History Main / DeadUnicornTrope

27th Apr '17 2:47:45 PM Coolnut
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** Similarly, the gunslinger's FamousLastWords of "Oh, they GOT me!" was used mainly in parody and lighthearted fare, and nothing serious.
4th Apr '17 4:00:39 AM BigKlingy
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* Nearly all parodies of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' have the main character as 10 years old. No ''Pokemon'' protagonist is canonically 10, most have a VagueAge and some of them are implied to be teenagers. The closest are the protagonists of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'', who are canonically ''11''.
4th Apr '17 3:21:04 AM BigKlingy
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* Many [[TheAhnold parodies of the Terminator]] have the character as a DumbMuscle. In [[Film/TheTerminator the original film]], the Terminator was actually very intelligent, and in fact [[ItCanThink this was a big part of what made it so threatening.]] It knew to retreat from a bad situation, how to repair itself when damaged, find its target via the phonebook, and at one point it even imitates the voice of her mother over the phone to trick her into revealing her location.
1st Mar '17 9:26:48 AM blockboy
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** "Nu-metal vocalists either have a low, scratchy grunt (Slipknot, Soulfly) or a clean-sounding, boyish voice (Lostprophets)"

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** "Nu-metal vocalists either have a low, scratchy grunt (Slipknot, Soulfly) or a clean-sounding, boyish voice (Lostprophets)"(Lostprophets, Linkin Park)"
20th Jan '17 4:49:28 AM Doug86
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* DysonSphere in science fiction: The concept was proposed by Freeman Dyson as a thought experiment on how a civilization could most efficiently harness the energy of its star. The most widely visualized variant is a solid shell fully enclosed around a star with the entire inner surface of the sphere a livable habitat spanning an area equivalent of trillions of Earth size planets. This is actually the most widely publicized visualization, but it's neither Dyson's original intent, nor was it ever that common in science fiction. Hard science fiction writers, at least, realize how flawed, impractical and implausible such a structure would be, and not just from an engineering standpoint. Anything living on the inner surface of a Dyson sphere would be pulled toward the sun by gravity and even if it were spinning, only the equatorial area would be habitable. Most of the time, in fiction, you will either see more plausible variants such as a [[{{Ringworld}} Niven ring]] or clusters of artificial structures surrounding a star; the latter was closer to Dyson's original intent. The {{Ringworld series}}, at least addresses the problem of how such a structure would maintain it's orbit around a star without crashing into it. The ''StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode Relics (in which the Enterprise actually does encounter a Dyson shell) actually lampshades the notion that the Dyson sphere is a very old (to them) concept that Picard is not suprised that Riker hadn't heard of.

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* DysonSphere in science fiction: The concept was proposed by Freeman Dyson as a thought experiment on how a civilization could most efficiently harness the energy of its star. The most widely visualized variant is a solid shell fully enclosed around a star with the entire inner surface of the sphere a livable habitat spanning an area equivalent of trillions of Earth size planets. This is actually the most widely publicized visualization, but it's neither Dyson's original intent, nor was it ever that common in science fiction. Hard science fiction writers, at least, realize how flawed, impractical and implausible such a structure would be, and not just from an engineering standpoint. Anything living on the inner surface of a Dyson sphere would be pulled toward the sun by gravity and even if it were spinning, only the equatorial area would be habitable. Most of the time, in fiction, you will either see more plausible variants such as a [[{{Ringworld}} Niven ring]] or clusters of artificial structures surrounding a star; the latter was closer to Dyson's original intent. The {{Ringworld series}}, at least addresses the problem of how such a structure would maintain it's its orbit around a star without crashing into it. The ''StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode Relics (in which the Enterprise ''Enterprise'' actually does encounter a Dyson shell) actually lampshades the notion that the Dyson sphere is a very old (to them) concept that Picard is not suprised that Riker hadn't heard of.
10th Jan '17 3:05:44 PM avon
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* DysonSphere in science fiction: The concept was proposed by Freeman Dyson as a thought experiment on how a civilization could most efficiently harness the energy of its star. The most widely visualized variant is a solid shell fully enclosed around a star with the inner area of the sphere a livable habitat spanning an area equivalent of trillions of Earth size planets. This is actually the most widely publicized visualization, but it's neither Dyson's original intent, nor was it ever that common in science fiction. Hard science fiction writers, at least, realize how flawed, impractical and implausible such a structure would be, and not just from an engineering standpoint. Most of the time, in fiction, you will either see more plausible variants such as a [[{{Ringworld}} Niven ring]] or clusters of artificial structures surrounding a star; the latter was closer to Dyson's original intent.

