History Main / ContinuityDrift

14th Jun '16 10:22:54 AM dangerdan97
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*** Admiral Motti dismisses the Jedi Order as an "ancient religion" and Han Solo sees The Force as superstition, suggesting that they never even saw a Jedi firsthand in their lives. However, 19 years ago they were a major force in the center of the Republic. Of course, you have to remember that Han is from Corellia, a world that tended to remain aloof from what was happening elsewhere in the galaxy; he spent practically all of his formative years on the fringes of galactic society (except in his late teens, when he briefly stayed on Coruscant with his live-in girlfriend); and while he was taught about the Force by the female Wookiee who raised him when he was a child, she only ever called it [[BuffySpeak "the life power"]] in the Wookiee language, and Han never seriously believed her.

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*** Admiral Motti dismisses the Jedi Order as an "ancient religion" and Han Solo sees The Force as superstition, suggesting that they never even saw a Jedi firsthand in their lives. However, 19 years ago they were a major force in the center of the Republic. Of course, you have to remember that Han is from Corellia, which [[AllThereInTheManual the EU expounds]] as a world that tended to remain aloof from what was happening elsewhere in the galaxy; he spent practically all of his formative years on the fringes of galactic society (except in his late teens, when he briefly stayed on Coruscant with his live-in girlfriend); and while he was taught about the Force by the female Wookiee who raised him when he was a child, she only ever called it [[BuffySpeak "the life power"]] in the Wookiee language, and Han never seriously believed her.
7th Jun '16 7:21:53 PM MasoTey
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* In the ''Franchise/YuGiOh'' franchise, monsters were originally physical manifestations/mutations of human souls and emotions (not unlike [[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure Stands]]). These monsters could become autonomous after the humans' death, demonically possess others, etc., and through magic be imprisoned in, and summoned from, magical stone slabs containing their images. The Duel Monsters cards were supposed to be the modern-day allegory of these slabs, and so people with knowledge of magic (like Malik, The Pharaoh, and Yami Bakura) could summon these beings through the cards (which is why the God Cards were so deadly - ANYONE who used them could summon the real Gods, not just mages). ''Anime/YuGiOhGX'' completely threw this concept out, and retconned these monsters into beings from AnotherDimension, trapped in cards. While ''Anime/YuGiOh5Ds'' went back to the idea of them being earthly spirits, ''Anime/YuGiOhZEXAL'' went right back to the "[[AnotherDimension parallel universe]]" thing, and ''Anime/YuGiOhArcV'' makes the multiple dimensions thing a central plot point.

to:

* In the ''Franchise/YuGiOh'' franchise, monsters were originally physical manifestations/mutations of human souls and emotions (not unlike [[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure Stands]]). These monsters could become autonomous after the humans' death, demonically possess others, etc., and through magic be imprisoned in, and summoned from, magical stone slabs containing their images. The Duel Monsters cards were supposed to be the modern-day allegory of these slabs, and so people with knowledge of magic (like Malik, The Pharaoh, and Yami Bakura) could summon these beings through the cards (which is why the God Cards were so deadly - -- ANYONE who used them could summon the real Gods, not just mages). ''Anime/YuGiOhGX'' completely threw this concept out, and retconned these monsters into beings from AnotherDimension, trapped in cards. While ''Anime/YuGiOh5Ds'' went back to the idea of them being earthly spirits, ''Anime/YuGiOhZEXAL'' went right back to the "[[AnotherDimension parallel universe]]" thing, and ''Anime/YuGiOhArcV'' makes the multiple dimensions thing a central plot point.



* ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' was set during a real ice age with humans. The sequels have more anthropomorphized animals, dinosaurs, pirate monkeys, Scrat causing continental drift twice - and no humans. However, as humans were ''extremely'' rare when ''Ice Age'' takes place it's possible they just never crossed paths.

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* ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' was set during a real ice age with humans. The sequels have more anthropomorphized animals, dinosaurs, pirate monkeys, Scrat causing continental drift twice - -- and no humans. However, as humans were ''extremely'' rare when ''Ice Age'' takes place it's possible they just never crossed paths.



** When Vader tells Tarkin that Obi-Wan is aboard the Death Star, Tarkin says, "Obi-Wan Kenobi? Surely he must be dead by now." Vader replies, "Don't underestimate The Force." This implies that if Kenobi weren't a Jedi, he likely would have died of old age by then. The prequels set Kenobi as no older than his 60s during ''A New Hope'', hardly an improbable age - although Tarkin could be interpreted as referring to Empire's purge of the Jedi.

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** When Vader tells Tarkin that Obi-Wan is aboard the Death Star, Tarkin says, "Obi-Wan Kenobi? Surely he must be dead by now." Vader replies, "Don't underestimate The Force." This implies that if Kenobi weren't a Jedi, he likely would have died of old age by then. The prequels set Kenobi as no older than his 60s during ''A New Hope'', hardly an improbable age - -- although Tarkin could be interpreted as referring to Empire's purge of the Jedi.



