History Main / DeadUnicornTrope

7th May '16 7:06:38 PM Josef5678
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** The [[Series/SesameStreet "Guy Smiley"]] stereotype of game show hosts as always-smiling {{Large Ham}}s who give a "slimy used-car salesman" vibe, crack awful jokes, and wear loud, flashy suits. Most of the genre's greats were a bit goofy and loud at times, but even party animals like [[Series/MatchGame Gene Rayburn]] or slicker types like [[Series/TicTacDough Wink Martindale]] or [[Series/LetsMakeADeal Monty Hall]] knew when to put on a serious demeanor. The "Guy Smiley" type host is an extreme Flanderization of the three aforementioned hosts, with a few traits thrown in just for comedy. Prolific host Creator/BillCullen was mellow, unattractive (at least in his later years), kindly, self-deprecating, and physically handicapped by polio in other words, about as far from the "Guy Smiley" stereotype as possible. But that image is so ingrained in the American consciousness that it inspires [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=My5d7i5SMAE things like this]] ... talk about [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8641McZ0mTk Truth In Television]].
*** Guy Smiley was mostly based on Jim Perry who was a bit excitable and dramatic, but was also very personable and sincere.

to:

** The [[Series/SesameStreet "Guy Smiley"]] stereotype of game show hosts as always-smiling {{Large Ham}}s who give a "slimy used-car salesman" vibe, crack awful jokes, and wear loud, flashy suits. Most of the genre's greats were a bit goofy and loud at times, with Jim Perry being the [[TropeCodifier codifier]] of the stereotype, but even party animals like [[Series/MatchGame Gene Rayburn]] or slicker types like [[Series/TicTacDough Wink Martindale]] or [[Series/LetsMakeADeal Monty Hall]] knew when to put on a serious demeanor.demeanor, including Perry himself. The "Guy Smiley" type host is an extreme Flanderization of the three aforementioned hosts, with a few traits thrown in just for comedy. Prolific host Creator/BillCullen was mellow, unattractive (at least in his later years), kindly, self-deprecating, and physically handicapped by polio in other words, about as far from the "Guy Smiley" stereotype as possible. But that image is so ingrained in the American consciousness that it inspires [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=My5d7i5SMAE things like this]] ... talk about [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8641McZ0mTk Truth In Television]].
*** Guy Smiley was mostly based on Jim Perry who was a bit excitable and dramatic, but was also very personable and sincere.
Television]].
7th May '16 4:11:34 PM cwm
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Added DiffLines:

*** Guy Smiley was mostly based on Jim Perry who was a bit excitable and dramatic, but was also very personable and sincere.
23rd Apr '16 6:37:01 PM pinkdalek
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Added DiffLines:

** Relatedly, the trope of the WhiteMagicianGirl is supposedly based on Aeris Gainsborough from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', but her personality is streetwise, flirty and occasionally insensitive, not IncorruptiblePurePureness. She's not even that much of a White Mage - her LimitBreak moves focus on healing, but the game is set up such that you'll be using her for Black Magic, Summons or Enemy Skills most of the time. Rosa from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'', whose main trait is [[SatelliteLoveInterest being in love with Cecil]] and wanting to be helpful for him, fits the personality part of the trope and most of the powers, but in addition to White Magic she's a powerful archer who can hit evasive targets with ease. Yuna from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' is closest, but she came along long after the trope was a cliché.
23rd Apr '16 12:24:58 PM pinkdalek
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* The stereotype of the typical [[EasternRPG JRPG]] protagonist as being an angsty, spikey-haired teenager swinging [[{{BFS}} a sword with its own zip code]]. The character the stereotype is supposed to be based on, [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Cloud Strife]], doesn't even hit all the points, since Cloud is ''twenty-one'' (though [[YoungerThanTheyLook he doesn't look it]]) and, in the actual game, Cloud was far less angsty than many fans seem to believe.
** This perception takes bits of both him and [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Squall Leonhart]], who isn't spiky-haired nor carries a {{BFS}} (his weapon is [[GunBlade a completely different breed of silliness]]), but is much angstier and 17 years old. In any case, main characters that actually fit the complete stereotype are almost non-existent in the entire genre. Even those who come close are few and far in between.
** A lot of people's memories of Cloud in general are cross-pollinated with Vincent Valentine and Squall Leonhart, resulting in the collective popularity of an angsty, tragic, cold and secretly vulnerable figure, despite his original concept being that of a flamboyantly cocky showoff (albeit with InferioritySuperiorityComplex). This false perception was such that ''Advent Children'' and ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'' both used interpretations of Cloud based on the {{Fanon}} version so that the audience would still feel familiar, and the 'classic' version of Cloud had to be slowly reintroduced with tons of angst in ''VideoGame/CrisisCore'' and ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' for fear an audience wouldn't accept him. It's not until ''VideoGame/TheatrythmFinalFantasy'' that he gets an official bio mentioning his haughtiness.

