History Main / ContinuityCreep

24th May '16 7:48:15 PM Kid
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*** A (common) moment of genius on the part of Pratchett though - in the earlier books the wizards all had names, and consequently died. Then he introduced the usual suspects, didn't give them names, and they became recurring characters. The only exceptions - Ponder Stibbons (Who's too smart and cowardly to die), Ridcully (Who's too stubborn to die) and Rincewind (Who's too fast to die, and in any case isn't so much a wizard as a wizzard) all, in some way, behave very differently from the standard Discworld wizards.

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*** A (common) moment of genius on the part of Pratchett though - in the earlier books the wizards all had names, and consequently died. Then he introduced the usual suspects, didn't give them names, and they became recurring characters. The only exceptions - Ponder Stibbons (Who's (who's too smart and cowardly to die), Ridcully (Who's (who's too stubborn to die) and Rincewind (Who's (who's too fast to die, and in any case isn't so much a wizard as a wizzard) all, in some way, behave very differently from the standard Discworld wizards.
25th Mar '16 10:57:38 AM DreadedDuck500
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* ''WesternAnimation/WanderOverYonder'' Season 1 is comprised of goofy standalone stories with a just pinch of continuity present in a few episodes, mainly the later ones. Season 2 has a MythArc which even a lot of the self-contained episodes are in some way related to.
3rd Mar '16 3:03:12 AM thatother1dude
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* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' initially had two- and three-part episodes which didn't really affect each other (except for the recurring villains). Then they started throwing in short arcs that built on the plot of previous Franchise/{{DCAU}} series, such as the season two premiere, which was a follow-up to ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'''s finale. And then, even the completely standalone episodes would still have brief moments suggesting continuity: the slow buildup of {{U|nresolvedSexualTension}}ST between John Stewart and Hawkgirl, and the very subtle bits of foreshadowing pointing towards the season two GrandFinale. Then ''Justice League Unlimited'' went all-out and used overarching plots that took half the season to resolve--CADMUS in the first two seasons, then the Secret Society in season three. It's generally agreed that the growth in continuity was concurrent with [[GrowingTheBeard an upswing in quality]]. In their defense, they on purpose chose to wait until near the end of that line of show's run to get that heavy. No doubt knowing they would lose the portion of the audience due to ContinuityLockout and BrokenBase of why people like super heroes. The last season aims to smooth this with what is essentially a much larger ''Challenge of the WesternAnimation/SuperFriends.'' But here we see their problems, with certain characters off limits and a whole slew of good and bad guys never actually named on screen, which while amazing nerd candy, isn't really going to inspire many new fans if that's all they had to go on. At least not to the extent the old ''Super Friends'' cartoon that really helped bring some of the rouges galleries of the other heroes much more brand value.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' initially had two- and three-part episodes which didn't really affect each other (except for the recurring villains). Then they started throwing in short arcs that built on the plot of previous Franchise/{{DCAU}} series, such as the season two premiere, which was a follow-up to ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'''s finale. And then, even the completely standalone episodes would still have brief moments suggesting continuity: the slow buildup of {{U|nresolvedSexualTension}}ST between John Stewart and Hawkgirl, and the very subtle bits of foreshadowing pointing towards the season two GrandFinale. Then ''Justice League Unlimited'' went all-out and used overarching plots that took half the season to resolve--CADMUS in the first two seasons, then the Secret Society in season three. It's generally agreed that the growth in continuity was concurrent with [[GrowingTheBeard an upswing in quality]]. In their defense, they on purpose chose to wait until near the end of that line of show's run to get that heavy. No doubt knowing they would lose the portion of the audience due to ContinuityLockout and BrokenBase of why people like super heroes. The last season aims to smooth this with what is essentially a much larger ''Challenge of the WesternAnimation/SuperFriends.'' But here we see their problems, with certain characters off limits and a whole slew of good and bad guys never actually named on screen, which while amazing nerd candy, isn't really going to inspire many new fans if that's all they had to go on. At least not to the extent the old ''Super Friends'' cartoon that really helped bring some of the rouges galleries of the other heroes much more brand value.
10th Feb '16 2:42:09 AM MisterCPC
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* ''WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall'' started out as a series of text reviews looking at bad comics before transitioning to a standard video review show. Eventually it started gaining storyarcs that occurred in conjunction with the reviews, Linkara started receiving a regular supporting cast, and some events from the storyarcs even ended up affecting the reviews.
25th Nov '15 8:31:06 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' began as a series of isolated stories set in various AdventureTowns in time and space (although the characters did evolve throughout the season). However, the second season saw its first major reference to the past in the form of the return of the Daleks, after they had all died, with the HandWave explanation that this adventure took place ''before'' their destruction. This and future seasons saw an increasing number of recurring elements and characters. It wasn't until the seventies that the narratives started to become definitely interconnected, and in the eighties this turned into ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. The new series, while still containing series and multi-series long arcs (with a few stand-alones) has dialed back on the ContinuityLockOut, if not completely.
** That is until Creator/StevenMoffat took over New Who in season 5. Since then, all of the seasons have been connected by a long over-arching story about the identity of The Doctor and new orders and secret organizations seeing him as a threat.
** The Spinoff ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' is a much straighter example, starting off with MonsterOfTheWeek style for 2 seasons. Season 4 is the longest single story in the entire Whovian universe. Think about that.

