History Main / CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys

20th Jun '18 5:24:03 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/CatchMeIfYouCan'': Inverted. The French police actually seem very gung-ho about shooting Abagnale on sight. Their national pride means they're much more livid at a con man like Frank stealing their money and repeatedly embarassing them.
2nd Jun '18 8:23:10 PM WZA
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The original ''Anime/CodeGeassAkitoTheExiled'' followed this trope UpToEleven (along with promoting stereotypical French snobbishness) with the entire European cast (outside W-0). Then the dub, by applying actual French accents to said characters, made it that much worse.
3rd May '18 4:58:42 PM t209
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Film/GIJoeRetaliation'', the President of the United States [[spoiler:really Zartan in disguise]] forces the major world powers to abandon nuclear weaponry. When he triggers their missiles simultaneously, France's representative is first to disarm their warheads albeit only doing it after they attempted to leave first in disgust.

to:

* In ''Film/GIJoeRetaliation'', the President of the United States [[spoiler:really Zartan in disguise]] forces the major world powers to abandon nuclear weaponry. When he triggers their missiles simultaneously, France's representative is first to disarm their warheads albeit only doing it after they attempted to leave first in disgust.disgust until the President threatened to launch.
3rd May '18 12:52:07 AM t209
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Film/GIJoeRetaliation'', the President of the United States [[spoiler:really Zartan in disguise]] forces the major world powers to abandon nuclear weaponry. When he triggers their missiles simultaneously, France's representative is first to disarm their warheads.

to:

* In ''Film/GIJoeRetaliation'', the President of the United States [[spoiler:really Zartan in disguise]] forces the major world powers to abandon nuclear weaponry. When he triggers their missiles simultaneously, France's representative is first to disarm their warheads.warheads albeit only doing it after they attempted to leave first in disgust.
7th Apr '18 6:58:31 AM IrvingIV
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In fact, the perception of the French as people who have no appetite for war could not be further from the truth. France is one of the largest and most powerful countries in Europe, and like every other large country in history it didn't get that way by being timid. For most of the last millennia, France was the military terror of Europe, and her people were renowned for an [[BloodKnight almost idiotic bloodthirstiness]] and willingness to expend lives and treasure for seemingly barren objectives. It's no coincidence that in most European languages, military terms derive from, if not are exclusively ''French'': "Artillery", "Battalion", "Regiment", "Defense" -- even the word "Attack" itself is French. France was also the first nation to move to a {{conscription}}-based national army during UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution when in the span of [[ReignOfTerror a single year]], France became the most advanced and modern army on the planet, giving careers to many great generals, including UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte himself.

to:

In fact, the perception of the French as people who have no appetite for war could not be further from the truth. France is one of the largest and most powerful countries in Europe, and like every other large country in history it didn't get that way by being timid. For most of the last millennia, France was the military terror of Europe, and her people were renowned for an [[BloodKnight almost idiotic bloodthirstiness]] and willingness to expend lives and treasure for seemingly barren objectives. It's no coincidence that in most European languages, military terms derive are either ''French'', or derived from, if not are exclusively ''French'': ''French'' words: "Artillery", "Battalion", "Regiment", "Defense" -- even the word "Attack" itself is French. France was also the first nation to move to a {{conscription}}-based national army during UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution when in the span of [[ReignOfTerror a single year]], France became the most advanced and modern army on the planet, giving careers to many great generals, including UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte himself.
30th Mar '18 2:49:59 PM Jormungar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It is unknown when exactly this stereotype first arose. The term itself was coined by writer Ken Keeler on an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' in 1995, but the actual perception of the French as a nation of cowards probably goes back to World War II, when in just six weeks the Germans thoroughly defeated and occupied France. Intra- and post-war perceptions of French arrogance and ungratefulness didn't help. [[note]]Such as UsefulNotes/CharlesDeGaulle's remark in a speech that France had "liberated herself" during the war, among other incidents.[[/note]] This trope was then applied retroactively through history, with French historical defeats and every subsequent defeat since being used to "confirm" it. This trope is also so widespread because it jives with that ''other'' major negative stereotype Anglophones have about the French - that of effeminacy. It shot back to prominence particularly in the US in 2003 when France refused to support the invasion of Iraq. While many other major nations also voted against it, France for whatever reason came in for a particularly acidic response from American conservatives.

to:

It is unknown when exactly this stereotype first arose. The term itself was coined by writer Ken Keeler on an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' in 1995, but the actual perception of the French as a nation of cowards probably goes back to World War II, when in just six weeks the Germans thoroughly defeated and occupied France. Intra- and post-war perceptions of French arrogance and ungratefulness didn't help. [[note]]Such as UsefulNotes/CharlesDeGaulle's remark in a speech that France had "liberated herself" during the war, among other incidents.[[/note]] This trope was then applied retroactively through history, with French historical defeats and every subsequent defeat since being used to "confirm" it. This trope is also so widespread because it jives with that ''other'' major negative stereotype Anglophones have about the French - that of effeminacy.they're effeminate. It shot back to prominence particularly in the US in 2003 when France refused to support the invasion of Iraq. While many other major nations also voted against it, France for whatever reason came in for a particularly acidic response from American conservatives.
28th Mar '18 7:32:07 PM KeylonRocks7356
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It is unknown when exactly this stereotype first arose. The term itself was coined by writer Ken Keeler on an episode of WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons in 1995, but the actual perception of the French as a nation of cowards probably goes back to World War II, when in just six weeks the Germans thoroughly defeated and occupied France. Intra- and post-war perceptions of French arrogance and ungratefulness didn't help. [[note]]Such as UsefulNotes/CharlesDeGaulle's remark in a speech that France had "liberated herself" during the war, among other incidents.[[/note]] This trope was then applied retroactively through history, with French historical defeats and every subsequent defeat since being used to "confirm" it. This trope is also so widespread because it jives with that ''other'' major negative stereotype Anglophones have about the French - that of effeminacy. It shot back to prominence particularly in the US in 2003 when France refused to support the invasion of Iraq. While many other major nations also voted against it, France for whatever reason came in for a particularly acidic response from American conservatives.

to:

It is unknown when exactly this stereotype first arose. The term itself was coined by writer Ken Keeler on an episode of WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' in 1995, but the actual perception of the French as a nation of cowards probably goes back to World War II, when in just six weeks the Germans thoroughly defeated and occupied France. Intra- and post-war perceptions of French arrogance and ungratefulness didn't help. [[note]]Such as UsefulNotes/CharlesDeGaulle's remark in a speech that France had "liberated herself" during the war, among other incidents.[[/note]] This trope was then applied retroactively through history, with French historical defeats and every subsequent defeat since being used to "confirm" it. This trope is also so widespread because it jives with that ''other'' major negative stereotype Anglophones have about the French - that of effeminacy. It shot back to prominence particularly in the US in 2003 when France refused to support the invasion of Iraq. While many other major nations also voted against it, France for whatever reason came in for a particularly acidic response from American conservatives.
14th Mar '18 2:57:41 PM GeorgeUK
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In the dub of Series/LupinIIIRedJacket, Zenigata makes this reference.
-->Zenigata: A glass of cheap fermented grapes, bread you can break your teeth on, and they call this "eating". No wonder they can't win a war! {laughs}
12th Mar '18 11:40:28 AM Macsen
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehog Antoine D'Coolette]]. In the first four years of the Franchise/ArchieComics Sonic series, he was the very epitome of this trope. Until he [[BetaCouple fell in love with Bunnie Rabbot]] and [[TookALevelInBadass took several levels in badass]]. Today his old ways are just something he can look back and laugh at himself over.

to:

* [[ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehog Antoine D'Coolette]]. In the first four years of the Franchise/ArchieComics Sonic series, he was the very epitome of this trope. Until he [[BetaCouple fell in love with Bunnie Rabbot]] and [[TookALevelInBadass took several levels in badass]]. Today It got to the point where his old ways are were just something he can look back and laugh at himself over.over. After the CosmicRetcon, these traits were actually {{retcon}}ned as well, to the point he was ''never'' this trope.
18th Feb '18 10:26:06 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


However from this height, there was the fall. Since her defeat at Waterloo, France declined in political and military might and has had a rough recent record, being defeated in the majority of major wars it has fought since then. The wars which France ''has'' won have largely been as part of a coalition. The ultimate ShockingDefeatLegacy is World War II, in which not only did the French get conquered in six weeks, but they also formally surrendered and became quasi-allies to Hitler until the Allied landings and liberation in 1944. The reason for that defeat and capitulation were huge issues in France itself from TheForties to TheSeventies (along with much debate about the role of Frenchmen in UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust). It must be noted that France lost more soldiers in the First World War (1.4 million) than the United States has lost in its entire history. A large portion of the war was fought on French soil, and by 1920 France had lost a greater proportion of her male population than ''any other combatant'' (including Russia, which went on to suffer [[RedOctober the Russian Civil War]]). Such were French losses that the army she fielded in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was actually ''smaller'' than the one she had in 1918, and the total population had barely changed in 20 years. Not to say the French simply stood aside: the French Resistance led by De Gaulle won much prestige and renown, and arguably saved the honor of France.

to:

However from this height, there was the fall. Since her defeat at Waterloo, France declined in political and military might and has had a rough recent record, being defeated in the majority of major wars it has fought since then. The wars which France ''has'' won have largely been as part of a coalition. The ultimate ShockingDefeatLegacy is World War II, in which not only did the French get conquered in six weeks, but they also formally surrendered and became quasi-allies to Hitler until the Allied landings and liberation in 1944. The reason for that defeat and capitulation were huge issues in France itself from TheForties to TheSeventies (along with much debate about the role of Frenchmen in UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust). It must be noted that France lost more soldiers in the First World War (1.4 million) than the United States has lost in its entire history. A large portion of the war was fought on French soil, and by 1920 France had lost a greater proportion of her male population than ''any other combatant'' (including Russia, which went on to suffer [[RedOctober [[UsefulNotes/RedOctober the Russian Civil War]]). Such were French losses that the army she fielded in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was actually ''smaller'' than the one she had in 1918, and the total population had barely changed in 20 years. Not to say the French simply stood aside: the French Resistance led by De Gaulle won much prestige and renown, and arguably saved the honor of France.
This list shows the last 10 events of 797. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys