History Main / ClassAndLevelSystem

8th Apr '18 4:17:55 PM Malady
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When CharacterClassSystem meets CharacterLevel. The oldest, and arguably the most popular, type of GameSystem. A player chooses a [[CharacterClassSystem class]] at character creation, and as the game is played, the character will earn {{Experience Point}}s; when they earn enough, they will advance to the next CharacterLevel, which will grant them new abilities and improve old ones ([[EmptyLevels usually]]).

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When CharacterClassSystem meets CharacterLevel. The oldest, and arguably the most popular, type of GameSystem. A player chooses a [[CharacterClassSystem class]] at character creation, and as the game is played, the character will earn {{Experience Point}}s; ExperiencePoints; when they earn enough, they will advance to the next CharacterLevel, which will grant them new abilities and improve old ones ([[EmptyLevels usually]]).
13th Feb '18 12:49:44 PM BeerBaron
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** The first four games in the main series[[note]]''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''[[/note]] all have similar variations of this system (with a few quirks varying by game). In general, at the start of the game, you choose a class (or create a custom class) which comes with a set of preferred skills which each get a decent initial bonus. With every 10 (15 in ''Daggerfall'') increases of these skills, you gain a CharacterLevel. The character level allows you to increase some of your Attributes (Strength, Intelligence, etc.), with multipliers based on the amount of times you leveled up the skills which those attributes govern. (For example, if you increase Heavy Armor 10 times, you'll get a x5 multiplier to Endurance, which governs the Heavy Armor skill. ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'' give you a randomly generated number of points to distribute anywhere, instead.) In each game (and especially ''Oblivion''), EmptyLevels or even a ParabolicPowerCurve are possible if you level up weak attributes like [[DumpStat Personality]] or get too many x1 multipliers. (More details about this are available on the EmptyLevels trope page.)

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** The first four games in the main series[[note]]''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''[[/note]] all have similar variations of this system (with a few quirks varying by game). In general, at the start of the game, you choose a class (or create a custom class) which comes with a set of preferred skills which each get a decent initial bonus. With every 10 (15 in ''Daggerfall'') increases of these skills, you gain a CharacterLevel. The character level allows you to increase some of your Attributes (Strength, Intelligence, etc.), with multipliers based on the amount of times you leveled up the skills which those attributes govern. (For For example, if you increase Heavy Armor 10 times, you'll get a x5 multiplier to Endurance, which governs the Heavy Armor skill. ''Arena'' (''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'' instead give you a randomly generated number of points to distribute anywhere, instead.to any of your Attributes.) In each game (and especially ''Oblivion''), EmptyLevels EmptyLevels, or even a ParabolicPowerCurve ParabolicPowerCurve, are possible if you level up weak attributes like non-combat Attributes (like [[DumpStat Personality]] Personality]]) or get too many x1 multipliers. (More details about this are available (This is explained in greater detail on the EmptyLevels trope page.)
6th Jan '18 11:23:14 AM Temporary14
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** The first four games in the main series[[note]]''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''[[/note]] all have similar variations of this system (with a few quirks varying by game). In general, at the start of the game, you choose a class (or create a custom class) which comes with a set of preferred skills which each get a decent initial bonus. With every 10 increases of these skills, you gain a CharacterLevel. The character level allows you to increase some of your Attributes (Strength, Intelligence, etc.), with multipliers based on the amount of times you leveled up the skills which those attributes govern. (For example, if you increase Heavy Armor 5 times, you'll get a x5 multiplier to Endurance, which governs the Heavy Armor skill.) In each game (and played UpToEleven in ''Oblivion''), EmptyLevels (or at least inefficient levels) are possible if you don't carefully monitor your skill increases for the maximum amount of multipliers per level. (More details about this are available on the EmptyLevels trope page.)

