History Main / ConflictBall

18th Mar '17 9:21:09 AM Scabbard
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** Sally's infamous yelling at Sonic for calling off wedding to keep his active role in the Freedom Fighters. Problem #1: This isn't Sonic's first attempt to ditch a wedding, and back then it was treated as a joke. Problem #2: Sally pulling her happiness over her subjects and angsting over it are huge out of character moments. Problem #3: There's no real consequences following the slap then [[RomanticPlotTumor heightened tension of their romance]], since apparently they soon go back to the healthy boss-subordinate relationship afterward.

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** Sally's infamous yelling at Sonic for calling off their wedding to keep his active role in the Freedom Fighters. Problem #1: This isn't Sonic's first attempt to ditch a wedding, and back then it was treated as a joke. Problem #2: Sally pulling her happiness over her subjects and angsting over it are huge out of character moments. Problem #3: There's no real consequences following the slap then [[RomanticPlotTumor heightened tension of their romance]], since apparently they soon go back to the healthy boss-subordinate relationship afterward.
5th Mar '17 1:53:53 PM MichaelKatsuro
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* In the ''ComicBook/{{Runaways}}'' arc "Homeschooling", Victor, in a stupid attempt to impress Nico, causes an accident that kills Old Lace and causes Klara to lose control of her powers, burying the Runaways' house in vines. Naturally, Chase is pissed off, but because nobody realizes that the accident was Victor's fault, he blames Klara. Inexplicably, Victor takes his side in the ensuing debate about what to do to bring Klara's powers under control, going so far as to suggest that they "take the kid gloves off" (which presumably means "beat the crap out of her until she retracts the vines".) It's inexplicable because 1) There's no indication that he's aware that he caused the accident, and thus he has no real incentive to support scapegoating her, and 2) Assuming that he still wants Nico to take him back, advocating the beating of a badly-traumatized eleven-year-old girl is probably not going to win him any points. There's a reason Terry Moore's run is generally considered FanonDiscontinuity.

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* In the ''ComicBook/{{Runaways}}'' arc "Homeschooling", Victor, in a stupid attempt to impress Nico, causes an accident that kills Old Lace and causes Klara to lose control of her powers, burying the Runaways' house in vines. Naturally, Chase is pissed off, but because nobody realizes that the accident was Victor's fault, he blames Klara. Inexplicably, Victor takes his side in the ensuing debate about what to do to bring Klara's powers under control, going so far as to suggest that they "take the kid gloves off" (which presumably means "beat the crap out of her until she retracts the vines".) It's inexplicable because 1) There's no indication that he's aware that he caused the accident, and thus he has no real incentive to support scapegoating her, and 2) Assuming that he still wants Nico to take him back, advocating the beating of a badly-traumatized eleven-year-old girl is probably not going to win him any points. There's a reason Terry Moore's run is generally considered FanonDiscontinuity.
16th Feb '17 12:43:35 PM NovaDeez
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* {{VideoGame/Castle Crashers}}: Similar to the above, several times throughout the game, any time you rescue a princess, the players all turn on each other in a fight to the death over her favor, despite usually having more princesses left to save.
31st Jan '17 10:55:36 AM dustyham
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* In ''Series/TheExpanse'', the ''Canterbury'' is drawn into responding to a distress call after a crewman, James Holden, ensures that it is logged with corporate HQ. This immediately provokes bad feelings within the bridge crew as each person suspects others around him or her of secretly logging the call.
14th Jan '17 7:47:59 AM smalltime
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* In the ''WesternAnimation/APupNamedScoobyDoo'' episode "Night of the Living Burger" Scooby and Shaggy have a falling out for some reason and spend almost the whole episode fighting before making up at the end. We never even find out what they were fighting about.

