History Main / CrazyHomelessPeople

7th Jul '16 7:57:01 AM Morgenthaler
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* Subverted in ''ComicBook/TheInvisibles'' where the crazy homeless guy is TheObiWan (Tom O' Bedlam).

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* Subverted in ''ComicBook/TheInvisibles'' where the crazy homeless guy is TheObiWan the mentor (Tom O' Bedlam).
29th Jun '16 9:53:46 AM Andyroid
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* In the ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'' episode "That's Using Your Head", Dexter meets a crazy old man who [[TalkativeLoon babbles nonsense]] ("Why stock three-wheels when the P-p-p-p-power Wheels outperform the rest? It's real simple, folks: we are not alone!") and wears a pile of electronics on his head. Dexter [[SeeminglyProfoundFool mistakes him]] for a MadScientist trying to make contact with aliens and tries to help him with his "invention", which does lead to aliens kidnapping him in the end. So...good?

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'' episode "That's Using Your Head", Dexter meets a crazy old man who [[TalkativeLoon babbles nonsense]] ("Why stock three-wheels when the P-p-p-p-power Wheels outperform the rest? It's real simple, folks: we are not alone!") and wears a pile of electronics on his head. Dexter [[SeeminglyProfoundFool mistakes him]] for a MadScientist trying to make contact with aliens and tries to help him with his "invention", which does lead to aliens kidnapping him in the end.being accidentally transported to an alien world. So...good?
25th Jun '16 12:23:47 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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The trope is a partial TruthInTelevision as the mentally ill are disproportionally represented in the homeless population. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration estimates that 20-25% of the homeless population in the US have "serious mental illnesses". The symptoms of many mental illnesses and addictions can make holding down a job difficult (and the stigma of a former brush with mental illness makes many employers wary of hiring them), and the loss of income may eventually lead to homelessness. The problem is compounded by the Patients' Rights Movement, which makes forcing someone into treatment extremely difficult, and America (and the rest of the world) instituting the policy of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deinstitutionalisation deinstitutionalization]]'' with regards to the mentally ill during the 1960s and 1970s. The idea was that with the invention of many psychotropic drugs (Thorazine for schizophrenia, Prozac for depression, Valium for anxiety, Lithium for bipolar disorder, etc), instead of locking up the mentally ill in mental hospitals (possibly for years or the rest of their lives), they would be given medication and sent home, and the money saved would be instead reinvested into community housing and social support programs to help these patients reintegrate into the community. Unfortunately, governments being what they are, the mental hospitals closed right on cue but the replacement social programs never materialized (and in fact many of the existing social programs ended up being dismantled during the Carter and Reagan eras). This left a vast number of mentally ill patients being left to fend for themselves and many of them relapsed and ended up homeless.

to:

The trope is a partial TruthInTelevision as the mentally ill are disproportionally represented in the homeless population. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration estimates that 20-25% of the homeless population in the US USA have "serious mental illnesses". The symptoms of many mental illnesses and addictions can make holding down a job difficult (and the stigma of a former brush with mental illness makes many employers wary of hiring them), and the loss of income may eventually lead to homelessness. The problem is compounded by the Patients' Rights Movement, which makes forcing someone into treatment extremely difficult, and America (and the rest of the world) instituting the policy of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deinstitutionalisation deinstitutionalization]]'' with regards to the mentally ill during the 1960s and 1970s. The idea was that with the invention of many psychotropic drugs (Thorazine for schizophrenia, Prozac for depression, Valium for anxiety, Lithium for bipolar disorder, etc), instead of locking up the mentally ill in mental hospitals (possibly for years or the rest of their lives), they would be given medication and sent home, and the money saved would be instead reinvested into community housing and social support programs to help these patients reintegrate into the community. Unfortunately, governments being what they are, the mental hospitals closed right on cue but the replacement social programs never materialized (and in fact many of the existing social programs ended up being dismantled during the Carter and Reagan eras). This left a vast number of mentally ill patients being left to fend for themselves and many of them relapsed and ended up homeless.
25th Jun '16 12:23:19 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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The trope is a partial TruthInTelevision as the mentally ill are disproportionally represented in the homeless population. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration estimates that 20-25% of the homeless population have "serious mental illnesses". The symptoms of many mental illnesses and addictions can make holding down a job difficult (and the stigma of a former brush with mental illness makes many employers wary of hiring them), and the loss of income may eventually lead to homelessness. The problem is compounded by the Patients' Rights Movement, which makes forcing someone into treatment extremely difficult, and America (and the rest of the world) instituting the policy of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deinstitutionalisation deinstitutionalization]]'' with regards to the mentally ill during the 1960s and 1970s. The idea was that with the invention of many psychotropic drugs (Thorazine for schizophrenia, Prozac for depression, Valium for anxiety, Lithium for bipolar disorder, etc), instead of locking up the mentally ill in mental hospitals (possibly for years or the rest of their lives), they would be given medication and sent home, and the money saved would be instead reinvested into community housing and social support programs to help these patients reintegrate into the community. Unfortunately, governments being what they are, the mental hospitals closed right on cue but the replacement social programs never materialized (and in fact many of the existing social programs ended up being dismantled during the Carter and Reagan eras). This left a vast number of mentally ill patients being left to fend for themselves and many of them relapsed and ended up homeless.

to:

The trope is a partial TruthInTelevision as the mentally ill are disproportionally represented in the homeless population. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration estimates that 20-25% of the homeless population in the US have "serious mental illnesses". The symptoms of many mental illnesses and addictions can make holding down a job difficult (and the stigma of a former brush with mental illness makes many employers wary of hiring them), and the loss of income may eventually lead to homelessness. The problem is compounded by the Patients' Rights Movement, which makes forcing someone into treatment extremely difficult, and America (and the rest of the world) instituting the policy of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deinstitutionalisation deinstitutionalization]]'' with regards to the mentally ill during the 1960s and 1970s. The idea was that with the invention of many psychotropic drugs (Thorazine for schizophrenia, Prozac for depression, Valium for anxiety, Lithium for bipolar disorder, etc), instead of locking up the mentally ill in mental hospitals (possibly for years or the rest of their lives), they would be given medication and sent home, and the money saved would be instead reinvested into community housing and social support programs to help these patients reintegrate into the community. Unfortunately, governments being what they are, the mental hospitals closed right on cue but the replacement social programs never materialized (and in fact many of the existing social programs ended up being dismantled during the Carter and Reagan eras). This left a vast number of mentally ill patients being left to fend for themselves and many of them relapsed and ended up homeless.
19th May '16 4:31:53 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* Averted in an [[VerySpecialEpisode episode]] of SavedByTheBell, in which the gang befriends and helps a homeless man (and his hot homeless daughter).

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* Averted in an [[VerySpecialEpisode episode]] of SavedByTheBell, Series/SavedByTheBell, in which the gang befriends and helps a homeless man (and his hot homeless daughter).
2nd May '16 1:54:36 PM WikiWitness
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* In the ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'' episode "That's Using Your Head", Dexter meets a crazy old man who [[TalkativeLoon babbles nonsense]] ("Why stock three-wheels when the P-p-p-p-power Wheels outperform the rest? It's real simple, folks: we are not alone!") and wears a pile of electronics on his head. Dexter [[SeeminglyProfoundFool mistakes him]] for a MadScientist trying to make contact with aliens and tries to help him with his "invention".

to:

* In the ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'' episode "That's Using Your Head", Dexter meets a crazy old man who [[TalkativeLoon babbles nonsense]] ("Why stock three-wheels when the P-p-p-p-power Wheels outperform the rest? It's real simple, folks: we are not alone!") and wears a pile of electronics on his head. Dexter [[SeeminglyProfoundFool mistakes him]] for a MadScientist trying to make contact with aliens and tries to help him with his "invention"."invention", which does lead to aliens kidnapping him in the end. So...good?
22nd Mar '16 8:23:18 PM TVRulezAgain
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* ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken'' loves this trope. In one episode, they have their own airline, complete with inflight movie performed by "Crazy Joe" ("You ain't got no legs, Lt. Dan!"). In another, a man navigates his daily life as if it were the game DragonsLair complete with dodging a homeless man spouting lines like "I'm the president of jellybeans. Have some mustard cuz it's Easter!" Yet another episode involved a number of insane homeless people wearing Clark Kent's discarded suits from when he changed into {{Superman}}, and Lois Lane and Jimmy Olson and even {{Batman}} at first think it's really Clark.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken'' loves this trope. In one episode, they have their own airline, complete with inflight movie performed by "Crazy Joe" ("You ain't got no legs, Lt. Dan!"). In another, a man navigates his daily life as if it were the game DragonsLair complete with dodging a homeless man spouting lines like "I'm the president of jellybeans. Have some mustard cuz it's Easter!" Yet another episode involved a number of insane homeless people wearing Clark Kent's discarded suits from when he changed into {{Superman}}, Franchise/{{Superman}}, and Lois Lane and Jimmy Olson and even {{Batman}} Franchise/{{Batman}} at first think it's really Clark.
21st Mar '16 4:16:02 AM Shaid
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* Crazy Dave in ''VideoGame/PlantsVsZombies''. Maybe. He calls himself your neighbor, which suggests that he has a home, but he runs a shop out of his car, wears a pot on his head, and speaks in gibberish. If the Team Arena Shooter [[VideoGame/PlantsVsZombiesGardenWarfare Garden Warfare]] is to be believed (assuming it's canon), he actually owns a mansion. There's even a fountain statue of him!

to:

* Crazy Dave in ''VideoGame/PlantsVsZombies''. Maybe. He calls himself your neighbor, which suggests that he has a home, but he runs a shop out of his car, wears a pot on his head, and speaks in gibberish. If the Team Arena Shooter ThirdPersonShooter [[VideoGame/PlantsVsZombiesGardenWarfare Garden Warfare]] is to be believed (assuming it's canon), he actually owns a mansion. There's even a fountain statue of him!
21st Mar '16 4:13:46 AM Shaid
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* Crazy Dave in ''VideoGame/PlantsVsZombies''. Maybe. He calls himself your neighbor, which suggests that he has a home, but he runs a shop out of his car, wears a pot on his head, and speaks in gibberish. If the Team Arena Shooter GardenWarfare is to be believed (assuming it's canon), he actually owns a mansion. There's even a fountain statue of him!

to:

* Crazy Dave in ''VideoGame/PlantsVsZombies''. Maybe. He calls himself your neighbor, which suggests that he has a home, but he runs a shop out of his car, wears a pot on his head, and speaks in gibberish. If the Team Arena Shooter GardenWarfare [[VideoGame/PlantsVsZombiesGardenWarfare Garden Warfare]] is to be believed (assuming it's canon), he actually owns a mansion. There's even a fountain statue of him!
21st Mar '16 4:10:29 AM Shaid
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* Crazy Dave in ''VideoGame/PlantsVsZombies''. Maybe. He calls himself your neighbor, which suggests that he has a home, but he runs a shop out of his car, wears a pot on his head, and speaks in gibberish.

to:

* Crazy Dave in ''VideoGame/PlantsVsZombies''. Maybe. He calls himself your neighbor, which suggests that he has a home, but he runs a shop out of his car, wears a pot on his head, and speaks in gibberish. If the Team Arena Shooter GardenWarfare is to be believed (assuming it's canon), he actually owns a mansion. There's even a fountain statue of him!
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