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** The first four games in the main series[[note]]''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''[[/note]] all have similar variations of this system (with a few quirks varying by game). In general, at the start of the game, you choose a class (or create a custom class) which comes with a set of preferred skills which each get a decent initial bonus. With every 10 (15 in ''Daggerfall'') increases of these skills, you gain a CharacterLevel. The character level allows you to increase some of your Attributes (Strength, Intelligence, etc.), with multipliers based on the amount of times you leveled up the skills which those attributes govern. (For example, if you increase Heavy Armor 5 10 times, you'll get a x5 multiplier to Endurance, which governs the Heavy Armor skill.skill. ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'' give you a randomly generated number of points to distribute anywhere, instead.) In each game (and played UpToEleven in especially ''Oblivion''), EmptyLevels (or at least inefficient levels) or even a ParabolicPowerCurve are possible if you don't carefully monitor your skill increases for the maximum amount of multipliers per level.level up weak attributes like [[DumpStat Personality]] or get too many x1 multipliers. (More details about this are available on the EmptyLevels trope page.)
15th Dec '17 7:51:48 AM BeerBaron
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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' games tend to be hard at the onset no matter what you do because of your low (arguably fair) chance to succeed at anything you do, and it is insisted that you train in a combat skill regardless of what your build is. The older games have guides explaining the way stats work and the peculiar hoops you have to jump through to maximize them properly.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' does away with traditional classes entirely.

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** The first four
games tend to be hard in the main series[[note]]''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''[[/note]] all have similar variations of this system (with a few quirks varying by game). In general, at the onset no matter what start of the game, you do because choose a class (or create a custom class) which comes with a set of preferred skills which each get a decent initial bonus. With every 10 increases of these skills, you gain a CharacterLevel. The character level allows you to increase some of your low (arguably fair) chance to succeed at anything Attributes (Strength, Intelligence, etc.), with multipliers based on the amount of times you do, and it is insisted that leveled up the skills which those attributes govern. (For example, if you train increase Heavy Armor 5 times, you'll get a x5 multiplier to Endurance, which governs the Heavy Armor skill.) In each game (and played UpToEleven in a combat ''Oblivion''), EmptyLevels (or at least inefficient levels) are possible if you don't carefully monitor your skill regardless of what your build is. The older games have guides explaining increases for the way stats work and maximum amount of multipliers per level. (More details about this are available on the peculiar hoops you have to jump through to maximize them properly.
EmptyLevels trope page.)
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' does overhauls the series' system, doing away with traditional classes entirely.and attributes entirely. Borrowing a bit from its Creator/{{Bethesda}} ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' sister series, ''Skyrim'' brings in elements of SkillScoresAndPerks instead.
5th Dec '17 9:18:07 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* Similarly to the ''Diablo'' example above, in ''[[DemonsSouls Demon's Souls]]'' the class you choose only affects which items you start with and your initial stats, but from that moment onwards, you can increase whatever stats you wish and it is very possible for a mage to end up wielding a Dragon Bone Smasher (a gigantic sword).

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* Similarly to the ''Diablo'' example above, in ''[[DemonsSouls Demon's Souls]]'' ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'' the class you choose only affects which items you start with and your initial stats, but from that moment onwards, you can increase whatever stats you wish and it is very possible for a mage to end up wielding a Dragon Bone Smasher (a gigantic sword).
5th Dec '17 4:56:22 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''{{Wizard101}}'' follows this formula, although it uses a more simplified version, for the benefit of its younger gamers.
** ''{{Pirate101}}'' being the sister of the above game follows the same pattern.

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* ''{{Wizard101}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Wizard101}}'' follows this formula, although it uses a more simplified version, for the benefit of its younger gamers.
** ''{{Pirate101}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Pirate101}}'' being the sister of the above game follows the same pattern.
25th Nov '17 11:43:08 PM Octorok103
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Added DiffLines:

** ''VideoGame/DiabloIII'' alters the formula a little. While you still have a number of different classes to choose from, leveling up your character no longer gives you points to invest in stats or skill trees; instead, your stats get increased automatically, and you unlock some combination of new skills, skill runes, and passives. In other words, the bulk of your customization is going to come from the gear and skills you have equipped. Once a character reaches max level, they start earning Paragon levels, which act a bit more like levels from the previous games; each Paragon level gives you a point to invest in one of sixteen stats split among four categories (Core Stats, Offensive, Defensive, and Utility). However, unlike any other kind of level in the series, Paragon levels are theoretically unlimited and shared between characters of the same type (normal, seasonal, hardcore, or [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs hardcore seasonal]]).
13th Nov '17 1:00:04 AM pjnick0
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[[folder:Fiction]]

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[[folder:Fiction]][[folder:Non-Game Media]]
14th May '17 3:54:54 PM nombretomado
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* ''TransformersWarForCybertron'' has a multiplayer character system that's equal parts this and ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'''s "create-a-class". The weapons and abilities are divided among four classes: Soldier (Warrior), Scout (Thief), Scientist (Wizard), and Leader (which has elements of Warrior and, to a small extent, Wizard). Within each class, you can choose any two weapons, two abilities, and three upgrades available to that class (plus aesthetic elements like body style). Each class levels up individually to a maximum of 25 per class, and leveling up unlocks additional abilities and upgrades for that class.

