History Main / CoolDown

2nd May '18 9:00:57 PM LlamaAdventure
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* Frequently abused by various {{Allegedly Free Game}}s, especially of the mobile variety. The common implementation is to either have every individual action run on a cooldown timer, or to have every action expend Energy, which recharges after a certain amount of real-life time, both cooldown times taking long enough to completely kill the flow of the game. Of course, the cooldown timer can always be reset with certain items [[BribingYourWayToVictory that can only be procured with real money.]]
25th Mar '18 8:59:12 AM WildKatGirl
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* In ''VideoGame/PlantsVsZombies'', all plants have a recovery time after they have been planted which varies from plant to plants, with powerful plants and instant-kills generally having the longest cooldowns. Some plants, such as Coconut Cannon and Banana Launcher, also have a cooldown after firing. In the second game, giving Plant Food to a seed packet resets the recovery time, and giving it to a plant will ignore its cooldown.
18th Feb '18 5:06:05 AM Diask
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Compare TheLawOfPowerProportionateToEffort.

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Compare TheLawOfPowerProportionateToEffort.
TheLawOfPowerProportionateToEffort. Not to be confused with {{Overheating}}, which is about firearms that cannot fire non-stop, even with BottomlessMagazines.



* In ''TabletopGame/HcSvntDracones'' a character that is Masterful in a proficiency can automatically put one success on a roll of that skill per day, at Preeminent they can auto-pass a check regardless of how many successes it required, daily. While many Focus abilities are "once per session".



** In ''Mass Effect 1'', each power has its own cooldown, which is abominably long or somewhat fast, depending on what passive abilities you have equipped.
** In ''Mass Effect 2'', however, using one power put all the other powers on a cooldown after using only one power. In exchange, though, the cooldowns are greatly reduced to a few seconds for almost every ability; powers with cooldowns longer than ten seconds are almost non-existent. Unless the squad members use their powers, since the squad members have much longer cooldown times than Shepard.
** ''Mass Effect 3'' removes cooldowns from ammo powers and introduces powers that run on a limited stock of grenades rather than cooldowns (or in the case of Nova and Phase Disruptor, the user's barrier). Armor powers no longer trigger cooldowns on activation, but do trigger a cooldown when "detonated" and impose a cooldown penalty when active.

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** In ''Mass Effect 1'', ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'', each power has its own cooldown, which is abominably long or somewhat fast, depending on what passive abilities you have equipped.
** In ''Mass Effect 2'', ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', however, using one power put all the other powers on a cooldown after using only one power. In exchange, though, the cooldowns are greatly reduced to a few seconds for almost every ability; powers with cooldowns longer than ten seconds are almost non-existent. Unless the squad members use their powers, since the squad members have much longer cooldown times than Shepard.
** ''Mass Effect 3'' ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' removes cooldowns from ammo powers and introduces powers that run on a limited stock of grenades rather than cooldowns (or in the case of Nova and Phase Disruptor, the user's barrier). Armor powers no longer trigger cooldowns on activation, but do trigger a cooldown when "detonated" and impose a cooldown penalty when active.



* In ''TabletopGame/HcSvntDracones'' a character that is Masterful in a proficiency can automatically put one success on a roll of that skill per day, at Preeminent they can auto-pass a check regardless of how many successes it required, daily. While many Focus abilities are "once per session".