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/APupNamedScoobyDoo'' episode "Night of the Living Burger" Scooby and Shaggy have a falling out for some reason and spend almost the whole episode fighting before making up at the end. We never even find out what they were fighting about. Even they forgot.
25th Dec '16 2:20:24 PM MiddleEighth
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*Much to the dismay of the four in ''Fanfic/TheKeysStandAlone: The Soft World'', the entire ''world'' seems to be holding a Conflict Ball. Even their attempts to avoid conflict often result in conflict. For example, the first day they're there, just by walking around and doing nothing even the slightest bit confrontational, they're attacked five times. (Six if you count the quasi- NoodleIncident when George describes how he was carrying Ringo back from the mesa and they were set upon by flying lizards that Ringo chased off).
19th Dec '16 1:45:12 PM eowynjedi
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* In episode "Relics" of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', the normally levelheaded NiceGuy Geordi La Forge gets fed up with [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Scotty]] after about ten minutes. Even though Scotty is poking around and Geordi is (of course) under the thumb of ScottyTime, it's jarring to see Geordi yell at a man who is to engineers what Kirk is to captains. But it serves the purpose of pushing Scotty into a holodeck recreation of the original bridge to ruminate with Picard on being alone in the future.
11th Dec '16 11:45:21 AM Silverblade2
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[[folder:All Serial Media]]
* Almost any straight use of YetAnotherChristmasCarol, on a show with an established cast, needs to have one of the characters abruptly meaner for no apparent reason so they can learn to change their ways back to the way they were before the episode. Or have a JerkAss character turn nicer, [[AesopAmnesia only to revert to their usual ways afterwards]]. In fact, shows that [[TropesAreTools fail to do this]] end up warping the plot into TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong instead.
[[/folder]]



* Many hotheaded RPG characters, whether heroes or villains, will be [[HotBlooded more in the mood to fight]] when it makes more sense to talk, because the plot [[ButThouMust can't go further if they resolve things peacefully]].
10th Nov '16 8:33:01 PM Drope
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* In one ''Anime/FairyTail'' filler episode, Juvia buys a dodgy potion that acts as this, causing truly random declarations of rivalry. Some are rather plausible, like Mirajane vs. Erza, but then you have Erza vs. wooden post (because it wouldn't move out of her way), Makarov vs. alcohol (because it got him drunk), and [[spoiler: Gray vs. The Horizon]].

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* In Parodied in one ''Anime/FairyTail'' filler episode, Juvia buys a dodgy potion that acts as this, causing truly random declarations of rivalry. Some are rather plausible, like Mirajane vs. Erza, but then you have Erza vs. wooden post (because it wouldn't move out of her way), Makarov vs. alcohol (because it got him drunk), and [[spoiler: Gray vs. The Horizon]].
24th Oct '16 6:50:45 PM merotoker
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** The ''Going Merry'' [[spoiler:fixes itself in the Skypeia Arc and Usopp knows that too]]. It's plain heartless to abandon it, but at the same time still sailing in it is plain brainless (and Luffy is not THAT brainless). Franky [[spoiler: even points out it's better FOR THE SHIP to abandon it, because if the crew it loves sinks with it, the ship will not find peace]]. Usopp's denial is part of his character personality [[FreudianExcuse based on his own side story]]. Eventually Usopp learns that [[spoiler: things like this happen and he has to learn from this, not deny it or lie to himself]] leading to a moment of redemption, yes, this one, at the end of Water Seven Arc [[spoiler: he's still a coward and fights with deception, but now he doesn't make excuses for his coward personality; he now accepts he is a coward. Plain and simple]]

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** The ''Going Merry'' [[spoiler:fixes itself in the Skypeia Arc and Usopp knows that too]]. It's plain heartless to abandon it, but at the same time still sailing in it is plain brainless (and Luffy is not THAT brainless). Franky [[spoiler: even points out it's better FOR THE SHIP to abandon it, because if the crew it loves sinks with it, the ship will not find peace]]. Usopp's denial is part of his character personality [[FreudianExcuse based on his own side story]]. Eventually Usopp learns that [[spoiler: things like this happen and he has to learn from this, not deny it or lie to himself]] leading to a moment of redemption, yes, this one, at the end of Water Seven Arc [[spoiler: he's still a coward and fights with deception, but now he doesn't make excuses for his coward personality; he now accepts he is a coward. Plain and simple]]simple]].



* Mousse from ''[[Manga/RanmaOneHalf Ranma ½]]'' is almost always in conflict with the titular protagonist, which is absurd when you realize that their primary goals regarding Shampoo coincide perfectly. They have literally no reason to fight, since (aside from his massive ego) Ranma should love an opportunity to remove one unwanted love interest, and Mousse should be happy to have at least one ally who will want to see Shampoo end up with Mousse. But that would be too easy, so instead Mousse is too blind to see the reality, and Ranma just responds as usual to someone attacking him.