** Most of the well-known races in Trek are wildly different from how they were originally conceived, beginning as a complex race and devolving, from one writer to the next, into a PlanetOfHats. The Ferengi, in their first appearance, were being set up as a fairly major military power; a few seasons later they were a much smaller power and quite cowardly, and by the time of ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'', they were, for all intents and purposes, not a military power at all, and their personality had withered down to [[PlanetOfHats all profit all the time]]. Their first appearance was the first reported visual (and possibly audio) contact with a Federation citizen, whereas by [=DS=]9 (less than half a decade later in the timeline) they had been an established economic presence in the quadrant for decades and had deep-seated ties with Klingons and Cardassians. Also, while [=DS=]9's Ferengi were often amoral scumbags, their outright evil TNG forebearers dressed in Klingon-esque primitive, fur-sashed mail uniforms, acted half-feral, executed second officers as a diplomatic act, and were stated to eat sapient beings. Not long after, they started wearing wide-collared suits, dressing more like modern humans that the Feds. Also, in several early Ferengi episodes, Troi claims to sense their feelings. Later on, Ferengi are immune to telepathy/empathy.

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** Most of the well-known races in Trek are wildly different from how they were originally conceived, beginning as a complex race and devolving, from one writer to the next, into a PlanetOfHats. The Ferengi, in their first appearance, were being set up as a fairly major military power; a few seasons later they were a much smaller power and quite cowardly, and by the time of ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'', they were, for all intents and purposes, not a military power at all, and their personality had withered down to [[PlanetOfHats all profit all the time]]. Their first appearance was the first reported visual (and possibly audio) contact with a Federation citizen, whereas by [=DS=]9 (less than half a decade later in the timeline) they had been an established economic presence in the quadrant for decades and had deep-seated ties with Klingons and Cardassians. Also, while [=DS=]9's Ferengi were often amoral scumbags, their outright evil TNG forebearers dressed in Klingon-esque primitive, fur-sashed mail uniforms, acted half-feral, executed second officers as a diplomatic act, and were stated to eat sapient beings. Not long after, they started wearing wide-collared suits, dressing more like modern humans that than the Feds. Also, in several early Ferengi episodes, Troi claims to sense their feelings. Later on, Ferengi are immune to telepathy/empathy.



** It should be noted that the Klingons virtually swapped characterization with the Romulans, who were depicted as honorable and noble warrior-officers. TNG and [=DS=]9 retooled them as a duplicitous, racist empire of fairly unsympathetic villains - hell, in the Decipher CCG adaptation, their main skill was literally ''Treachery''.

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** It should be noted that the Klingons virtually swapped characterization with the Romulans, who were depicted as honorable and noble warrior-officers. TNG and [=DS=]9 retooled them as a duplicitous, racist empire of fairly unsympathetic villains - -- hell, in the Decipher CCG adaptation, their main skill was literally ''Treachery''.



** When ''pon farr'' was first mentioned in the Original Series episode, "Amok Time," it was explicitly referred to being a biological process particular to Vulcan males. This was further supported by Saavik's dialogue with David in ''Film/StarTrekIIITheSearchForSpock'', reinforcing that Vulcan males experience ''pon farr'' every seven years upon reaching maturity. And then ''Enterprise'' has [=T'Pol=] undergo ''pon farr''. So either the definition was changed by the writers, or [[DudeLooksLikeALady there's something T'Pol isn't not telling us]]...

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** When ''pon farr'' was first mentioned in the Original Series episode, "Amok Time," it was explicitly referred to being a biological process particular to Vulcan males. This was further supported by Saavik's dialogue with David in ''Film/StarTrekIIITheSearchForSpock'', reinforcing that Vulcan males experience ''pon farr'' every seven years upon reaching maturity. And then ''Enterprise'' has [=T'Pol=] undergo ''pon farr''. So either the definition was changed by the writers, or [[DudeLooksLikeALady there's something T'Pol isn't not telling us]]...



