History Main / ContinuityCreep

17th Nov '17 4:03:51 PM erforce
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* The original ''Film/ANightmareOnElmStreet'' takes place in an unspecified location ("Every town has an Elm Street.") and antagonist Fred Krueger is a mysterious figure, with his ability to terrorize in dreams left relatively unexplained. A very effective Horror film in its own right, the sequels (of varying quality) developed the mythology around the character, gradually revealing the central location as Springwood, Ohio, as well as Krueger's history and tried to provide some detail as to how he gained his ability to enter dreams. They also eventually confirmed the original implications that he was a pedophile, which the earlier films could not explore. (This was all, of course, coupled with the more [[Flanderization familiar incarnation of "Freddy" as a comedic killer]], so hardly perfect.)
* The ''Franchise/Halloween'' underwent this, with the original film being an effective and suspenseful Horror film on its own, and the [[Film:HalloweenII1981 first sequel]] continuing the story, intending to conclude the Michael Myers storyline, while revealing that [[spoiler:Laurie Strode is Michael's long-lost sister, who doesn't know about the familial relationship between them]]. When later films returned to the character, they tried to add increasing complexity that many audiences felt reduced the menace of the central character. Although the series has since been rebooted more than once, the reveal has long been respected as canon, and elements of the fourth through sixth films, such have been alluded to as well.

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* The original ''Film/ANightmareOnElmStreet'' ''Film/ANightmareOnElmStreet1984'' takes place in an unspecified location ("Every town has an Elm Street.") and antagonist Fred Freddy Krueger is a mysterious figure, with his ability to terrorize in dreams left relatively unexplained. A very effective Horror film in its own right, the sequels (of varying quality) developed the mythology around the character, gradually revealing the central location as Springwood, Ohio, as well as Krueger's history and tried to provide some detail as to how he gained his ability to enter dreams. They also eventually confirmed the original implications that he was a pedophile, which the earlier films could not explore. (This was all, of course, coupled with the more [[Flanderization [[{{Flanderization}} familiar incarnation of "Freddy" as a comedic killer]], so hardly perfect.)
* The ''Franchise/Halloween'' ''Franchise/{{Halloween}}'' underwent this, with the [[Film/Halloween1978 original film film]] being an effective and suspenseful Horror film on its own, and the [[Film:HalloweenII1981 [[Film/HalloweenII1981 first sequel]] continuing the story, intending to conclude the Michael Myers storyline, while revealing that [[spoiler:Laurie Strode is Michael's long-lost sister, who doesn't know about the familial relationship between them]]. When later films returned to the character, they tried to add increasing complexity that many audiences felt reduced the menace of the central character. Although the series has since been rebooted more than once, the reveal has long been respected as canon, and elements of the fourth through sixth films, such have been alluded to as well.
21st Oct '17 6:00:02 AM JVM
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[[folder:Films]]
* The original ''Film/ANightmareOnElmStreet'' takes place in an unspecified location ("Every town has an Elm Street.") and antagonist Fred Krueger is a mysterious figure, with his ability to terrorize in dreams left relatively unexplained. A very effective Horror film in its own right, the sequels (of varying quality) developed the mythology around the character, gradually revealing the central location as Springwood, Ohio, as well as Krueger's history and tried to provide some detail as to how he gained his ability to enter dreams. They also eventually confirmed the original implications that he was a pedophile, which the earlier films could not explore. (This was all, of course, coupled with the more [[Flanderization familiar incarnation of "Freddy" as a comedic killer]], so hardly perfect.)
* The ''Franchise/Halloween'' underwent this, with the original film being an effective and suspenseful Horror film on its own, and the [[Film:HalloweenII1981 first sequel]] continuing the story, intending to conclude the Michael Myers storyline, while revealing that [[spoiler:Laurie Strode is Michael's long-lost sister, who doesn't know about the familial relationship between them]]. When later films returned to the character, they tried to add increasing complexity that many audiences felt reduced the menace of the central character. Although the series has since been rebooted more than once, the reveal has long been respected as canon, and elements of the fourth through sixth films, such have been alluded to as well.
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' started off random adventures parodying Johnny Quest by Season II it all became interlocking and connecting stories, some of which purposely aired out of order.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' started off random adventures parodying Johnny Quest Quest, by Season II the second season it all became interlocking and connecting stories, some of which purposely aired out of order.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' did this in later seasons, when they had enough previous material to do so. One of the antagonists or one of Timmy's previous wishes gone wrong returns for revenge on occasion. This is especially prevalent in the episode concerning Unwish Island.
* If the first few episodes of the third season are any indication, ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' has finally become a show all about referencing itself.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' did fell into this in later seasons, for a period, when they realized they had enough previous material to do so. One of the antagonists or one of so, with multiple episodes featuring Timmy's previous wishes gone wrong returns returning for revenge on occasion. This is especially prevalent in the episode concerning Unwish Island.
Island, as well as Timmy's Secret Wish and the Wishology trilogy. Since around the latter, however, these stories have declined back to the more familiar episodic structure with relatively little ongoing continuity, save a few references in the tenth season to Timmy's Dad suddenly becoming rich.
* If From the first few episodes of the third season are any indication, onward, ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' has had finally become became a show all about referencing itself.



* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' starts going in this direction after second season finale, which gave the series a good case of CerebusSyndrome. As of season 5, the series has a long list of {{sequel episode}}s.

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* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' starts began going in this direction after second season finale, which gave although the process was relatively gradual at first, with mythology episodes being separated by relatively typical adventures by the show's standard By the fifth season, however, the series began to suffer from a good severe case of CerebusSyndrome. As of season 5, the series has CerebusSyndrome and building up a long list of {{sequel episode}}s.episode}}s as well as flashbacks and ongoing story arcs, with fewer episodes able to stand on their own, culminating in three mini-series - Stakes, Islands and Elements.



* ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'' still remains episodic for the most part, but it began to revisit previously established plot elements and build upon them more readily after its second season. There has also been a much larger emphasis on story arcs concerning character relationships since the fourth season.

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* ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'' still remains remained episodic for the most part, of its run, but it began to revisit previously established plot elements and build upon them more readily after its second season. There has also been was a much larger emphasis on story arcs concerning character relationships since the fourth season.season. The final season, "Regular Show InSpace " was fully serialized.



* ''WesternAnimation/WanderOverYonder'' Season 1 is comprised of goofy standalone stories with a just pinch of continuity present in a few episodes, mainly the later ones. Season 2 has a MythArc which even a lot of the self-contained episodes are in some way related to.

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* ''WesternAnimation/WanderOverYonder'' Season 1 is comprised of goofy standalone stories with a just pinch of continuity present in a few episodes, mainly the later ones. Season 2 has a MythArc which even a lot that primarily occurs over four episodes, but still concerns many of the self-contained episodes are in some way related to.stories as well, without causing ContinuityLockout .



* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is an unusual example. For 17 seasons it mostly had no continuity, save for the very rare CallBack; heck, just look at its [[TheyKilledKennyAgain most famous joke]]. After creating the {{Continuity Cavalcade}} that was ''VideoGame/SouthParkTheStickOfTruth,'' however, the creators seem to have gotten a taste for it. Season 18 was mostly episodic, but featured numerous nods to earlier events in the season, with some subplots continuing throughout; season 19 had more continuity, with each episode contributing to an overall arc about PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad. Season 20 is basically one long story broken up into 10 episodes, but proved too ambitious for its own good, especially when [[RealLifeWritesThePlot the actual presidential election]] messed up the creators' planned story line. Season 21 seems to be back at Season 18's level.

