History Main / CrazyHomelessPeople

20th May '17 1:57:39 PM JustTroper
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Formally, such a character may not be even be homeless: sometimes they do have an apartment or other place to live. Their defining trait is that instead of living like an ordinary person (i. e. going to work, having a timetable, etc.), they seemingly aimlessly wander the streets, [[TalkativeLoon muttering to themselves]] and doing other strange things. If such a character is female and [[UnkemptBeauty beautiful in spite of her unkempt appearance]], it is TheOphelia.

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Formally, Technically, such a character may not be even be homeless: sometimes they do have an apartment or other place to live. Their defining trait is that instead of living like an ordinary person (i. e. going to work, having a timetable, etc.), they seemingly aimlessly wander the streets, [[TalkativeLoon muttering to themselves]] and doing other strange things. If such a character is female and [[UnkemptBeauty beautiful in spite of her unkempt appearance]], it is TheOphelia.
18th May '17 4:13:27 AM TheAnecdotalist
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The trope is a partial TruthInTelevision as the mentally ill are disproportionally represented in the homeless population. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration estimates that 20-25% of the homeless population in the USA have "serious mental illnesses". The symptoms of many mental illnesses and addictions can make holding down a job difficult (and the stigma of a former brush with mental illness makes many employers wary of hiring them), and the loss of income may eventually lead to homelessness. The problem is compounded by the Patients' Rights Movement, which makes forcing someone into treatment extremely difficult, and America (and the rest of the world) instituting the policy of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deinstitutionalisation deinstitutionalization]]'' with regards to the mentally ill during the 1960s and 1970s. The idea was that with the invention of many psychotropic drugs (Thorazine for schizophrenia, Prozac for depression, Valium for anxiety, Lithium for bipolar disorder, etc), instead of locking up the mentally ill in mental hospitals (possibly for years or the rest of their lives), they would be given medication and sent home, and the money saved would be instead reinvested into community housing and social support programs to help these patients reintegrate into the community. Unfortunately, governments being what they are, the mental hospitals closed right on cue but the replacement social programs never materialized (and in fact many of the existing social programs ended up being dismantled during the Carter and Reagan eras). This left a vast number of mentally ill patients being left to fend for themselves and many of them relapsed and ended up homeless.

to:

The trope is a partial TruthInTelevision as the mentally ill are disproportionally represented in the homeless population. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration estimates that 20-25% of the homeless population in the USA have "serious mental illnesses". The symptoms of many mental illnesses and addictions can make holding down a job difficult (and the stigma of a former brush with mental illness makes many employers wary of hiring them), and the loss of income may eventually lead to homelessness. The problem is compounded by the Patients' Rights Movement, which makes forcing someone into treatment extremely difficult, and America (and the rest of the world) instituting the policy of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deinstitutionalisation deinstitutionalization]]'' with regards to the mentally ill during the 1960s and 1970s. The idea was that with the invention of many psychotropic drugs (Thorazine for schizophrenia, Prozac for depression, Valium for anxiety, Lithium for bipolar disorder, etc), instead of locking up the mentally ill in mental hospitals (possibly for years or the rest of their lives), they would be given medication and sent home, and the money saved would be instead reinvested into community housing and social support programs to help these patients reintegrate into the community. Unfortunately, governments being what they are, the mental hospitals closed right on cue but the replacement social programs never materialized (and in fact many of the existing social programs ended up being dismantled during the Carter and Reagan [and Thatcher] eras). This left a vast number of mentally ill patients being left to fend for themselves and many of them relapsed and ended up homeless.
24th Mar '17 10:34:49 PM CosmicFerret
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* ''Film/AroundTheWorldInEightyDays'' adaptation starring Jackie Chan has a crazy homeless man played by Rob Schneider.

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* ''Film/AroundTheWorldInEightyDays'' ''Film/AroundTheWorldInEightyDays2004'' adaptation starring Jackie Chan has a crazy homeless man played by Rob Schneider.
25th Feb '17 11:54:02 AM easytorememberhandle
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* ComicBook/{{Deadpool}} had a mentally ill homeless man as a sidekick for a while. His name was "Ratbag", and Deadpool was so amused by his schizophrenic ramblings that he hired him as a "biographer". At the end of the arc, while facing the telekinetic villain Black Swan, Deadpool forced him to use his powers to cure Ratbag's illness. Once the man was lucid again, 'Pool ordered him to escape as he made what was then his LastStand. One of the character's first unquestionably heroic acts.
5th Feb '17 1:14:30 PM nombretomado
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* This trope gets considerable play in ''[[AuntDimity Aunt Dimity's Christmas]]''. The villagers' reactions to the news that Lori and her family had a collapsed vagrant airlifted to hospital ranges from incredulity to hostility. Lori herself also recounts how she is often uncomfortable when confronted by homeless people (having so nearly been one herself); of the villagers, she says, "I was the last person on earth qualified to judge my neighbors. I had too much in common with them." Lori and Fr. Bright also have an argument over the man's sanity, especially as the evidence of his recent past suggests he has done highly unusual things and may have been committed to a psychiatric hospital; the priest later admits, "Where there was goodness, I chose to see madness." [[TheVicar Rev. Bunting]] chastises the villagers for their attitude as well.

