History Main / DeadUnicornTrope

15th Jun '18 7:17:06 AM LondonKdS
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* DroitDuSeigneur: It's unclear whether it was ever actually practiced by anybody in RealLife. That is to say, there were certainly nobles who took advantage of their subjects, including to satisfy their lust, but codifying these acts as "a lordly right" is a guaranteed way to draw people's ire and quite possibly invoke a rebellion. However, ''criticizing'' people for practicing it goes [[OlderThanDirt all the way back to]] ''Literature/TheEpicOfGilgamesh''. Basically, it seems to have never been an actual thing that happened so much as it was a go-to horror story to tell people when you wanted to turn them against a particular rich person you disliked.

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* DroitDuSeigneur: It's unclear whether it was ever actually practiced by anybody in RealLife. That is to say, there were certainly nobles who took advantage of their subjects, including to satisfy their lust, but codifying these acts as "a lordly right" is a guaranteed way to draw people's ire and quite possibly invoke a rebellion. However, ''criticizing'' ''accusing'' people for of practicing it goes [[OlderThanDirt all the way back to]] ''Literature/TheEpicOfGilgamesh''. Basically, it seems to have never been an actual thing that happened so much as it was a go-to horror story to tell people when you wanted to turn them against a particular rich person you disliked.
10th Jun '18 8:35:07 PM rjd1922
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* Zombies [[BrainFood eating brains]]. It was not a part of ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'' or any of the films that followed on it, until ''Film/TheReturnOfTheLivingDead'' -- which was released in '''1985''', nearly two decades after ''Night'', and was a much more comedic and less serious take on the zombie movie genre than its predecessors or most of its followers. Furthermore, it's almost impossible to find a movie where the zombies actually say "Braaaiiiins." This appears to be a conflation of two unrelated aspects of Romero's zombies: they eat human flesh, and the only way to kill them is to destroy their brains.

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* Zombies [[BrainFood eating brains]]. It was not a part of ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'' or any of the films that followed on it, until ''Film/TheReturnOfTheLivingDead'' -- which was released in '''1985''', nearly two decades after ''Night'', and was a much more comedic and less serious take on the zombie movie genre than its predecessors or most of its followers. Furthermore, it's almost impossible to find a movie where the zombies actually say "Braaaiiiins." This appears to be a conflation of two unrelated aspects of Romero's zombies: they eat human flesh, and [[RemovingTheHeadOrDestroyingTheBrain the only way to kill them is to destroy their brains.brains]].
9th Jun '18 4:22:02 PM angie710
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Added DiffLines:

* BankruptcyBarrel: Although people ''were'' forced historically to wear a barrel, it wasn't for poverty. It was a punishment for public drunkenness, or drunk-and-disorderly conduct/disturbing the peace.
9th Jun '18 10:17:22 AM angie710
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Added DiffLines:

* SexyWhateverOutfit: Although female nurses, police officers, etc. ''did'' (and in some places, still do) wear dresses or skirts as part of their uniforms, the hems were never more than an inch or two above the knee, ''at most''. Nor did they show AbsoluteCleavage. Besides being impractical, uniforms like that would be regarded as unprofessional, causing them to lose credibility with the patients or civilians whose lives they're working to save.
23rd May '18 11:21:40 AM StFan
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[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

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[[folder:Comics]]
* The so-called cliche of Clark Kent changing to Franchise/{{Superman}} in phone booths comes entirely from TWO straight uses in the ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheatricalCartoons'' of the 1940s. A use of this trope in the comic books of the same period had Superman note how difficult it is to change costume in a phone booth, meaning this was [[UnbuiltTrope deconstructed even when it was new]]. Parodies and homages sprung up soon afterward, but in the comics Superman would more often change costume in a deserted storeroom or alleyway, and in the George Reeves television series, he NEVER used a phone booth at all. Later uses of the phone booth costume change outside of parody are all done with [[LampshadeHanging winks, nods, or other acknowledgements of the 'cliche']]. Brian Cronin sets the record straight in his 'Comic Book Legends Revealed' blog [[http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2011/07/22/comic-book-legends-revealed-324/ here.]]
** Also worth noting is that in the 1940s, telephone booths were made of wood with no glass panels. Clark Kent would never consider changing in a glass phone booth (which all parodies use) because everybody would be able to see him change.
** ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' actually pokes fun at this trope as well. Clark is looking for a place to change, notices a phone kiosk (not a booth as such; only the phone is sheltered from the elements), and gives it a strange look before "changing" thanks to a revolving door. This particular trope is so well known that its inclusion as a gag in the movie was guaranteed to get audiences to laugh.
** Another supposed classic element of the Superman mythos is that Comics/LoisLane has no idea that Clark Kent and Superman are one and the same and that she is easily fooled by a pair of glasses. What makes this ironic is that Lois is the character in the comics who is ''most'' certain Clark is Superman and that between the 40s and 90s every other Superman story had Superman use some elaborate scheme involving robots, optical illusions, Bruce Wayne wearing a Clark Kent disguise and so forth in order to throw Lois off the scent. After the early 90s, most continuities have her completely in the know.
* The idea of Franchise/{{Batman}} being a grim, brooding CrazyPrepared semi-madman is both an inversion and a subversion of this trope. The Batman of the 40s was a bit of a homicidal maniac, but the Batman we've all come to know and love was more or less a straight-laced BoringInvincibleHero. The Batman that most people remember was UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}} version, who often got involved in silly situations, and the Super-Friends version who couldn't be called "grim", "brooding" or "dark" at all. It was probably the 1986 graphic novel ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' that really brought Batman's darkness to the fore, and since that was one of the stories that inspired Creator/TimBurton's [[Film/{{Batman}} 1989 film]], that's the version that is popularly thought of nowadays.

