History Main / DeadUnicornTrope

12th Aug '17 3:05:27 PM RedScharlach
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** The ''ninjatao'' or ''shinobigatana'' is frequently depicted as the chosen blade of the ninja. Modern day ninja exponents such as Masaki Hastumi and Stephen Hayes popularize the weapon and it also frequently appears in ninja movies. However, although there is no historical evidence of this weapon as a specialized ninja sword, it does appear to be derived from the ''wakizashi'' and ''chokuto''. More likely, ninja would use whatever style blades that they could aquire. The ninjatao seems to date no earlier than the 20th century and this was after the ninja clans dissolved.

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** The ''ninjatao'' or ''shinobigatana'' is frequently depicted as the chosen blade of the ninja. Modern day ninja exponents such as Masaki Hastumi and Stephen Hayes popularize the weapon and it also frequently appears in ninja movies. However, although there is no historical evidence of this weapon as a specialized ninja sword, it does appear to be derived from the ''wakizashi'' and ''chokuto''. More likely, ninja would use whatever style blades that they could aquire.acquire. The ninjatao seems to date no earlier than the 20th century and this was after the ninja clans dissolved.



* TrueLovesKiss: It doesn't appear in as many fairy tales as one might think. It's not in the original Snow White at all - where the princess is saved when the apple core in her throat is dislodged. The Disney film borrowed it from Sleeping Beauty, but it's not a straight example in that tale either. The princess wakes up when the prince kisses her - but only because the hundred years of the spell are up. And even then in ''Disney/SnowWhite'' the cure for the poison is Love's ''First'' Kiss. In the original version of The Frog Prince, the titular hero is restored to human form when the princess angrily throws him against a wall (because... uh...), the kiss motif only appearing in modern retellings of the story.

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* TrueLovesKiss: It doesn't appear in as many fairy tales as one might think. It's not in the original Snow White at all - where instead, the princess is saved when the apple core in her throat is dislodged. The Disney film borrowed it from Sleeping Beauty, but it's not a straight example in that tale either. The princess wakes up when the prince kisses her - but only because the hundred years of the spell are up. And even then in ''Disney/SnowWhite'' the cure for the poison is Love's ''First'' Kiss. In the original version of The Frog Prince, the titular hero is restored to human form when the princess angrily throws him against a wall (because... uh...), the kiss motif only appearing in modern retellings of the story.



** The idea that ''Doctor Who'' always takes place in Victorian Britain, or with 'Space Victorians', or {{Steampunk}}, etcetera. In the Classic series, we first visit the Victorian era (relatively briefly) in "The Evil of the Daleks" in Season 4, and we don't go back until "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" in Season 14 (which used [[ClicheStorm every Victorian London trope going]]). Then "Timelash" in Season 23 and "Ghost Light" in Season 26 started using the setting with a self-aware vibe of it being deliberate ''Doctor Who'' cliché. ("The Next Doctor" pulls out all the Victorian London / Steampunk stops, beginning with that first lavish Dickensian Christmas Eve setting.) The Revival series embraced this with gusto, in particular having the Eleventh Doctor retire to live with a Sontaran and Silurian in Victorian London for a plotline on the grounds that it's a 'default setting'. Presumably, the Doctor's [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Victorian fashion sense]] gave the idea that he hangs around there more than he does...

to:

** The idea that ''Doctor Who'' always takes place in Victorian Britain, or with 'Space Victorians', or {{Steampunk}}, etcetera. In the Classic series, we first visit the Victorian era (relatively briefly) in "The Evil of the Daleks" in Season 4, and we don't go back until "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" in Season 14 (which used [[ClicheStorm every Victorian London trope going]]). Then "Timelash" in Season 23 and "Ghost Light" in Season 26 started using the setting with a self-aware vibe of it being deliberate ''Doctor Who'' cliché. ("The Next Doctor" pulls out all the Victorian London / Steampunk stops, beginning with that first lavish Dickensian Christmas Eve setting.) The Revival series embraced this with gusto, in particular having the Eleventh Doctor retire to live with a Sontaran and Silurian in Victorian London for a plotline on the grounds that it's a 'default setting'."default" setting. Presumably, the Doctor's [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Victorian fashion sense]] gave the idea that he hangs around there more than he does...