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* Mousse from ''[[Manga/RanmaOneHalf Ranma ½]]'' ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'' is almost always in conflict with the titular protagonist, which is absurd when you realize that their primary goals regarding Shampoo coincide perfectly. They have literally no reason to fight, since (aside from his massive ego) Ranma should love an opportunity to remove one unwanted love interest, and Mousse should be happy to have at least one ally who will want to see Shampoo end up with Mousse. But that would be too easy, so instead Mousse is too blind to see the reality, and Ranma just responds as usual to someone attacking him.



* ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'' is this in SPADES to the point where people are hoping for a huge retcon to make it all a fever dream or something. The main conflict comes from the Phoenix coming back to Earth to find a new host, which most likely will be Comicbook/HopeSummers, the Mutant Messiah. The Avengers decide that they must stop it, since the Phoenix is killing people on its way back, and they want to take Hope off-world. The X-Men want Hope to stay on Earth so that she can repopulate the mutant race. The plot kicks off with the Avengers, particularly Comicbook/CaptainAmerica, deciding to take the reigns of the destiny of the mutant race, even though they've never shown much concern for mutants. But wait, you could just have Cap tell Cyclops to have Hope meet the Phoenix in space, which would lower the risk... Instead he shows up on Utopia and demands that Cyclops hand over his granddaughter... Cyclops then blasts Cap, Cap then calls in back up, Cyclops does the same, Hope runs away, and loads and loads of fighting ensues. The rest of the plot consists of the Avengers [[BullyingADragon antagonizing the X-Men who possess the Phoenix]], which was [[GoodJobBreakingItHero split thanks to]] ComicBook/IronMan. You may have noticed that, if both sides had sat down and talked this over like actual adults, then there would've been no problem. The plot can be summed up as follows:

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* ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'' is this in SPADES to the point where people are hoping for a huge retcon to make it all a fever dream or something. The main conflict comes from the Phoenix coming back to Earth to find a new host, which most likely will be Comicbook/HopeSummers, the Mutant Messiah. The Avengers decide that they must stop it, since the Phoenix is killing people on its way back, and they want to take Hope off-world. The X-Men want Hope to stay on Earth so that she can repopulate the mutant race. The plot kicks off with the Avengers, particularly Comicbook/CaptainAmerica, deciding to take the reigns of the destiny of the mutant race, even though they've never shown much concern for mutants. But wait, you could just have Cap tell Cyclops to have Hope meet the Phoenix in space, which would lower the risk... Instead he shows up on Utopia and demands that Cyclops hand over his granddaughter... Cyclops then blasts Cap, Cap then calls in back up, Cyclops does the same, Hope runs away, and loads and loads of fighting ensues. The rest of the plot consists of the Avengers [[BullyingADragon antagonizing the X-Men who possess the Phoenix]], which was [[GoodJobBreakingItHero [[NiceJobBreakingItHero split thanks to]] ComicBook/IronMan. You may have noticed that, if both sides had sat down and talked this over like actual adults, then there would've been no problem. The plot can be summed up as follows:



** It gets worse. Rachel Summers used the Phoenix for years with no ill effects. Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} knows this. Wolverine is an Avenger, and, in fact, is the guy who gave Cap his intel... His horribly outdated and bias intel. The conflict requires both sides to ignore the existence of Rachel Summers, her history and basically most Phoenix-related stories outside of ''Comicbook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga''. You may think that the writers merely forgot about Rachel... Except that she is still a prominent character in the X-books, and ''she actually has a role in the story''. She just never speaks up about the Phoenix for no apparent reason.

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** It gets worse. Rachel Summers ComicBook/RachelSummers used the Phoenix for years with no ill effects. Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} knows this. Wolverine is an Avenger, and, in fact, is the guy who gave Cap his intel... His horribly outdated and bias intel. The conflict requires both sides to ignore the existence of Rachel Summers, her history and basically most Phoenix-related stories outside of ''Comicbook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga''. You may think that the writers merely forgot about Rachel... Except that she is still a prominent character in the X-books, and ''she actually has a role in the story''. She just never speaks up about the Phoenix for no apparent reason.