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[[folder:Comics]]
[[folder:Comic Books]]
* ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'':
**
The so-called cliche cliché of Clark Kent changing to Franchise/{{Superman}} Superman in phone booths comes entirely from TWO straight uses in the ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheatricalCartoons'' of the 1940s. A use of this trope in the comic books of the same period had Superman note how difficult it is to change costume in a phone booth, meaning this was [[UnbuiltTrope deconstructed even when it was new]]. Parodies and homages sprung up soon afterward, but in the comics Superman would more often change costume in a deserted storeroom or alleyway, and in the George Reeves television series, he NEVER used a phone booth at all. Later uses of the phone booth costume change outside of parody are all done with [[LampshadeHanging winks, nods, or other acknowledgements of the 'cliche']]. "cliché"]]. Brian Cronin sets the record straight in his 'Comic "Comic Book Legends Revealed' Revealed" blog [[http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2011/07/22/comic-book-legends-revealed-324/ here.]]
**
]]\\\
Also worth noting is that in the 1940s, telephone booths were made of wood with no glass panels. Clark Kent would never consider changing in a glass phone booth (which all parodies use) because everybody would be able to see him change.
**
change. ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' actually pokes fun at this trope as well. Clark is looking for a place to change, notices a phone kiosk (not a booth as such; only the phone is sheltered from the elements), and gives it a strange look before "changing" thanks to a revolving door. This particular trope is so well known that its inclusion as a gag in the movie was guaranteed to get audiences to laugh.
** Another supposed classic element of the Superman mythos is that Comics/LoisLane has no idea that Clark Kent and Superman are one and the same and that she is easily fooled by a pair of glasses. What makes this ironic is that Lois is the character in the comics who is ''most'' certain Clark is Superman and that between the 40s '40s and 90s '90s every other Superman story had Superman use some elaborate scheme involving robots, optical illusions, Bruce Wayne wearing a Clark Kent disguise and so forth in order to throw Lois off the scent. After the early 90s, '90s, most continuities have her completely in the know.
* The idea of Franchise/{{Batman}} being a grim, brooding CrazyPrepared semi-madman is both an inversion and a subversion of this trope. The Batman of the 40s '40s was a bit of a homicidal maniac, but the Batman we've all come to know and love was more or less a straight-laced BoringInvincibleHero. The Batman that most people remember was UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}} version, who often got involved in silly situations, and the Super-Friends version who couldn't be called "grim", "brooding" or "dark" at all. It was probably the 1986 graphic novel ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' that really brought Batman's darkness to the fore, and since that was one of the stories that inspired Creator/TimBurton's [[Film/{{Batman}} 1989 film]], that's the version that is popularly thought of nowadays.



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[[folder:Film]][[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



** The idea of TheIgor comes from conflating Dr. Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'s hunchbacked assistant in the [[Film/{{Frankenstein 1931}} first movie]] (Fritz) and Ygor from the [[Film/SonOfFrankenstein third]] and [[Film/TheGhostOfFrankenstein fourth movies]] -- a non-hunchbacked (though broken-necked, which caused him to carry one shoulder higher) schemer who wanted to reanimate the monster for his own personal gain. Neither of them were in the original book-- although after seeing ''Film/YoungFrankenstein'' one gets the feeling that if Igor didn't exist it would be necessary to invent him.