** It is now generally accepted that Timelords automatically regenerate when mortally injured, but it wasn't until the FIFTH regeneration that this happened. Hartnell was renewed by 'part of the Tardis'. Troughton suffered a 'change of appearance' (often supposed now to be a ''forced'' regeneration). Pertwee only regenerated after being given a nudge by K’anpo (although it's finally termed 'regeneration'). Tom Baker merged with a mystical future version of himself. Only with Davison's regeneration onwards has the process been regular and automatic (and even Davison's Doctor questioned whether his death would trigger regeneration - "I might regenerate - I don't know".) In "The War Games" we even see a Time Lord get shot and he just dies, no regeneration. "Last of the Time Lords" has the Master choose not to regenerate, and Time Lords get shot in "Day of the Doctor" without regenerating (the implication is that Dalek weaponry is anti-regenerative).
** Time Lord sexuality has swung back and forth over the years. The First Doctor was a wholesome but sexual being - he had a romantic subplot with a woman in a first season episode and a granddaughter, with no implication she came from any route other than the standard way one creates granddaughters (and she had her own [[GirlOfTheWeek Boys of the Week]] and was shown to like kissing people). The Second Doctor flirted with Astrid in "Enemy of the World" for no reason other than pleasure. The Third Doctor flirted with Liz a ''lot'' and had Jo and Sarah as {{Implied Love Interest}}s, while the Master often used his sexuality as a weapon (like in "The Mind of Evil" and "The Time Monster"). The Fourth Doctor was less sexual than his predecessor due to his alien nature ("you're a beautiful woman, probably") but still had {{U|nresolvedSexualTension}}ST and even ShipTease with Sarah, Leela and both Romanas (especially the second). None of this was treated as any big deal - it was simply there as part of the character, and never in focus due to its unimportance. But by the 80s, production team members who felt the Doctor should be above such human concerns began to take charge. It's also not a coincidence that these concerns also surfaced after hiring PeterDavison, an actor much closer in age with his co-stars (the previous four Doctors' actors were 15-30 years older than their companions), giving rise to fears that [[MoralGuardians Mary Whitehouse]] would add "sexual innuendo" to the charges on her rap sheet against the show. Phrases like "no hanky-panky in the TARDIS" were coined and the producer enforced a policy of the Doctor not even being allowed to touch or look at his companions in case people got the wrong idea. By this point the Doctor was considered {{Asexual}} by the show, the fandom and the mainstream media, and people were beginning to suspect that Time Lords as a species were just above that sort of thing - and so when the TV Movie had the Eighth Doctor giving a BigDamnKiss to a human woman purely for the pleasure of it, fans tore out their hair and cried. The Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures book "Lungbarrow" came out after the movie and canonised the idea of 'looms', a system of asexual reproduction for Time Lords that generates full adults. The new series pinged right back to the idea of Time Lords being sexual, showing children, talking about the Doctor's parents and wives, and makes the Doctor's sexuality and sexualisation a major theme of his character.
** Susan is a character who especially stands out as someone from a completely different show. She makes a lot of sense as the granddaughter of a mysterious old man time traveller who is likely a human (albeit from another planet), and less sense as the granddaughter of an asexual two-hearted Time Lord DefectorFromDecadence from an ancient world that influences the workings of the universe. There is no real in-story reason to explain why the Doctor never went back to see her, either - at least not until her implied death in the GreatOffscreenWar, anyway.

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** It is now generally accepted that Timelords automatically regenerate when mortally injured, but it wasn't until the FIFTH regeneration that this happened. Hartnell was renewed by 'part of the Tardis'. Troughton suffered a 'change of appearance' (often supposed now to be a ''forced'' regeneration). Pertwee only regenerated after being given a nudge by K’anpo (although it's finally termed 'regeneration'). Tom Baker merged with a mystical future version of himself. Only with Davison's regeneration onwards has the process been regular and automatic (and even Davison's Doctor questioned whether his death would trigger regeneration - -- "I might regenerate - -- I don't know".) In "The War Games" we even see a Time Lord get shot and he just dies, no regeneration. "Last of the Time Lords" has the Master choose not to regenerate, and Time Lords get shot in "Day of the Doctor" without regenerating (the implication is that Dalek weaponry is anti-regenerative).
** Time Lord sexuality has swung back and forth over the years. The First Doctor was a wholesome but sexual being - -- he had a romantic subplot with a woman in a first season episode and a granddaughter, with no implication she came from any route other than the standard way one creates granddaughters (and she had her own [[GirlOfTheWeek Boys of the Week]] and was shown to like kissing people). The Second Doctor flirted with Astrid in "Enemy of the World" for no reason other than pleasure. The Third Doctor flirted with Liz a ''lot'' and had Jo and Sarah as {{Implied Love Interest}}s, while the Master often used his sexuality as a weapon (like in "The Mind of Evil" and "The Time Monster"). The Fourth Doctor was less sexual than his predecessor due to his alien nature ("you're a beautiful woman, probably") but still had {{U|nresolvedSexualTension}}ST and even ShipTease with Sarah, Leela and both Romanas (especially the second). None of this was treated as any big deal - -- it was simply there as part of the character, and never in focus due to its unimportance. But by the 80s, production team members who felt the Doctor should be above such human concerns began to take charge. It's also not a coincidence that these concerns also surfaced after hiring PeterDavison, an actor much closer in age with his co-stars (the previous four Doctors' actors were 15-30 years older than their companions), giving rise to fears that [[MoralGuardians Mary Whitehouse]] would add "sexual innuendo" to the charges on her rap sheet against the show. Phrases like "no hanky-panky in the TARDIS" were coined and the producer enforced a policy of the Doctor not even being allowed to touch or look at his companions in case people got the wrong idea. By this point the Doctor was considered {{Asexual}} by the show, the fandom and the mainstream media, and people were beginning to suspect that Time Lords as a species were just above that sort of thing - -- and so when the TV Movie had the Eighth Doctor giving a BigDamnKiss to a human woman purely for the pleasure of it, fans tore out their hair and cried. The Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures book "Lungbarrow" came out after the movie and canonised the idea of 'looms', a system of asexual reproduction for Time Lords that generates full adults. The new series pinged right back to the idea of Time Lords being sexual, showing children, talking about the Doctor's parents and wives, and makes the Doctor's sexuality and sexualisation a major theme of his character.
** Susan is a character who especially stands out as someone from a completely different show. She makes a lot of sense as the granddaughter of a mysterious old man time traveller who is likely a human (albeit from another planet), and less sense as the granddaughter of an asexual two-hearted Time Lord DefectorFromDecadence from an ancient world that influences the workings of the universe. There is no real in-story reason to explain why the Doctor never went back to see her, either - -- at least not until her implied death in the GreatOffscreenWar, anyway.