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* The stereotype of the typical [[EasternRPG JRPG]] protagonist as being an angsty, spikey-haired teenager covered in belts and zippers, swinging [[{{BFS}} a sword with its own zip code]]. The character the stereotype is [[TropeCodifier supposed to be based on, on]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Cloud Strife]], doesn't even hit all the points, since Cloud is ''twenty-one'' (though [[YoungerThanTheyLook he doesn't look it]]) and, in the actual game, Cloud was far less angsty than many fans seem to believe.
** This perception takes bits of both him and [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Squall Leonhart]], who isn't spiky-haired nor carries
a {{BFS}} (his weapon is [[GunBlade a completely different breed of silliness]]), but is much angstier and 17 years old. In any case, main characters that actually fit the complete stereotype are almost non-existent in the entire genre. Even those who come close are few and far in between.
** A lot of people's memories of Cloud in general are cross-pollinated with Vincent Valentine and Squall Leonhart, resulting in the collective popularity of an angsty, tragic, cold and secretly vulnerable figure, despite his original concept being that of a
21-year-old flamboyantly cocky showoff (albeit {{Jerkass}} with InferioritySuperiorityComplex). [[TheMentallyDisturbed a whole different kind of mental problem to 'angst']] and only three zippers and one belt. This false perception is a {{Fanon}} [[CompositeCharacter combining]] Cloud's iconic character design with elements of the younger and sulkier Squall Leonhart from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'', and the [[TheDulcineaEffect particular dead girlfriend issues]] of Locke Cole from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI''; it was such popular enough that ''Advent Children'' and ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'' both used interpretations of Cloud based on the {{Fanon}} this garbled version so that the audience would still feel familiar, and the 'classic' version of Cloud had to be slowly reintroduced familiar with tons the character. Outside of angst in ''VideoGame/CrisisCore'' and ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' for fear an audience wouldn't accept him. It's not until ''VideoGame/TheatrythmFinalFantasy'' the fanonised Cloud, characters that he gets an official bio mentioning his haughtiness.fit the complete stereotype can only be found as parodies (such as [[VideoGame/EatLeadTheReturnOfMattHazard Altos Tratus]]), and even those who come close are few and far in between; the genre as a whole tends to favour optimistic if not outright HotBlooded characters.
9th Apr '16 9:45:07 PM Ezclee4050
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* All parodies of/homages to FilmNoir have moody jazz scores, but the real classic Noirs from the 1940s had the typical orchestral scores of that period of Hollywood music. It was the late 50s-early 60s TV shows inspired by Film Noir (like ''Peter Gunn'') that used jazz. [[http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=42962&pg=1#.Uz2x7fldWSo This article explains it in detail.]]

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* All parodies of/homages to FilmNoir have moody jazz scores, but the real classic Noirs from the 1940s had the typical orchestral scores of that period of Hollywood music. It was the late 50s-early 60s TV shows inspired by Film Noir (like ''Peter Gunn'') ''Series/PeterGunn'') that used jazz. [[http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=42962&pg=1#.Uz2x7fldWSo This article explains it in detail.]]
3rd Apr '16 10:27:26 AM narm00
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** ''[[Film/{{Superman}} Superman: the Movie]]'' actually pokes fun at this trope as well. Clark is looking for a place to change, notices a phone kiosk (not a booth as such; only the phone is sheltered from the elements), and gives it a strange look before "changing" thanks to a revolving door. This particular trope is so well known that its inclusion as a gag in the movie was guaranteed to get audiences to laugh.

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** ''[[Film/{{Superman}} Superman: the Movie]]'' ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' actually pokes fun at this trope as well. Clark is looking for a place to change, notices a phone kiosk (not a booth as such; only the phone is sheltered from the elements), and gives it a strange look before "changing" thanks to a revolving door. This particular trope is so well known that its inclusion as a gag in the movie was guaranteed to get audiences to laugh.



