History Main / ContinuityDrift

25th Mar '17 1:27:38 PM EDP
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** Hiei initially points out that he and Yukina are '''half'''-siblings with different mothers. In the Three Kings Saga, it's revealed that the two have the same mother, were born at the same time, and Hiei was conceived by a man, while Yukina was conceived asexually.

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** Hiei initially points out that he and Yukina are '''half'''-siblings with different mothers. In the Three Kings Saga, it's revealed that the two have the same mother, were born at the same time, and Hiei was conceived by a man, while Yukina was conceived asexually. Then again, it wouldn't have been out of character of Hiei to just lie.
21st Feb '17 12:41:37 AM KeithM
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* In ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'', Cerberus was presented as a dastardly lot carrying out unethical experimentation for little good reason. When ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' came about and players were forced to work with them, the members with which you now encountered being more moral sorts, attempts were made to paper over the difference by claiming those that appeared in the first game were rogue elements. Not everyone bought the explanation. ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' revealed that the Illusive Man collected the most sympathetic members he could find to manipulate Shepard.

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* In ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'', Cerberus was presented as a dastardly lot carrying out unethical experimentation for little good reason. reason and a rogue Alliance military Black Ops unit. When ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' came about and players were forced to work with them, Cerberus was now an independent well-funded but fairly small group, with Shepard's resurrection and the construction of the SR-2 ''Normandy'' taking up a huge portion of their resources, and the members with which you now encountered being more moral sorts, attempts sorts. Attempts were made to paper over the difference by claiming those that appeared in the first game were rogue elements. elements. Not everyone bought the explanation. ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' revealed that the Illusive Man collected the most sympathetic members he could find to manipulate Shepard.Shepard, and Cerberus was a full-on NGOSuperpower that could outfit a respectable battlefleet.
21st Feb '17 12:26:02 AM KeithM
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** In the first novel, Harrington herself is a competent but not necessarily noteworthy officer who superiors higher up the chain of command don't really know, and in subsequent novels gains a number of people trying to destroy her reputation and career. In the short story "Let's Dance", written many real-life years later but taking place chronologically about a year or so before the ''On Basilisk Station'', Harrington gains a measure of notoriety by assisting a known terrorist group in freeing some genetic slaves, creating a minor diplomatic kerfuffle and forcing the Navy to quietly send her off to command school to keep her away from the press and political opposition until things die down. At no point in the novels which take place later was this incident ever mentioned, even by her internal enemies who otherwise used every excuse, rumor, spin, and dirty trick to bring her down.

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** In the first novel, Harrington herself is a competent but not necessarily noteworthy officer who superiors higher up the chain of command don't really know, and in subsequent novels gains a number of people trying to destroy her reputation and career. In the short story "Let's Dance", written many real-life years later but taking place chronologically about a year or so before the ''On Basilisk Station'', Harrington gains a measure of notoriety by assisting a known terrorist group in freeing some genetic slaves, creating a minor diplomatic kerfuffle and forcing the Navy to quietly send her off to command school to keep her away from the press and political opposition until things die down. At no point in the novels which take place later was this incident ever mentioned, even by her internal enemies who otherwise used every excuse, rumor, spin, and dirty trick to bring her down.
21st Feb '17 12:24:00 AM KeithM
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* In the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series there are assorted examples.
** One of the notable ones involve prolong, the life extension treatment common to advanced societies. It isn't mentioned in the first book ''On Basilisk Station'', and makes it appearance in the second, ''The Honor of the Queen'' when the Manticorans visit the less technologically advanced planet of Grayson, which doesn't have that medical technology. Third-generation prolong treatment is stated to extend ''all'' stages of human physical maturity, and people from Grayson are explicitly stated to be disturbed by the sight of a warship that looks like it's crewed by teenagers and even pre-teens. Although that particular comparison isn't mentioned again, there are some references later in the series that imply the same thing, such as when Queen Elizabeth III states she didn't start developing a bust until she was in her late 20s. Much later in the series, when the subject of prolong comes up, it's mentioned that recipients get treatment during childhood that cancels the effect so that they age at a normal human rate until they've reached physical maturity.
** In the first novel, Harrington herself is a competent but not necessarily noteworthy officer who superiors higher up the chain of command don't really know, and in subsequent novels gains a number of people trying to destroy her reputation and career. In the short story "Let's Dance", written many real-life years later but taking place chronologically about a year or so before the ''On Basilisk Station'', Harrington gains a measure of notoriety by assisting a known terrorist group in freeing some genetic slaves, creating a minor diplomatic kerfuffle and forcing the Navy to quietly send her off to command school to keep her away from the press and political opposition until things die down. At no point in the novels which take place later was this incident ever mentioned, even by her internal enemies who otherwise used every excuse, rumor, spin, and dirty trick to bring her down.
5th Feb '17 2:40:18 PM skidoo23
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** It is now generally accepted that Timelords automatically regenerate when mortally injured, but it wasn't until the FIFTH regeneration that this happened. Hartnell was renewed by 'part of the Tardis'. Troughton suffered a 'change of appearance' (often supposed now to be a ''forced'' regeneration). Pertwee only regenerated after being given a nudge by K’anpo (although it's finally termed 'regeneration'). Tom Baker merged with a mystical future version of himself. Only with Davison's regeneration onwards has the process been regular and automatic (and even Davison's Doctor questioned whether his death would trigger regeneration -- "I might regenerate -- I don't know".) In "The War Games" we even see a Time Lord get shot and he just dies, no regeneration. "Last of the Time Lords" has the Master choose not to regenerate, and Time Lords get shot in "Day of the Doctor" without regenerating (the implication is that Dalek weaponry is anti-regenerative).
** Time Lord sexuality has swung back and forth over the years. The First Doctor was a wholesome but sexual being -- he had a romantic subplot with a woman in a first season episode and a granddaughter, with no implication she came from any route other than the standard way one creates granddaughters (and she had her own [[GirlOfTheWeek Boys of the Week]] and was shown to like kissing people). The Second Doctor flirted with Astrid in "Enemy of the World" for no reason other than pleasure. The Third Doctor flirted with Liz a ''lot'' and had Jo and Sarah as {{Implied Love Interest}}s, while the Master often used his sexuality as a weapon (like in "The Mind of Evil" and "The Time Monster"). The Fourth Doctor was less sexual than his predecessor due to his alien nature ("you're a beautiful woman, probably") but still had {{U|nresolvedSexualTension}}ST and even ShipTease with Sarah, Leela and both Romanas (especially the second). None of this was treated as any big deal -- it was simply there as part of the character, and never in focus due to its unimportance. But by the 80s, production team members who felt the Doctor should be above such human concerns began to take charge. It's also not a coincidence that these concerns also surfaced after hiring PeterDavison, an actor much closer in age with his co-stars (the previous four Doctors' actors were 15-30 years older than their companions), giving rise to fears that [[MoralGuardians Mary Whitehouse]] would add "sexual innuendo" to the charges on her rap sheet against the show. Phrases like "no hanky-panky in the TARDIS" were coined and the producer enforced a policy of the Doctor not even being allowed to touch or look at his companions in case people got the wrong idea. By this point the Doctor was considered {{Asexual}} by the show, the fandom and the mainstream media, and people were beginning to suspect that Time Lords as a species were just above that sort of thing -- and so when the TV Movie had the Eighth Doctor giving a BigDamnKiss to a human woman purely for the pleasure of it, fans tore out their hair and cried. The Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures book "Lungbarrow" came out after the movie and canonised the idea of 'looms', a system of asexual reproduction for Time Lords that generates full adults. The new series pinged right back to the idea of Time Lords being sexual, showing children, talking about the Doctor's parents and wives, and makes the Doctor's sexuality and sexualisation a major theme of his character.
** Whether "Time Lord" is the name of the race from Galifrey or a subset of them has drifted in and out over time. The classic series originally implied that they were all Time Lords, and then later episodes introduced Galifreyans who were pure HumanAliens (including primitive cultures living on the same planet). The revived series reverted to using it as the name of the race until the Twelth Doctor's run started making the distinction again, and even then the term is used to refer to both the few individuals with the rank and also the culture in general.

to:

** It is now generally accepted that Timelords automatically regenerate when mortally injured, but it wasn't until the FIFTH regeneration that this happened. Hartnell was renewed by 'part of the Tardis'. Troughton suffered a 'change of appearance' (often supposed now to be a ''forced'' regeneration). Pertwee only regenerated after being given a nudge by K’anpo (although it's finally termed 'regeneration'). Tom Baker merged with a mystical future version of himself. Only with Davison's regeneration onwards has the process been regular and automatic (and even Davison's Doctor questioned whether his death would trigger regeneration -- "I might regenerate -- I don't know".) In "The War Games" we even see a Time Lord get shot and he just dies, no regeneration. "Last of the Time Lords" has the Master choose not to regenerate, and Time Lords get shot in "Day of the Doctor" without regenerating (the implication is that Dalek weaponry is anti-regenerative).
anti-regenerative, although there have also been episodes indicating that a severe enough injury can kill a Time Lord outright; plus given that the context is war those Time Lords being seen killed may have already exhausted their 13-life limit).
** Time Lord sexuality has swung back and forth over the years. The First Doctor was a wholesome but sexual being -- he had a romantic subplot with a woman in a first season episode and a granddaughter, with no implication she came from any route other than the standard way one creates granddaughters (and she had her own [[GirlOfTheWeek Boys of the Week]] and was shown to like kissing people). The Second Doctor flirted with Astrid in "Enemy of the World" for no reason other than pleasure. The Third Doctor flirted with Liz a ''lot'' and had Jo and Sarah as {{Implied Love Interest}}s, while the Master often used his sexuality as a weapon (like in "The Mind of Evil" and "The Time Monster").Monster") with a bit of HoYay with the Doctor tossed into the mix. The Fourth Doctor was less sexual than his predecessor due to his alien nature ("you're a beautiful woman, probably") but still had {{U|nresolvedSexualTension}}ST and even ShipTease with Sarah, Leela and both Romanas (especially the second). None of this was treated as any big deal -- it was simply there as part of the character, and never in focus due to its unimportance.unimportance (plus network restrictions given that the BBC considered ''Doctor Who'' a children's programme). But by the 80s, production team members who felt the Doctor should be above such human concerns began to take charge. It's also not a coincidence that these concerns also surfaced after hiring PeterDavison, an actor much closer in age with his co-stars (the previous four Doctors' actors were 15-30 years older than their companions), giving rise to fears that [[MoralGuardians Mary Whitehouse]] would add "sexual innuendo" to the charges on her rap sheet against the show. Phrases like "no hanky-panky in the TARDIS" were coined and the producer enforced a policy of the Doctor not even being allowed to touch or look at his companions in case people got the wrong idea. By this point the Doctor was considered {{Asexual}} by the show, the fandom and the mainstream media, and people were beginning to suspect that Time Lords as a species were just above that sort of thing -- and so when the TV Movie had the Eighth Doctor giving a BigDamnKiss to a human woman purely for the pleasure of it, fans tore out their hair and cried. The Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures book "Lungbarrow" came out after the movie and canonised semi-canonised the idea of 'looms', a system of asexual reproduction for Time Lords that generates full adults.adults, while another novel cast doubt on the Doctor actually having a biological granddaughter. The new series pinged right back to the idea of Time Lords being sexual, showing children, talking about the Doctor's parents and wives, and makes the Doctor's sexuality and sexualisation a major theme of his character.
** Whether "Time Lord" is the name of the race from Galifrey or a subset of them has drifted in and out over time. The classic series originally implied that they were all Time Lords, and then later episodes introduced Galifreyans who were pure HumanAliens (including primitive cultures living on the same planet). The revived series reverted to using it as the name of the race - with the Eleventh Doctor episode "A Good Man Goes to War" even establishing the existence of a specific form of Time Lord DNA - until the Twelth Doctor's run started making the distinction again, and even then the term is used to refer to both the few individuals with the rank and also the culture in general.


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** Clara has also been accused of continuity drift, given how over the course of 2 1/2 seasons she changed from being a computer illiterate nanny to being someone nearly as powerful as the Doctor himself and his DistaffCounterpart. Defenders simply reply that this is character development, and that while it may have only been 2 1/2 seasons on screen, the passage of time for Clara is somewhat greater (with an implied 2-3 year time jump between Series 7 and the 50th anniversary special.
28th Jan '17 9:56:01 PM Dere
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** The story was also responsible for bringing back Comicbook/NormanOsborn from the dead. Not only did this slap a huge {{Retcon}} on a story that was written 20 years earlier but it negated the actions of the Jackal throughout the Saga.

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** The Thanks to ExecutiveMeddling, the story was also responsible for bringing back Comicbook/NormanOsborn from the dead. Not only did this slap a huge {{Retcon}} on a story that was written 20 years earlier but it negated the actions of the Jackal throughout the Saga. Just about all of the writers involved in the saga were notably against the retcon.
18th Jan '17 5:09:30 AM AlternativeCola
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*** To be fair, the writers likely didn't intend to develop the previous Avatars originally. In said episode it was somewhat implied that one of the faces Koh showed was the Avatar who tried to steal his face (and it wasn't Kuruk).

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*** To be fair, the writers likely didn't intend to develop the previous Avatars originally. In said episode it was somewhat implied that one of the faces Koh showed was the Avatar who tried to steal his face (and it wasn't Kuruk).Kuruk), though it was later confirmed that the person whose face was shown was not an Avatar but in fact, Kuruk's lost love Ummi as stated by Kuruk to Aang in the series finale.
5th Jan '17 1:40:08 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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** A minor example: ''Nanny Ogg's Cookbook'' (1999) has a bit in the courtship section about sending coded messages by the positioning of stamps on a love letter. Nanny views this as a bit old-fashioned, from the days when "a girl wasn't expected to have any private correspondence until she was thirty-five." In ''Discworld/GoingPostal'' (2004), Moist von Lipwig invents the postage stamp....[[note]]This could be handwaved ''if'' you subscribe to the idea that the 'Nanny Ogg'-era stamps are the ink-pad type mentioned early in Discworld\GoingPostal, and the sender somehow convinces the local postal worker to place the ink a certain way.[[/note]]

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** A minor example: ''Nanny Ogg's Cookbook'' (1999) has a bit in the courtship section about sending coded messages by the positioning of stamps on a love letter. Nanny views this as a bit old-fashioned, from the days when "a girl wasn't expected to have any private correspondence until she was thirty-five." In ''Discworld/GoingPostal'' (2004), Moist von Lipwig invents the postage stamp....[[note]]This could be handwaved ''if'' you subscribe to the idea that the 'Nanny Ogg'-era stamps are the ink-pad type mentioned early in Discworld\GoingPostal, Discworld/GoingPostal, and the sender somehow convinces the local postal worker to place the ink a certain way.[[/note]]
5th Jan '17 1:38:51 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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** A minor example: ''Nanny Ogg's Cookbook'' (1999) has a bit in the courtship section about sending coded messages by the positioning of stamps on a love letter. Nanny views this as a bit old-fashioned, from the days when "a girl wasn't expected to have any private correspondence until she was thirty-five." In ''Discworld/GoingPostal'' (2004), Moist von Lipwig invents the postage stamp...

to:

** A minor example: ''Nanny Ogg's Cookbook'' (1999) has a bit in the courtship section about sending coded messages by the positioning of stamps on a love letter. Nanny views this as a bit old-fashioned, from the days when "a girl wasn't expected to have any private correspondence until she was thirty-five." In ''Discworld/GoingPostal'' (2004), Moist von Lipwig invents the postage stamp... stamp....[[note]]This could be handwaved ''if'' you subscribe to the idea that the 'Nanny Ogg'-era stamps are the ink-pad type mentioned early in Discworld\GoingPostal, and the sender somehow convinces the local postal worker to place the ink a certain way.[[/note]]
15th Dec '16 8:17:23 AM Austin
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** There are other plot elements that were introduced early in the series that ended up never being expanded on. A method of tracking people using things called Spirit Ribbons is also never seen again after the initial arc, with all of the characters tracking each other using only their spiritual power. In fact, the afterlife aspect of the series is often inconsequential, with various aspects of it (the reincarnation cycle, who hollows were before they changed into hollows, the possibility of Shinigami having once been humans themselves, and Hell) remaining unexplored in favor of battles between the various spiritual factions.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ContinuityDrift