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** The idea of TheIgor comes from conflating Dr. Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'s hunchbacked assistant in the [[Film/{{Frankenstein 1931}} first movie]] (Fritz) and Ygor from the [[Film/SonOfFrankenstein third]] and [[Film/TheGhostOfFrankenstein fourth movies]] -- a non-hunchbacked (though broken-necked, which caused him to carry one shoulder higher) schemer who wanted to reanimate the monster for his own personal gain. Neither of them were in the original book-- book -- although after seeing ''Film/YoungFrankenstein'' one gets the feeling that if Igor didn't exist it would be necessary to invent him.



* [[OurZombiesAreDifferent Pop culture zombie tropes]] have almost nothing to do with the African/Caribbean legends--in these traditions [[VoodooZombie zombies are corpses resurrected by magicians to be slaves]]. These zombies will not attack you (unless, presumably, their masters order them to) and can't "spread" their condition to you. The threat of ''becoming'' a zombie [[AndThenJohnWasAZombie is scary]], but the idea that the zombies themselves hurt people has no basis in folklore. Likely it's a misappropriation of [[OurGhoulsAreCreepier Ghouls]] in legend, undead who would, sure enough, eat people. In fact, at no point in ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'' is the word "zombie" spoken, but "ghoul" is (the ending credits does list "featured zombies" though). The fans ran with zombies, though, and the term stuck as [[TropeMaker the film spawned an entire genre]].

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* [[OurZombiesAreDifferent Pop culture zombie tropes]] have almost nothing to do with the African/Caribbean legends--in legends -- in these traditions [[VoodooZombie zombies are corpses resurrected by magicians to be slaves]]. These zombies will not attack you (unless, presumably, their masters order them to) and can't "spread" their condition to you. The threat of ''becoming'' a zombie [[AndThenJohnWasAZombie is scary]], but the idea that the zombies themselves hurt people has no basis in folklore. Likely it's a misappropriation of [[OurGhoulsAreCreepier Ghouls]] in legend, undead who would, sure enough, eat people. In fact, at no point in ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'' is the word "zombie" spoken, but "ghoul" is (the ending credits does list "featured zombies" though). The fans ran with zombies, though, and the term stuck as [[TropeMaker the film spawned an entire genre]].



* The notion that in ''Film/JamesBond'' films the villain [[JustBetweenYouAndMe always tells Bond what his evil plan is]] is not entirely accurate, as often Bond already knows or has figured out what the plan is already, and the villain is just filling in some details (usually for the benefit of the audience). Indeed, on several occasions it is ''Bond'' who actually explains the evil plan ''to the villain'', often to stroke / poke at their ego or to distract them to buy time or get them to drop their guard.
** Similarly, the notion that "The main Bond girl works for the villains until she falls in love with James Bond"...has only happened ''once'', with Pussy Galore from ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}''. While Bond has slept with evil henchwomen before (''Film/{{Thunderball}}'', ''Film/{{Goldeneye}}'', ''Film/DieAnotherDay''), the aforementioned ''Goldfinger'' is the only case where he slept with a henchwoman who changed sides. The rest of the time, it's either they were completely innocent but just so happened to get involved with the villain's plans (i.e., [[Film/DrNo Honey Ryder]], [[Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough Christmas Jones]][[note]]if you consider her, not [[BigBad Elektra King]], to be the Bond Girl of the film[[/note]]), on Bond's side to begin with ([[Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice Kissy Suzuki]], [[Film/OnHerMajestysSecretService Tracy Di Vincenzo]]), working for the villain but having no idea what their plans were ([[Film/FromRussiaWithLove Tatiana Romanova]], Film/{{Octopussy}}) or effectively a slave of the villains (i.e., [[Film/{{Thunderball}} Domino]], [[Film/LiveAndLetDie Solitare]]).

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* ''Film/JamesBond'':
**
The notion that in ''Film/JamesBond'' the films the villain [[JustBetweenYouAndMe always tells Bond what his evil plan is]] is not entirely accurate, as often Bond already knows or has figured out what the plan is already, and the villain is just filling in some details (usually for the benefit of the audience). Indeed, on several occasions it is ''Bond'' who actually explains the evil plan ''to the villain'', often to stroke / poke at their ego or to distract them to buy time or get them to drop their guard.
** Similarly, the notion that "The main Bond girl works for the villains until she falls in love with James Bond"... has only happened ''once'', with Pussy Galore from ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}''. While Bond has slept with evil henchwomen before (''Film/{{Thunderball}}'', ''Film/{{Goldeneye}}'', ''Film/DieAnotherDay''), the aforementioned ''Goldfinger'' is the only case where he slept with a henchwoman who changed sides. The rest of the time, it's either they were completely innocent but just so happened to get involved with the villain's plans (i.e., [[Film/DrNo Honey Ryder]], [[Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough Christmas Jones]][[note]]if you consider her, not [[BigBad Elektra King]], to be the Bond Girl of the film[[/note]]), on Bond's side to begin with ([[Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice Kissy Suzuki]], [[Film/OnHerMajestysSecretService Tracy Di Vincenzo]]), working for the villain but having no idea what their plans were ([[Film/FromRussiaWithLove Tatiana Romanova]], Film/{{Octopussy}}) or effectively a slave of the villains (i.e., [[Film/{{Thunderball}} Domino]], [[Film/LiveAndLetDie Solitare]]).