** This line is fixed in the 3DS re-release - Phoenix instead says he never imagined the possibly of "becoming the defendant for this case". Specially in the original, his line was him stating he never thought he'd "end up in the defendant's chair" himself. So it's likely he WAS referring to that specific case only, but it was just worded badly.

to:

** This line is fixed in the 3DS re-release - -- Phoenix instead says he never imagined the possibly of "becoming the defendant for this case". Specially in the original, his line was him stating he never thought he'd "end up in the defendant's chair" himself. So it's likely he WAS referring to that specific case only, but it was just worded badly.



* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'': In one early conversation between Karkat and Sollux, the two trolls insult each other by saying that the other is repulsive to the opposite sex, and on another occasion, Feferi immediately assumes that Eridan's crush is female, before considering that it might be male. Both of these conversations seem to imply that troll society is heteronormative; however, it is later established that the [[EveryoneIsBi trolls are all bisexual]], and don't even have a word for monosexuality. It's not too hard to come up with an in-universe justification - it would be consistent with canon if some characters had mild preferences for one gender, and all of those characters had opposite-sex love interests - but it's clear that Hussie hadn't come up with the idea of all trolls being bi until later on.

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* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'': In one early conversation between Karkat and Sollux, the two trolls insult each other by saying that the other is repulsive to the opposite sex, and on another occasion, Feferi immediately assumes that Eridan's crush is female, before considering that it might be male. Both of these conversations seem to imply that troll society is heteronormative; however, it is later established that the [[EveryoneIsBi trolls are all bisexual]], and don't even have a word for monosexuality. It's not too hard to come up with an in-universe justification - -- it would be consistent with canon if some characters had mild preferences for one gender, and all of those characters had opposite-sex love interests - -- but it's clear that Hussie hadn't come up with the idea of all trolls being bi until later on.
7th Jun '16 3:15:31 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* In the YuGiOh franchise, monsters were originally physical manifestations/mutations of human souls and emotions (not unlike [[JoJosBizarreAdventure Stands]]). These monsters could become autonomous after the humans' death, demonically possess others, etc., and through magic be imprisoned in, and summoned from, magical stone slabs containing their images. The Duel Monsters cards were supposed to be the modern-day allegory of these slabs, and so people with knowledge of magic (like Malik, The Pharaoh, and Yami Bakura) could summon these beings through the cards (which is why the God Cards were so deadly - ANYONE who used them could summon the real Gods, not just mages). YuGiOhGX completely threw this concept out, and retconned these monsters into beings from AnotherDimension, trapped in cards. While YuGiOh5Ds went back to the idea of them being earthly spirits, YuGiOhZexal went right back to the "[[AnotherDimension parallel universe]]" thing, and YuGiOhArcV makes the multiple dimensions thing a central plot point.

to:

* In the YuGiOh ''Franchise/YuGiOh'' franchise, monsters were originally physical manifestations/mutations of human souls and emotions (not unlike [[JoJosBizarreAdventure [[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure Stands]]). These monsters could become autonomous after the humans' death, demonically possess others, etc., and through magic be imprisoned in, and summoned from, magical stone slabs containing their images. The Duel Monsters cards were supposed to be the modern-day allegory of these slabs, and so people with knowledge of magic (like Malik, The Pharaoh, and Yami Bakura) could summon these beings through the cards (which is why the God Cards were so deadly - ANYONE who used them could summon the real Gods, not just mages). YuGiOhGX ''Anime/YuGiOhGX'' completely threw this concept out, and retconned these monsters into beings from AnotherDimension, trapped in cards. While YuGiOh5Ds ''Anime/YuGiOh5Ds'' went back to the idea of them being earthly spirits, YuGiOhZexal ''Anime/YuGiOhZEXAL'' went right back to the "[[AnotherDimension parallel universe]]" thing, and YuGiOhArcV ''Anime/YuGiOhArcV'' makes the multiple dimensions thing a central plot point.
29th May '16 5:53:57 PM emillang1000
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* In the YuGiOh franchise, monsters were originally physical manifestations/mutations of human souls and emotions (not unlike [[JoJosBizarreAdventure Stands]]. These monsters could become autonomous after the humans' death, demonically possess others, etc., and through magic be imprisoned in, and summoned from, magical stone slabs containing their images. The Duel Monsters cards were supposed to be the modern-day allegory of these slabs, and so people with knowledge of magic (like Malik, The Pharaoh, and Yami Bakura) could summon these beings through the cards (which is why the God Cards were so deadly - ANYONE who used them could summon the real Gods, not just mages). YuGiOhGX completely threw this concept out, and retconned these monsters into beings from AnotherDimension, trapped in cards. While YuGiOh5Ds went back to the idea of them being earthly spirits, YuGiOhZexal went right back to the "[[AnotherDimension parallel universe]]" thing, and YuGiOhArcV makes the multiple dimensions thing a central plot point.

to:

* In the YuGiOh franchise, monsters were originally physical manifestations/mutations of human souls and emotions (not unlike [[JoJosBizarreAdventure Stands]].Stands]]). These monsters could become autonomous after the humans' death, demonically possess others, etc., and through magic be imprisoned in, and summoned from, magical stone slabs containing their images. The Duel Monsters cards were supposed to be the modern-day allegory of these slabs, and so people with knowledge of magic (like Malik, The Pharaoh, and Yami Bakura) could summon these beings through the cards (which is why the God Cards were so deadly - ANYONE who used them could summon the real Gods, not just mages). YuGiOhGX completely threw this concept out, and retconned these monsters into beings from AnotherDimension, trapped in cards. While YuGiOh5Ds went back to the idea of them being earthly spirits, YuGiOhZexal went right back to the "[[AnotherDimension parallel universe]]" thing, and YuGiOhArcV makes the multiple dimensions thing a central plot point.
29th May '16 5:53:22 PM emillang1000
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Added DiffLines:

* In the YuGiOh franchise, monsters were originally physical manifestations/mutations of human souls and emotions (not unlike [[JoJosBizarreAdventure Stands]]. These monsters could become autonomous after the humans' death, demonically possess others, etc., and through magic be imprisoned in, and summoned from, magical stone slabs containing their images. The Duel Monsters cards were supposed to be the modern-day allegory of these slabs, and so people with knowledge of magic (like Malik, The Pharaoh, and Yami Bakura) could summon these beings through the cards (which is why the God Cards were so deadly - ANYONE who used them could summon the real Gods, not just mages). YuGiOhGX completely threw this concept out, and retconned these monsters into beings from AnotherDimension, trapped in cards. While YuGiOh5Ds went back to the idea of them being earthly spirits, YuGiOhZexal went right back to the "[[AnotherDimension parallel universe]]" thing, and YuGiOhArcV makes the multiple dimensions thing a central plot point.
27th May '16 3:37:06 PM Doug86
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* Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''HumanxCommonwealth'' series started off the character of Flinx as a partially telepathic young thief, with the implication that his powers, though unusual, are not particularly terrifying and bizarre. The two mentor figures, Bran Tse-Mallory and Truzenzuzex, even comment among themselves that the boy is "a partial telepath", but apparently don't care enough to research the matter further. In later novels that expand Flinx's origin story, it's revealed that he's an empath, not a telepath, and was created as such by a [[ZeroPercentApprovalRating universally reviled]] group of {{Evilutionary Biologist}}s, so they ''really'' ought to have been more curious. Also, Flinx's age given in ''Bloodhype'' conflicts with the universal timeline Foster later established, the description of his ship is vastly different (to the point where Foster {{retcon}}ned it to be able to camouflage and reconfigure itself at will), and his pet minidrag is male, rather than the female it was established canonically to be in the chronologically earlier ''The End of the Matter''.

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* Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''HumanxCommonwealth'' ''Literature/HumanxCommonwealth'' series started off the character of Flinx as a partially telepathic young thief, with the implication that his powers, though unusual, are not particularly terrifying and bizarre. The two mentor figures, Bran Tse-Mallory and Truzenzuzex, even comment among themselves that the boy is "a partial telepath", but apparently don't care enough to research the matter further. In later novels that expand Flinx's origin story, it's revealed that he's an empath, not a telepath, and was created as such by a [[ZeroPercentApprovalRating universally reviled]] group of {{Evilutionary Biologist}}s, so they ''really'' ought to have been more curious. Also, Flinx's age given in ''Bloodhype'' conflicts with the universal timeline Foster later established, the description of his ship is vastly different (to the point where Foster {{retcon}}ned it to be able to camouflage and reconfigure itself at will), and his pet minidrag is male, rather than the female it was established canonically to be in the chronologically earlier ''The End of the Matter''.
22nd May '16 6:58:43 AM TheMightyHeptagon
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Added DiffLines:

** ''A New Hope'' establishes that the Jedi were hunted to near-extinction by Darth Vader and the Empire, but it never says anything about a full-on [[ThePurge purge]] from within the ranks of the Old Republic's military, and it never makes it clear that Imperial Stormtroopers are all under standing orders to kill Jedi on sight. As Michael from Belated Media points out, this can make it seem odd that Obi-Wan has seemingly no problem with igniting his lightsaber in the middle of a crowded bar in Mos Eisley, knowing full well that there's a squad of Stormtroopers right outside the bar looking for a pair of wanted fugitives.
20th May '16 4:16:36 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'', Judges seem to have originally been portrayed as an elite unit within the regular police force, and some early strips feature non-Judge cops as {{redshirts}}. Nowadays, the entire police force is composed of Judges.
** The first published ComicBook/JudgeDredd comic describes Dredd as operating in New York City and as having been ''elected'' to his post. Later, New York was revised to just part of Mega City One, and Judges were presented as having passed through an intense years-long training program before being graduated to duty with no election necessary.

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* In ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'', ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'':
**
Judges seem to have originally been portrayed as an elite unit within the regular police force, and some early strips feature non-Judge cops as {{redshirts}}. Nowadays, the entire police force is composed of Judges.
** The first published ComicBook/JudgeDredd comic describes Dredd as operating in New York City and as having been ''elected'' to his post. Later, New York was revised to just part of Mega City One, and Judges were presented as having passed through an intense years-long training program before being graduated to duty with no election necessary.
17th Mar '16 9:57:46 PM merotoker
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* In ''Manga/PokemonSpecial'' an earlier chapter has Red capturing a Gyarados that already belong to another trainer (Misty). However, at a later point, [[DubNameChange Blue]]/Green says that, as is explicitly shown in most other parts of the franchise, catching a Pokémon some else has already caught is impossible. In another case, in the Red/Blue/Green arc, the Gym Badges had actual mystic powers and were the {{MacGuffin}}s the villains' plans centered around. In all later arcs, Gym Badges, including the original 8, are just ordinary badges.
** The ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' anime also seems inconsistent at how many Pokémon a trainer could carry. An early episode features a trainer who carries plenty of Poké Balls at the time, shortly afterwards we're told they're only allowed to carry six. What happens to the seventh' has also changed. Ash's Krabby simply disappears soon after he caught it and gets sent to Professor Oak. But when he catches Sewaddle in Unova the Poké Ball simply shrinks down and becomes unusable until Ash sends one of his other Pokémon away.

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* In ''Manga/PokemonSpecial'' an earlier chapter has Red capturing a Gyarados that already belong belonged to another trainer (Misty). However, at a later point, [[DubNameChange Blue]]/Green says that, as is explicitly shown in most other parts of the franchise, catching a Pokémon some else has already caught is impossible. In another case, in the Red/Blue/Green arc, the Gym Badges had actual mystic powers and were the {{MacGuffin}}s the villains' plans centered around. In all later arcs, Gym Badges, including the original 8, are just ordinary badges.
** The ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' anime also seems inconsistent at how many Pokémon a trainer could carry. An early episode features a trainer who carries plenty of Poké Balls at the time, time; shortly afterwards we're told they're only allowed to carry six. What happens to the seventh' has also changed. Ash's Krabby simply disappears soon after he caught it and gets sent to Professor Oak. But when he catches Sewaddle in Unova the Poké Ball simply shrinks down and becomes unusable until Ash sends one of his other Pokémon away.



** Hell, at least half of Superman's powers are the result of ContinuityDrift and PowerCreepPowerSeep. Originally he could lift a car over his head, outrun an express train, leap 1/8 of a mile, had telescopic vision and super-hearing, and "nothing but a bursting shell could pierce his skin". Later comics and cartoons gave him a long list of other/greater powers. The ones that stuck include the power to fly, the strength to lift ocean liners and move colossal space cruisers with his bare hands, enough speed to compete with the Flash in a foot race and (sometimes) make inter-stellar flights, super-breath/freeze-breath, invulnerability to anything other than magic or kryptonite, and expanded his vision powers to include x-ray vision, heat vision, microscopic vision, and the ability to see across the entire electromagnetic spectrum.

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** Hell, at least half of Superman's powers are the result of ContinuityDrift this and PowerCreepPowerSeep. Originally he could lift a car over his head, outrun an express train, leap 1/8 of a mile, had telescopic vision and super-hearing, and "nothing but a bursting shell could pierce his skin". Later comics and cartoons gave him a long list of other/greater powers. The ones that stuck include the power to fly, the strength to lift ocean liners and move colossal space cruisers with his bare hands, enough speed to compete with the Flash in a foot race and (sometimes) make inter-stellar flights, super-breath/freeze-breath, invulnerability to anything other than magic or kryptonite, and expanded his vision powers to include x-ray vision, heat vision, microscopic vision, and the ability to see across the entire electromagnetic spectrum.



** In the ''Film/GreenLantern'' film adaptation, the "spaceship" is changed to an escape pod, which a mortally wounded Abin Sur uses uses to escape Oa following a tumultuous battle that cripples his ability to use his ring.