** Which brings us to the new series' much-talked-about ''reversal'' of his asexuality. Honestly, mostly he's ''getting'' kissed by someone else and is totally ''bewildered'' by it, and for someone who's suddenly shagging everybody, his lack of sexual interest has been made ''more'' explicit than ever (genuinely not understanding why someone would want to put Dark Water, which makes non-organic material invisible, [[TheNudifier in a swimming pool]], [immediately dismissing Amy's coming onto him on the grounds that it would ''never'' work with someone as old and alien as him, spending a lot of the Rose Tyler seasons at {{UST}} critical mass but only the part-human clone Doctor being able to go into a full RelationshipUpgrade, ''River Song of all people'' genuinely believing that though she loved ''him,'' she didn't truly matter that much to him because "you don't expect a sunset to admire you back.") There has been a definite ''increase'' of flirtatious banter, and that "getting surprise-snogged" thing is a big-time RunningGag, but a misunderstanding of ''both'' eras has led to the misconception of "ultimate asexual turned ultimate manwhore."

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** Which brings us to the new series' much-talked-about ''reversal'' of his asexuality. Honestly, mostly he's ''getting'' kissed by someone else and is totally ''bewildered'' by it, and for someone who's suddenly shagging everybody, his lack of sexual interest has been made ''more'' explicit than ever (genuinely not understanding why someone would want to put Dark Water, which makes non-organic material invisible, [[TheNudifier in a swimming pool]], [immediately immediately dismissing Amy's coming onto him on the grounds that it would ''never'' work with someone as old and alien as him, spending a lot of the Rose Tyler seasons at {{UST}} critical mass but only the part-human clone Doctor being able to go into a full RelationshipUpgrade, ''River Song of all people'' genuinely believing that though she loved ''him,'' she didn't truly matter that much to him because "you don't expect a sunset to admire you back.") back"). There has been a definite ''increase'' of flirtatious banter, and that "getting surprise-snogged" thing is a big-time RunningGag, but a misunderstanding of ''both'' eras has led to the misconception of "ultimate asexual turned ultimate manwhore."



** "Nu-metal bands never have guitar solos, but some do" (This is actually only true of a handful of bands who just happen to be labeled nu-metal. Many famous nu-metal bands ''do'' feature guitar solos, abiet somewhat short ones. Even Limp Bizkit had a couple of brief guitar solos.)

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** "Nu-metal bands never have guitar solos, but some do" (This is actually only true of a handful of bands who just happen to be labeled nu-metal. Many famous nu-metal bands ''do'' feature guitar solos, abiet albeit somewhat short ones. Even Limp Bizkit had a couple of brief guitar solos.)
5th Aug '17 4:49:05 PM RossN
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Added DiffLines:

** Another supposed classic element of the Superman mythos is that Comics/LoisLane has no idea that Clark Kent and Superman are one in the same and that she is easily fooled by a pair of glasses. What makes this ironic is that Lois is the character in the comics who is ''most'' certain Clark is Superman and that between the 40's and 90's every other Superman story had Superman use some elaborate scheme involving robots, optical illusions, Bruce Wayne wearing a Clark Kent disguises and so forth in order to throw Lois off the scent. After the early 90s most continuities have her completely in the know.
1st Aug '17 12:01:17 PM MBG
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** The stereotype of the typical [[EasternRPG JRPG]] protagonist as a {{Wangst}}y, [[ImprobableHairstyle spikey-haired]] [[ImprobableAge teenager]] [[RummageSaleReject covered in belts and zippers]], swinging [[{{BFS}} a sword with its own zip code]]. The character the stereotype is [[TropeCodifier supposed to be based on]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Cloud Strife]], doesn't even hit all the points, since Cloud is a 21-year-old flamboyantly cocky {{Jerkass}} with [[TheMentallyDisturbed a whole different kind of mental problem to 'angst']] and two zippers (on his shoes). This perception is a {{Fanon}} [[CompositeCharacter combining]] Cloud's [[MemeticOutfit iconic character design]] with elements of the younger and sulkier Squall Leonhart from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII''; it was popular enough that ''Advent Children'' and ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'' both used interpretations of Cloud based on this garbled version [[PanderingToTheBase so that the audience would still feel familiar with the character]]. Outside of the fanonised Cloud, characters that fit the complete stereotype can only be found as parodies (such as [[VideoGame/EatLeadTheReturnOfMattHazard Altos Tratus]]), and even those who come close are few and far in between; the genre as a whole tends to favour optimistic if not outright HotBlooded characters. Much of the reason Cloud and Squall were so [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny innovative]] was because their [[DarkerAndEdgier troubled, more realistic]] personalities were radically different to the IdiotHero types that dominate the genre.

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** The stereotype of the typical [[EasternRPG JRPG]] protagonist as a {{Wangst}}y, [[ImprobableHairstyle spikey-haired]] [[ImprobableAge teenager]] [[RummageSaleReject covered in belts and zippers]], swinging [[{{BFS}} a sword with its own zip code]]. The character the stereotype is [[TropeCodifier supposed to be based on]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Cloud Strife]], doesn't even hit all the points, since Cloud is a 21-year-old flamboyantly cocky {{Jerkass}} with [[TheMentallyDisturbed a whole different kind of mental problem to 'angst']] and two zippers (on his shoes). This perception is a {{Fanon}} [[CompositeCharacter combining]] Cloud's [[MemeticOutfit iconic character design]] with elements of the younger and sulkier Squall Leonhart from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII''; ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'' and a few bits and pieces of the considerably angstier Vincent Valentine; it was popular enough that ''Advent Children'' and ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'' both used interpretations of Cloud based on this garbled version [[PanderingToTheBase so that the audience would still feel familiar with the character]]. Outside of the fanonised Cloud, characters that fit the complete stereotype can only be found as parodies (such as [[VideoGame/EatLeadTheReturnOfMattHazard Altos Tratus]]), and even those who come close are few and far in between; the genre as a whole tends to favour optimistic if not outright HotBlooded characters. Much of the reason Cloud and Squall were so [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny innovative]] was because their [[DarkerAndEdgier troubled, more realistic]] personalities were radically different to the IdiotHero types that dominate the genre.genre.
** Muddying the issue further is that Cloud's Fanon persona is a major target of {{Copy Cat Sue}}s. The iconic first OC among young anime or JRPG fans that isn't MarySueClassic is dead-on to the above stereotype.
28th Jul '17 3:06:52 PM jamespolk
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* Despite what all the numerous campy homages to silent cinema tell you, the DastardlyWhiplash was barely ever used, much less in its iconic form, in silent film. It was mostly used in vaudeville and stage melodramas of the day, which was where the overuse really came about and led to all the parodies of the concept, even though the trope was as dead as disco by the time the 1930's hit. The only significant use of the trope in silent movies was in ''The Perils of Pauline'', but even that example [[UnbuiltTrope is quite different from the standard whiplash stereotype.]]

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* Despite what all the numerous campy homages to silent cinema tell you, the DastardlyWhiplash was barely ever used, much less in its iconic form, in silent film. It was mostly used in vaudeville and stage melodramas of the day, which was where the overuse really came about and led to all the parodies of the concept, even though the trope was as dead as disco by the time the 1930's hit. The only significant use of the trope in silent movies was in ''The Perils of Pauline'', ''Film/ThePerilsOfPauline'', but even that example [[UnbuiltTrope is quite different from the standard whiplash stereotype.]]
20th Jul '17 8:55:40 AM Morgenthaler
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Do not confuse for [[SugarWiki/RobotUnicornAttack a certain robotic unicorn]], or for a [[WesternAnimation/AdventureTime Rainicorn]].

