History Main / CutAndPasteEnvironments

3rd Jun '16 9:44:25 AM nombretomado
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* The PS2 ''Manga/InuYasha'' RPG pushed this to its illogical limits. Travel through various areas consisted of about 12-15 individual 'screens', copy-pasted around each other to create these areas, with a few "unique" screens in some areas. Underground areas and towns were mostly exempt from this, though.

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* The PS2 [=PS2=] ''Manga/InuYasha'' RPG pushed this to its illogical limits. Travel through various areas consisted of about 12-15 individual 'screens', copy-pasted around each other to create these areas, with a few "unique" screens in some areas. Underground areas and towns were mostly exempt from this, though.



* The ''VideoGame/RomancingSaGa'' PS2 Remake used this for the Assassin's Guild, it is one big intersection in every room, and the only way to find your way around is following white gems on the floor, the south exit will take you back to the entrance no matter where you are though.

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* The ''VideoGame/RomancingSaGa'' PS2 [=PS2=] Remake used this for the Assassin's Guild, it is one big intersection in every room, and the only way to find your way around is following white gems on the floor, the south exit will take you back to the entrance no matter where you are though.
17th May '16 2:33:59 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has enormous expanses of land that re-use some assets to fill out the space, supposedly due to limitations imposed by the {{Playstation3}}. While all [=MMO=]s do this to some extent, much ado has been made about this game's usage of the trope as it sometimes recycled entire topographical features. When the game got rebooted in 2013, almost every single geographical location gotten a makeover and looks unique to each other.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has enormous expanses of land that re-use some assets to fill out the space, supposedly due to limitations imposed by the {{Playstation3}}.UsefulNotes/Playstation3. While all [=MMO=]s do this to some extent, much ado has been made about this game's usage of the trope as it sometimes recycled entire topographical features. When the game got rebooted in 2013, almost every single geographical location gotten a makeover and looks unique to each other.
2nd Mar '16 5:26:33 AM erforce
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* ''VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon'' frequently reuses room layouts, with the only differences being the placement of objects; this can possibly be explained by way of about half or more of the game taking place in an office building. ''F.E.A.R. 2'' in turn reuses only-slightly-modified subway areas from ''VideoGame/{{Condemned}}: Criminal Origins'', while the SCU headquarters in one level of ''Condemned 2'' bears more than a passing resemblance to the aforementioned Armacham offices.

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* ''VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon'' frequently reuses room layouts, with the only differences being the placement of objects; this can possibly be explained by way of about half or more of the game taking place in an office building. ''F.E.A.R. 2'' in turn reuses only-slightly-modified subway areas from ''VideoGame/{{Condemned}}: Criminal Origins'', ''VideoGame/CondemnedCriminalOrigins'', while the SCU headquarters in one level of ''Condemned 2'' ''VideoGame/Condemned2Bloodshot'' bears more than a passing resemblance to the aforementioned Armacham offices.
22nd Jan '16 9:03:07 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''VideoGame/ResidentEvilTheUmbrellaChronicles'' has the train and mansion chapters ported directly from the games they appeared in (namely ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil0'' and the 2002 version of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil''), as well as portions of Raccoon City from ''ResidentEvilOutbreak''.

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* ''VideoGame/ResidentEvilTheUmbrellaChronicles'' has the train and mansion chapters ported directly from the games they appeared in (namely ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil0'' and the 2002 version of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil''), as well as portions of Raccoon City from ''ResidentEvilOutbreak''.''VideoGame/ResidentEvilOutbreak''.
12th Jan '16 2:19:49 PM eroock
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-->--'''Covetous Shen''', {{lampshad|eHanging}}ing the dungeon design in ''VideoGame/DiabloIII''.

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-->--'''Covetous -->-- '''Covetous Shen''', {{lampshad|eHanging}}ing the dungeon design in ''VideoGame/DiabloIII''.
4th Aug '15 9:04:14 AM Jake
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Added DiffLines:

* On a related note, British public housing in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War was built this way, particularly large tower blocks. Re-using the same building plan and placing bulk orders of the materials saved time and money, neither of which the newly-formed Ministry of Works had in abundance with the country almost bankrupt and a lot of returning veterans and their families needing a roof over their heads before winter arrived.
18th Jul '15 6:37:08 PM Vios
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** This is not unique to ''Franchise/MassEffect'' for Bioware games. ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' was built on this; there were innumerable room interiors that were all the same except for some minor set dressing like tables and detritus. Indeed, that's how NWN levels are built; they're like 3D tilemaps. Oddly, ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' averted this, despite using a modified version of the NWN engine. Interestingly, their earlier ''BaldursGate'' series games were rather different, with each outdoor environment and the vast majority of the dungeon environments being ''hand-drawn'', with certain stock elements included where necessary (doors and trees in the main). Quite an achievement given the sheer size, number and detail of the maps that had to be created.

