History Main / DeadUnicornTrope

24th Aug '16 1:41:07 AM Twentington
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** The [[Series/SesameStreet "Guy Smiley"]] stereotype of game show hosts as always-smiling {{Large Ham}}s who give a "slimy used-car salesman" vibe, crack awful jokes, and wear loud, flashy suits. Most of the genre's greats were a bit goofy and loud at times, with Jim Perry being the [[TropeCodifier codifier]] of the stereotype, but even party animals like [[Series/MatchGame Gene Rayburn]] or slicker types like [[Series/TicTacDough Wink Martindale]] or [[Series/LetsMakeADeal Monty Hall]] knew when to put on a serious demeanor, including Perry himself. The "Guy Smiley" type host is an extreme Flanderization of the three aforementioned hosts, with a few traits thrown in just for comedy. Prolific host Creator/BillCullen was mellow, unattractive (at least in his later years), kindly, self-deprecating, and physically handicapped by polio in other words, about as far from the "Guy Smiley" stereotype as possible. But that image is so ingrained in the American consciousness that it inspires [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=My5d7i5SMAE things like this]] ... talk about [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8641McZ0mTk Truth In Television]].
** The deep, melodramatic voice that most "parody" announcers have is almost entirely fabrication. Don Pardo had a deep, dramatic voice, but it was authoritative and exciting without being over-the-top, in addition to sporting an obvious New England accent. (That, and 99% of his game show career was before 1975[[labelnote:*]]The association of Don Pardo with game shows is likely strengthened by parodies on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'', where he was the announcer for many years[[/labelnote]].) In fact, most announcers sound absolutely nothing like that. Some were higher-voiced and commanding (Johnny Olson, Johnny Gilbert); others were much mellower (Gene Wood, Jack Clark, Charlie O'Donnell, John Harlan); and when he was hamming it up, [[Series/ThePriceIsRight Rod Roddy]] was still high and nasal. Burton Richardson ''almost'' played this kind of voice straight for a while.

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** The [[Series/SesameStreet "Guy Smiley"]] stereotype of game show hosts as always-smiling {{Large Ham}}s who give a "slimy used-car salesman" vibe, crack awful jokes, and wear loud, flashy suits. Most of the genre's greats were a bit goofy and loud at times, with Jim Perry being the [[TropeCodifier codifier]] of the stereotype, but even he, along with party animals like [[Series/MatchGame Gene Rayburn]] Rayburn]], or slicker types like [[Series/TicTacDough Wink Martindale]] or [[Series/LetsMakeADeal Monty Hall]] knew when to put on a serious demeanor, including Perry himself. demeanor. The "Guy Smiley" type host is an extreme Flanderization of the three aforementioned hosts, with a few traits thrown in just for comedy. Prolific host Creator/BillCullen was mellow, unattractive (at least in his later years), kindly, self-deprecating, and physically handicapped by polio in other words, about as far from the "Guy Smiley" stereotype as possible. But that image is so ingrained in the American consciousness that it inspires [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=My5d7i5SMAE things like this]] ... talk about [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8641McZ0mTk Truth In Television]].
** The deep, melodramatic voice that most "parody" announcers have is almost entirely fabrication. Don Pardo had a deep, dramatic voice, but it was authoritative and exciting without being over-the-top, in addition to sporting an obvious New England accent. (That, and 99% of his game show career was before 1975[[labelnote:*]]The association of Don Pardo with game shows is likely strengthened by parodies on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'', where he was the announcer for many years[[/labelnote]].) In fact, most game show announcers sound absolutely nothing like that. Some were higher-voiced and commanding (Johnny Most had much higher pitched voices (e.g., Johnny Olson, Rod Roddy, or Johnny Gilbert); others Gilbert), while quite a few were much mellower (Gene (such as Gene Wood, Jack Clark, Charlie O'Donnell, or John Harlan); and when he was hamming it up, [[Series/ThePriceIsRight Rod Roddy]] was still high and nasal.Harlan). Burton Richardson ''almost'' played this kind of voice straight for a while.
22nd Aug '16 8:30:04 PM TheDiego908
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** Relatedly, the trope of the WhiteMagicianGirl is supposedly based on Aeris Gainsborough from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', but her personality is streetwise, flirty and occasionally insensitive, not IncorruptiblePurePureness. She's not even that much of a White Mage - her LimitBreak moves focus on healing, but the game is set up such that you'll be using her for Black Magic, Summons or Enemy Skills most of the time. Rosa from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'', whose main trait is [[SatelliteLoveInterest being in love with Cecil]] and wanting to be helpful for him, fits the personality part of the trope and most of the powers, but in addition to White Magic she's a powerful archer who can hit evasive targets with ease. Yuna from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' is closest, but she came along long after the trope was a cliché.

