History Main / ClassAndLevelSystem

21st Sep '16 10:17:08 AM DragonRanger
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** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVI'': Characters levels are gained via experience and increase stats, but the class ranks (up to 8) increase via number of battles won and gives new spells. However, what is unique is that spells learned this way are kept even after a class change.

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** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVI'': Characters ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII'' keeps it simple: you can switch classes at any time, but each class is leveled separately and has its own unique set of spells with no carryover.
** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVI'' and ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVII'': Character
levels are gained via experience and increase stats, but the class ranks (up to 8) increase via number of battles won and gives new spells. However, what is unique is that spells learned this way are kept even after a class change.change (in most cases, anyway; a remake of ''VII'' restricted this so that spells from basic classes are kept but those from {{Prestige Class}}es aren't).
25th Jun '16 5:00:41 PM nombretomado
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* ''DragonQuest'' examples:

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* ''DragonQuest'' ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' examples:
18th Jun '16 6:48:15 PM nombretomado
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* LegendOfTheFiveRings uses a system that combines this with point-buy - you use XP to purchase skills, abilities, and special tricks like spells, and the values of skills and abilities in turn increases your level (or "Insight Rank"). As your Insight Rank goes up, you learn new techniques for your school (or from a new school). Partially averted in cases of ronin, heimin, hinin, and some gaijin - the Ronin have techniques, but they aren't taught to just anyone, and many ronin level up without classes. Heimin and hinin don't tend to have schools at all; if they manage to develop, they do so classlessly. Finally, certain gaijin groups - particularly Thrane and Merenae - don't appear to have schools at all.

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* LegendOfTheFiveRings ''TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings'' uses a system that combines this with point-buy - you use XP to purchase skills, abilities, and special tricks like spells, and the values of skills and abilities in turn increases your level (or "Insight Rank"). As your Insight Rank goes up, you learn new techniques for your school (or from a new school). Partially averted in cases of ronin, heimin, hinin, and some gaijin - the Ronin have techniques, but they aren't taught to just anyone, and many ronin level up without classes. Heimin and hinin don't tend to have schools at all; if they manage to develop, they do so classlessly. Finally, certain gaijin groups - particularly Thrane and Merenae - don't appear to have schools at all.
1st Jun '16 8:19:19 AM ImpudentInfidel
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* In ''Series/Farscape'' Delvian religious leaders work like this. The main character Zhaan levels up from a level 9 to level 10 Pa'u in one story, then uses her new abilities to solve the current crisis.
23rd Jan '16 4:37:41 PM pinkdalek
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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' is an unusual example, in that each character was given a class during development, but it only persists in initial equipment/stats/design and the LimitBreak techniques. For instance, Cloud was listed as a Mystic Knight/Berserker and comes equipped with a sword, black magic and Limit Breaks focused around huge physical damage output or inflicting statuses on enemies, but the player can load him up with healing magic and hide him in the back row if they want to.
19th Jan '16 4:30:01 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** ''HackMaster'' seems to be for people who think 3rd Edition ''Dungeons & Dragons'' is for effete [[ClubKid metrosexuals]] who wouldn't know which end of a dagger to hold without a self-help book. Thus, the 1st/2nd edition''Dungeons & Dragons'' system is repeated.

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** * ''HackMaster'' seems to be for people who think 3rd Edition ''Dungeons & Dragons'' is for effete [[ClubKid metrosexuals]] who wouldn't know which end of a dagger to hold without a self-help book. Thus, uses the 1st/2nd edition''Dungeons & Dragons'' system is repeated.as inspiration.
15th Dec '15 12:28:05 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/ChampionsOnline'' toys with this. While the game operates primarily on a PointBuySystem, the predetermined Archetypes function much like a traditional WoW-Style character class, complete with multiple skill trees.

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* ''VideoGame/ChampionsOnline'' toys with this. While the game operates primarily on a PointBuySystem, the predetermined Archetypes function much like a traditional WoW-Style [=WoW=]-Style character class, complete with multiple skill trees.
15th Dec '15 12:27:59 PM nombretomado
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* Pretty much every major MMORPG that isn't a WideOpenSandbox tends to favor this system. The TropeCodifier for this is arguably ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', which most modern MMORPG's have looked to for inspiration in some fashion. In the "WoW-Style" ClassAndLevelSystem, characters select a basic class at level one. At some point (typically level 10, though this varies), characters choose from a small number of "Talent Trees" which they can specialize in. Certain [=MMOs=] like ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic" and {{VideoGame/Aion}} require you to select a PrestigeClass as well. As a result of this system, members of the same basic class can function in radically different ways, to the point of being completely distinct in extreme cases.

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* Pretty much every major MMORPG that isn't a WideOpenSandbox tends to favor this system. The TropeCodifier for this is arguably ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', which most modern MMORPG's have looked to for inspiration in some fashion. In the "WoW-Style" "[=WoW=]-Style" ClassAndLevelSystem, characters select a basic class at level one. At some point (typically level 10, though this varies), characters choose from a small number of "Talent Trees" which they can specialize in. Certain [=MMOs=] like ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic" and {{VideoGame/Aion}} require you to select a PrestigeClass as well. As a result of this system, members of the same basic class can function in radically different ways, to the point of being completely distinct in extreme cases.
15th Dec '15 12:27:43 PM nombretomado
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* Pretty much every major MMORPG that isn't a WideOpenSandbox tends to favor this system. The TropeCodifier for this is arguably ''WorldOfWarcraft'', which most modern MMORPG's have looked to for inspiration in some fashion. In the "WoW-Style" ClassAndLevelSystem, characters select a basic class at level one. At some point (typically level 10, though this varies), characters choose from a small number of "Talent Trees" which they can specialize in. Certain [=MMOs=] like ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic" and {{VideoGame/Aion}} require you to select a PrestigeClass as well. As a result of this system, members of the same basic class can function in radically different ways, to the point of being completely distinct in extreme cases.

to:

* Pretty much every major MMORPG that isn't a WideOpenSandbox tends to favor this system. The TropeCodifier for this is arguably ''WorldOfWarcraft'', ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', which most modern MMORPG's have looked to for inspiration in some fashion. In the "WoW-Style" ClassAndLevelSystem, characters select a basic class at level one. At some point (typically level 10, though this varies), characters choose from a small number of "Talent Trees" which they can specialize in. Certain [=MMOs=] like ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic" and {{VideoGame/Aion}} require you to select a PrestigeClass as well. As a result of this system, members of the same basic class can function in radically different ways, to the point of being completely distinct in extreme cases.
30th Jul '15 4:13:51 PM nombretomado
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* ''TransformersWarForCybertron'' has a multiplayer character system that's equal parts this and ''ModernWarfare'''s "create-a-class". The weapons and abilities are divided among four classes: Soldier (Warrior), Scout (Thief), Scientist (Wizard), and Leader (which has elements of Warrior and, to a small extent, Wizard). Within each class, you can choose any two weapons, two abilities, and three upgrades available to that class (plus aesthetic elements like body style). Each class levels up individually to a maximum of 25 per class, and leveling up unlocks additional abilities and upgrades for that class.

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* ''TransformersWarForCybertron'' has a multiplayer character system that's equal parts this and ''ModernWarfare'''s ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'''s "create-a-class". The weapons and abilities are divided among four classes: Soldier (Warrior), Scout (Thief), Scientist (Wizard), and Leader (which has elements of Warrior and, to a small extent, Wizard). Within each class, you can choose any two weapons, two abilities, and three upgrades available to that class (plus aesthetic elements like body style). Each class levels up individually to a maximum of 25 per class, and leveling up unlocks additional abilities and upgrades for that class.
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