History Main / ContinuityDrift

13th Jan '18 5:14:08 AM erforce
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* The ''Film/XMen'' film series is rather infamous for this, although the introduction of an AlternateTimeline created via MentalTimeTravel in ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'' excuses ''some'' of the discrepancies.

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* The ''Film/XMen'' film series ''Film/XMenFilmSeries'' is rather infamous for this, although the introduction of an AlternateTimeline created via MentalTimeTravel in ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'' excuses ''some'' of the discrepancies.
6th Jan '18 5:02:07 AM HarpieSiren
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* While the existence of past Keyblade wielders was always a plot point in ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'', Keyblades themselves were treated as though they were rare and special. By ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'', this is no longer the case, with one character even lampshading that "it seems like everyone has one of those things these days". Similarly, the original game claims that the Keyblade chooses its master, but ''Birth by Sleep'' shows that people become Keyblade wielders because other Keyblade wielders choose them as successors and make them undertake a rite of passage.

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* *''Franchise/KingdomHearts''
**
While the existence of past Keyblade wielders was always a plot point in ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'', Keyblades themselves were treated as though they were rare and special. By ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'', this is no longer the case, with one character even lampshading that "it seems like everyone has one of those things these days". Similarly, the original game claims that the Keyblade chooses its master, but ''Birth by Sleep'' shows that people become Keyblade wielders because other Keyblade wielders choose them as successors and make them undertake a rite of passage.
** [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI The original]] ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' pretty heavily implies that {{the Heartless}} are ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as the name implies]]) people who've lost their hearts after being corrupted by Darkness. Hence, the climax of the game pretty clearly shows Sora [[spoiler: becoming a Heartless]] after he [[spoiler: sacrifices his heart to save Kairi]], and then [[spoiler: becoming human again]] after [[spoiler: Kairi uses her magic to restore his heart]]. But then ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'' establishes that Heartless ''do'' have hearts, and that people don't become Heartless themselves; their ''hearts'' become Heartless after being corrupted by negative emotions and detaching from their bodies, while the heartless shell left behind is called a "Nobody".[[note]]To sum up: the terms are ''exactly'' backward. Heartless are hearts with ''no body''. Nobodies are bodies with no heart.[[/note]] But of course, Nobodies hadn't been introduced to the mythos at that point. [[KudzuPlot It's probably best not to think too hard about the climax...]]



* [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI The original]] ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' pretty heavily implies that {{the Heartless}} are ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as the name implies]]) people who've lost their hearts after being corrupted by Darkness. Hence, the climax of the game pretty clearly shows Sora [[spoiler: becoming a Heartless]] after he [[spoiler: sacrifices his heart to save Kairi]], and then [[spoiler: becoming human again]] after [[spoiler: Kairi uses her magic to restore his heart]]. But then ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'' establishes that Heartless ''do'' have hearts, and that people don't become Heartless themselves; their ''hearts'' become Heartless after being corrupted by negative emotions and detaching from their bodies, while the heartless shell left behind is called a "Nobody".[[note]]To sum up: the terms are ''exactly'' backward. Heartless are hearts with ''no body''. Nobodies are bodies with no heart.[[/note]] But of course, Nobodies hadn't been introduced to the mythos at that point. [[KudzuPlot It's probably best not to think too hard about the climax...]]

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* [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI The original]] ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' pretty heavily implies that {{the Heartless}} are ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as the name implies]]) people who've lost their hearts after being corrupted by Darkness. Hence, the climax of the game pretty clearly shows Sora [[spoiler: becoming a Heartless]] after he [[spoiler: sacrifices his heart to save Kairi]], and then [[spoiler: becoming human again]] after [[spoiler: Kairi uses her magic to restore his heart]]. But then ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'' establishes that Heartless ''do'' have hearts, and that people don't become Heartless themselves; their ''hearts'' become Heartless after being corrupted by negative emotions and detaching from their bodies, while the heartless shell left behind is called a "Nobody".[[note]]To sum up: the terms are ''exactly'' backward. Heartless are hearts with ''no body''. Nobodies are bodies with no heart.[[/note]] But of course, Nobodies hadn't been introduced to the mythos at that point. [[KudzuPlot It's probably best not to think too hard about the climax...]]
4th Dec '17 6:57:38 PM CheeseDogX
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** In the first game, when Phoenix and Grossberg first meet, it's implied they never met, even though he appears in the first case of the third game, which is a flashback. Though it could be argued Grossberg never got a good look at Phoenix (who was wearing a face mask due to his cold), and Phoenix was hopped up on cold medicine and only remembered the incident hazily. They also didn't interact meaningfully.