* The notion that characters in TheWestern wear hats that are ColorCodedForYourConvenience (heroes wearing white hats and villains wearing black hats) was never really a thing, except for children's shows. All the way back to ''Film/TheGreatTrainRobbery'' hat colors were fairly evenly distributed, and once films went to color most characters had brown hats in any case. The trope was invented in the 90s, mostly to mock the BlackAndWhiteMorality of many westerns.
** Similarly, the gunslinger's FamousLastWords of "Oh, they GOT me!" was used mainly in parody and lighthearted fare, and nothing serious.

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* The notion that characters in TheWestern wear hats that are ColorCodedForYourConvenience (heroes wearing white hats and villains wearing black hats) was never really a thing, except for children's shows. All the way back to ''Film/TheGreatTrainRobbery'' hat colors were fairly evenly distributed, and once films went to color most characters had brown hats in any case. The trope was invented in the 90s, '90s, mostly to mock the BlackAndWhiteMorality of many westerns.
** * Similarly, the gunslinger's FamousLastWords of "Oh, they GOT me!" was used mainly in parody and lighthearted fare, and nothing serious.serious.
* Some pornographic films advertise that they do not use the missionary position, as everyone is tired of that because it is so common. However, the missionary position is actually avoided for the fairly obvious reason that it's difficult to see the woman's "assets" if the actors are smooshed against each other (for the same reason, reverse cowgirl, rear-entry, and anal are far more popular in porn than in real life). Also, during the missionary position it's easier to see the man than the woman, which is exactly what porn aimed at straight men (as the majority is) wants to avoid. Using it would actually be a subversion.



[[folder:Adult Films]]
* Some pornographic films advertise that they do not use the missionary position, as everyone is tired of that because it is so common. However, the missionary position is actually avoided for the fairly obvious reason that it's difficult to see the woman's "assets" if the actors are smooshed against each other (for the same reason, reverse cowgirl, rear-entry, and anal are far more popular in porn than in real life). Also, during the missionary position it's easier to see the man than the woman, which is exactly what porn aimed at straight men (as the majority is) wants to avoid. Using it would actually be a subversion.
[[/folder]]



** And on the other end of the spectrum, the belief that ''all'' fairytales were "originally" gory grimdark horror stories before their {{Disneyfication}}. Some were gory by modern standards and there's a ''lot'' of ValuesDissonance, but overall it's not as bad as many people make it out to be. For instance, Disney's ''{{Disney/Cinderella}}'' is frequently claimed to have bowlderized the darker Creator/BrothersGrimm version, even though the Disney film opens with a disclaimer that it's based on Charles Perrault's version, which predates the Grimms' version by over a century.

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** And on the other end of the spectrum, the belief that ''all'' fairytales were "originally" gory grimdark horror stories before their {{Disneyfication}}. Some were gory by modern standards and there's a ''lot'' of ValuesDissonance, but overall it's not as bad as many people make it out to be. For instance, Disney's ''{{Disney/Cinderella}}'' ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}'' is frequently claimed to have bowlderized the darker Creator/BrothersGrimm version, even though the Disney film opens with a disclaimer that it's based on Charles Perrault's version, which predates the Grimms' version by over a century.



** For some reason, [[KnightInShiningArmor knights in shining armor]] rescuing [[DistressedDamsel distressed damsels]] from [[DragonsPreferPrincesses dragons]] is commonly associated with fairytales, even though this is rather rare, appearing only twice in the works of Creator/TheBrothersGrimm.

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** For some reason, [[KnightInShiningArmor knights in shining armor]] rescuing [[DistressedDamsel distressed damsels]] from [[DragonsPreferPrincesses dragons]] is commonly associated with fairytales, fairy tales, even though this is rather rare, appearing only twice in the works of Creator/TheBrothersGrimm.