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* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is an a very unusual example. For 17 seasons it mostly had no continuity, save While most famous for the very rare CallBack; heck, just look at its [[TheyKilledKennyAgain most famous joke]]. killing off the same character repeatedly in amusing ways]] despite all continuity, early seasons actually had a number of small continuity nods, as well as ongoing storylines concerning teacher Mr. Garrison, which often played as subplots in otherwise standalone episodes. After creating the {{Continuity Cavalcade}} that was ''VideoGame/SouthParkTheStickOfTruth,'' sixth season, which featured multiple minor arcs, the show began veering a little closer to StatusQuoIsGod although still with the occasional CallBack or RunningGag scene. More famously, however, it experimented with ongoing storylines from the creators seem eighteenth to have gotten a taste for it. Season 18 twentieth seasons.
**The sixth season, again,
was particularly filled with story arcs, mostly episodic, but relating to the fallout from Kenny's "permanent" death the previous season and the boys' efforts to move past it by hanging out with Butters, Tweek, and eventually Kenny's spirit trapped in Cartman's body. Another storyline considers the death of Ms. Choksondik and Mr. Garrison's promotion to Fourth Grade Teacher as he comes to terms with his sexuality and finally discards his SentientPuppet Mr. Hat.
**The second half of the twelfth season
featured numerous nods a few common threads, with the main boys confronting their own unpopularity at school across four episodes in "Breast Cancer Show Ever", the "Pandemic" duology, and "Elementary School Musical". None of this is intentional, and the episodes stand on their own.
**The eighteenth season unintentionally fell under this. "Gluten Free Ebola" only happened
to earlier events in carry from the previous episode for convenience, but a RunningGag involving Randy Marsh lying about knowing the musician Lorde, and being forced to impersonate her, was mistaken by a journalist for suggesting he and Lorde were one and the same. The next episode featured a reporter by the same name uncovering that Lorde is indeed Randy's alter-ego. This became a running gag throughout the season, with some subplots continuing throughout; and ArcWelding brought this and many other gags together for the season's final two episodes, which tried to create a cohesive storyline. Multiple episodes also happened to comment on issues in technology as well. Matt and Trey flat-out admit on the commentary this all happened accidentally at first. (So, really, the first eight episodes can mostly stand on their own.)
**The nineteenth
season 19 had more featured heavier continuity, with each episode contributing introducing new character PC Principal to kick off an overall arc about PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad. Season 20 PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad - however, again, the first seven episodes mostly focus on their own subject matter and stand alone, with topics such as the upcoming presidential campaign and Yaoi fan art. Like the previous season, the final three episodes of the season tried to tie everything together into one cohesive storyline, though the final episode maintains its own theme on gun rights as well. The season is basically often described as serialized due to the ongoing themes.
**The twentieth season was infamously fully serialized, with
one long story broken storyline broke up into 10 over ten episodes, but with only a few carrying individual identity. The concept proved too ambitious for its own good, especially when [[RealLifeWritesThePlot the actual presidential election]] messed up the creators' planned story line. Season line, resulting in an AbortedArc and a conclusion for the other threads that many did not find satisfying. Even the final two episodes themselves made fun of the show's serialization
**Season
21 seems to be back at Season 18's level. have returned to the show's StatusQuoIsGod days, with one RunningGag but little else for continuity.
**The episodes "200" and "201", as well as ''VideoGame/SouthParkTheStickOfTruth'' were all willing to utilize {{Continuity Cavalcade}} to their full advantage as love letters to the shows' fans, and the latter was seen as driving the show's swing towards serialization.
18th Oct '17 2:30:09 PM elenaisabel722
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* Craig Gerber's two shows, ''WesternAnimation/SofiaTheFirst'' and its spin off series, ''WesternAnimation/ElenaOfAvalor'' , both follow this. Regarding the former, it started out with simple one and done stories with the occasional callback. Most episodes from season 2 onward build off of previous episodes in some way. This is taken up to eleven in seasons 3 and 4, with the Secret Library and Mystic Isles arcs. In the case of the latter, though it maintains the same TV-Y rating as Sofia, it has a much tighter story arc starting at the beginning. It has standalone episodes, but sequel episodes and continuity callbacks are increasingly more common.
11th Oct '17 6:49:32 PM JoeMerl
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* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is an unusual example. For 17 seasons it mostly had no continuity, save for the very rare CallBack; heck, just look at its [[TheyKilledKennyAgain most famous joke]]. After creating the {{Continuity Cavalcade}} that was ''VideoGame/SouthParkTheStickOfTruth,'' however, the creators seem to have gotten a taste for it. Season 18 was mostly episodic, but featured numerous nods to earlier events in the season, with some subplots continuing throughout; season 19 had more continuity, with each episode contributing to an overall arc about PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad. Season 20 is basically one long story broken up into 10 episodes, but proved too ambitious for its own good, especially when [[RealLifeWritesThePlot the actual presidential election]] messed up the creators' planned story line. Season 21 seems to be back at Season 18's level.
18th Sep '17 3:32:17 AM mario0987
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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' began as a series of isolated stories set in various AdventureTowns in time and space (although the characters did evolve throughout the season). However, the second season saw its first major reference to the past in the form of the return of the Daleks, after they had all died, with the HandWave explanation that this adventure took place ''before'' their destruction. This and future seasons saw an increasing number of recurring elements and characters. It wasn't until the seventies that the narratives started to become definitely interconnected, and in the eighties this turned into ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. The new series, while still containing series and multi-series long arcs (with a few stand-alones) has dialed back on the ContinuityLockOut, if not completely. That is until Creator/StevenMoffat took over New Who in season 5. Since then, all of the seasons have been connected by a long over-arching story about the identity of the Doctor and new orders and secret organizations seeing him as a threat.