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Do not confuse for [[SugarWiki/RobotUnicornAttack a certain robotic unicorn]], or for a [[WesternAnimation/AdventureTime Rainicorn]].
Rainicorn]]. Not (usually) related to [[UnicornsAreSacred actual dead unicorns]] either.
13th Jul '17 1:32:42 PM CaptEquinox
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** The idea that ''Doctor Who'' always takes place in Victorian Britain, or with 'Space Victorians', or {{Steampunk}}, etcetera. In the Classic series, we first visit the Victorian era (relatively briefly) in "The Evil of the Daleks" in Season 4, and we don't go back until "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" in Season 14 (which used [[ClicheStorm every Victorian London trope going]]). Then "Timelash" in Season 23 and "Ghost Light" in Season 26 started using the setting with a self-aware vibe of it being deliberate ''Doctor Who'' cliché. The Revival series embraced this with gusto, in particular having the Eleventh Doctor retire to live with a Sontaran and Silurian in Victorian London for a plotline on the grounds that it's a 'default setting'. Presumably, the Doctor's [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Victorian fashion sense]] gave the idea that he hangs around there more than he does...
** The Classic show wasn't entirely [[NoHuggingNoKissing sexless]] until it became an EnforcedTrope in the 80s, by which time the Doctor's {{Asexuality}} was already a meme. The Doctor did not kiss his companions, and the show was not focused on romance at all, but {{UST}} was omnipresent and [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar innuendo]] was common. Each of the first four Doctors got at least one story where they would be allowed to flirt with a pretty girl, or be distracted by one; ImpliedLoveInterest relationships and ShipTease moments between the Doctor and his companion were common throughout the 70s; and the First Doctor was introduced with a granddaughter (along with the implications of what sort of actions someone would have had to have done to get a granddaughter) and even got engaged to a GirlOfTheWeek in one story. The idea was not supposed to be that the Doctor had no sexual feelings - just that the show wasn't about that sort of thing, and so it wouldn't make sense to include a TokenRomance. Nevertheless, fandom memory holds that the Doctor was NotDistractedByTheSexy (and possibly [[ExoticEquipment without the relevant parts]]) until the New series decided to make him into a ChickMagnet, and jokes to this extent have been made on the show.

to:

** The idea that ''Doctor Who'' always takes place in Victorian Britain, or with 'Space Victorians', or {{Steampunk}}, etcetera. In the Classic series, we first visit the Victorian era (relatively briefly) in "The Evil of the Daleks" in Season 4, and we don't go back until "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" in Season 14 (which used [[ClicheStorm every Victorian London trope going]]). Then "Timelash" in Season 23 and "Ghost Light" in Season 26 started using the setting with a self-aware vibe of it being deliberate ''Doctor Who'' cliché. ("The Next Doctor" pulls out all the Victorian London / Steampunk stops, beginning with that first lavish Dickensian Christmas Eve setting.) The Revival series embraced this with gusto, in particular having the Eleventh Doctor retire to live with a Sontaran and Silurian in Victorian London for a plotline on the grounds that it's a 'default setting'. Presumably, the Doctor's [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Victorian fashion sense]] gave the idea that he hangs around there more than he does...
** The Classic show wasn't entirely [[NoHuggingNoKissing sexless]] until it became an EnforcedTrope in the 80s, by which time the Doctor's {{Asexuality}} was already a meme. The Doctor did not kiss his companions, and the show was not focused on romance at all, but {{UST}} was omnipresent and [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar innuendo]] was common. Each of the first four Doctors got at least one story where they would be allowed to flirt with a pretty girl, or be distracted by one; ImpliedLoveInterest relationships and ShipTease moments between the Doctor and his companion were common throughout the 70s; 70s;[[note]]especially between the 4th Doctor and his companion Romana, since Baker really did have a relationship with Lalla Ward[[/note]] and the First Doctor was introduced with a granddaughter (along with the implications of what sort of actions someone would have had to have done to get a granddaughter) and even got engaged to a GirlOfTheWeek in one story. The idea was not supposed to be that the Doctor had no sexual feelings - just that the show wasn't about that sort of thing, and so it wouldn't make sense to include a TokenRomance. Nevertheless, fandom memory holds that the Doctor was NotDistractedByTheSexy (and possibly [[ExoticEquipment without the relevant parts]]) until the New series decided to make him into a ChickMagnet, and jokes to this extent have been made on the show.
13th Jul '17 1:22:21 PM CaptEquinox
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* During the heyday of the "quirky indie" style of movie, parodies and jokes about it often included barbs about them always featuring a guy hooking up with a gorgeous girl far out of his league. But while this is [[UglyGuyHotWife a common sitcom trope]], it doesn't describe these movies too well, usually featuring a more down to Earth, cute {{Moe}} type as the female lead with the male usually being the equivalent, a guy who doesn't mean the conventional standards of handsome, but few would consider Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/MichaelCera or Paul Dano to be actually unattractive (or Creator/JosephGordonLevitt...). It tends to be more about the social (not socioeconomic) status of the characters. They aren't cool enough.