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* ''VideoGame/FTLFasterThanLight''
** Each FTL engine takes time to charge up and requires someone in the cockpit to do so. Putting more power into the engines decreases the delay.
** All weapons come with a delay from few to 20 or so seconds before they can fire. This delay can be shortened by posting someone to a weapons system or with augmenations.
** Teleporters, cloaking, mind control, hacking and back-up battery all become ionized once their effect wears off (or in case of teleporters, the moment someone gets teleported), rendering them unusable for some time.
** A certain race comes with an ability to lock whatever room they are in for some time, but it can be used only sparingly due to a cooldown period.
26th Jan '18 11:20:18 AM Jubileus57
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Miitopia}}'', the Ancient Robots and their boss equivalents are forced into this state for a few turns after firing their powerful FrickinLaserBeams. During cooldown, they can only perform ramming attacks, but they gain an ExtraTurn.
30th Nov '16 6:56:42 AM Hanz
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* Certain moves in ''VideoGame/Pokemon'' force the user to recharge for a turn after use due to the amount of energy they expend, including [[WaveMotionGun Hyper Beam]], [[TimeCrash Roar of Time]], and the special starter-only attacks.

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* Certain moves in ''VideoGame/Pokemon'' ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' force the user to recharge for a turn after use due to the amount of energy they expend, including [[WaveMotionGun Hyper Beam]], [[TimeCrash Roar of Time]], and the special starter-only attacks.
19th Aug '16 11:21:04 AM Gess
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* All special abilities and magical spells in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' have cooldown periods in addition to consuming stamina and mana, respectively.

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* All special abilities and magical spells in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' have cooldown periods in addition to consuming stamina and mana, respectively. Even more credibility-stretching, healing potions and ''hand grenades'' also have cooldowns.
9th Jul '16 12:31:37 PM StFan
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* ''{{VideoGame/Diablo}} 2'' had the combination. Some spells were cooldown spells, some could be cast continuously. Unlike most games, if any cooldown spell was used, it would prevent all other cooldown skills from being used for the period, not just itself. Many skill setups in the game involved combining a cooldown skill with a fast casting skill.

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[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* ''{{VideoGame/Diablo}} 2'' ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':
** The Fourth Edition provides a {{tabletop RPG}} example with its split of at-will, encounter (basically "usable once per fight") and daily powers for virtually all classes. At-will attack powers in particular were sharply limited in number -- most characters would start with two, perhaps three different class-specific at-will moves at their disposal right at level 1 and then never get any more or improve them much, forcing them to increasingly rely on their daily and encounter powers as those became available.
** The ''Tome of Battle'' supplement for edition 3.5 has a variant -- each of a character's martial maneuvers can be used once per combat, but they can pause to "refresh" them so that they can be used again. The [[SupernaturalMartialArts swordsage]], who relies on rote memorization, knows a large number of maneuvers but must spend his entire turn to refresh even one. The [[GeniusBruiser warblade]], who relies on improvisation and practical experience, knows a moderate number of maneuvers but can refresh all of them at once by making a basic (non-maneuver) attack. The [[{{Determinator}} crusader]], who relies on instinct and tenacity over skill, knows a small number of maneuvers and [[FightLikeACardPlayer the selection he can use at any one time is randomized]], but they refresh automatically (i.e. he never runs out).
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[[folder:Video Games]]
* ''VideoGame/DiabloII''
had the combination. Some spells were cooldown spells, some could be cast continuously. Unlike most games, if any cooldown spell was used, it would prevent all other cooldown skills from being used for the period, not just itself. Many skill setups in the game involved combining a cooldown skill with a fast casting skill.



* Common in [=DnD-type RPGs=], with spells that can only be used once daily, and so on.
* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'''s own fourth edition provides a {{tabletop RPG}} example with its split of at-will, encounter (basically "usable once per fight") and daily powers for virtually all classes. At-will attack powers in particular were sharply limited in number -- most characters would start with two, perhaps three different class-specific at-will moves at their disposal right at level 1 and then never get any more or improve them much, forcing them to increasingly rely on their daily and encounter powers as those became available.
** The ''Tome of Battle'' supplement for edition 3.5 has a variant - each of a character's martial maneuvers can be used once per combat, but they can pause to "refresh" them so that they can be used again. The [[SupernaturalMartialArts swordsage]], who relies on rote memorization, knows a large number of maneuvers but must spend his entire turn to refresh even one. The [[GeniusBruiser warblade]], who relies on improvisation and practical experience, knows a moderate number of maneuvers but can refresh all of them at once by making a basic (non-maneuver) attack. The [[{{Determinator}} crusader]], who relies on instinct and tenacity over skill, knows a small number of maneuvers and [[FightLikeACardPlayer the selection he can use at any one time is randomised]], but they refresh automatically (i.e. he never runs out).