* ''Series/MythBusters'' made reference to one when tackling the (busted) myth that steel-toed boots could actually sever toes instead of protecting them. Adam commented about "samurai movies" where the tip of someone's boot would be cut off, except the toes are intact right behind where the tip was severed. This is actually a somewhat common comedy trope, but its appearance in a "samurai movie" is highly dubious at best (what with the characters wearing ''sandals'' and all).
** Mythbusters does this a lot, actually, especially in later seasons. Since almost all the more well-known myths have been tested over the course of the show's eight seasons, the show has used much more obscure ones to keep things going.
** Since firing their folklorist, the show has been more about finding out what is possible than setting the record straight.
** Speaking of {{Samurai}}, Japanese armor was never made of lacquered wood despite many claims to the contrary -- it was usually various types of leather, iron, and eventually steel armor, with plenty of silk cording to tie it together. [[note]]The iron armor was still lacquered. Iron rusted easily in Japan's moist climate, and the metal was expensive, so they had to protect what precious iron they received.[[/note]]
*** Or, to put it another way, there was such a thing as wood-crafted ''ceremonial'' armor, but mistaking it for the real thing is akin to thinking that European knights rode into battle in ruffled collars and ring-covered hands.

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* ''Series/MythBusters'' ''Series/MythBusters'':
** the show
made reference to one when tackling the (busted) myth that steel-toed boots could actually sever toes instead of protecting them. Adam commented about "samurai movies" where the tip of someone's boot would be cut off, except the toes are intact right behind where the tip was severed. This is actually a somewhat common comedy trope, but its appearance in a "samurai movie" is highly dubious at best (what with the characters wearing ''sandals'' and all).
** Mythbusters ''[=MythBusters=]'' does this a lot, actually, especially in later seasons. Since almost all the more well-known myths have been tested over the course of the show's eight seasons, the show has used much more obscure ones to keep things going.
**
going. Since firing their folklorist, the show has been more about finding out what is possible than setting the record straight.
** Speaking of {{Samurai}}, Japanese armor was never made of lacquered wood despite many claims to the contrary -- it was usually various types of leather, iron, and eventually steel armor, with plenty of silk cording to tie it together. [[note]]The iron armor was still lacquered. Iron rusted easily in Japan's moist climate, and the metal was expensive, so they had to protect what precious iron they received.[[/note]]
***
[[/note]] Or, to put it another way, there was such a thing as wood-crafted ''ceremonial'' armor, but mistaking it for the real thing is akin to thinking that European knights rode into battle in ruffled collars and ring-covered hands.



** Not many of the Doctor's companions actually [[BrokenHeel twisted an ankle]], and very few were helpless [[ScreamingWoman screaming women]]. In fact, Susan is the only one that comes to mind, and she did both. And even Susan shared the TARDIS with another female companion, Barbara, a strong-willed teacher who MinoredInAssKicking. In the 60s, the Doctor filled his TARDIS with rotating man/woman pairs, with occasionally a younger 'child' character to round the team out, and the sole female companion only became the norm in the 1970s. Much of this is because there were women in similar science fiction shows at the time who were pointless MsFanservice damsels (see the ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' "Science Fiction Sketch" for an example of a parody) and [[FanNickname the memory cheats]]. Unfortunately, memory often cheated the producers -- new companions were usually promoted in ''Magazine/RadioTimes'' with promises that they weren't just screaming girls like in the old days, and Mel was introduced as something of a "homage" to the companions of the 1960s, but was more like [[{{Camp}} John Nathan Turner's version of]] a [[DamselScrappy B-Movie Scream Queen]] -- it's fair to say no character like her had ever appeared in the series before.

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** Not many of the Doctor's companions actually [[BrokenHeel twisted an ankle]], and very few were helpless [[ScreamingWoman screaming women]]. In fact, Susan is the only one that comes to mind, and she did both. And even Susan shared the TARDIS with another female companion, Barbara, a strong-willed teacher who MinoredInAssKicking. In the 60s, '60s, the Doctor filled his TARDIS with rotating man/woman pairs, with occasionally a younger 'child' "child" character to round the team out, and the sole female companion only became the norm in the 1970s. Much of this is because there were women in similar science fiction science-fiction shows at the time who were pointless MsFanservice damsels (see the ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' "Science Fiction Sketch" for an example of a parody) and [[FanNickname the memory cheats]]. Unfortunately, memory often cheated the producers -- new companions were usually promoted in ''Magazine/RadioTimes'' with promises that they weren't just screaming girls like in the old days, and Mel was introduced as something of a "homage" to the companions of the 1960s, but was more like [[{{Camp}} John Nathan Turner's version of]] a [[DamselScrappy B-Movie Scream Queen]] -- it's fair to say no character like her had ever appeared in the series before.



** People often misremember Doctors' personalities. Creator/WilliamHartnell is remembered overwhelmingly as being grumpy and a TokenEvilTeammate when he spent more of his tenure being silly, grandfatherly and giggling about one of his schemes. Creator/PatrickTroughton is remembered as the giddy, recorder-playing fool he was in "The Three Doctors" rather than the often detached and authoritative character he was. Creator/TomBaker is much more associated with his CloudCuckooLander InvincibleHero characteristics despite spending most of his tenure as a gothic, [[{{InhumanEmotion}} detached]] ByronicHero who could be as disturbing as he was silly. And Creator/PeterDavison is often decried as being a GoodIsBoring NiceGuy despite being a DeadpanSnarker [[TheDeterminator Determinator]] who was much more likely to just shoot the monster than most other Doctors. Much of this is down to gimmicks being remembered better than a whole portrayal, or disproportionate weight given to certain eras and scenes.

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** People often misremember Doctors' personalities. Creator/WilliamHartnell is remembered overwhelmingly as being grumpy and a TokenEvilTeammate when he spent more of his tenure being silly, grandfatherly and giggling about one of his schemes. Creator/PatrickTroughton is remembered as the giddy, recorder-playing fool he was in "The Three Doctors" rather than the often detached and authoritative character he was. Creator/TomBaker is much more associated with his CloudCuckooLander {{CloudcuckooLander}} InvincibleHero characteristics despite spending most of his tenure as a gothic, [[{{InhumanEmotion}} detached]] ByronicHero who could be as disturbing as he was silly. And Creator/PeterDavison is often decried as being a GoodIsBoring NiceGuy despite being a DeadpanSnarker [[TheDeterminator Determinator]] who was much more likely to just shoot the monster than most other Doctors. Much of this is down to gimmicks being remembered better than a whole portrayal, or disproportionate weight given to certain eras and scenes.



** The idea that ''Doctor Who'' always takes place in Victorian Britain, or with 'Space Victorians', or {{Steampunk}}, etc. In the Classic series, we first visit the Victorian era (relatively briefly) in "The Evil of the Daleks" in Season 4, and we don't go back until "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" in Season 14 (which used [[ClicheStorm every Victorian London trope going]]). Then "Timelash" in Season 23 and "Ghost Light" in Season 26 started using the setting with a self-aware vibe of it being deliberate ''Doctor Who'' cliché. ("The Next Doctor" pulls out all the Victorian London / Steampunk stops, beginning with that first lavish Dickensian Christmas Eve setting.) The Revival series embraced this with gusto, in particular having the Eleventh Doctor retire to live with a Sontaran and Silurian in Victorian London for a plotline on the grounds that it's a "default" setting. Presumably, the Doctor's [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Victorian fashion sense]] gave the idea that he hangs around there more than he does...
** The Classic show wasn't entirely [[NoHuggingNoKissing sexless]] until it became an EnforcedTrope in the 80s, by which time the Doctor's {{Asexuality}} was already a meme. The Doctor did not kiss his companions, and the show was not focused on romance at all, but {{UST}} was omnipresent and [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar innuendo]] was common. Each of the first four Doctors got at least one story where they would be allowed to flirt with a pretty girl, or be distracted by one; ImpliedLoveInterest relationships and ShipTease moments between the Doctor and his companion were common throughout the 70s;[[note]]especially between the 4th Doctor and his companion Romana, since Baker really did have a relationship with Lalla Ward[[/note]] and the First Doctor was introduced with a granddaughter (along with the implications of what sort of actions someone would have had to have done to get a granddaughter) and even got engaged to a GirlOfTheWeek in one story. The idea was not supposed to be that the Doctor had no sexual feelings -- just that the show wasn't about that sort of thing, and so it wouldn't make sense to include a TokenRomance. Nevertheless, fandom memory holds that the Doctor was NotDistractedByTheSexy (and possibly [[ExoticEquipment without the relevant parts]]) until the New series decided to make him into a ChickMagnet, and jokes to this extent have been made on the show.

to:

** The idea that ''Doctor Who'' always takes place in Victorian Britain, or with 'Space Victorians', "Space Victorians", or {{Steampunk}}, etc. In the Classic series, we first visit the Victorian era (relatively briefly) in "The Evil of the Daleks" in Season 4, and we don't go back until "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" in Season 14 (which used [[ClicheStorm every Victorian London trope going]]). Then "Timelash" in Season 23 and "Ghost Light" in Season 26 started using the setting with a self-aware vibe of it being deliberate ''Doctor Who'' cliché. ("The Next Doctor" pulls out all the Victorian London / Steampunk stops, beginning with that first lavish Dickensian Christmas Eve setting.) The Revival series embraced this with gusto, in particular having the Eleventh Doctor retire to live with a Sontaran and Silurian in Victorian London for a plotline on the grounds that it's a "default" setting. Presumably, the Doctor's [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Victorian fashion sense]] gave the idea that he hangs around there more than he does...
** The Classic show wasn't entirely [[NoHuggingNoKissing sexless]] until it became an EnforcedTrope in the 80s, '80s, by which time the Doctor's {{Asexuality}} was already a meme. The Doctor did not kiss his companions, and the show was not focused on romance at all, but {{UST}} was omnipresent and [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar innuendo]] was common. Each of the first four Doctors got at least one story where they would be allowed to flirt with a pretty girl, or be distracted by one; ImpliedLoveInterest relationships and ShipTease moments between the Doctor and his companion were common throughout the 70s;[[note]]especially '70s;[[note]]especially between the 4th Doctor and his companion Romana, since Baker really did have a relationship with Lalla Ward[[/note]] and the First Doctor was introduced with a granddaughter (along with the implications of what sort of actions someone would have had to have done to get a granddaughter) and even got engaged to a GirlOfTheWeek in one story. The idea was not supposed to be that the Doctor had no sexual feelings -- just that the show wasn't about that sort of thing, and so it wouldn't make sense to include a TokenRomance. Nevertheless, fandom memory holds that the Doctor was NotDistractedByTheSexy (and possibly [[ExoticEquipment without the relevant parts]]) until the New series decided to make him into a ChickMagnet, and jokes to this extent have been made on the show.



-->Well a friend of mine named Steve Goodman wrote that song, and he told me it was the perfect country and western song.
-->I wrote him back a letter and told him it was not the perfect country and western song because it hadn't said anything at all about "Mama", or trains[[{{Beat}} ...]] or trucks[[{{Beat}} ...]] or prison[[{{Beat}} ...]] or gettin' drunk.
-->Well he sat down and wrote another verse to the song and he sent it to me. After readin' it I realized that my friend had written the perfect country and western song. And I felt obliged to include it on this album; the last verse goes like this here:
-->''Well I was drunk the day my mom got out of prison''
-->''And I went to pick her up in the rain''
-->''But before I could get to the station in my pickup truck''
-->''She got run'd over by a damned ol' train''

to:

-->Well --->Well a friend of mine named Steve Goodman wrote that song, and he told me it was the perfect country and western song.
-->I
song.\\
I
wrote him back a letter and told him it was not the perfect country and western song because it hadn't said anything at all about "Mama", or trains[[{{Beat}} ...]] or trucks[[{{Beat}} ...]] or prison[[{{Beat}} ...]] or gettin' drunk.
-->Well
drunk.\\
Well
he sat down and wrote another verse to the song and he sent it to me. After readin' it I realized that my friend had written the perfect country and western song. And I felt obliged to include it on this album; the last verse goes like this here:
-->''Well
here:\\
''Well
I was drunk the day my mom got out of prison''
-->''And
prison\\
And
I went to pick her up in the rain''
-->''But
rain\\
But
before I could get to the station in my pickup truck''
-->''She
truck\\
She
got run'd over by a damned ol' train''



*** There are, however, quite a few ''blues'' songs that follow that structure. Almost none of them start "I woke up this morning", though.[[note]]A few classic blues songs include some variation on "I woke up this morning" but Music/RobertJohnson's "Walking Blues" is the only one that actually ''opens'' with that line.[[/note]]

to:

*** ** There are, however, quite a few ''blues'' songs that follow that structure. Almost none of them start "I woke up this morning", though.[[note]]A few classic blues songs include some variation on "I woke up this morning" but Music/RobertJohnson's "Walking Blues" is the only one that actually ''opens'' with that line.[[/note]]



[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]

to:

[[folder:Professional [[folder:Pro Wrestling]]



* The AnvilOnHead gag (or alternatively, dynamite gags) is very commonly associated with cartoons from UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, but one would be surprised to know that while violence was common in these cartoons and had gag props to match, anvils and dynamite were [[NewerThanTheyThink an extremely rare sight in them until some point around the 1950s]], where the trope was popularized as a stock cartoon gag by its use in the Road Runner cartoons (which were intended as an over-the-top parody of these earlier cartoons in the first place) and the odd Bugs Bunny cartoon like Show Biz Bugs and Long Haired Hare. The book Literature/AmericanCornball has a section discussing this very subject. The use of the trope is far more prominent in parodies or homages to these old cartoons, such as ''Itchy and Scratchy'' and ''Animaniacs''.
** The AnvilOnHead and probably more so the dynamite gags most likely originate from the WesternAnimation/{{Tom And Jerry}} shorts of the 1940s in which at least one short (WesternAnimation/{{The Yankee Doodle Mouse}}) was almost entirely devoted to explosive gags and was, in fact, the original source of parody for Chuck Jones's Road Runner cartoons.