** Issue 178-179, the House of Acorn imprisons Tails' dad for wanting to reform the government, invoking the Prowers to become hostile with the heroes, escpecially Sonic, who runs his bad mouth and supports the monarch. Tails suddenly becomes unfriendly to his otherwise big brother, however, over a whole different reason: [[spoiler: he is holding grudge against Sonic for him stealing his LoveInterest despite that Fiona Fox always treated him like dirt and despite he was on a very friendly term with him on Antoine's wedding, only few episodes prior.]]

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** Issue 178-179, the House of Acorn imprisons Tails' dad for wanting to reform the government, invoking the Prowers to become hostile with the heroes, escpecially especially Sonic, who runs his bad mouth and supports the monarch. Tails suddenly becomes unfriendly to his otherwise big brother, however, over a whole different reason: [[spoiler: he is holding grudge against Sonic for him stealing his LoveInterest {{Love Interest|s}} despite that Fiona Fox always treated him like dirt and despite he was on a very friendly term with him on Antoine's wedding, only few episodes prior.]]



* Franchise/{{Batman}} and [[Franchise/GreenLantern Hal Jordan]] were not always at odds. The rationale for Batman disliking Green Lantern was initially because Batman did not trust Hal after he became [[DemonicPossession The Parallax]]. But that eventually got {{Retcon}}ned so that they never liked each other from the start, with little convincing justification as to why. John Stewart once claimed that it was because Batman's main schtick is instilling fear, and Hal, having the ability to "overcome great fear", never "bought what he was selling". But that doesn't explain why Batman doesn't dislike Franchise/{{Superman}}, Franchise/WonderWoman, Franchise/TheFlash, or any number of other superheroes who also don't seem to be afraid of him. The New 52 Justice League {{Reboot}}ed version seems to suggest that Batman doesn't like Green Lantern because he's a JerkWithAHeartOfGold.

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* Franchise/{{Batman}} and [[Franchise/GreenLantern Hal Jordan]] were not always at odds. The rationale for Batman disliking Green Lantern was initially because Batman did not trust Hal after he became [[DemonicPossession The Parallax]]. But that eventually got {{Retcon}}ned so that they never liked each other from the start, with little convincing justification as to why. John Stewart once claimed that it was because Batman's main schtick is instilling fear, and Hal, having the ability to "overcome great fear", never "bought what he was selling". But that doesn't explain why Batman doesn't dislike Franchise/{{Superman}}, Franchise/WonderWoman, Franchise/TheFlash, or any number of other superheroes who also don't seem to be afraid of him. The New 52 Justice League {{Reboot}}ed version seems to suggest that Batman doesn't like Green Lantern because he's a JerkWithAHeartOfGold.



* ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} catches the ball and flies away with it in ''ComicBook/HelOnEarth''. She can not accept the fact that she's been in stasis for twenty years and that her formerly baby cousin (Superman) has grown up in that time. As such she refuses to listen to anything he says. This came back to bite her in the ass when [[spoiler: she ended up in a relationship with H'El despite everyone else telling her that it was a bad idea]]. Although Superman and the Justice League aren't exactly faultless here either, ignoring several opportunities to explain ''why'' she shouldn't trust H'El and letting her go on believing that they're trying to stop the two of them from going back in time and saving their home planet from destruction just ''because''.

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* ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} catches the ball and flies away with it in ''ComicBook/HelOnEarth''. She can not cannot accept the fact that she's been in stasis for twenty years and that her formerly baby cousin (Superman) has grown up in that time. As such she refuses to listen to anything he says. This came back to bite her in the ass when [[spoiler: she ended up in a relationship with H'El despite everyone else telling her that it was a bad idea]]. Although Superman and the Justice League aren't exactly faultless here either, ignoring several opportunities to explain ''why'' she shouldn't trust H'El and letting her go on believing that they're trying to stop the two of them from going back in time and saving their home planet from destruction just ''because''.



* The character Steven Caldwell of ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' was, according to the actor, supposed to be more of a jerk in the original script. However, the actor subtly nicened him up a bit. Unfortunately the trade off was that whenever the script called for him to truly be a jerk, it often looked a little forced. One notable example is the episode ''Sateda'', in which Shepard claims that Caldwell doesn't value alien team members such as Ronin as much as earth members, a point that had never been hinted at before. Later subverted in a very clever way when the audience learned that [[spoiler: Caldwell was a goa'uld spy, normal Caldwell's personality was much more balanced.]]

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* The character Steven Caldwell of ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' was, according to the actor, supposed to be more of a jerk in the original script. However, the actor subtly nicened him up a bit. Unfortunately the trade off was that whenever the script called for him to truly be a jerk, it often looked a little forced. One notable example is the episode ''Sateda'', in which Shepard claims that Caldwell doesn't value alien team members such as Ronin as much as earth members, a point that had never been hinted at before. Later subverted in a very clever way when the audience learned that [[spoiler: Caldwell was a goa'uld spy, normal Caldwell's personality was much more balanced.]]balanced]].



** This was particularly glaring in Season 7, when Buffy and her cohort end up sharply at odds towards the end of the season. The most infamous example is how Buffy ends up kicked out of her own house in "Empty Places": the Potentials stage a coup voting for Faith to be put in charge instead of her after a perfect storm of failures is set up for Buffy ''and'' somehow all of the Scoobies have lost faith in her so none of them back her up (leading to Dawn of all people giving her the boot, which is particularly ConflictBall as the episode didn't give her an excuse to turn on Buffy like the other Scoobies). Faith herself seems utterly stunned by the turn of events, as she'd only raised the argument because she had a few issues with Buffy's tactics. Also Spike, Buffy's biggest supporter, is noticeably absent on a mission for the episode just so they can have ''everyone else'' turn on her (which he promptly calls them on when he returns). It's undone within two episodes, making it even more jarring.
** Season 6 just may have been worse about this, particularly regarding [[spoiler: Xander and Anya's failed wedding]]. Or how about [[spoiler: Willow's magic addiction try try to justify her turn to the dark side after Tara is killed]]?

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** This was particularly glaring in Season 7, when Buffy and her cohort end up sharply at odds towards the end of the season. The most infamous example is how Buffy ends up kicked out of her own house in "Empty Places": the Potentials stage a coup voting for Faith to be put in charge instead of her after a perfect storm of failures is set up for Buffy ''and'' somehow all of the Scoobies have lost faith in her so none of them back her up (leading to Dawn of all people giving her the boot, which is particularly ConflictBall Conflict Ball as the episode didn't give her an excuse to turn on Buffy like the other Scoobies). Faith herself seems utterly stunned by the turn of events, as she'd only raised the argument because she had a few issues with Buffy's tactics. Also Spike, Buffy's biggest supporter, is noticeably absent on a mission for the episode just so they can have ''everyone else'' turn on her (which he promptly calls them on when he returns). It's undone within two episodes, making it even more jarring.
** Season 6 just may have been worse about this, particularly regarding [[spoiler: Xander and Anya's failed wedding]]. Or how about [[spoiler: Willow's magic addiction to try try to and justify her turn to the dark side after Tara is killed]]?



** On a more dramatic note, the conflict ball is InherentInTheSystem. The setting's {{youkai}} are defined as forces that conflict with mankind and their existence depend on humans fearing them. And since the setting itself is a FantasticNatureReserve designed to keep youkai from going extinct via PuffOfLogic, youkai sometimes fill their fear quota by causing dreadful incidents for no greater reason than "well, I'm a youkai," and the resident humans who are in on TheMasquerade sometimes beat up youkai for no greater reason than [[PretendPrejudice "well, she's a youkai,"]] in order to fill the conflict quota.

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** On a more dramatic note, the conflict ball is InherentInTheSystem. The setting's {{youkai}} are defined as forces that conflict with mankind and their existence depend on humans fearing them. And since the setting itself is a FantasticNatureReserve designed to keep youkai from going extinct via PuffOfLogic, youkai sometimes fill their fear quota by causing dreadful incidents for no greater reason than "well, I'm a youkai," and the resident humans who are in on TheMasquerade the {{Masquerade}} sometimes beat up youkai for no greater reason than [[PretendPrejudice "well, she's a youkai,"]] in order to fill the conflict quota.