* During the heyday of the "quirky indie" style of movie, parodies and jokes about it often included barbs about them always featuring a guy hooking up with a gorgeous girl far out of his league. But while this is [[UglyGuyHotWife a common sitcom trope]], it doesn't describe these movies too well, usually featuring a more down to Earth, cute {{Moe}} type as the female lead with the male usually being the equivalent, a guy who doesn't mean the conventional standards of handsome but few would consider Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/MichaelCera or Paul Dano to be actually unattractive (or Creator/JosephGordonLevitt...). It tends to be more about the social (not socioeconomic) status of the characters. They aren't cool enough.

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* During the heyday of the "quirky indie" style of movie, parodies and jokes about it often included barbs about them always featuring a guy hooking up with a gorgeous girl far out of his league. But while this is [[UglyGuyHotWife a common sitcom trope]], it doesn't describe these movies too well, usually featuring a more down to Earth, cute {{Moe}} type as the female lead with the male usually being the equivalent, a guy who doesn't mean the conventional standards of handsome handsome, but few would consider Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/MichaelCera or Paul Dano to be actually unattractive (or Creator/JosephGordonLevitt...). It tends to be more about the social (not socioeconomic) status of the characters. They aren't cool enough.



* "InAWorld..." is THE most clichéd way to open a movie trailer, but the number of actual, non-spoof trailers that use the phrase at all is smaller that one would think, and ones that actually open with it are rarer still.

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* "InAWorld..." is THE most clichéd way to open a movie trailer, but the number of actual, non-spoof trailers that use the phrase at all is smaller that than one would think, and ones that actually open with it are rarer still.



** And on the other end of the spectrum, the belief that ''all'' fairytales were "originally" gory grimdark horror stories before their {{Disneyfication}}. Some were gory by modern standards and there's a ''lot'' of ValuesDissonance, but overall it's not as bad as many people make it out to be. For instance, Disney's ''{{Disney/Cinderella}}'' is frequently claimed to have bowlderized the darker Creator/BrothersGrimm version, even though the Disney film opens with a disclaimer that it's based on Charles Perrault's version, which outdates the Grimm's by over a century.

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** And on the other end of the spectrum, the belief that ''all'' fairytales were "originally" gory grimdark horror stories before their {{Disneyfication}}. Some were gory by modern standards and there's a ''lot'' of ValuesDissonance, but overall it's not as bad as many people make it out to be. For instance, Disney's ''{{Disney/Cinderella}}'' is frequently claimed to have bowlderized the darker Creator/BrothersGrimm version, even though the Disney film opens with a disclaimer that it's based on Charles Perrault's version, which outdates predates the Grimm's Grimms' version by over a century.



** The FairyGodmother is extremely rare and appears to have been introduced from literary variants. Literature/SleepingBeauty is often just the victims of a prophesied fate. Literature/{{Cinderella}} is generally helped by her dead mother in some way, or by some magical beings whose good will she's earned.

to:

** The FairyGodmother is extremely rare and appears to have been introduced from literary variants. Literature/SleepingBeauty is often just the victims victim of a prophesied fate. Literature/{{Cinderella}} is generally helped by her dead mother in some way, or by some magical beings whose good will she's earned.



** Not many of the Doctor's companions actually [[BrokenHeel twisted an ankle]], and very few were helpless [[ScreamingWoman screaming women]]. In fact, Susan is the only one that comes to mind, and she did both. And even Susan shared the TARDIS with another female companion, Barbara, a strong-willed teacher who MinoredInAssKicking. In the 60s, the Doctor filled his TARDIS with rotating man/woman pairs, with occasionally a younger 'child' character to round the team out, and the sole female companion only became the norm in the 1970s. Much of this is because there were women in similar science fiction shows at the time who were pointless MsFanservice damsels (see the ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' "Science Fiction Sketch" for an example of a parody) and [[FanNickname the memory cheats]]. Unfortunately, memory often cheated the producers - new companions were usually promoted in ''Radio Times'' with promises that they [[GirlsNeedRoleModels weren't just screaming girls like in the old days]], and Mel was introduced as something of a "homage" to the companions of the 1960s, but was more like [[{{Camp}} John Nathan Turner's version of]] a [[DamselScrappy B-Movie Scream Queen]] - it's fair to say no character like her had ever appeared in the series before.