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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' began as a series of isolated stories set in various AdventureTowns in time and space (although the characters did evolve throughout the season). However, the second season saw its first major reference to the past in the form of the return of the Daleks, after they had all died, with the HandWave explanation that this adventure took place ''before'' their destruction. This and future seasons saw an increasing number of recurring elements and characters. It wasn't until the seventies that the narratives started to become definitely interconnected, and in the eighties this turned into ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. The new series, while still containing series and multi-series long arcs (with a few stand-alones) has dialed back on the ContinuityLockOut, if not completely.
**
completely. That is until Creator/StevenMoffat took over New Who in season 5. Since then, all of the seasons have been connected by a long over-arching story about the identity of The Doctor and new orders and secret organizations seeing him as a threat.
** The Spinoff * ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' is a much straighter example, starting started off with MonsterOfTheWeek style for 2 seasons. Season 4 is the longest single story in the entire Whovian universe. Think about that.
18th Nov '15 1:16:46 PM Doug86
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* Creator/BrianAzzarello's ComicBook/''OneHundredBullets'' starts off as a fairly straightforward VictimOfTheWeek series about a shady government agent named Agent Graves, who offers wronged people a chance at taking consequence-free revenge with a handgun and 100 untraceable rounds of ammunition. Initially, Azzarello just uses unrelated standalone stories to examine the moral dilemmas inherent in the concept of revenge, with Graves as the only reappearing character. As the series goes on, though, some of the previous [[VictimOfTheWeek Victims of the Week]] return to become recurring characters, and a sprawling MythArc gradually becomes apparent as the characters figure out their connections to one another and work to uncover Agent Graves' motivations for seeking them out.

to:

* Creator/BrianAzzarello's ComicBook/''OneHundredBullets'' ''ComicBook/OneHundredBullets'' starts off as a fairly straightforward VictimOfTheWeek series about a shady government agent named Agent Graves, who offers wronged people a chance at taking consequence-free revenge with a handgun and 100 untraceable rounds of ammunition. Initially, Azzarello just uses unrelated standalone stories to examine the moral dilemmas inherent in the concept of revenge, with Graves as the only reappearing character. As the series goes on, though, some of the previous [[VictimOfTheWeek Victims of the Week]] return to become recurring characters, and a sprawling MythArc gradually becomes apparent as the characters figure out their connections to one another and work to uncover Agent Graves' motivations for seeking them out.
13th Nov '15 2:17:31 AM Doug86
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** ''Comicbook/JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'' began as a series of random, one-off strips. After a while, the comic evolved so that each issue told a longer story, and a full-fledged Myth Arc was in place by the end. This was deliberate.

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** ''Comicbook/JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'' ''ComicBook/JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'' began as a series of random, one-off strips. After a while, the comic evolved so that each issue told a longer story, and a full-fledged Myth Arc was in place by the end. This was deliberate.



* The comic version of ''Comicbook/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' started with one-off stories because Tania del Rio (the writer) had orders from her editor to do the stories ''Franchise/{{Archie|Comics}}'' style. However, she slipped in some continuity slowly over each issue. By the time she got a new editor (who also happens to run ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog''), the "Four Blades" plot was already underway.
* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the between the chapter meta panels in ''Comicbook/{{Empowered}}''.

to:

* The comic version of ''Comicbook/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' ''ComicBook/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' started with one-off stories because Tania del Rio (the writer) had orders from her editor to do the stories ''Franchise/{{Archie|Comics}}'' style. However, she slipped in some continuity slowly over each issue. By the time she got a new editor (who also happens to run ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog''), the "Four Blades" plot was already underway.
* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the between the chapter meta panels in ''Comicbook/{{Empowered}}''.''ComicBook/{{Empowered}}''.