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** This is not unique to ''Franchise/MassEffect'' for Bioware games. ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' was built on this; there were innumerable room interiors that were all the same except for some minor set dressing like tables and detritus. Indeed, that's how NWN levels are built; they're like 3D tilemaps. Oddly, ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' averted this, despite using a modified version of the NWN engine. Interestingly, their earlier ''BaldursGate'' ''Franchise/BaldursGate'' series games were rather different, with each outdoor environment and the vast majority of the dungeon environments being ''hand-drawn'', with certain stock elements included where necessary (doors and trees in the main). Quite an achievement given the sheer size, number and detail of the maps that had to be created.
20th Jun '15 11:24:49 AM Morgenthaler
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** ''RedDwarf'' used this a fair bit due to the limited budget:

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** ''RedDwarf'' ''Series/RedDwarf'' used this a fair bit due to the limited budget:
1st Jun '15 9:32:05 AM Prfnoff
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* ''Dead Island'' has the entire final "dungeon" as this. It's pretty obvious they ran out of time or ideas at the end, and just lopped the same room/hallway combo for the end. There's even the same branching hallways into the same big empty rooms with nothing. Very odd, as the doors to these empty rooms are big and imposing.

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* ''Dead Island'' ''VideoGame/DeadIsland'' has the entire final "dungeon" as this. It's pretty obvious they ran out of time or ideas at the end, and just lopped the same room/hallway combo for the end. There's even the same branching hallways into the same big empty rooms with nothing. Very odd, as the doors to these empty rooms are big and imposing.



* ''VideoGame/{{Jak 3}}'' could be considered this in the way that Haven City shares almost all of the layout, landmarks, models and textures to its appearance in Jak II, except for the added destruction. Justifiable for the sake of continuity, and doing so made an actual emotional impact on players as they saw a place they were so familiar with in ruins.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Jak 3}}'' ''VideoGame/Jak3Wastelander'' could be considered this in the way that Haven City shares almost all of the layout, landmarks, models and textures to its appearance in Jak II, except for the added destruction. Justifiable for the sake of continuity, and doing so made an actual emotional impact on players as they saw a place they were so familiar with in ruins.
31st May '15 11:16:09 AM LentilSandEater
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** Oranbega, the lost city hidden beneath Paragon City, is a confusing magical labyrinth you will be visiting ''frequently''. In the Rogue Isles, Oranbega doesn't exist. Instead, the ruins of the lost city of Mu are located there. Predictably, ''they're exactly the same''. Some players don't even distinguish between the two. Somewhat justified in that the Oranbegans and Mu were two sides of an ancient CivilWar.

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** Oranbega, the lost city hidden beneath Paragon City, is a confusing magical labyrinth you will be visiting ''frequently''. In the Rogue Isles, Oranbega doesn't exist. Instead, the ruins of the lost city of Mu are located there. Predictably, ''they're exactly the same''. Some players don't even distinguish between the two. Somewhat justified in that the Oranbegans and Mu were two sides of an ancient CivilWar.



** Barber shops[[note]]Except the the barber shop near CJ's home (since according to the storyline the person running that particular one has been cutting CJ's hair for years), and another on the southeast corner of Los Santos[[/note]], fast food joints[[note]]This one at least may be [[JustifiedTrope justifiable]][[/note]], weapons shops[[note]]most of the time; one shop is larger than the others[[/note]], and tattoo parlors are all identical and even use the same workers, so it gets a bit jarring to see a guy that sells guns in San Andreas can also pop up in every other county that sells guns.

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** Barber shops[[note]]Except the the barber shop near CJ's home (since according to the storyline the person running that particular one has been cutting CJ's hair for years), and another on the southeast corner of Los Santos[[/note]], fast food joints[[note]]This one at least may be [[JustifiedTrope justifiable]][[/note]], joints, weapons shops[[note]]most of the time; one shop is larger than the others[[/note]], and tattoo parlors are all identical and even use the same workers, so it gets a bit jarring to see a guy that sells guns in San Andreas can also pop up in every other county that sells guns.



* MMORPG ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' is a big user of this trope; at least with buildings. While the actual geography for most areas is unique, the buildings, caves, and "doodads" that get placed there obviously come from a standardized set of models that get a PaletteSwap from one zone to the next. Justified in two counts: the aforementioned economy of design, and the fact that the game is based on the ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}'' RTS franchise and deliberately copies the look and feel of the buildings of each race. Indeed, it's really easy to tell who built a given area just by looking at the architecture.