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** Not many of the Doctor's companions actually [[BrokenHeel twisted an ankle]], and very few were helpless [[ScreamingWoman screaming women]]. In fact, Susan is the only one that comes to mind, and she did both. And even Susan shared the TARDIS with another female companion, Barbara, a strong-willed teacher who MinoredInAssKicking. In the 60s, the Doctor filled his TARDIS with rotating man/woman pairs, with occasionally a younger 'child' character to round the team out, and the sole female companion only became the norm in the 1970s. Much of this is because there were women in similar science fiction shows at the time who were pointless MsFanservice damsels (see the ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' "Science Fiction Sketch" for an example of a parody) and [[FanNickname the memory cheats]]. Unfortunately, memory often cheated the producers - new companions were usually promoted in ''Radio Times'' ''Magazine/RadioTimes'' with promises that they [[GirlsNeedRoleModels weren't just screaming girls like in the old days]], and Mel was introduced as something of a "homage" to the companions of the 1960s, but was more like [[{{Camp}} John Nathan Turner's version of]] a [[DamselScrappy B-Movie Scream Queen]] - it's fair to say no character like her had ever appeared in the series before.



** "Nu-metal bands never have guitar solos, but some do" (This is actually only true of a handful of bands who just happen to be labeled nu-metal. Many famous nu-metal bands ''do'' feature guitar solos, abiet somewhat short ones. Even LimpBizkit had a couple of brief guitar solos.)

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** "Nu-metal bands never have guitar solos, but some do" (This is actually only true of a handful of bands who just happen to be labeled nu-metal. Many famous nu-metal bands ''do'' feature guitar solos, abiet somewhat short ones. Even LimpBizkit Limp Bizkit had a couple of brief guitar solos.)



*** And even Korn made some use of rapping, as on the rap battle with Fred Durst "All in the Family" and guest vocals from Nas and Ice Cube

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*** And even Korn made some use of rapping, as on the rap battle with Fred Durst Durst, "All in the Family" Family", and guest vocals from Nas and Ice CubeCube.



* ''Website/TheGrandListOfConsoleRolePlayingGameCliches'', some of which are worded on way too specific detail (for example, [[GoodMorningCrono the very first one]]). There are some spot-on ones though (like [[DoomedHomeTown The next one]]).

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* ''Website/TheGrandListOfConsoleRolePlayingGameCliches'', some of which are worded on way too specific detail (for example, [[GoodMorningCrono the very first one]]). There are some spot-on ones though (like [[DoomedHomeTown The the next one]]).
18th Mar '16 6:42:53 PM Josef5678
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** For some reason, [[KnightInShiningArmor knights in shining armor]] rescuing [[DistressedDamsel distressed damsels]] from [[DragonsPreferPrincesses dragons]] is commonly associated with fairytales, even though this is rather rare, appearing only twice in TheBrothersGrimm.

to:

** For some reason, [[KnightInShiningArmor knights in shining armor]] rescuing [[DistressedDamsel distressed damsels]] from [[DragonsPreferPrincesses dragons]] is commonly associated with fairytales, even though this is rather rare, appearing only twice in TheBrothersGrimm.the works of Creator/TheBrothersGrimm.



** The FairyGodmother is extremely rare and appears to have been introduced from literary variants. SleepingBeauty is often just the victims of a prophesied fate. {{Cinderella}} is generally helped by her dead mother in some way, or by some magical beings whose good will she's earned.

to:

** The FairyGodmother is extremely rare and appears to have been introduced from literary variants. SleepingBeauty Literature/SleepingBeauty is often just the victims of a prophesied fate. {{Cinderella}} Literature/{{Cinderella}} is generally helped by her dead mother in some way, or by some magical beings whose good will she's earned.
18th Mar '16 6:38:31 PM Goldfritha
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** For some reason, [[KnightInShiningArmor knights in shining armor]] rescuing [[DistressedDamsel distressed damsels]] from [[DragonsPreferPrincesses dragons]] is commonly associated with fairytales, even though this is something that almost ''never'' happens[[note]]It does happen in some very famous myths and legends, like Perseus rescuing Andromeda from the sea monster, the legend of Saint George and the dragon, or a few stories from the [[Myth/KingArthur Arthurian cycle]].[[/note]]. In fact, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlando_Furioso one of the most famous chivalric romances]] has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradamante a female knight]] who rescues at least one distressed gentleman.

to:

** For some reason, [[KnightInShiningArmor knights in shining armor]] rescuing [[DistressedDamsel distressed damsels]] from [[DragonsPreferPrincesses dragons]] is commonly associated with fairytales, even though this is something that almost ''never'' happens[[note]]It does happen rather rare, appearing only twice in TheBrothersGrimm.
** {{Unicorn}}s are even more rare. ''Literature/TheBraveLittleTailor'', one of their rare appearances, has not the delicate and pure creature but the fierce and dangerous version of actual medieval legend.
** The FairyGodmother is extremely rare and appears to have been introduced from literary variants. SleepingBeauty is often just the victims of a prophesied fate. {{Cinderella}} is generally helped by her dead mother
in some very famous myths and legends, like Perseus rescuing Andromeda from the sea monster, the legend of Saint George and the dragon, way, or a few stories from the [[Myth/KingArthur Arthurian cycle]].[[/note]]. In fact, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlando_Furioso one of the most famous chivalric romances]] has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradamante a female knight]] who rescues at least one distressed gentleman.by some magical beings whose good will she's earned.
3rd Mar '16 6:28:51 PM Twentington
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** The [[Series/SesameStreet "Guy Smiley"]] stereotype of game show hosts as always-smiling {{Large Ham}}s who give a "slimy used-car salesman" vibe, crack awful jokes and wear loud, flashy suits. Most of the genre's greats were a bit goofy and loud at times, but even party animals like [[Series/MatchGame Gene Rayburn]] or slicker types like [[Series/TicTacDough Wink Martindale]] or [[Series/LetsMakeADeal Monty Hall]] knew when to put on a serious demeanor. The "Guy Smiley" type host is an extreme Flanderization of the three aforementioned hosts, with a few traits thrown in just for comedy. Prolific host Creator/BillCullen was mellow, unattractive, kindly, self-deprecating, and physically handicapped by polio in other words, about as far from the "Guy Smiley" stereotype as possible. But that image is so ingrained in the American consciousness that it inspires [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=My5d7i5SMAE things like this]] ... talk about [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8641McZ0mTk Truth In Television]].
** The deep, melodramatic voice that most "parody" announcers have is almost entirely fabrication. Don Pardo had a deep, dramatic voice, but it was authoritative and exciting without being over-the-top, in addition to sporting an obvious New England accent. (That, and 99% of his game show career was before 1975[[labelnote:*]]The association of Don Pardo with game shows is likely strengthened by parodies on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'', where he's the announcer[[/labelnote]].) In fact, most announcers sound absolutely nothing like that. Some were higher-voiced and commanding (Johnny Olson, Johnny Gilbert); others were much mellower (Gene Wood, Jack Clark, Charlie O'Donnell, John Harlan); and when he was hamming it up, [[ThePriceIsRight Rod Roddy]] was still high and nasal. Burton Richardson ''almost'' played this kind of voice straight for a while.

to:

** The [[Series/SesameStreet "Guy Smiley"]] stereotype of game show hosts as always-smiling {{Large Ham}}s who give a "slimy used-car salesman" vibe, crack awful jokes jokes, and wear loud, flashy suits. Most of the genre's greats were a bit goofy and loud at times, but even party animals like [[Series/MatchGame Gene Rayburn]] or slicker types like [[Series/TicTacDough Wink Martindale]] or [[Series/LetsMakeADeal Monty Hall]] knew when to put on a serious demeanor. The "Guy Smiley" type host is an extreme Flanderization of the three aforementioned hosts, with a few traits thrown in just for comedy. Prolific host Creator/BillCullen was mellow, unattractive, unattractive (at least in his later years), kindly, self-deprecating, and physically handicapped by polio in other words, about as far from the "Guy Smiley" stereotype as possible. But that image is so ingrained in the American consciousness that it inspires [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=My5d7i5SMAE things like this]] ... talk about [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8641McZ0mTk Truth In Television]].
** The deep, melodramatic voice that most "parody" announcers have is almost entirely fabrication. Don Pardo had a deep, dramatic voice, but it was authoritative and exciting without being over-the-top, in addition to sporting an obvious New England accent. (That, and 99% of his game show career was before 1975[[labelnote:*]]The association of Don Pardo with game shows is likely strengthened by parodies on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'', where he's he was the announcer[[/labelnote]].announcer for many years[[/labelnote]].) In fact, most announcers sound absolutely nothing like that. Some were higher-voiced and commanding (Johnny Olson, Johnny Gilbert); others were much mellower (Gene Wood, Jack Clark, Charlie O'Donnell, John Harlan); and when he was hamming it up, [[ThePriceIsRight [[Series/ThePriceIsRight Rod Roddy]] was still high and nasal. Burton Richardson ''almost'' played this kind of voice straight for a while.