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** Relatedly, the trope of the WhiteMagicianGirl is supposedly based on Aeris Gainsborough from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', but her personality is streetwise, flirty and occasionally insensitive, not IncorruptiblePurePureness. She's not even that much of a White Mage - her LimitBreak moves focus on healing, but the game is set up such that you'll be using her for Black Magic, Summons or Enemy Skills most of the time. Rosa from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV'', whose main trait is [[SatelliteLoveInterest being in love with Cecil]] and wanting to be helpful for him, fits the personality part of the trope and most of the powers, but in addition to White Magic she's a powerful archer who can hit evasive targets with ease. Yuna from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' is closest, but she came along long after the trope was a cliché.cliché, and even then, her main trait was being a summoner, not using white magic.
22nd Aug '16 5:38:53 PM MazeMaker
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* The notion that in ''Film/JamesBond'' films the villain [[JustBetweenYouAndMe always tells Bond what his evil plan is]] is not entirely accurate, as often Bond already knows or has figured out what the plan is already, and the villain is just filling in some details (usually for the benefit of the audience). Indeed, on several occasions it is ''Bond'' who actually explains the evil plan ''to the villain', often to stroke / poke at their ego or to distract them to buy time or get them to drop their guard.

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* The notion that in ''Film/JamesBond'' films the villain [[JustBetweenYouAndMe always tells Bond what his evil plan is]] is not entirely accurate, as often Bond already knows or has figured out what the plan is already, and the villain is just filling in some details (usually for the benefit of the audience). Indeed, on several occasions it is ''Bond'' who actually explains the evil plan ''to the villain', villain'', often to stroke / poke at their ego or to distract them to buy time or get them to drop their guard.
20th Aug '16 7:18:49 AM Lymantria
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** ''Literature/SaveThePearls'' uses food pills completely seriously, but that's probably among the least of that book's problems.[[index]]
** ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' mocked this: In Brain Guy's supposedly advanced culture, food pills exist, but you have to eat an entire bowl of them at a time, thus negating any advantages.

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** ''Literature/SaveThePearls'' uses food pills completely seriously, but that's probably among the least of that book's problems.[[index]]
problems.
** ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' mocked this: In Brain Guy's supposedly advanced culture, food pills exist, but you have to eat an entire bowl of them at a time, thus negating any advantages.[[index]]
19th Aug '16 5:31:13 AM Josef5678
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* While "[[GoodMorningCrono waking up the main character in order to start the story]]" is common enough to be a trope of its own, "having the main character be woken up by his mother" thing is something that is purely inspired by VideoGame/ChronoTrigger. There are situations where it may play out like this, but it's actually rare for it to happen.

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* While "[[GoodMorningCrono waking up the main character in order to start the story]]" is common enough to be a trope of its own, "having the main character be woken up by his mother" thing is something that is purely inspired by VideoGame/ChronoTrigger.''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger''. There are situations where it may play out like this, but it's actually rare for it to happen.
18th Aug '16 10:54:10 AM TheDiego908
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Added DiffLines:

* While "[[GoodMorningCrono waking up the main character in order to start the story]]" is common enough to be a trope of its own, "having the main character be woken up by his mother" thing is something that is purely inspired by VideoGame/ChronoTrigger. There are situations where it may play out like this, but it's actually rare for it to happen.
7th Aug '16 2:45:03 PM whunt
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* TheButlerDidIt is the most well known example. It does appear in a couple old mystery novels, but is nowhere near as common as people unfamiliar with such novels seem to think. (You ''will'' find a somewhat sizable list of examples on our tropes page but almost all of these come from after the twist had already become falsely known as a cliche and are either [[ParodiedTrope parodying it]], [[PlayingWithATrope playing with it]], or using its notoriety to make it a case of TheUntwist.) The origin of the phrase was not a literal description but rather a summary of a far more common trope: [[TheDogWasTheMastermind Having an unimportant background character end up being the culprit]]. See [[http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2470/in-whodunits-its-the-butler-did-it-who-did-it-first here]] for more info. It might also have gained some lift from that one incident when a man, getting out of a ''Theatre/TheMouseTrap'' showing (the play is famed for not having its ending be an open secret) yelled in the street "It was the butler!"... while no butlers are even featured in the play.

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* TheButlerDidIt is the most well known example. It does appear in a couple old mystery novels, but is nowhere near as common as people unfamiliar with such novels seem to think. (You ''will'' find a somewhat sizable list of examples on our tropes page but almost all of these come from after the twist had already become falsely known as a cliche and are either [[ParodiedTrope parodying it]], [[PlayingWithATrope playing with it]], or using its notoriety to make it a case of TheUntwist.) The origin of the phrase was not a literal description but rather a summary of a far more common trope: [[TheDogWasTheMastermind Having an unimportant background character end up being the culprit]]. What happened far more often was the butler had access to the crime scene and ''knew who did it'', rather than having been the culprit himself. See [[http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2470/in-whodunits-its-the-butler-did-it-who-did-it-first here]] for more info. It might also have gained some lift from that one incident when a man, getting out of a ''Theatre/TheMouseTrap'' showing (the play is famed for not having its ending be an open secret) yelled in the street "It was the butler!"... while no butlers are even featured in the play.
1st Aug '16 5:54:42 AM pinkdalek
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** The idea that ''Doctor Who'' always takes place in Victorian Britain, or with 'Space Victorians', or {{Steampunk}}, etcetera. In the Classic series, we first visit the Victorian era (relatively briefly) in "The Evil of the Daleks" in Season 4, and we don't go back until "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" in Season 14 (which used [[TropeOverdosed every Victorian London trope going]]). Then "Timelash" in Season 23 and "Ghost Light" in Season 26 started using the setting with a self-aware vibe of it being deliberate ''Doctor Who'' cliché. The Revival series embraced this with gusto, in particular having the Eleventh Doctor retire to live with a Sontaran and Silurian in Victorian London for a plotline on the grounds that it's a 'default setting'. Presumably, the Doctor's [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Victorian fashion sense]] gave the idea that he hangs around there more than he does...