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* DysonSphere in science fiction: The concept was proposed by Freeman Dyson as a thought experiment on how a civilization could most efficiently harness the energy of its star. The most widely visualized variant is a solid shell fully enclosed around a star with the entire inner area surface of the sphere a livable habitat spanning an area equivalent of trillions of Earth size planets. This is actually the most widely publicized visualization, but it's neither Dyson's original intent, nor was it ever that common in science fiction. Hard science fiction writers, at least, realize how flawed, impractical and implausible such a structure would be, and not just from an engineering standpoint. Anything living on the inner surface of a Dyson sphere would be pulled toward the sun by gravity and even if it were spinning, only the equatorial area would be habitable. Most of the time, in fiction, you will either see more plausible variants such as a [[{{Ringworld}} Niven ring]] or clusters of artificial structures surrounding a star; the latter was closer to Dyson's original intent. The {{Ringworld series}}, at least addresses the problem of how such a structure would maintain it's orbit around a star without crashing into it. The ''StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode Relics (in which the Enterprise actually does encounter a Dyson shell) actually lampshades the notion that the Dyson sphere is a very old (to them) concept that Picard is not suprised that Riker hadn't heard of.
9th Jan '17 7:46:43 PM Josef5678
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* DysonSphere in science fiction: The concept was proposed by Freeman Dyson as a thought experiment on how a civilization could most efficiently harness the energy of it's star. The most widely visualized variant is a solid shell fully enclosed around a star with the inner area of the sphere a livable habitat spanning an area equivalent of trillions of Earth size planets. This is actually the most widely publicized visualization, but it's neither Dyson's original intent, nor was it ever that common in science fiction. Hard science fiction writers, at least, realize how flawed, impractical and implausible such a structure would be, and not just from an engineering standpoint. Most of the time, in fiction, you will either see more plausible variants such as a [[{{Ringworld}} Niven ring]] or clusters of artificial structures surrounding a star; the latter was closer to Dyson's original intent.

to:

* DysonSphere in science fiction: The concept was proposed by Freeman Dyson as a thought experiment on how a civilization could most efficiently harness the energy of it's its star. The most widely visualized variant is a solid shell fully enclosed around a star with the inner area of the sphere a livable habitat spanning an area equivalent of trillions of Earth size planets. This is actually the most widely publicized visualization, but it's neither Dyson's original intent, nor was it ever that common in science fiction. Hard science fiction writers, at least, realize how flawed, impractical and implausible such a structure would be, and not just from an engineering standpoint. Most of the time, in fiction, you will either see more plausible variants such as a [[{{Ringworld}} Niven ring]] or clusters of artificial structures surrounding a star; the latter was closer to Dyson's original intent.
9th Jan '17 1:05:38 PM avon
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* DysonSphere in science fiction: The concept was proposed by Freeman Dyson as a thought experiment on how a civilization could most efficiently harness the energy of it's star. The most widely visualized variant is a solid shell fully enclosed around a star with the inner area of the sphere a livable habitat spanning an area equivalent of trillions of Earth size planets. This is actually the most widely publicized visualization, but it's neither Dyson's original intent, nor was it ever that common in science fiction. Hard science fiction writers, at least, realize how flawed, impractical and implausible such a structure would be, and not just from an engineering standpoint. Most of the time, in fiction, you will either see more plausible variants such as a [[{{Ringworld}} Niven ring]] or clusters of artificial structures surrounding a star; the latter was closer to Dyson's original intent.
6th Jan '17 1:22:11 PM avon
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* OnceUponATime in the original fairy tales, though many of the Grimms' tales do.

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* {{Ninja}} outfits: The all black ninja-gi associated with the ninja warrior did not exist much in real life. This outfit actually originated in Kabuki as the uniform of the kuroko (stagehands). Although they were visible in their function of manipulating the scenery of a performance, their black color was an indication that the viewers were supposed to pretend that they could not see them. However, whenever ninjas were present in a kabuki story itself, they wore kuroko outfits due to their stealthy appearance, as well as to save money on costuming. In real life, a good ninja would wear whatever would help him blend in with his surroundings, be it a merchant, a farmer, or an average man on the street. Various books on ninjas have pointed out that a ninja wearing a black outfit at night would actually stand out more than if he was wearing a blue, grey or even red outfit.
** The Ninja throwing star (also known as the shuriken) was not a killing weapon, as is often depicted in "Ninjer" movies from TheEighties. The shuriken was a throwaway weapon of distraction. It often was not expected to actually damage the target but to at least momentarily slow them down and divert their attention while the thrower either made his escape or made a counterattack. Shuriken would often be thrown at the face or hands as a distraction to the opponent. Also, the most common form of realistic shuriken was not the the throwing star (Hira) but a plain metal spike (Bo).
** The ''ninjatao'' or ''shinobigatana'' is frequently depicted as the chosen blade of the ninja. Modern day ninja exponents such as Masaki Hastumi and Stephen Hayes popularize the weapon and it also frequently appears in ninja movies. However, although there is no historical evidence of this weapon as a specialized ninja sword, it does appear to be derived from the ''wakizashi'' and ''chokuto''. More likely, ninja would use whatever style blades that they could aquire. The ninjatao seems to date no earlier than the 20th century and this was after the ninja clans dissolved.
* OnceUponATime in the original fairy tales, though many of the Grimms' tales do.
2nd Jan '17 1:51:58 AM Chytus
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* TrappedInAnotherWorld: Supposedly, in {{anime}}, this frequently manifests as a WishFulfillment fantasy where a young {{everyman}} is transported to a fantasy world, where at least one beautiful girl falls in love with him. ''LightNovel/ReZero'' popularized [[GenreDeconstruction brutally deconstructing]] this concept; ''Anime/NowAndThenHereAndThere'' did the same thing, even more brutally, 15 years earlier. But straight examples of this are rare and, except for ''LightNovel/TheFamiliarOfZero'', much less famous than the subversive versions. Even ''LightNovel/SwordArtOnline'', perhaps the most (in)famous example, is relatively subversive--the "game" designer [[TheMostDangerousVideoGame torments the millions of trapped players and encourages them to murder each other]], mocking their desire for a harmless-fun fantasyland.
** Except it totally is, and isekai fantasy is probably the most popular genre there is at the moment.
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