** Having the audience [[TitleScream shout the show's name]] in the intro. ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Scrabble}}'' are the only shows that have ever done this (although the 1985 show ''[[Series/BreakTheBank1985 Break the Bank]]'' did it when throwing to commercial), and even then, ''Wheel'''s chant has been the same pre-recorded one on all but a handful of occasions.

to:

** Having the audience [[TitleScream shout the show's name]] in the intro. ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Scrabble}}'' are the only shows that have ever done played this straight (although the 1985 show ''[[Series/BreakTheBank1985 Break the Bank]]'' did it when throwing to commercial), and even then, ''Wheel'''s chant has been the same pre-recorded one on all but a handful of occasions.
18th Feb '16 9:25:57 PM Josef5678
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Do not confuse for a [[RobotUnicornAttack certain robotic unicorn]]. Or a [[WesternAnimation/AdventureTime Rainicorn]].

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Do not confuse for a [[RobotUnicornAttack [[SugarWiki/RobotUnicornAttack certain robotic unicorn]]. Or a [[WesternAnimation/AdventureTime Rainicorn]].



** The Brains thing was a side effect of the writers of Return overthinking the science a bit-- dead people, they reasoned, by definition can't produce their own new biochemicals and tissues. This justified the flesh-eating, but also meant that they'd need to consume the specific tissues they needed to maintain. They also would go after lungs when their ability to speak was breaking down and spines when theirs were broken and so on, the brains thing was just the one that stuck for whatever reason. In the actual film the justification is that brains somehow dull the pain they feel from decomposing.

to:

** The Brains thing was a side effect of the writers of Return ''Return'' overthinking the science a bit-- dead people, they reasoned, by definition can't produce their own new biochemicals and tissues. This justified the flesh-eating, but also meant that they'd need to consume the specific tissues they needed to maintain. They also would go after lungs when their ability to speak was breaking down and spines when theirs were broken and so on, the brains thing was just the one that stuck for whatever reason. In the actual film the justification is that brains somehow dull the pain they feel from decomposing.



** MysteryScienceTheater3000 mocked this: In Brain Guy's supposedly advanced culture, food pills exist, but you have to eat an entire bowl of them at a time, thus negating any advantages.

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** MysteryScienceTheater3000 ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' mocked this: In Brain Guy's supposedly advanced culture, food pills exist, but you have to eat an entire bowl of them at a time, thus negating any advantages.



* SynchroVox was only ever used seriously in a few animated series during TheFifties and [[TheSixties Sixties]], notably ''ClutchCargo'' and ''Space Angel''. It was immediately [[DiscreditedTrope discredited]] as [[ExaggeratedTrope an extreme form of]] LimitedAnimation, and was used only for comedic effect afterward.

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* SynchroVox was only ever used seriously in a few animated series during TheFifties and [[TheSixties Sixties]], notably ''ClutchCargo'' ''WesternAnimation/ClutchCargo'' and ''Space Angel''. It was immediately [[DiscreditedTrope discredited]] as [[ExaggeratedTrope an extreme form of]] LimitedAnimation, and was used only for comedic effect afterward.



** For some reason, [[KnightInShiningArmor knights in shining armor]] rescuing [[DistressedDamsel distressed damsels]] from [[DragonsPreferPrincesses dragons]] is commonly associated with fairytales, even though this is something that almost ''never'' happens[[note]]It does happen in some very famous myths and legends, like Perseus rescuing Andromeda from the sea monster, the legend of Saint George and the dragon, or a few stories from the [[KingArthur Arthurian cycle]].[[/note]]. In fact, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlando_Furioso one of the most famous chivalric romances]] has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradamante a female knight]] who rescues at least one distressed gentleman.

to:

** For some reason, [[KnightInShiningArmor knights in shining armor]] rescuing [[DistressedDamsel distressed damsels]] from [[DragonsPreferPrincesses dragons]] is commonly associated with fairytales, even though this is something that almost ''never'' happens[[note]]It does happen in some very famous myths and legends, like Perseus rescuing Andromeda from the sea monster, the legend of Saint George and the dragon, or a few stories from the [[KingArthur [[Myth/KingArthur Arthurian cycle]].[[/note]]. In fact, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlando_Furioso one of the most famous chivalric romances]] has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradamante a female knight]] who rescues at least one distressed gentleman.