* Creator/GarthEnnis's run in ''Comicbook/ThePunisherMAX.'' The CIA's disastrous attempts to recruit him in "In The Beginning" is brought up in "Mother Russia," and a couple of characters have very important roles in "Up is Down and Black is White", "Man of Stone" and "Long Cold Dark". Yorkie from "Kitchen Irish" crops up again in "Man of Stone" and "Long Cold Dark". "Mother Russia" is a crucial part of later stories "Up is Down and Black is White", "Man of Stone", "Long Cold Dark" and "Valley Forge Valley Forge." The events of "The Slavers" has a bearing on "Widowmaker."
* Creator/{{DC|Comics}} and Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}} superheroes can be considered this in general. Back in UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}}, every story was a self-contained plot. Over the years, comics added more and more continuity until the modern soap-opera style of storytelling resulted. This, of course, led to a large amount of ContinuitySnarl, more-so on DC's end than Marvel's, due to DC being an amalgam of characters from a myriad of authors and bought-out companies (most notably Charlton Comics), while nearly all of Marvel's A-list names spawned from the mind of Creator/StanLee (i.e. it was easier for the Generalisimo to recall and/or retcon stuff he himself had written than it was for DC authors who may have had to research character that DC themselves may have not created, like [[Comicbook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]]).
* For the first several issues the ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' parts of ''Comicbook/SonicTheComic'' were mainly just full one-shots that never really related to one each other. Issue 8 started a sense of plot but it took several more issues of on and off one-shots until it came into full effect.
* Creator/BrianAzzarello's ''[[Comicbook/OneHundredBullets 100 Bullets]]'' starts off as a fairly straightforward VictimOfTheWeek series about a shady government agent named Agent Graves, who offers wronged people a chance at taking consequence-free revenge with a handgun and 100 untraceable rounds of ammunition. Initially, Azzarello just uses unrelated standalone stories to examine the moral dilemmas inherent in the concept of revenge, with Graves as the only reappearing character. As the series goes on, though, some of the previous [[VictimOfTheWeek Victims of the Week]] return to become recurring characters, and a sprawling MythArc gradually becomes apparent as the characters figure out their connections to one another and work to uncover Agent Graves' motivations for seeking them out.

to:

* Creator/GarthEnnis's run in ''Comicbook/ThePunisherMAX.''ComicBook/ThePunisherMAX.'' The CIA's disastrous attempts to recruit him in "In The Beginning" is brought up in "Mother Russia," and a couple of characters have very important roles in "Up is Down and Black is White", "Man of Stone" and "Long Cold Dark". Yorkie from "Kitchen Irish" crops up again in "Man of Stone" and "Long Cold Dark". "Mother Russia" is a crucial part of later stories "Up is Down and Black is White", "Man of Stone", "Long Cold Dark" and "Valley Forge Valley Forge." The events of "The Slavers" has a bearing on "Widowmaker."
* Creator/{{DC|Comics}} and Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}} superheroes can be considered this in general. Back in UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}}, every story was a self-contained plot. Over the years, comics added more and more continuity until the modern soap-opera style of storytelling resulted. This, of course, led to a large amount of ContinuitySnarl, more-so on DC's end than Marvel's, due to DC being an amalgam of characters from a myriad of authors and bought-out companies (most notably Charlton Comics), while nearly all of Marvel's A-list names spawned from the mind of Creator/StanLee (i.e. it was easier for the Generalisimo to recall and/or retcon stuff he himself had written than it was for DC authors who may have had to research character that DC themselves may have not created, like [[Comicbook/{{Shazam}} [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]]).
* For the first several issues the ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' parts of ''Comicbook/SonicTheComic'' ''ComicBook/SonicTheComic'' were mainly just full one-shots that never really related to one each other. Issue 8 started a sense of plot but it took several more issues of on and off one-shots until it came into full effect.
* Creator/BrianAzzarello's ''[[Comicbook/OneHundredBullets 100 Bullets]]'' ComicBook/''OneHundredBullets'' starts off as a fairly straightforward VictimOfTheWeek series about a shady government agent named Agent Graves, who offers wronged people a chance at taking consequence-free revenge with a handgun and 100 untraceable rounds of ammunition. Initially, Azzarello just uses unrelated standalone stories to examine the moral dilemmas inherent in the concept of revenge, with Graves as the only reappearing character. As the series goes on, though, some of the previous [[VictimOfTheWeek Victims of the Week]] return to become recurring characters, and a sprawling MythArc gradually becomes apparent as the characters figure out their connections to one another and work to uncover Agent Graves' motivations for seeking them out.



* The EighthDoctorAdventures tie-in novels began in early 1997 with a MonsterOfTheWeek format, albeit, one with lots of references to the show. However, starting with the 6th novel, Lawrence Miles' ''Alien Bodies'' later that year, the seeds of a MythArc were sown, and by the 23rd novel, Kate Orman and Jonathan Blum's ''Unnatural History'', published in 1999, the series was in full on ContinuityLockOut with story lines that wouldn't be sort of-tied up until 73rd and final novel, Lance Parkin's ''The Gallifrey Chronicles'', published in 2005.

to:

* The EighthDoctorAdventures Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures tie-in novels began in early 1997 with a MonsterOfTheWeek format, albeit, one with lots of references to the show. However, starting with the 6th novel, Lawrence Miles' ''Alien Bodies'' later that year, the seeds of a MythArc were sown, and by the 23rd novel, Kate Orman and Jonathan Blum's ''Unnatural History'', published in 1999, the series was in full on ContinuityLockOut with story lines that wouldn't be sort of-tied up until 73rd and final novel, Lance Parkin's ''The Gallifrey Chronicles'', published in 2005.



* {{Invoked|Trope}} in ''Webcomic/SkinHorse'', which was pretty continuity heavy from the start, but nonetheless took the time to {{lampshade|Hanging}} it (the "simple" beginnings they refer to, in addition to not being that simple, are actually only the first ''week'' of strips):

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* * {{Invoked|Trope}} in ''Webcomic/SkinHorse'', which was pretty continuity heavy from the start, but nonetheless took the time to {{lampshade|Hanging}} it (the "simple" beginnings they refer to, in addition to not being that simple, are actually only the first ''week'' of strips):



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5th Nov '15 8:51:19 AM TheAlsoPerson
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* The EighthDoctorAdventures tie-in novels began in early 1997 with a MonsterOfTheWeek format, albeit, one with lots of references to the show. However, starting with the 6th novel, Lawrence Miles' "Alien Bodies" later that year, the seeds of a MythArc were sown and by the 23rd novel, Kate Orman and Jonathan Blum's "Unnatural History", published in 1999, the series was in full on ContinuityLockOut with story lines that wouldn't be sorta-tied up until 73rd and final novel, Lance Parkin's The Gallifrey Chronicles, published in 2005.

to:

* The EighthDoctorAdventures tie-in novels began in early 1997 with a MonsterOfTheWeek format, albeit, one with lots of references to the show. However, starting with the 6th novel, Lawrence Miles' "Alien Bodies" ''Alien Bodies'' later that year, the seeds of a MythArc were sown sown, and by the 23rd novel, Kate Orman and Jonathan Blum's "Unnatural History", ''Unnatural History'', published in 1999, the series was in full on ContinuityLockOut with story lines that wouldn't be sorta-tied sort of-tied up until 73rd and final novel, Lance Parkin's The ''The Gallifrey Chronicles, Chronicles'', published in 2005.
5th Nov '15 8:49:35 AM TheAlsoPerson
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* The EighthDoctorAdventures tie-in novels began in early 1997 with a MonsterOfThWeek format, albeit, one with lots of references to the show. However, starting with the 6th novel, Lawrence Miles' "Alien Bodies" later that year, the seeds of a MythArc were sown and by the 23rd novel, Kate Orman and Jonathan Blum's "Unnatural History", published in 1999, the series was in full on ContinuityLockOut with story lines that wouldn't be sorta-tied up until 73rd and final novel, Lance Parkin's The Gallifrey Chronicles, published in 2005.

to:

* The EighthDoctorAdventures tie-in novels began in early 1997 with a MonsterOfThWeek MonsterOfTheWeek format, albeit, one with lots of references to the show. However, starting with the 6th novel, Lawrence Miles' "Alien Bodies" later that year, the seeds of a MythArc were sown and by the 23rd novel, Kate Orman and Jonathan Blum's "Unnatural History", published in 1999, the series was in full on ContinuityLockOut with story lines that wouldn't be sorta-tied up until 73rd and final novel, Lance Parkin's The Gallifrey Chronicles, published in 2005.
5th Nov '15 8:49:12 AM TheAlsoPerson
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Added DiffLines:

*The EighthDoctorAdventures tie-in novels began in early 1997 with a MonsterOfThWeek format, albeit, one with lots of references to the show. However, starting with the 6th novel, Lawrence Miles' "Alien Bodies" later that year, the seeds of a MythArc were sown and by the 23rd novel, Kate Orman and Jonathan Blum's "Unnatural History", published in 1999, the series was in full on ContinuityLockOut with story lines that wouldn't be sorta-tied up until 73rd and final novel, Lance Parkin's The Gallifrey Chronicles, published in 2005.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ContinuityCreep