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* This trope gets considerable play in ''[[AuntDimity ''[[Literature/AuntDimity Aunt Dimity's Christmas]]''. The villagers' reactions to the news that Lori and her family had a collapsed vagrant airlifted to hospital ranges from incredulity to hostility. Lori herself also recounts how she is often uncomfortable when confronted by homeless people (having so nearly been one herself); of the villagers, she says, "I was the last person on earth qualified to judge my neighbors. I had too much in common with them." Lori and Fr. Bright also have an argument over the man's sanity, especially as the evidence of his recent past suggests he has done highly unusual things and may have been committed to a psychiatric hospital; the priest later admits, "Where there was goodness, I chose to see madness." [[TheVicar Rev. Bunting]] chastises the villagers for their attitude as well.
5th Feb '17 9:00:24 AM JustTroper
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* The mysterious wise woman of the streets from ''Literature/TheDaysGoSoSlow'' by Nicasio Latasa who becomes an EccentricMentor for the protagonist Curren and helps him change his life. She is also a seer with precognitive powers, and it is mentioned that in spite of being extremely unkempt, she retained traces of beauty.
3rd Feb '17 10:12:06 AM JustTroper
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Formally, such a character may not be even be homeless: sometimes they even do have an apartment or other place to live. Their defining trait is that instead of living like an ordinary person (i. e. going to work, having a timetable, etc.), they seemingly aimlessly wander the streets, muttering to themselves and doing other strange things. If such a character is female and [[UnkemptBeauty beautiful in spite of her unkempt appearance]], it is TheOphelia.

to:

Formally, such a character may not be even be homeless: sometimes they even do have an apartment or other place to live. Their defining trait is that instead of living like an ordinary person (i. e. going to work, having a timetable, etc.), they seemingly aimlessly wander the streets, [[TalkativeLoon muttering to themselves themselves]] and doing other strange things. If such a character is female and [[UnkemptBeauty beautiful in spite of her unkempt appearance]], it is TheOphelia.
3rd Feb '17 9:02:12 AM JustTroper
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Formally, such a character may not be even be homeless: sometimes they even do have an apartment or other place to live. Their defining trait is that instead of living like an ordinary person (i. e. going to work, having a timetable, etc.), they seemingly aimlessly wander the streets, muttering to themselves and doing other strange things.

to:

Formally, such a character may not be even be homeless: sometimes they even do have an apartment or other place to live. Their defining trait is that instead of living like an ordinary person (i. e. going to work, having a timetable, etc.), they seemingly aimlessly wander the streets, muttering to themselves and doing other strange things.
things. If such a character is female and [[UnkemptBeauty beautiful in spite of her unkempt appearance]], it is TheOphelia.
3rd Feb '17 8:56:08 AM JustTroper
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Added DiffLines:

Formally, such a character may not be even be homeless: sometimes they even do have an apartment or other place to live. Their defining trait is that instead of living like an ordinary person (i. e. going to work, having a timetable, etc.), they seemingly aimlessly wander the streets, muttering to themselves and doing other strange things.
2nd Dec '16 1:36:42 AM GhostOfAGeek
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* There's a recurring, homeless, black man in PolkOut. He's a murdering, drug-dealing rapist.
* The [[UnexplainedRecovery formerly]] late [[BackAlleyDoctor Doctor Hobo]] in Webcomic/VGCats. His speech was an endless stream of word salad, and his behavior ranged from "erratic" to "incomprehensible". He refers to a dead rodent as his cell phone, and seems to have convinced himself that he was a doctor.
* The AuthorAvatar of Webcomic/LeastICouldDo's current artist is a fat homeless guy who draws for food.
* Melody from Webcomic/SoundsLikeAMelody is a rare webcomcis example of an aversion/sympathetic version.
* Webcomic/EverydayHeroes has [[http://eheroes.smackjeeves.com/comics/2113033/yeah-what-she-said/ Scary Mary.]] She is definitely crazy, but has lately shown signs of being on to something.
* Webcomic/TheWordWeary features a recurring homeless character named "Robert." Though sometimes the [[http://www.wordwearycomic.com/2011/12/3-december-2011.html butt of jokes]] and occasionally wildly inappropriate, he's treated relatively sympathetically.

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* There's a recurring, homeless, black man in PolkOut.''Webcomic/PolkOut''. He's a murdering, drug-dealing rapist.
* The [[UnexplainedRecovery formerly]] late [[BackAlleyDoctor Doctor Hobo]] in Webcomic/VGCats.''Webcomic/VGCats''. His speech was an endless stream of word salad, and his behavior ranged from "erratic" to "incomprehensible". He refers to a dead rodent as his cell phone, and seems to have convinced himself that he was a doctor.
* The AuthorAvatar of Webcomic/LeastICouldDo's ''Webcomic/LeastICouldDo'''s current artist is a fat homeless guy who draws for food.
* Melody from Webcomic/SoundsLikeAMelody ''Webcomic/SoundsLikeAMelody'' is a rare webcomcis webcomics example of an aversion/sympathetic version.
* Webcomic/EverydayHeroes ''Webcomic/EverydayHeroes'' has [[http://eheroes.smackjeeves.com/comics/2113033/yeah-what-she-said/ Scary Mary.]] She is definitely crazy, but has lately shown signs of being on to something.
* Webcomic/TheWordWeary ''Webcomic/TheWordWeary'' features a recurring homeless character named "Robert." Though sometimes the [[http://www.wordwearycomic.com/2011/12/3-december-2011.html butt of jokes]] and occasionally wildly inappropriate, he's treated relatively sympathetically.
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