* A once commonly joked about aspect of {{Emo}} music before the term hit the mainstream was the supposed tendency of bands to cry on stage, but despite the many jokes about this and some parodies of it there are no reliable reports of any bands actually doing this.



* Similarly, public perception of {{Grunge}} involves relatively simplistic guitar rock with a bit of feedback and a singer droning apathetically about problems with women and other general life woes. The problem is that none of the bands really sounded like this, let alone like one another. In fact, there was no real unified grunge sound, only a general skeleton that other bands added onto, and individual sounds varied between noisy alt-rock with some power pop leanings (Nirvana), ArenaRock (Pearl Jam before their journey into more outre territory), a mix of noise rock and 70s hard rock (Soundgarden), a strange hybrid of HairMetal and DoomMetal (Alice in Chains), stripped-down, bluesy, almost protopunk-leaning alt-rock (Mudhoney), PsychedelicRock (Screaming Trees), PostHardcore and proto-sludge metal (Melvins), NoiseRock (Tad)... you get the picture. Basically, bands that actually did try to boil grunge down to one single cohesive style (Bush, Candlebox, Live, and Stone Temple Pilots circa ''Core'', mainly) wound up either creating or aiding in the creation of PostGrunge, which, minus the feedback part, is essentially what the public thought grunge was, ergo there's no such thing as a grunge act that truly embodied every single part of the stereotype.
* Similarly to NuMetal, EmoMusic became subject to the stereotype that most bands were whiny high schoolers singing about relationship problems or general {{Wangst}}. While bands such as SimplePlan certainly could be seen as fitting for this description, most of the better-remembered bands of the genre really weren't like this. {{Music/AFI}}, who popularized the "dark clothes and fringe hair" look, were 20-30 somethings, who even in their mainstream success brought about by albums like ''Sing The Sorrow'' and ''Decemberunderground'' continued to write about classical horror-influenced themes. MyChemicalRomance never took themselves seriously as a band, shunned their "emo kid" fans and wrote about a fun topic for their final album. FallOutBoy stopped writing about relationships with ''Folie a Deux''. Finally, this may be one of those cases where a work's perception is shaped by that of its fans.

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* Similarly, public Public perception of {{Grunge}} involves relatively simplistic guitar rock with a bit of feedback and a singer droning apathetically about problems with women and other general life woes. The problem is that none of the bands really sounded like this, let alone like one another. In fact, there was no real unified grunge sound, only a general skeleton that other bands added onto, and individual sounds varied between noisy alt-rock with some power pop leanings (Nirvana), ArenaRock (Pearl Jam before their journey into more outre territory), a mix of noise rock and 70s hard rock (Soundgarden), a strange hybrid of HairMetal and DoomMetal (Alice in Chains), stripped-down, bluesy, almost protopunk-leaning alt-rock (Mudhoney), PsychedelicRock (Screaming Trees), PostHardcore and proto-sludge metal (Melvins), NoiseRock (Tad)... you get the picture. Basically, bands that actually did try to boil grunge down to one single cohesive style (Bush, Candlebox, Live, and Stone Temple Pilots circa ''Core'', mainly) wound up either creating or aiding in the creation of PostGrunge, which, minus the feedback part, is essentially what the public thought grunge was, ergo there's no such thing as a grunge act that truly embodied every single part of the stereotype.
* Similarly to NuMetal, EmoMusic became subject to the stereotype that most bands were whiny high schoolers singing about relationship problems or general {{Wangst}}. While {{Wangst}}, and that bands would tend to cry on stage. No reliable reports exist of bands doing this, and while bands such as SimplePlan Music/SimplePlan certainly could be seen as fitting for this the rest of the description, most of the better-remembered bands of the genre really weren't like this. {{Music/AFI}}, who popularized the "dark clothes and fringe hair" look, were 20-30 somethings, who even in their mainstream success brought about by albums like ''Sing The Sorrow'' and ''Decemberunderground'' continued to write about classical horror-influenced themes. MyChemicalRomance Music/MyChemicalRomance never took themselves seriously as a band, shunned their "emo kid" fans and wrote about a fun topic for their final album. FallOutBoy Music/FallOutBoy stopped writing about relationships with ''Folie a Deux''. Finally, this may be one of those cases where a work's perception is shaped by that of its fans.
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