* ''BloodlineChampions'' uses cooldowns to limit abilities, as well as having them all activate global cooldowns. Certain abilities can be used to refresh these cooldowns or cause the enemy to suddenly have their abilities to suddenly be on a temporary cooldown, and a few may be activated that ignores the global cooldown.

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* ''BloodlineChampions'' ''VideoGame/BloodlineChampions'' uses cooldowns to limit abilities, as well as having them all activate global cooldowns. Certain abilities can be used to refresh these cooldowns or cause the enemy to suddenly have their abilities to suddenly be on a temporary cooldown, and a few may be activated that ignores the global cooldown.



* ''VideoGame/{{StarCraft II}}'' is moving a bit in this direction, where some {{Mana}}-based abilities are being replaced with cooldowns.

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* ''VideoGame/{{StarCraft II}}'' ''VideoGame/StarCraftII'' is moving a bit in this direction, where some {{Mana}}-based abilities are being replaced with cooldowns.



* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' uses cooldown management extensively for class balance. All classes have some form of resource management, whether it be mana, runic power, energy, rage, etc.; but also mix this up with cooldowns for individual abilities and occasionally shared families of abilities. To this, add a global cooldown, plus certain abilities that aren't on the global cooldown but ''also'' have their own shared cooldowns. The {{Metagame}} of managing one's cooldowns can therefore become as much if not more a part of the game mechanics as the abilities themselves.
** In some cases, the "rotation" that one goes through with their character can affect Damage Per Second or Threat per second by several THOUSAND points, but are typically obscure and can only be found out by people using add-ons, trial and error, or just being told what to do.
* ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'' has a hero type whose resource management is replaced by cooldown management.
** To clarify; all characters in the game have cooldown on all of their abilities. Most champions also have a resource bar, meaning they can't spam abilities for two reasons (cooldown and mana cost, essentially). However, some champions, such as Garen and Katarina, don't have a resource bar, and instead can spam their abilities as long as they arent on cooldown.

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* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' uses cooldown management extensively for class balance. All classes have some form of resource management, whether it be mana, runic power, energy, rage, etc.; but also mix this up with cooldowns for individual abilities and occasionally shared families of abilities. To this, add a global cooldown, plus certain abilities that aren't on the global cooldown but ''also'' have their own shared cooldowns. The {{Metagame}} of managing one's cooldowns can therefore become as much if not more a part of the game mechanics as the abilities themselves.
**
themselves. In some cases, the "rotation" that one goes through with their character can affect Damage Per Second or Threat per second by several THOUSAND points, but are typically obscure and can only be found out by people using add-ons, trial and error, or just being told what to do.
* ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'' has a hero type whose resource management is replaced by cooldown management.
**
management. To clarify; clarify: all characters in the game have cooldown on all of their abilities. Most champions also have a resource bar, meaning they can't spam abilities for two reasons (cooldown and mana cost, essentially). However, some champions, such as Garen and Katarina, don't have a resource bar, and instead can spam their abilities as long as they arent on cooldown.



* The ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series has both versions with various tradeoffs. In ''Mass Effect 1'', each power had its own cooldown, which was abominably long or somewhat fast, depending on what passive abilities you had equipped. In ''Mass Effect 2'', however, using one power put all the other powers on a cooldown after using only one power. In exchange, though, the cooldowns were greatly reduced to a few seconds for almost every ability; powers with cooldowns longer than ten seconds were almost non-existent. Unless the squad members used their powers, since the squad members had much longer cooldown times than Shepard. ''Mass Effect 3'' removed cooldowns from ammo powers and introduced powers that ran on a limited stock of grenades rather than cooldowns (or in the case of Nova and Phase Disruptor, the user's barrier). Armor powers no longer trigger cooldowns on activation, but do trigger a cooldown when "detonated" and impose a cooldown penalty when active.