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** In the first game, when Phoenix and Grossberg first meet, it's implied they never met, even though he appears in the first case of the third game, which is a flashback. Though it could be argued Grossberg never got a good look at Phoenix (who was wearing a face surgical mask due to his a cold), and Phoenix was could have been hopped up on cold medicine and only remembered forgot the incident hazily. less-important parts of the trial. They also didn't interact meaningfully.meaningfully in that flashback case.
4th Dec '17 6:53:59 PM CheeseDogX
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** In the first game, when Phoenix and Grossberg first meet, it's implied they never met, even though he appears in the first case of the third game, which is a flashback.

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** In the first game, when Phoenix and Grossberg first meet, it's implied they never met, even though he appears in the first case of the third game, which is a flashback. Though it could be argued Grossberg never got a good look at Phoenix (who was wearing a face mask due to his cold), and Phoenix was hopped up on cold medicine and only remembered the incident hazily. They also didn't interact meaningfully.
4th Dec '17 6:39:57 PM CheeseDogX
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** In "Where No Man Has Gone Before", the second ''Trek'' pilot, Spock says that one of his ancestors married a human female, implying some distant relative. Somewhere along the line they decided that Spock's mother was human, and the MalignedMixedMarriage of Spock's parents is now an essential part of his character. Why Spock avoided mentioning that his mother was human is left to the imagination, though it is possible that at that point he was just trying to cover up a part of his heritage he was ashamed of.

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** In "Where No Man Has Gone Before", the second ''Trek'' pilot, Spock says that one of his ancestors married a human female, implying some distant relative. Somewhere along the line they decided that Spock's mother was human, and the MalignedMixedMarriage of Spock's parents is now an essential part of his character. Why Spock avoided mentioning that his mother was human is left to the imagination, though it is possible that at that point he was just trying to cover up a part of his heritage he was ashamed of. Plus, it's not like he actually lied. One of his ancestors did marry a human female. It's just that the ancestor was also human, as were all his descendants until Spock.
4th Dec '17 5:16:37 PM CheeseDogX
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*** There's also the fact that Leia explicitly says she remembers what her biological mother was like in ''Return'', only for it to be revealed in ''Revenge'' that Padme died giving birth to the twins. Of course as a Force sensitive it's entirely possible that Force children have a much greater connection, and even memory, of their mother from within the room. Though that doesn't explain the disparity of Leia remembering her and Luke not.

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*** There's also the fact that Leia explicitly says she remembers what her biological mother was like in ''Return'', only for it to be revealed in ''Revenge'' that Padme died giving birth to the twins. Of course as a Force sensitive it's entirely possible that Force children have a much greater connection, and even memory, of their mother from within the room. Though that doesn't explain the disparity of Leia remembering her and Luke not. Another possibility is that Leia was talking about Breha Organa, her adopted mother.
28th Nov '17 9:48:48 AM ScroogeMacDuck
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[[folder:Film]]

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[[folder:Film]][[folder:Film (Live-Action)]]