* {{Fighting game}}s take this trope UpToEleven. Most of the time, characters are only fighting each other, because the players simply wanted to select those particular characters. If loving family members and TrueCompanions are in the roster of a fighting game, they can be "forced" to fight each other. This also leads to certain characters that [[WouldntHitAGirl wouldn't hit females]] or [[WouldntHurtAChild children]] breaking their ethical codes. Admittedly, matches like that aren't [[InvokedTrope invoked]] through the stories, but fighting game Story Mode/Arcade Mode "conflicts" are very underwhelming, because the characters often fight over trivial things.

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* {{Fighting game}}s take this trope UpToEleven. Most of the time, characters are only fighting each other, because the players simply wanted to select those particular characters. If loving family members and TrueCompanions are in the roster of a fighting game, they can be "forced" to fight each other. This also leads to certain characters that [[WouldntHitAGirl wouldn't hit females]] or [[WouldntHurtAChild children]] breaking their ethical codes. Admittedly, matches like that aren't [[InvokedTrope invoked]] {{invoked|Trope}} through the stories, but fighting game Story Mode/Arcade Mode "conflicts" are very underwhelming, because the characters often fight over trivial things.



** In the General Story ''A Shadow Falls'' in ''VideoGame/StreetFighterV'', there are 2 instances where characters start fights for idiotic reasons, because the instigators are very stubborn and seemingly paranoid about theft. The first is in Brazil where Ken meets Laura. He politely tells her about a McGuffin in her possession that he needs. For no reason at all, Laura believes that he was ''trying to steal it'' from her brother Sean and wants to beat Ken into a pulp. Later, Dhalsim travels to New York to speak with Alex about another [=McGuffin=]. Dhalsim is also very polite, but Alex jumps to conclusions, accuses him of being a mugger with ''no proof'', then attacks him.

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** In the General Story ''A Shadow Falls'' in ''VideoGame/StreetFighterV'', there are 2 instances where characters start fights for idiotic reasons, because the instigators are very stubborn and seemingly paranoid about theft. The first is in Brazil where Ken meets Laura. He politely tells her about a McGuffin MacGuffin in her possession that he needs. For no reason at all, Laura believes that he was ''trying to steal it'' from her brother Sean and wants to beat Ken into a pulp. Later, Dhalsim travels to New York to speak with Alex about another [=McGuffin=].[=MacGuffin=]. Dhalsim is also very polite, but Alex jumps to conclusions, accuses him of being a mugger with ''no proof'', then attacks him.



* ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'': Whenever Candace actually goes along with her brothers' latest scheme, she (usually) has a great time and often gets quality time with Jeremy. Yet she is constantly trying to bust them for no apparent reason beyond sibling upmanship (pointless as they genuinely look up to her) and winning her mom's approval. Later on even she has pointed out that the urge is irrational, but often tries (and usually fails) to resist the "urge to bust" like it's an odd GRatedDrug addiction. Sometimes, admittedly, the things the boys are doing would be dangerous if they were even a smidgen less competent (showcased in "Phineas and Ferb get Busted" where one misplaced bolt led to most of the house being wrecked), and sometimes she does seem to be in it more because she thinks what they're doing is dangerous (like the all-terrain vehicle bit) or disruptive (driving cattle through downtown).

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* ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'': ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'':
**
Whenever Candace actually goes along with her brothers' latest scheme, she (usually) has a great time and often gets quality time with Jeremy. Yet she is constantly trying to bust them for no apparent reason beyond sibling upmanship (pointless as they genuinely look up to her) and winning her mom's approval. Later on even she has pointed out that the urge is irrational, but often tries (and usually fails) to resist the "urge to bust" like it's an odd GRatedDrug addiction. Sometimes, admittedly, the things the boys are doing would be dangerous if they were even a smidgen less competent (showcased in "Phineas and Ferb get Busted" where one misplaced bolt led to most of the house being wrecked), and sometimes she does seem to be in it more because she thinks what they're doing is dangerous (like the all-terrain vehicle bit) or disruptive (driving cattle through downtown).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ConflictBall