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* MMORPG ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' is a big user of this trope; at least with buildings. While the actual geography for most areas is unique, the buildings, caves, and "doodads" that get placed there obviously come from a standardized set of models that get a PaletteSwap from one zone to the next. Justified in two counts: the aforementioned economy of design, and the fact that the game is based on the ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}'' RTS franchise and deliberately copies the look and feel of the buildings of each race. Indeed, it's really easy to tell who built a given area just by looking at the architecture.



* Present to an extreme level in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', where the wastelands around Lothering, the city of Kirkwall, and the final Deep Roads dungeon of Act I are the only areas with a unique map. There was literally no original environment after VideoGame/DragonAgeII's Act I, the closest being Hawk's new hightown estate. Even Sebastian's ''supposedly'' unique graveyard cave for his personal Act II quest is just a retextured world mine-shaft cave if you look close enough at it's map layout. All however, is somewhat justified in that the game is framed around Varric telling the story of the Champion of Kirkwall to Cassandra Pentaghast and that he's more likely to focus on what Hawke did than on the details of where.
*** The two pieces of post-release DownloadableContent both take steps to address this issue, as both are set outside of Kirkwall and feature entirely unique areas.

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* Present to an extreme level in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', where the wastelands around Lothering, the city of Kirkwall, and the final Deep Roads dungeon of Act I are the only areas with a unique map. There was literally no original environment after VideoGame/DragonAgeII's Act I, the closest being Hawk's new hightown estate. Even Sebastian's ''supposedly'' unique graveyard cave for his personal Act II quest is just a retextured world mine-shaft cave if you look close enough at it's map layout. All however, is somewhat justified in that the game is framed around Varric telling the story of the Champion of Kirkwall to Cassandra Pentaghast and that he's more likely to focus on what Hawke did than on the details of where.
***
layout.
**
The two pieces of post-release DownloadableContent both take steps to address this issue, as both are set outside of Kirkwall and feature entirely unique areas.



* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' fell victim to this. Averted somewhat as the areas are randomized every time you enter, and justified by the fact that the sole dungeon in the game is one gigantic building.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' fell victim to this. Averted somewhat Downplayed as the areas are randomized every time you enter, and justified by the fact that the sole dungeon in the game is one gigantic building.enter.



* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'': The subways which the player must use to navigate [[InsurmountableWaistHighFence conveniently placed piles of rubble]] suffer from this. Probably justified, as subway tunnels are not usually known for their visual variety. A less justified example would be the occasional reuse of building interiors or layouts.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'': The subways which the player must use to navigate [[InsurmountableWaistHighFence conveniently placed piles of rubble]] suffer from this. Probably justified, as subway tunnels are not usually known for their visual variety. A less justified example would be There's also the occasional reuse of building interiors or layouts.



** Justified in the Vault design, since they were drafted by one to a handful of contractors and built from mass-manufactured prefabs all over the country.[[spoiler:And because all the civilian Vault communities were social experiments, they'd want to keep as many non-experimental variables as constant as they could.]]



* ''VideoGame/TheConduit'' plays this trope straight. While many of the earlier levels are repetitive (somewhat justified in that they take place in repetitive real-world buildings), the player can also use the [[SwissArmyWeapon ASE]] to show a path to the next waypoint.

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* ''VideoGame/TheConduit'' plays this trope straight. While many of the earlier levels are repetitive (somewhat justified in that they take place in repetitive real-world buildings), repetitive, the player can also use the [[SwissArmyWeapon ASE]] to show a path to the next waypoint.



* ''VideoGame/{{Fuel}}'' is a great offender, having objects repeated several times in a small area. This, of course, is justified by the game's 14400 square kilometers of environment.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Fuel}}'' is a great offender, having objects repeated several times in a small area. This, of course, is justified by the game's 14400 square kilometers of environment.



* ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' has the finale of The Sacrifice campaign looking ''exactly'' like the finale map used in The Passing campaign for ''VideoGame/Left4Dead2'' with some of the back alleys and streets being blocked off in the former. However, the recycled maps are justified due to the first game taking place before the second game and the characters from both games eventually meet up in the same area.

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* ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' has the finale of The Sacrifice campaign looking ''exactly'' like the finale map used in The Passing campaign for ''VideoGame/Left4Dead2'' with some of the back alleys and streets being blocked off in the former. However, the recycled maps are justified due to the first game taking place before the second game and the characters from both games eventually meet up in the same area.



*** Which is all somewhat [[JustifiedTrope justified]], in that the exteriors may have certain unique features but the ships are all part of one standardized class or another, and it's likely that there would be some redundancy to make the construction of Star Fleet vessels as streamlined as possible to ease mass production. Non-Star-Fleet ships usually tend to be a bit better, though if you've seen one Klingon or Romulan or Ferengi bridge you've (probably literally) seen them all.
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