to:

* The AnvilOnHead gag (or alternatively, dynamite gags) is very commonly associated with cartoons from UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, but one would be surprised to know that while violence was common in these cartoons and had gag props to match, anvils and dynamite were [[NewerThanTheyThink an extremely rare sight in them until some point around the 1950s]], where the trope was popularized as a stock cartoon gag by its use in the Road Runner cartoons (which were intended as an over-the-top parody of these earlier cartoons in the first place) and the odd Bugs Bunny cartoon like Show "Show Biz Bugs Bugs" and Long "Long Haired Hare. Hare". The book Literature/AmericanCornball ''Literature/AmericanCornball'' has a section discussing this very subject. The use of the trope is far more prominent in parodies or homages to these old cartoons, such as ''Itchy and Scratchy'' and ''Animaniacs''.
**
''Animaniacs''.\\\
The AnvilOnHead and probably more so the dynamite gags most likely originate from the WesternAnimation/{{Tom And Jerry}} ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' shorts of the 1940s in which at least one short (WesternAnimation/{{The Yankee Doodle Mouse}}) ("WesternAnimation/TheYankeeDoodleMouse") was almost entirely devoted to explosive gags and was, in fact, the original source of parody for Chuck Jones's Road Runner cartoons.






22nd May '18 10:43:54 AM PiDa
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* In Japan, where octopus are commonly eaten and even related to, it's popularly believed that octopus never became a major part of the Northern European diet because octopuses are associated with the Devil in Christianity. While octopuses were sometimes called "devilfish" in the past, there's no particular association between octopuses and the Devil in most Western cultures and there never was. Despite this, this belief occasionally shows up in Japanese media (such as Laughing Octopus's backstory in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4'', which involves an anti-octopus cult and comes off to anyone familiar with European culture as absurd and random).

to:

* In Japan, where octopus are commonly eaten and even related to, it's popularly believed that octopus never became a major part of the Northern European diet because octopuses are associated with the Devil in Christianity. While octopuses were sometimes called "devilfish" in the past, and they are vaguely used as a symbol for evil in a lot of cases, there's no particular association between octopuses and the Devil in most Western cultures and there never was. Despite this, this belief occasionally shows up in Japanese media (such as Laughing Octopus's backstory in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4'', which involves an anti-octopus cult and comes off to anyone familiar with European culture as absurd and random).
22nd May '18 10:42:54 AM PiDa
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Added DiffLines:

* In Japan, where octopus are commonly eaten and even related to, it's popularly believed that octopus never became a major part of the Northern European diet because octopuses are associated with the Devil in Christianity. While octopuses were sometimes called "devilfish" in the past, there's no particular association between octopuses and the Devil in most Western cultures and there never was. Despite this, this belief occasionally shows up in Japanese media (such as Laughing Octopus's backstory in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4'', which involves an anti-octopus cult and comes off to anyone familiar with European culture as absurd and random).
22nd May '18 9:55:02 AM Sharlee
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** The whole idea that the Creature was assembled from bits of corpses originated in the numerous stage plays that followed (read: ripped off) the novel, then was indelibly codified by the 1931 film. Shelley's original text never stated how Frankenstein built his monster.

to:

** The whole idea that the Creature was [[ArtificialZombie assembled from bits of corpses corpses]] originated in the numerous stage plays that followed (read: ripped off) the novel, then was indelibly codified by the 1931 film. Shelley's original text never stated how Frankenstein built his monster.
22nd May '18 9:53:55 AM Sharlee
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Added DiffLines:

** The whole idea that the Creature was assembled from bits of corpses originated in the numerous stage plays that followed (read: ripped off) the novel, then was indelibly codified by the 1931 film. Shelley's original text never stated how Frankenstein built his monster.
18th May '18 2:48:20 PM KingLyger
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* ChalkOutline: They do not do that in real life. Ever. It actually ''does'' contaminate the area and makes it more difficult for the investigators. The trope may be partly a case of TheCoconutEffect, as newspaper photographers who weren't allowed to show the body would use a chalk outline as a stand-in, and the public presumably came to think of this as part of the crime scene investigation itself.

to:

* ChalkOutline: They do not The cops don't do that in real life. Ever. In fact, they've never done that. It actually ''does'' contaminate contaminates the area and makes it more difficult for the investigators. The trope may be partly a case of TheCoconutEffect, as newspaper photographers who weren't allowed to show the body would use a chalk outline as a stand-in, and the public presumably came to think of this as part of the crime scene investigation itself.
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