History Main / ComplacentGamingSyndrome

30th Jun '17 9:10:11 PM mlsmithca
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In BoardGame circles, if a gaming group wind up doing this for a particular strategy, it's known as Group Think, and seems to occur when a group collectively decides on a 'best' strategy for a game, however balanced that strategy is against other strategies - The best remedy to it is simply to introduce new blood into the gaming group, or at least for some members of the group to play the game with another group and pick up some new tricks to introduce back into the gaming group suffering from it. Alternatively it could simply be a GameBreaker that wasn't discovered in play testing.

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In BoardGame circles, if a gaming group wind up doing this for a particular strategy, it's known as Group Think, and seems to occur when a group collectively decides on a 'best' strategy for a game, however balanced that strategy is against other strategies - strategies. The best remedy to it is simply to introduce new blood into the gaming group, or at least for some members of the group to play the game with another group and pick up some new tricks to introduce back into the gaming group suffering from it. Alternatively it could simply be a GameBreaker that wasn't discovered in play testing.
26th Jun '17 2:41:53 PM MBG159
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** And the inverse of this: in online simulators, you often find players who have recently gotten back into the game after having only played it as kids, and are [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks unfamiliar with and distrustful of the new mechanics and archetypes that have arisen since then.]] Consequently, boot up one of these simulators, and you'll often be greeted with servers that ban the Extra Deck, Pendulums, Rituals, and basically anything released after 2006. Even simply using powerful or tournament-level strategies that meet the above qualifications will often elicit a RageQuit.
22nd Jun '17 10:25:19 PM jormis29
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* One of El Disgusto's primary traits in ''Literature/BinderOfShame'' is his refusal to play anything except a [[GratuitousNinja ninja.]] Even if the game is a medieval pseudo-European setting, a 1930s America-set ''CallOfCthulhu'' campaign, or ''StarTrek.''

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* One of El Disgusto's primary traits in ''Literature/BinderOfShame'' is his refusal to play anything except a [[GratuitousNinja ninja.]] Even if the game is a medieval pseudo-European setting, a 1930s America-set ''CallOfCthulhu'' ''TabletopGame/CallOfCthulhu'' campaign, or ''StarTrek.''Franchise/StarTrek.''
1st Jun '17 12:10:15 AM ZombieAladdin
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* {{Pinball}}: When playing in a tournament or just going for high scores, odds are a very skilled player is going to go straight for the multiball, or at least expend a great deal of effort in getting there. This is because multiball makes for a good safety net: As the machine will not count the ball as drained until every ball in a multiball is gone, this allows the player to take more risks and play faster, on top of the additional scoring the multiball provides. In addition, most machines will provide a ball saver[[note]]A mechanic that returns any balls lost down the drain with no penalty as long as it's active[[/note]] at the beginning of a multiball. In other words, a multiball will temporarily remove all of the risk from gameplay, which most savvy players consider more valuable than anything else, even the WizardMode.
25th Apr '17 6:51:20 PM cantab
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** The chess 'meta' got this way in the 19th century, in the 'Romantic era' that favoured flashy attacks and sacrifices. For the other player to decline to take a sacrificed piece was seen as unsporting. Then along came Steinitz who in 1872 developed a new style of play and crushed everyone else, became the first recognised World Champion, and ended the Romantic era.
15th Apr '17 11:01:06 PM Filosera
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** Also occasionally results in this trope being exploited by way of an IKnowYouKnowIKnow chain. If people are just going to perfect-defend any attack that comes their way, there's no point in putting anything flashy on the attack, which means there's no point in picking up other ways to defend against the flashy things that won't be on the attack because there's no point in flashy things on the attack so might as well save some EXP that could be put to better use elsewhere by using Perfect Defenses. This is perfectly sound logic when it's a brawl between the Exalt types that are just straight-up powerful in direct combat (and that's most of them); unfortunately, it falls apart painfully against the types that are weaker in a head-on brawl but specialize in esoteric control effects that don't have anything to do with hitting someone. Granted, the fact that the types that were good at that tended to be the least popular ones to play in all-types-OK games (going by census tallies on various Exalted chat-games and MUSHes, where PvP is probably more likely than in a standard tabletop campaign) might be a case of ComplacentGamingSyndrome all its own.

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** Also occasionally results in this trope being exploited by way of an IKnowYouKnowIKnow chain. If people are just going to perfect-defend any attack that comes their way, there's no point in putting anything flashy on the attack, which means there's no point in picking up other ways to defend against the flashy things that won't be on the attack because there's no point in flashy things on the attack so might as well save some EXP that could be put to better use elsewhere by using Perfect Defenses. This is perfectly sound logic when it's a brawl between the Exalt types that are just straight-up powerful in direct combat (and that's most of them); unfortunately, it falls apart painfully against the types that are weaker in a head-on brawl but specialize in esoteric control effects that don't have anything to do with hitting someone. Granted, the fact that the types that were good at that tended to be the least popular ones to play in all-types-OK games (going by census tallies on various Exalted chat-games and MUSHes, chat-games, where PvP is probably often more likely to occur than in a standard tabletop campaign) might be a case of ComplacentGamingSyndrome all its own.
15th Apr '17 10:59:56 PM Filosera
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** Also occasionally results in this trope being exploited by way of an IKnowYouKnowIKnow chain. If people are just going to perfect-defend any attack that comes their way, there's no point in putting anything flashy on the attack, which means there's no point in picking up other ways to defend against the flashy things that won't be on the attack because there's no point in flashy things on the attack so might as well save some EXP that could be put to better use elsewhere by using Perfect Defenses. This is perfectly sound logic when it's a brawl between the Exalt types that are just straight-up powerful in direct combat (and that's most of them); unfortunately, it falls apart painfully against the types that are weaker in a head-on brawl but specialize in esoteric control effects that don't have anything to do with hitting someone. Granted, the fact that the types that were good at that tended to be the least popular ones to play in all-types-OK games (going by census tallies on various Exalted chat-games and MUSHes, where PvP is probably more likely than in a standard tabletop campaign) might be a case of ComplacentGamingSyndrome all its own.
4th Apr '17 6:31:50 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* Sometimes present in the original Art Fleming era of ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', which paid full winnings to all contestants, winning or losing. Some contestants would intentionally stop ringing in if they felt that they had earned enough money, or if another contestant picked up a significant lead. The AlexTrebek-hosted revival (1984-present) gave this an ObviousRulePatch by offering the full winnings only to the winner, to create more of an incentive to compete. The losing contestants initially got parting gifts, but starting in the early 2000s, second and third place respectively won a flat $2,000 and $1,000.