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'' began as a series of isolated stories set in various AdventureTowns in time and space (although the characters did evolve throughout the season). However, the second season saw its first major reference to the past in the form of the return of the Daleks, after they had all died, with the HandWave explanation that this adventure took place ''before'' their destruction. This and future seasons saw an increasing number of recurring elements and characters. It wasn't until the seventies that the narratives started to become definitely interconnected, and in the eighties this turned into ContinuityLockOut and ContinuityPorn. The new series, while still containing series and multi-series long arcs (with a few stand-alones) has dialed back on the ContinuityLockOut, if not completely. That is until Creator/StevenMoffat took over New Who in season 5. Since then, all of the seasons have been connected by a long over-arching story about the identity of the Doctor and new orders and secret organizations seeing him as a threat. The show returned to the series long arc format once the Twelfth Doctor took over.
24th Jun '17 2:27:30 PM nombretomado
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* In a way, the "Zenithia trilogy" of ''Franchise/DragonQuest'' (games IV - VI). Despite large differences in the world maps of the games, the lack of connections between the games' plots, and there being very few ties between IV and V and almost none between VI and the other two, fans did argue that there were faint clues that the three games took place in the same continuity (like the Loto/Erdrick trilogy that comprises the first three games). This was even after [[WordOfGod series creator Yuji Horii said in an interview that]] the three games were intended to only be linked by the recurring appearance of a heavenly location named Zenithia. However, with the DS remakes, it's now official that the three games do take place in the same continuity, especially with [[spoiler: a bonus quest in VI spelling it out that IV and then V take place in the future after VI]].

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* In a way, the "Zenithia trilogy" of ''Franchise/DragonQuest'' ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' (games IV - VI). Despite large differences in the world maps of the games, the lack of connections between the games' plots, and there being very few ties between IV and V and almost none between VI and the other two, fans did argue that there were faint clues that the three games took place in the same continuity (like the Loto/Erdrick trilogy that comprises the first three games). This was even after [[WordOfGod series creator Yuji Horii said in an interview that]] the three games were intended to only be linked by the recurring appearance of a heavenly location named Zenithia. However, with the DS remakes, it's now official that the three games do take place in the same continuity, especially with [[spoiler: a bonus quest in VI spelling it out that IV and then V take place in the future after VI]].
21st Jun '17 12:48:18 AM DrPsyche
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* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' began as a fairly episodic MonsterOfTheWeek show where Steven and the Gems fight creatures, solve mysteries, and deal with personal relationships. As the first season continued a MythArc started to build with the mid season finale hinting at a greater plot. From there the plot has grown exponentially, with various character moments coming back and several innocuous background events gaining greater relevance. The protagonists meet more concrete recurring antagonists and even creatures like the monster defeated in the pilot make a few returns to further explore the show's backstory.
21st Jun '17 12:07:58 AM Nulono
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* ''WebVideo/FriendshipIsWitchcraft'' is another comedy achieving this status through reoccurring jokes. The first episode is little more than a collection of random gags with some amusing quips about the source episode's plot. Over time however, many of it's best early jokes were referenced such as Fluttershy's status as a cult leader with Rarity as a follower, Applejack's war crimes, Pinkie's gypsy powers, Sweetie Belle is a robot, Twilight's villainous plans etc, and crafted a fairly coherent story with distinct characters. All while warping the original episode's plot into something barely unrecognizable from its source.

to:

* ''WebVideo/FriendshipIsWitchcraft'' is another comedy achieving this status through reoccurring jokes. The first episode is little more than a collection of random gags with some amusing quips about the source episode's plot. Over time however, many of it's its best early jokes were referenced such as Fluttershy's status as a cult leader with Rarity as a follower, Applejack's war crimes, Pinkie's gypsy powers, Sweetie Belle is a robot, Twilight's villainous plans etc, and crafted a fairly coherent story with distinct characters. All while warping the original episode's plot into something barely unrecognizable from its source.
5th Jun '17 5:31:05 PM WillKeaton
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* ''Series/StargateSG1'' has generally gone for a HalfArcSeason format, but as it went on, the arc episodes became more numerous, and the standalone episodes got rarer and rarer. The Anubis arc was a particularly notable example, as it lasted for two entire seasons.

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* ''Series/StargateSG1'' has generally gone for a HalfArcSeason format, but as it went on, the arc episodes became more numerous, and the standalone episodes got rarer and rarer. The Anubis arc was a particularly notable example, as it lasted for two entire several seasons.
21st May '17 10:50:51 PM GamerSlyRatchet
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* ''WesternAnimation/AllHailKingJulien'' started out as a comedic series of stand-alone episodes with some callbacks and continuity. The end of the second season introduced a dramatic cliffhanger that led to a mini-arc regarding Julien's parents the following season. After that, a seemingly-minor BrickJoke ended up becoming a major plot point in the last few episodes of season four, which ended in another cliffhanger that sets up the fifth season, ''Exiled'', which features a large StoryArc that resolves said cliffhanger.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ContinuityCreep