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** In the ''Film/GreenLantern'' film adaptation, the "spaceship" is changed to an escape pod, which a mortally wounded Abin Sur uses uses to escape Oa following a tumultuous battle that cripples his ability to use his ring.



** ''Film/XMen1'' states that ComicBook/{{Magneto}} built his psychic-proof helmet around the time that Senator Kelly's Mutant Registration Act led him to ramp up the Brotherhood's terrorist campaign, since he knew that Xavier was tracking him. ''Film/XMenFirstClass'' establishes that he's had his helmet since the 1960's, and that he originally stole it from Sebastian Shaw.

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** ''Film/XMen1'' states that ComicBook/{{Magneto}} SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}} built his psychic-proof helmet around the time that Senator Kelly's Mutant Registration Act led him to ramp up the Brotherhood's terrorist campaign, since he knew that Xavier was tracking him. ''Film/XMenFirstClass'' establishes that he's had his helmet since the 1960's, and that he originally stole it from Sebastian Shaw.



** A more minor example: The first book states that each apprentice must visit the Moonstone before becoming a warrior: they travel there with the leader when he or she decides to [[DeadPersonConversation speak with [=StarClan=]]]. While we don't actually see it happen for the rest of the first series, it still gets mentioned occasionally. It's totally forgotten in the second series, and after it was pointed out by fans, the authors later {{Lampshaded}} it by having Leafpool say "We seem to have left that tradition behind in our old home." In the prequel Super Editions that take place before the first series, they do have the "each apprentice must visit the Moonstone" requirement again, but oddly enough it's the apprentices themselves, rather than the leader, that receives the visions from their ancestors at the Moonstone.

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** A more minor example: The first book states that each apprentice must visit the Moonstone before becoming a warrior: they travel there with the leader when he or she decides to [[DeadPersonConversation speak with [=StarClan=]]].StarClan]]. While we don't actually see it happen for the rest of the first series, it still gets mentioned occasionally. It's totally forgotten in the second series, and after it was pointed out by fans, the authors later {{Lampshaded}} {{lampshade|Hanging}}d it by having Leafpool say "We seem to have left that tradition behind in our old home." In the prequel Super Editions that take place before the first series, they do have the "each apprentice must visit the Moonstone" requirement again, but oddly enough it's the apprentices themselves, rather than the leader, that receives the visions from their ancestors at the Moonstone.



** The lightsaber itself started as a [[ElegantWeaponForAMoreCivilisedAge ceremonial weapon]], mostly used for battles between Jedis and a last resort weapon when diplomacy failed. Twenty years of expanded universe, parodies and video games later, Jedis are facing off entire armies with nothing but a lightsaber.

to:

** The lightsaber itself started as a [[ElegantWeaponForAMoreCivilisedAge [[ElegantWeaponForAMoreCivilizedAge ceremonial weapon]], mostly used for battles between Jedis and a last resort weapon when diplomacy failed. Twenty years of expanded universe, parodies and video games later, Jedis are facing off entire armies with nothing but a lightsaber.



** Time Lord sexuality has swung back and forth over the years. The First Doctor was a wholesome but sexual being - he had a romantic subplot with a woman in a first season episode and a granddaughter, with no implication she came from any route other than the standard way one creates granddaughters (and she had her own [[GirlOfTheWeek Boys of the Week]] and was shown to like kissing people). The Second Doctor flirted with Astrid in "Enemy of the World" for no reason other than pleasure. The Third Doctor flirted with Liz a ''lot'' and had Jo and Sarah as {{Implied Love Interest}}s, while the Master often used his sexuality as a weapon (like in "The Mind of Evil" and "The Time Monster"). The Fourth Doctor was less sexual than his predecessor due to his alien nature ("you're a beautiful woman, probably") but still had {{UST}} and even ShipTease with Sarah, Leela and both Romanas (especially the second). None of this was treated as any big deal - it was simply there as part of the character, and never in focus due to its unimportance. But by the 80s, production team members who felt the Doctor should be above such human concerns began to take charge. It's also not a coincidence that these concerns also surfaced after hiring PeterDavison, an actor much closer in age with his co-stars (the previous four Doctors' actors were 15-30 years older than their companions), giving rise to fears that [[MoralGuardians Mary Whitehouse]] would add "sexual innuendo" to the charges on her rap sheet against the show. Phrases like "no hanky-panky in the TARDIS" were coined and the producer enforced a policy of the Doctor not even being allowed to touch or look at his companions in case people got the wrong idea. By this point the Doctor was considered {{Asexual}} by the show, the fandom and the mainstream media, and people were beginning to suspect that Time Lords as a species were just above that sort of thing - and so when the TV Movie had the Eighth Doctor giving a BigDamnKiss to a human woman purely for the pleasure of it, fans tore out their hair and cried. The Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures book "Lungbarrow" came out after the movie and canonised the idea of 'looms', a system of asexual reproduction for Time Lords that generates full adults. The new series pinged right back to the idea of Time Lords being sexual, showing children, talking about the Doctor's parents and wives, and makes the Doctor's sexuality and sexualisation a major theme of his character.