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[[folder: Film (Animated)]]
* The Disney version of ''Disney/PeterPan'' doesn't always line up completely with its prequel film series ''Franchise/DisneyFairies'':
** At the end of the first movie, a young Wendy can be glimpsed, in a scene taking place shortly after the birth of Tinker Bell herself. This makes little chronological sense, as everything about the way Peter Pan and Tinker Bell are treated in the first film implies they've long been outstanding inhabitants of Neverland, enough that they've both passed into Earth's folklore by the time Wendy is 12 years old. (CanonDiscontinuity seems to have been declared on this particular scene, with later films apparently moving the timeline back to somewhere in the 19th century.)
** In ''The Pirate Fairy'':
*** Captain Hook's arrival in Neverland as shown in that film does not really fit in with what is known of his background in the 1953 film: it is implied there that he was a pirate captain all along and came as one to Neverland, complete with crew and ship (hence why said crew is so anxious for their captain to give upon his grudge with Peter already and finally go ''back'' to his old ways), whereas ''Pirate Fairy'' shows him arriving as a young cabin boy in Neverland and finding the ''Jolly Rogers'' (with Smee as captain) already in Neverland, to somehow become its captain after the events of the movie.
*** Hook's original sum-up of his crocodile problem in the 1953 movie made it clear that the Crocodile only started chasing him because he liked the taste of his hand when Peter fed it to the croc, and has been wanting more ever since. Even then, ''Pirate Fairy'' shows the Crocodile being first trained to hunt Hook by the fairies soon after it was born, and long before Hook's first confrontation with Peter Pan.
[[/folder]]
26th Nov '17 8:32:01 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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* The very first issue of ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' had the Four's base of operations located in a fictional CityOfAdventure called "Central City". It took a few issues before it became established that their adventures (as well as most of Marvel's other superhero comics) take place in New York City. Today, of course, stories set in New York are arguably Marvel's trademark, so it's hard to think of the series taking place anywhere else.
20th Nov '17 8:25:43 PM PaulA
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** Time Lord sexuality has swung back and forth over the years. The First Doctor was a wholesome but sexual being -- he had a romantic subplot with a woman in a first season episode and a granddaughter, with no implication she came from any route other than the standard way one creates granddaughters (and she had her own [[GirlOfTheWeek Boys of the Week]] and was shown to like kissing people). The Second Doctor flirted with Astrid in "Enemy of the World" for no reason other than pleasure. The Third Doctor flirted with Liz a ''lot'' and had Jo and Sarah as {{Implied Love Interest}}s, while the Master often used his sexuality as a weapon (like in "The Mind of Evil" and "The Time Monster") with a bit of HoYay with the Doctor tossed into the mix. The Fourth Doctor was less sexual than his predecessor due to his alien nature ("you're a beautiful woman, probably") but still had {{U|nresolvedSexualTension}}ST and even ShipTease with Sarah, Leela and both Romanas (especially the second). None of this was treated as any big deal -- it was simply there as part of the character, and never in focus due to its unimportance (plus network restrictions given that the BBC considered ''Doctor Who'' a children's programme). But by the 80s, production team members who felt the Doctor should be above such human concerns began to take charge. It's also not a coincidence that these concerns also surfaced after hiring PeterDavison, an actor much closer in age with his co-stars (the previous four Doctors' actors were 15-30 years older than their companions), giving rise to fears that [[MoralGuardians Mary Whitehouse]] would add "sexual innuendo" to the charges on her rap sheet against the show. Phrases like "no hanky-panky in the TARDIS" were coined and the producer enforced a policy of the Doctor not even being allowed to touch or look at his companions in case people got the wrong idea. By this point the Doctor was considered {{Asexual}} by the show, the fandom and the mainstream media, and people were beginning to suspect that Time Lords as a species were just above that sort of thing -- and so when the TV Movie had the Eighth Doctor giving a BigDamnKiss to a human woman purely for the pleasure of it, fans tore out their hair and cried. The Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures book "Lungbarrow" came out after the movie and semi-canonised the idea of 'looms', a system of asexual reproduction for Time Lords that generates full adults, while another novel cast doubt on the Doctor actually having a biological granddaughter. The new series pinged right back to the idea of Time Lords being sexual, showing children, talking about the Doctor's parents and wives, and makes the Doctor's sexuality and sexualisation a major theme of his character.

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** Time Lord sexuality has swung back and forth over the years. The First Doctor was a wholesome but sexual being -- he had a romantic subplot with a woman in a first season episode and a granddaughter, with no implication she came from any route other than the standard way one creates granddaughters (and she had her own [[GirlOfTheWeek Boys of the Week]] and was shown to like kissing people). The Second Doctor flirted with Astrid in "Enemy of the World" for no reason other than pleasure. The Third Doctor flirted with Liz a ''lot'' and had Jo and Sarah as {{Implied Love Interest}}s, while the Master often used his sexuality as a weapon (like in "The Mind of Evil" and "The Time Monster") with a bit of HoYay with the Doctor tossed into the mix. The Fourth Doctor was less sexual than his predecessor due to his alien nature ("you're a beautiful woman, probably") but still had {{U|nresolvedSexualTension}}ST and even ShipTease with Sarah, Leela and both Romanas (especially the second). None of this was treated as any big deal -- it was simply there as part of the character, and never in focus due to its unimportance (plus network restrictions given that the BBC considered ''Doctor Who'' a children's programme). But by the 80s, production team members who felt the Doctor should be above such human concerns began to take charge. It's also not a coincidence that these concerns also surfaced after hiring PeterDavison, Creator/PeterDavison, an actor much closer in age with his co-stars (the previous four Doctors' actors were 15-30 years older than their companions), giving rise to fears that [[MoralGuardians Mary Whitehouse]] would add "sexual innuendo" to the charges on her rap sheet against the show. Phrases like "no hanky-panky in the TARDIS" were coined and the producer enforced a policy of the Doctor not even being allowed to touch or look at his companions in case people got the wrong idea. By this point the Doctor was considered {{Asexual}} by the show, the fandom and the mainstream media, and people were beginning to suspect that Time Lords as a species were just above that sort of thing -- and so when the TV Movie had the Eighth Doctor giving a BigDamnKiss to a human woman purely for the pleasure of it, fans tore out their hair and cried. The Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures book "Lungbarrow" ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoNewAdventuresLungbarrow Lungbarrow]]'' came out after the movie and semi-canonised the idea of 'looms', a system of asexual reproduction for Time Lords that generates full adults, while another novel cast doubt on the Doctor actually having a biological granddaughter. The new series pinged right back to the idea of Time Lords being sexual, showing children, talking about the Doctor's parents and wives, and makes the Doctor's sexuality and sexualisation a major theme of his character.
20th Nov '17 12:06:25 PM bfunc
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** Another early episode had Bender joining a robot religion led by Preacher Bot and swearing off alcohol for the religiously acceptable synthetic oil. And yet the very first episode established that alcohol is ''necessary'' for a robot to function (there's even a legal limit that robots have to be above), and Preacher Bot is even seen handing out alcohol to homeless robots in the first ChristmasEpisode. This is never addressed. It's possible that synthetic oil is designed to fuel a robot's power circuits as an alternate fuel to alcohol.

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** Another early episode had Bender joining a robot religion led by Preacher Bot and swearing off alcohol for the religiously acceptable synthetic oil. And yet the very first episode established that alcohol is ''necessary'' for a robot to function (there's even a legal limit that robots have to be above), and Preacher Bot is even seen handing out alcohol to homeless robots in the first ChristmasEpisode. This ChristmasEpisode, making Bender's insistence that alcohol is never addressed. unacceptable to Robotologists questionable. It's possible that synthetic oil is designed Bender misunderstood a restriction ("Do not indulge in alcohol to fuel a robot's power circuits excess") as an alternate fuel outright prohibition ("Do not indulge in alcohol period"), or that as a new convert he is taking an extreme position in an excess of zeal. It may be worth noting that in ''Mother's Day'' Cardbot's description of the glorious robot worker's paradise ''does'' include an outright prohibition on alcohol, which is what motivates Bender to alcohol.defect.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ContinuityDrift