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* The ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series has both versions with various tradeoffs. tradeoffs.
**
In ''Mass Effect 1'', each power had has its own cooldown, which was is abominably long or somewhat fast, depending on what passive abilities you had equipped. have equipped.
**
In ''Mass Effect 2'', however, using one power put all the other powers on a cooldown after using only one power. In exchange, though, the cooldowns were are greatly reduced to a few seconds for almost every ability; powers with cooldowns longer than ten seconds were are almost non-existent. Unless the squad members used use their powers, since the squad members had have much longer cooldown times than Shepard. Shepard.
**
''Mass Effect 3'' removed removes cooldowns from ammo powers and introduced introduces powers that ran run on a limited stock of grenades rather than cooldowns (or in the case of Nova and Phase Disruptor, the user's barrier). Armor powers no longer trigger cooldowns on activation, but do trigger a cooldown when "detonated" and impose a cooldown penalty when active.



* ''VideoGame/{{Eve Online}}'' has the global session change timer, which starts when you do an action on a rather small list and forces you to wait 30 seconds before doing another (these include actions like dock at a station, change the ship you're in, join/leave a fleet, use a stargate, ''log on to the game''; you know, that sort of thing). Most active modules have individual cooldown as well; active, repeating modules call it ''cycle time'', while non-repeating modules call it a ''reactivation delay''.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Eve Online}}'' ''VideoGame/EveOnline'' has the global session change timer, which starts when you do an action on a rather small list and forces you to wait 30 seconds before doing another (these include actions like dock at a station, change the ship you're in, join/leave a fleet, use a stargate, ''log on to the game''; you know, that sort of thing). Most active modules have individual cooldown as well; active, repeating modules call it ''cycle time'', while non-repeating modules call it a ''reactivation delay''.


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9th Jan '16 3:38:35 PM Bugfragged
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* In ''VideoGame/NocturneRPGMaker'', all physical skills and stronger spells require a certain amount of turns to cool down. Physical skills have a longer cooldown time, but usually cost little to no MP to compensate. However, the Accelerate passive gives a chance of instantly refreshing a non-ultimate skill.
2nd Jan '16 9:45:53 AM nombretomado
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* {{Eve Online}} has the global session change timer, which starts when you do an action on a rather small list and forces you to wait 30 seconds before doing another (these include actions like dock at a station, change the ship you're in, join/leave a fleet, use a stargate, ''log on to the game''; you know, that sort of thing). Most active modules have individual cooldown as well; active, repeating modules call it ''cycle time'', while non-repeating modules call it a ''reactivation delay''.
* ''{{Solatorobo}}'' has cooldown present only in the fishing minigame; any weapons can be fired until they run out of ammo.

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* {{Eve Online}} ''VideoGame/{{Eve Online}}'' has the global session change timer, which starts when you do an action on a rather small list and forces you to wait 30 seconds before doing another (these include actions like dock at a station, change the ship you're in, join/leave a fleet, use a stargate, ''log on to the game''; you know, that sort of thing). Most active modules have individual cooldown as well; active, repeating modules call it ''cycle time'', while non-repeating modules call it a ''reactivation delay''.
* ''{{Solatorobo}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Solatorobo}}'' has cooldown present only in the fishing minigame; any weapons can be fired until they run out of ammo.
22nd Dec '15 4:25:31 PM TwinBladeWarrior
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* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', [[MakeMeWannaShout Shouts]] have a cooldown period related to how powerful they are and to what level they've been upgraded.

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* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', [[MakeMeWannaShout Shouts]] have a global cooldown period related to how powerful they are and to what level they've been upgraded.is used (One, two or three words).
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