Disney ordered additional episodes before its first season even finished production and became the most popular cartoon of the late 2000s, second to only FamilyGuy. By 2010, the show's popularity with children and adults was enough for Disney to consider turning the show into a Cash Cow Franchise (in the vein of Nickelodeon's SpongeBob SquarePants) with merchandise, theme park attractions, and spinoffs all on the drawing board. The 2011 TV Movie "Across The Second Dimension" scored high enough in the ratings – better than any other TV-movie of an animated show – that a fourth season and theatrical movie were both greenlit. Even with the encroachment of other popular cartoons in The New Tens (My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, Adventure Time, Regular Show), the show's road to success seemed unstoppable.

to:

* When Disney Channel debuted Phineas and Ferb in 2007, it received praise from critics and did extremely well in the ratings from the get-go, to the point that Disney ordered additional episodes before its first season even finished production and became the most popular cartoon of the late 2000s, second to only FamilyGuy.WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy. By 2010, the show's popularity with children and adults was enough for Disney to consider turning the show into a Cash Cow Franchise (in the vein of Nickelodeon's SpongeBob SquarePants) with merchandise, theme park attractions, and spinoffs all on the drawing board. The 2011 TV Movie "Across The Second Dimension" scored high enough in the ratings – better than any other TV-movie of an animated show – that a fourth season and theatrical movie were both greenlit. Even with the encroachment of other popular cartoons in The New Tens (My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, Adventure Time, Regular Show), the show's road to success seemed unstoppable.
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