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** The idea that ''Doctor Who'' always takes place in Victorian Britain, or with 'Space Victorians', or {{Steampunk}}, etcetera. In the Classic series, we first visit the Victorian era (relatively briefly) in "The Evil of the Daleks" in Season 4, and we don't go back until "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" in Season 14 (which used [[TropeOverdosed [[ClicheStorm every Victorian London trope going]]). Then "Timelash" in Season 23 and "Ghost Light" in Season 26 started using the setting with a self-aware vibe of it being deliberate ''Doctor Who'' cliché. The Revival series embraced this with gusto, in particular having the Eleventh Doctor retire to live with a Sontaran and Silurian in Victorian London for a plotline on the grounds that it's a 'default setting'. Presumably, the Doctor's [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Victorian fashion sense]] gave the idea that he hangs around there more than he does...
1st Aug '16 4:38:32 AM pinkdalek
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Added DiffLines:

** The idea that ''Doctor Who'' always takes place in Victorian Britain, or with 'Space Victorians', or {{Steampunk}}, etcetera. In the Classic series, we first visit the Victorian era (relatively briefly) in "The Evil of the Daleks" in Season 4, and we don't go back until "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" in Season 14 (which used [[TropeOverdosed every Victorian London trope going]]). Then "Timelash" in Season 23 and "Ghost Light" in Season 26 started using the setting with a self-aware vibe of it being deliberate ''Doctor Who'' cliché. The Revival series embraced this with gusto, in particular having the Eleventh Doctor retire to live with a Sontaran and Silurian in Victorian London for a plotline on the grounds that it's a 'default setting'. Presumably, the Doctor's [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel Victorian fashion sense]] gave the idea that he hangs around there more than he does...
13th Jul '16 4:08:23 PM pinkdalek
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** People often misremember Doctors' personalities. Creator/WilliamHartnell is remembered overwhelmingly as being grumpy and a TokenEvilTeammate when he spent more of his tenure being silly, being a grandfather figure and giggling. Creator/PatrickTroughton is remembered as the giddy, recorder-playing fool he was in "The Three Doctors" rather than the often mercurial, detached, authoritative and manipulative character he was. Creator/TomBaker is much more associated with his jelly-babies-and-wordplay CloudCuckooLander InvincibleHero characteristics despite spending most of his tenure as a gothic, [[{{InhumanEmotion}} detached]], often insecure ByronicHero who used his CreepyBlueEyes, CheshireCatGrin and VoiceOfDramatic to disturb and fascinate other characters. Much of this is down to particular episodes and eras being seized upon by the fanbase, or people remembering an outfit or gimmick rather than a performance.

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** People often misremember Doctors' personalities. Creator/WilliamHartnell is remembered overwhelmingly as being grumpy and a TokenEvilTeammate when he spent more of his tenure being silly, being a grandfather figure grandfatherly and giggling. giggling about one of his schemes. Creator/PatrickTroughton is remembered as the giddy, recorder-playing fool he was in "The Three Doctors" rather than the often mercurial, detached, detached and authoritative and manipulative character he was. Creator/TomBaker is much more associated with his jelly-babies-and-wordplay CloudCuckooLander InvincibleHero characteristics despite spending most of his tenure as a gothic, [[{{InhumanEmotion}} detached]], often insecure detached]] ByronicHero who used his CreepyBlueEyes, CheshireCatGrin and VoiceOfDramatic could be as disturbing as he was silly. And Creator/PeterDavison is often decried as being a GoodIsBoring NiceGuy despite being a DeadpanSnarker [[TheDeterminator Determinator]] who was much more likely to disturb and fascinate just shoot the monster than most other characters. Doctors. Much of this is down to particular episodes and eras gimmicks being seized upon by the fanbase, or people remembering an outfit or gimmick rather remembered better than a performance.whole portrayal, or disproportionate weight given to certain eras and scenes.
** Creator/RobertHolmes is stereotyped as always using {{Obstructive Bureaucrat}}s as lead villains. He only had them as lead villains in "Carnival of Monsters" and "The Sunmakers", both stories of which use settings where this would be unavoidable (Customs officials and a taxation dystopia). Usually, his lead villains were more dynamic types - even in "The Deadly Assassin", which was much criticised for turning Gallifrey into a bureaucratic parliament, the bureaucratic Time Lords are LawfulNeutral at worst; the villainous Time Lords are a slick and ambitious man of action and a [[{{Lich}} hissing zombie]].
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