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* Sometimes present in the original Art Fleming era of ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', which paid full winnings to all contestants, winning or losing. Some contestants would intentionally stop ringing in if they felt that they had earned enough money, or if another contestant picked up a significant lead. The AlexTrebek-hosted Creator/AlexTrebek-hosted revival (1984-present) gave this an ObviousRulePatch by offering the full winnings only to the winner, to create more of an incentive to compete. The losing contestants initially got parting gifts, but starting in the early 2000s, second and third place respectively won a flat $2,000 and $1,000.
29th Mar '17 7:57:00 PM Sanokal
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** This trope gets taken Up to Eleven in certain formats with "Tier Zero" Decks - those that are so strong that little else can stand up to them, resulting in said ridiculous number of Mirror Matches observed in tournament finals. Well-known examples include Tele-DAD of the early Synchro era, Dragon Rulers shortly after their debut, [=PePe=] (Perfomapals/Performages), and most recently Zoodiacs.

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** This trope gets taken Up to Eleven in certain formats with "Tier Zero" Decks - those that are so strong that little else can stand up to them, resulting in said ridiculous number of Mirror Matches observed in tournament finals. Well-known examples include Tele-DAD of the early Synchro era, Dragon Rulers shortly after their debut, and [=PePe=] (Perfomapals/Performages), and most recently Zoodiacs.(Perfomapals/Performages). Zoodiacs are a complicated example; the deck itself is certainly top-tier, but it's the ''engine'', commonly splashed into other decks, that is the real Tier Zero.



* Anime Example: Kite suffered this in YugiohZexal. To be more accurate, he suffered it a bit more in Zexal's second season. During season 1, while he relies on his ace Galaxy-Eyes Photon Dragon, at least he was willing to use/showcase other monsters in his deck. Come season 2, Kite almost ALWAYS opens his duels with the same method: Special summon Photon Striker and normal summon Photon Bouncer, then tribute them both for Galaxy Eyes. A solid strategy to be sure, but the rest of his deck essentially got the shaft.

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* Anime Example: ''Anime/YuGiOhZEXAL'': It can often happen in the franchise as a whole, but Kite suffered this in YugiohZexal. this. To be more accurate, he suffered it a bit more in Zexal's ZEXAL's second season. During season 1, while he relies on his ace Galaxy-Eyes Photon Dragon, at least he was willing to use/showcase other monsters in his deck. Come season 2, Kite almost ALWAYS opens his duels with the same method: Special summon Photon Striker Thrasher and normal summon Photon Bouncer, Crusher, then tribute them both for Galaxy Eyes. A solid strategy to be sure, but the rest of his deck essentially got the shaft.
18th Mar '17 9:15:01 PM avpfreak15
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** Charisma as a DumpStat, since it is the only primary stat that doesn't obviously affect a character in any way. (Strength affects weight-carrying limits, Dexterity Armor Class and Reflex Saves, etc.) Unless you're playing a class that uses Charisma for an ability (such as Sorcerers and Bards for spells and music, Clerics for Turn Undead, and Paladins for Charisma Modifier to Saves check bonus), most people have no problem letting it fall off, especially when high Intelligence and the resulting bonus skill points quickly and easily make up for having a Charisma Modifier of 0 to -2. Yes, an ugly jerk of a mage can conduct diplomatic peace talks better than some trained characters. Plus they have spells when that isn't enough, beginning with "polite" mind control such as Charm Person, and leading up to the much more blunt "Give me control of the kingdom, or I will call down Meteors on your head, send you to an alternate dimension, or just kill you outright if I'm pressed for time"

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** Charisma as a DumpStat, since it is the only primary stat that doesn't obviously affect a character in any way. (Strength affects physical attacks and weight-carrying limits, Dexterity Armor Class and Reflex Saves, etc.) Unless you're playing a class that uses Charisma for an ability (such as Sorcerers and Bards for spells and music, Clerics for Turn Undead, and Paladins for Charisma Modifier to Saves check bonus), most people have no problem letting it fall off, especially when high Intelligence and the resulting bonus skill points quickly and easily make up for having a Charisma Modifier of 0 to -2. Yes, an ugly jerk of a mage can conduct diplomatic peace talks better than some trained characters. Plus they have spells when that isn't enough, beginning with "polite" mind control such as Charm Person, and leading up to the much more blunt "Give me control of the kingdom, or I will call down Meteors on your head, send you to an alternate dimension, or just kill you outright if I'm pressed for time"
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