to:

** Time Lord sexuality has swung back and forth over the years. The First Doctor was a wholesome but sexual being - he had a romantic subplot with a woman in a first season episode and a granddaughter, with no implication she came from any route other than the standard way one creates granddaughters (and she had her own [[GirlOfTheWeek Boys of the Week]] and was shown to like kissing people). The Second Doctor flirted with Astrid in "Enemy of the World" for no reason other than pleasure. The Third Doctor flirted with Liz a ''lot'' and had Jo and Sarah as {{Implied Love Interest}}s, while the Master often used his sexuality as a weapon (like in "The Mind of Evil" and "The Time Monster"). The Fourth Doctor was less sexual than his predecessor due to his alien nature ("you're a beautiful woman, probably") but still had {{UST}} {{U|nresolvedSexualTension}}ST and even ShipTease with Sarah, Leela and both Romanas (especially the second). None of this was treated as any big deal - it was simply there as part of the character, and never in focus due to its unimportance. But by the 80s, production team members who felt the Doctor should be above such human concerns began to take charge. It's also not a coincidence that these concerns also surfaced after hiring PeterDavison, an actor much closer in age with his co-stars (the previous four Doctors' actors were 15-30 years older than their companions), giving rise to fears that [[MoralGuardians Mary Whitehouse]] would add "sexual innuendo" to the charges on her rap sheet against the show. Phrases like "no hanky-panky in the TARDIS" were coined and the producer enforced a policy of the Doctor not even being allowed to touch or look at his companions in case people got the wrong idea. By this point the Doctor was considered {{Asexual}} by the show, the fandom and the mainstream media, and people were beginning to suspect that Time Lords as a species were just above that sort of thing - and so when the TV Movie had the Eighth Doctor giving a BigDamnKiss to a human woman purely for the pleasure of it, fans tore out their hair and cried. The Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures book "Lungbarrow" came out after the movie and canonised the idea of 'looms', a system of asexual reproduction for Time Lords that generates full adults. The new series pinged right back to the idea of Time Lords being sexual, showing children, talking about the Doctor's parents and wives, and makes the Doctor's sexuality and sexualisation a major theme of his character.



* Fire Lord Sozin's age and reigning period changes between seasons of AvatarTheLastAirbender. In the first two seasons he was said to have ruled during the first 70 years or so of the war, but come season 3 it is established that he only ruled for the first 20 years. Also a brief backstory released on the nick.com website implies that he was a young man who only recently became Fire Lord at around the time Avatar Roku died, but it is later established that Roku and Sozin were the same age and that Sozin had already been Fire Lord for a reasonable period by the time of Roku's death.

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* Fire Lord Sozin's age and reigning period changes between seasons of AvatarTheLastAirbender.''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender''. In the first two seasons he was said to have ruled during the first 70 years or so of the war, but come season 3 it is established that he only ruled for the first 20 years. Also a brief backstory released on the nick.com website implies that he was a young man who only recently became Fire Lord at around the time Avatar Roku died, but it is later established that Roku and Sozin were the same age and that Sozin had already been Fire Lord for a reasonable period by the time of Roku's death.



* In WesternAnimation/{{Wakfu}}, [[spoiler: Quilby's]] past whereabouts before being imprisoned changes between episodes 20 and 24 of season 2. When Adamaï and Grougaloragran destroy the preserved alien creatures within the Zinit, [[spoiler: Quilby]] explicitly states that they were his research. However, during a flashback in episode 23, a large army of Mechasms are seen in the sky during [[spoiler: Quilby's imprisonment]] And since it's true that Orgonax was the only mechasm on the World of Twelve during that period, [[spoiler: Quilby]] couldn't have been on the Zinit to research alien creatures if he was imprisoned back on his homeworld.

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* In WesternAnimation/{{Wakfu}}, ''WesternAnimation/{{Wakfu}}'', [[spoiler: Quilby's]] past whereabouts before being imprisoned changes between episodes 20 and 24 of season 2. When Adamaï and Grougaloragran destroy the preserved alien creatures within the Zinit, [[spoiler: Quilby]] explicitly states that they were his research. However, during a flashback in episode 23, a large army of Mechasms are seen in the sky during [[spoiler: Quilby's imprisonment]] And since it's true that Orgonax was the only mechasm on the World of Twelve during that period, [[spoiler: Quilby]] couldn't have been on the Zinit to research alien creatures if he was imprisoned back on his homeworld.
16th Mar '16 10:00:22 PM nowaymanguy
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Added DiffLines:

** This line is fixed in the 3DS re-release - Phoenix instead says he never imagined the possibly of "becoming the defendant for this case". Specially in the original, his line was him stating he never thought he'd "end up in the defendant's chair" himself. So it's likely he WAS referring to that specific case only, but it was just worded badly.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ContinuityDrift