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* During the heyday of the "quirky indie" style of movie, parodies and jokes about it often included barbs about them always featuring a guy hooking up with a gorgeous girl far out of his league. But while this is [[UglyGuyHotWife a common sitcom trope]], it doesn't describe these movies too well, usually featuring well. Usually in such films the female lead is a more down to Earth, cute {{Moe}} type as the female lead type, with the male usually being often the equivalent, a guy who doesn't mean equivalent; he may not meet the conventional standards of handsome, "handsome", but few would consider is not unattractive (considering he's often played by Creator/JimCarrey, Creator/MichaelCera or Creator/MichaelCera, Paul Dano to be actually unattractive (or or Creator/JosephGordonLevitt...). It tends to be more about the social (not socioeconomic) status of the characters. They aren't cool enough. In silent and early sound films it ''is'' socioeconomic; a working class guy tries to succeed to ''become'' worthy of a higher-class woman. (She already loves him. The one he has to impress is her father.)
19th Jun '17 5:11:30 PM AmethystLeslie
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* Nearly all parodies of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' have the main character as 10 years old. No ''Pokemon'' protagonist is canonically 10, most have a VagueAge and some of them are implied to be teenagers. The closest are the protagonists of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon", who are canonically ''11''.

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* Nearly all parodies of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' have the main character as 10 years old. No ''Pokemon'' protagonist is canonically 10, most have a VagueAge and some of them are implied to be teenagers. The closest are the protagonists of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon", ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', who are canonically ''11''.
19th Jun '17 5:11:05 PM AmethystLeslie
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* Nearly all parodies of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' have the main character as 10 years old. No ''Pokemon'' protagonist is canonically 10, most have a VagueAge and some of them are implied to be teenagers. The closest are the protagonists of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon, who are canonically ''11''.

to:

* Nearly all parodies of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' have the main character as 10 years old. No ''Pokemon'' protagonist is canonically 10, most have a VagueAge and some of them are implied to be teenagers. The closest are the protagonists of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon, ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon", who are canonically ''11''.
19th Jun '17 5:10:38 PM AmethystLeslie
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* Nearly all parodies of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' have the main character as 10 years old. No ''Pokemon'' protagonist is canonically 10, most have a VagueAge and some of them are implied to be teenagers. The closest are the protagonists of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'', who are canonically ''11''.

to:

* Nearly all parodies of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' have the main character as 10 years old. No ''Pokemon'' protagonist is canonically 10, most have a VagueAge and some of them are implied to be teenagers. The closest are the protagonists of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'', ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon, who are canonically ''11''. ''11''.
** It's VERY likely it stems from the [[Anime/{{Pokemon}} anime]], where the protagonist Ash Ketchum is 10 years old.
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