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* ''TransformersWarForCybertron'' ''VideoGame/TransformersWarForCybertron'' has a multiplayer character system that's equal parts this and ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'''s "create-a-class". The weapons and abilities are divided among four classes: Soldier (Warrior), Scout (Thief), Scientist (Wizard), and Leader (which has elements of Warrior and, to a small extent, Wizard). Within each class, you can choose any two weapons, two abilities, and three upgrades available to that class (plus aesthetic elements like body style). Each class levels up individually to a maximum of 25 per class, and leveling up unlocks additional abilities and upgrades for that class.
27th Feb '17 7:04:54 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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The JobSystem is a specific version of the ClassAndLevelSystem, where classes level independently of each other; each class is like a different character, and the character can switch between them at will.

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The JobSystem is a specific version of the ClassAndLevelSystem, Class and Level System, where classes level independently of each other; each class is like a different character, and the character can switch between them at will.



* Pretty much every major MMORPG that isn't a WideOpenSandbox tends to favor this system. The TropeCodifier for this is arguably ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', which most modern MMORPG's have looked to for inspiration in some fashion. In the "[=WoW=]-Style" ClassAndLevelSystem, characters select a basic class at level one. At some point (typically level 10, though this varies), characters choose from a small number of "Talent Trees" which they can specialize in. Certain [=MMOs=] like ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic" and {{VideoGame/Aion}} require you to select a PrestigeClass as well. As a result of this system, members of the same basic class can function in radically different ways, to the point of being completely distinct in extreme cases.
* ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'' has a fairly traditional ClassAndLevelSystem, in that it has classes and levels, though the classes themselves are more exotic than just the standard warrior, mage and cleric. Unusually for a MMORPG, it also lacks a PointBuySystem entirely, instead offering new power (skill) choices on some levels, and slots for enhancements on others. It even avoids the traditional act of taking the same skill multiple time to get better versions of it, relying instead on the enhancement system for skill improvement.

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* Pretty much every major MMORPG that isn't a WideOpenSandbox tends to favor this system. The TropeCodifier for this is arguably ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', which most modern MMORPG's have looked to for inspiration in some fashion. In the "[=WoW=]-Style" ClassAndLevelSystem, Class and Level System, characters select a basic class at level one. At some point (typically level 10, though this varies), characters choose from a small number of "Talent Trees" which they can specialize in. Certain [=MMOs=] like ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic" and {{VideoGame/Aion}} require you to select a PrestigeClass as well. As a result of this system, members of the same basic class can function in radically different ways, to the point of being completely distinct in extreme cases.
* ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'' has a fairly traditional ClassAndLevelSystem, Class and Level System, in that it has classes and levels, though the classes themselves are more exotic than just the standard warrior, mage and cleric. Unusually for a MMORPG, it also lacks a PointBuySystem entirely, instead offering new power (skill) choices on some levels, and slots for enhancements on others. It even avoids the traditional act of taking the same skill multiple time to get better versions of it, relying instead on the enhancement system for skill improvement.



* ''Franchise/MassEffect'' plays with this. The ClassAndLevelSystem is in full force, especially in the first game. However, almost every character has their own unique class. Only [[PlayerCharacter Commander Shepard]] has a choice of classes, and only Kaidan and Ashley have classes that come from the same pool (and even then, only in the first game).

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* ''Franchise/MassEffect'' plays with this. The ClassAndLevelSystem Class and Level System is in full force, especially in the first game. However, almost every character has their own unique class. Only [[PlayerCharacter Commander Shepard]] has a choice of classes, and only Kaidan and Ashley have classes that come from the same pool (and even then, only in the first game).



* The Palladium system, used in ''TabletopGame/{{RIFTS}}'' and all other games published by Palladium Press, is a pure ClassAndLevelSystem.

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* The Palladium system, used in ''TabletopGame/{{RIFTS}}'' and all other games published by Palladium Press, is a pure ClassAndLevelSystem.Class and Level System.
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