History Main / ContinuityDrift

22nd Oct '17 7:26:48 PM comicwriter
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** When Sabretooth first meets Wolverine in ''Film/XMen1'', he never gives any indication that he knows who Wolverine is, even though he spends more time with him than with any of the X-Men. ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'' later reveals that, not only do the two have an extensive history together (going back to the mid-1800's), they're actually ''half-brothers''. The first film also depicts Sabretooth as a barely-intelligible, beast-like creature who rarely speaks, while the prequel has him as a much more intelligent and articulate villain.

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** When Sabretooth Comicbook/{{Sabretooth}} first meets Wolverine in ''Film/XMen1'', he never gives any indication that he knows who Wolverine is, even though he spends more time with him than with any of the X-Men. ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'' later reveals that, not only do the two have an extensive history together (going back to the mid-1800's), they're actually ''half-brothers''. The first film also depicts Sabretooth as a barely-intelligible, beast-like creature who rarely speaks, while the prequel has him as a much more intelligent and articulate villain.villain.
** The first movie also strongly implies that Wolverine's claws are mechanical in nature, and screws can even clearly be seen on them during the scene where Magneto attacks him in the train. ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'' would later incorporate the comics' retcon that Logan possessed natural bone claws that were later coated in adamantium.
20th Sep '17 2:05:02 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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** In the original version of [[Literature/TheGunslinger book I]], Roland discovers that the Man in Black he's been chasing isn't Marten but Walter. Later books in the series indicate that Marten, Walter, Flagg, and so on are the same adversary Roland's been chasing all this time, not just symbolically as "the Man in Black" but ''literally the same person''. This is made explicit in the revised version of book I.
** In [[Literature/TheDrawingOfTheThree book II]], Eddie Dean is from Co-Op City, The Bronx, in 1983. From [[Literature/TheWastelands book III]] onward, he's from Co-Op City, Brooklyn, in 1987. This would be a simple gaffe, if not for the fact that it becomes a plot point that Co-Op City really is in the Bronx and Eddie's Co-Op City in Brooklyn is a sign that his world isn't the "real world".
** There are tons of minor changes as well. For example, it seems like Roland's motivation for going to the Dark Tower changes every book as does the function of the Tower itself. Hell, Roland attributes the multiverse's imminent collapse on the Tower itself at the end of book IV. It's not until the last three that everything finally solidifies, probably due to King finally deciding what the Tower is and does.

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** In the original version of [[Literature/TheGunslinger book I]], the first book]], Roland discovers that the Man in Black he's been chasing isn't Marten Broadcloak but Walter. Walter O'Dim. Later books in the series indicate that Marten, Walter, Flagg, Marten and so on Walter are the same adversary Roland's been chasing all this time, not just symbolically as "the Man in Black" but ''literally the same person''. This is made explicit in the revised version of book I.
version.
** In [[Literature/TheDrawingOfTheThree book II]], the second book]], Eddie Dean is from Co-Op City, The the Bronx, in 1983. From [[Literature/TheWastelands book III]] onward, he's from Co-Op City, Brooklyn, in 1987. This would be a simple gaffe, if not for the fact that it becomes a plot point that Co-Op City really is ''is'' in the Bronx Bronx, and Eddie's Co-Op City in Brooklyn is a sign that his world isn't the "real world".
** There are tons of minor changes as well. For example, it seems like Roland's motivation for going to the Dark Tower changes every book as does the function of the Tower itself. Hell, Roland attributes the multiverse's imminent collapse on the Tower itself at the end of book IV.the fourth book. It's not until the last three that everything finally solidifies, probably due to King finally deciding what the Tower is and does.



** In the original version of book one, the FinalBoss is referred to (in a very sinister manner) as ''The Beast''. Turns out they meant the Crimson King all along, [[spoiler:and he's not very tough]].

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** In the original version of book one, the first book, the FinalBoss is referred to (in a very sinister manner) as ''The Beast''. Turns out they meant the Crimson King all along, [[spoiler:and he's not very tough]].tough]].
** In general, the books tend to vacillate on whether Roland's companions ''actually'' hail from the real world, or just from [[SharedUniverse the same fictional universe]] where most of Creator/StephenKing's other books take place. Case in point: ''Literature/TheDrawingOfTheThree'' has a scene where Eddie Dean remembers seeing the movie ''Film/TheShining'' (which was originally a Stephen King novel), while ''Literature/WizardAndGlass'' claims that his brother Henry was friends with Skipper Brannigan (the bully who torments Dinky Earnshaw in "Literature/EverythingsEventual"), and ''Literature/WolvesOfTheCalla'' has Father Callahan (first introduced in ''Literature/SalemsLot'') saved from Neo-Nazis by the same kindly booksellers whom Jake Chambers meets in ''Literature/TheWasteLands''. This becomes particularly glaring in ''Literature/SongOfSusannah'', where Roland and Eddie [[MediumAwareness outright meet Stephen King and discover that they're both characters from his novels]]. [[note]] Among other things, Eddie discovers that he was born in Co-Op City in Brooklyn because King forgot that Co-Op City is actually in the Bronx.[[/note]] But then the last book in the series features Roland traveling to New York to meet Susannah's godfather Moses Carver immediately after encountering Stephen King in Maine, with Carver even giving him a copy of King's novel ''Literature/{{Insomnia}}''. It's...a little inconsistent, to say the least.
16th Sep '17 10:33:35 PM igordebraga
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** When Mystique loses her powers in ''The Last Stand'', she reverts to the appearance of a relatively young woman (Rebecca Romijn was 34 at the time), clearly implied to be her default human form. ''First Class'' later establishes that Mystique is far older than this, being not much younger than Xavier and Magneto and, like them, should be in her sixties by the time of the original trilogy.

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** When Mystique loses her powers in ''The Last Stand'', she reverts to the appearance of a relatively young woman (Rebecca Romijn was 34 at the time), clearly implied to be her default human form. ''First Class'' later establishes that Mystique is far older than this, being not much younger than Xavier and Magneto and, like them, should be in her sixties by the time of the original trilogy. Though like Wolverine's healing factor, the shapeshifting gives an excuse for why she ages slower than regular humans.



** In general there didn't seem to be much indication that the Infinity Stones were even a thing. For instance, ''The Avengers'' states that Loki's scepter, which is revealed to be the Mind Stone in ''[[Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron Age of Ultron]]'', is simply a weapon powered by the Tesseract.

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** In general there didn't seem to be much indication that the Infinity Stones were even a thing. For instance, ''The Avengers'' states that Loki's scepter, which is revealed to be contain the Mind Stone in ''[[Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron Age of Ultron]]'', is simply a weapon powered given to him by the Tesseract.The Other.
12th Sep '17 10:55:23 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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* [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI The original]] ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' can be decidedly vague about how {{the Heartless}} operate, but it pretty heavily implies that they're ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as the name implies]]) people who've lost their hearts after being corrupted by Darkness. Hence, the climax of the game pretty clearly shows Sora [[spoiler: becoming a Heartless]] after he [[spoiler: sacrifices his heart to save Kairi]], and then [[spoiler: becoming human again]] after [[spoiler: Kairi uses her magic to restore his heart]]. But then ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'' establishes that Heartless ''do'' have hearts, and that people don't become Heartless themselves; their ''hearts'' become Heartless after being corrupted by negative emotions and detaching from their bodies, while the heartless shell left behind is called a "Nobody". But of course, Nobodies hadn't been introduced to the mythos at that point. [[KudzuPlot It's probably best not to think too hard about the climax...]]

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* [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI The original]] ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' can be decidedly vague about how {{the Heartless}} operate, but it pretty heavily implies that they're {{the Heartless}} are ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as the name implies]]) people who've lost their hearts after being corrupted by Darkness. Hence, the climax of the game pretty clearly shows Sora [[spoiler: becoming a Heartless]] after he [[spoiler: sacrifices his heart to save Kairi]], and then [[spoiler: becoming human again]] after [[spoiler: Kairi uses her magic to restore his heart]]. But then ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'' establishes that Heartless ''do'' have hearts, and that people don't become Heartless themselves; their ''hearts'' become Heartless after being corrupted by negative emotions and detaching from their bodies, while the heartless shell left behind is called a "Nobody". But of course, Nobodies hadn't been introduced to the mythos at that point. [[KudzuPlot It's probably best not to think too hard about the climax...]]
12th Sep '17 10:49:53 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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** In ''A New Hope'', "Ben Kenobi" wears brown robes and a white tunic, which seem like pretty fitting garb for an old hermit living in hiding from the Empire in the middle of nowhere. But in the prequels, the brown robes and white tunic were made into the official uniform of the Jedi Order. If Obi-Wan was really trying to pass himself off as an unassuming old hermit while hiding from the Empire, [[PaperThinDisguise he apparently wasn't trying very hard]].

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** In ''A New Hope'', "Ben Kenobi" wears brown robes and a white tunic, which seem like pretty fitting garb for an a mysterious old hermit living in hiding from the Empire in the middle of nowhere. But in the prequels, the brown robes and white tunic were made into the official uniform of the Jedi Order. If Obi-Wan was really trying to pass himself off as an unassuming old hermit while hiding from the Empire, [[PaperThinDisguise he apparently wasn't trying very hard]].
12th Sep '17 10:39:19 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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** In ''A New Hope'', Ben Kenobi wears brown robes. In the prequels, brown robes were made into the official uniform of the Jedi order, making Kenobi's "disguise" a lot less convincing.

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** In ''A New Hope'', Ben Kenobi "Ben Kenobi" wears brown robes. In robes and a white tunic, which seem like pretty fitting garb for an old hermit living in hiding from the Empire in the middle of nowhere. But in the prequels, the brown robes and white tunic were made into the official uniform of the Jedi order, making Kenobi's "disguise" a lot less convincing.Order. If Obi-Wan was really trying to pass himself off as an unassuming old hermit while hiding from the Empire, [[PaperThinDisguise he apparently wasn't trying very hard]].
12th Sep '17 9:47:16 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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* [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI The original]] ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' can be decidedly vague about how {{the Heartless}} operate, but it pretty heavily implies that they're ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as the name implies]]) people who've lost their hearts after being corrupted by Darkness. Hence, the climax of the game pretty clearly shows Sora [[spoiler: becoming a Heartless]] after he [[spoiler: sacrifices his heart to save Kairi]], and then [[spoiler: becoming human again]] after [[spoiler: Kairi uses her magic to restore his heart]]. But then ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'' establishes that Heartless ''do'' have hearts, and that people don't become Heartless themselves; their ''hearts'' become Heartless after being corrupted by negative emotions and detaching from their bodies, while the heartless shell left behind is called a "Nobody". But of course, Nobodies hadn't been introduced to the mythos at that point. [[KudzuPlot It's probably best not to think too hard about the climax...]]
20th Aug '17 10:45:41 PM GrammarNavi
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** The ''Return of the Jedi'' novelization follows a draft of the movie in stating Obi-Wan and Uncle Owen were actually brothers. Nothing really contradicted it until ''Attack of the Clones'' where Owen is Anakin's stepbrother. Thus, after ''The Phantom Menace'', a ''Literature/JediAcademy'' novel with young Obi-Wan came out which mentioned his brother Owen.

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** The ''Return of the Jedi'' novelization follows a draft of the movie in stating Obi-Wan and Uncle Owen were actually brothers. Nothing really contradicted it until ''Attack of the Clones'' where Owen is Anakin's stepbrother. Thus, after ''The Phantom Menace'', a ''Literature/JediAcademy'' ''Literature/JediAcademyTrilogy'' novel with young Obi-Wan came out which mentioned his brother Owen.
16th Jul '17 1:35:33 PM tomandtish
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** Lennier also forgets that there is a worker caste as well. It's in the same episode as well (Grail) and he's actually the one who first says that there's two castes (it's actually the same conversation DeLenn is in). No mention of workers at all. Apparently forgetfulness is contagious?
15th Jul '17 5:56:07 PM ElectroKraken
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* The pilot episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' stated that all jobs were selected for everyone by the government, everyone had "job chips" implanted in their hands, and leaving your job was [[DisproportionateRetribution punishable by death]]. Nowadays, the job chips seems to function mostly as a form of ID, with everyone taking the job they want.

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* The pilot episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' stated that all jobs were selected for everyone by the government, everyone had "job chips" implanted in their hands, and leaving your job was [[DisproportionateRetribution punishable by death]]. Nowadays, the job chips seems seem to function mostly as a form of ID, with everyone taking the job they want.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ContinuityDrift