History Main / CharacterDevelopment

22nd Oct '16 5:53:17 AM ANTMuddle
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While the definition of "good" and "bad" character development is subjective, it's generally agreed upon that good character development is believable and rounds out a well-written character. Bad character development leads to the feeling that someone is manipulating the events to their own whims, or even reduces the character's believability.

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While the definition of "good" and "bad" character development is subjective, it's generally agreed upon that good character development is believable and rounds out a well-written character. Bad character development leads to the feeling that someone is manipulating the events to their own whims, or even reduces the character's believability.
believability (in some cases, {{chickification}}).
28th Oct '15 6:11:15 PM eroock
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'''Character Development''' is, by definition, the change in characterization of a DynamicCharacter, who changes over the course of a narrative. At its core, it shows a character changing. Most narrative fiction in any media will feature some display of this.

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'''Character Development''' Character Development is, by definition, the change in characterization of a DynamicCharacter, who changes over the course of a narrative. At its core, it shows a character changing. Most narrative fiction in any media will feature some display of this.
28th Oct '15 6:10:41 PM eroock
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[[quoteright:230:[[Franchise/{{Halloween}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laurie_strode17.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:230:[[Franchise/{{Halloween}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laurie_strode17.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laurie_strode1.jpg]]]]
28th Oct '15 6:04:48 PM eroock
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[[quoteright:216:[[Franchise/{{Halloween}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/aaalaurieaaa_4881.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:216: From DamselInDistress to ActionGirl. [[Film/{{Halloween 1978}} A lot can change]] in [[Film/HalloweenH20TwentyYearsLater twenty years]].]]

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[[quoteright:216:[[Franchise/{{Halloween}} [[quoteright:230:[[Franchise/{{Halloween}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/aaalaurieaaa_4881.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laurie_strode17.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:216: [[caption-width-right:230: From DamselInDistress to ActionGirl. [[Film/{{Halloween 1978}} A lot can change]] in [[Film/HalloweenH20TwentyYearsLater twenty years]].]]
13th Jul '15 1:28:30 PM Vasha
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These are hardly the only examples. The EvilTwin of CharacterDevelopment is CharacterDerailment. Beware this trope. To see the opposite of this trope, see StaticCharacter. See also FlatCharacter and RoundedCharacter. Compare HiddenDepths, where something is revealed that was true all along, but would not have been visible before.

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These are hardly the only examples. The EvilTwin of CharacterDevelopment Character Development is CharacterDerailment. Beware this trope. To see the opposite of this trope, see StaticCharacter. See also FlatCharacter and RoundedCharacter. Compare HiddenDepths, where something is revealed that was true all along, but would not have been visible before.
12th May '15 5:02:38 AM Alvin
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* HiddenDepths has a character develop in unexpected directions. It can also describe FlatCharacter turning into a RoundedCharacter.

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* HiddenDepths has a character develop in unexpected directions. It can also describe a FlatCharacter turning into a RoundedCharacter.
19th Mar '15 4:22:16 PM tropeminer
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Character development is, by definition, the change in characterization of a DynamicCharacter, who changes over the course of a narrative. At its core, it shows a character changing. Most narrative fiction in any media will feature some display of this.

to:

Character development '''Character Development''' is, by definition, the change in characterization of a DynamicCharacter, who changes over the course of a narrative. At its core, it shows a character changing. Most narrative fiction in any media will feature some display of this.
25th Oct '14 6:00:57 AM TrollBrutal
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The oldest form of this is [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillain the moral decay]] of the AntiHero, as in Shakespeare's ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' or ''Coriolanus'', or the modern equivalent of [[Characters/BreakingBadWalterWhite Walter White]] in ''Series/BreakingBad''. In each case the protagonist's growing vices are timidly concealed at first but then openly displayed. A fascinating reversal of this occurs in ''SchindlersList'' - at first Schindler claims he is only saving people because he needs them for his business. By the end he is openly losing millions. His inversion of moral decay goes from an intention to get rich by exploiting slave labor, to grieving over not saving one more person.
31st May '14 11:23:48 PM babyhenchy1
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The oldest form of this is [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillain the moral decay]] of the AntiHero, as in Shakespeare's ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' or ''Coriolanus'', or the modern equivalent of Walter White in ''Series/BreakingBad''. In each case the protagonist's growing vices are timidly concealed at first but then openly displayed. A fascinating reversal of this occurs in ''SchindlersList'' - at first Schindler claims he is only saving people because he needs them for his business. By the end he is openly losing millions. His inversion of moral decay goes from an intention to get rich by exploiting slave labor, to grieving over not saving one more person.

to:

The oldest form of this is [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillain the moral decay]] of the AntiHero, as in Shakespeare's ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' or ''Coriolanus'', or the modern equivalent of [[Characters/BreakingBadWalterWhite Walter White White]] in ''Series/BreakingBad''. In each case the protagonist's growing vices are timidly concealed at first but then openly displayed. A fascinating reversal of this occurs in ''SchindlersList'' - at first Schindler claims he is only saving people because he needs them for his business. By the end he is openly losing millions. His inversion of moral decay goes from an intention to get rich by exploiting slave labor, to grieving over not saving one more person.
31st May '14 11:21:21 PM babyhenchy1
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The oldest form of this is [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillain the moral decay]] of the AntiHero, as in Shakespeare's ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' or ''Coriolanus'', or the modern equivalent of Walter White in Breaking Bad. In each case the protagonist's growing vices are timidly concealed at first but then openly displayed. A fascinating reversal of this occurs in ''SchindlersList'' - at first Schindler claims he is only saving people because he needs them for his business. By the end he is openly losing millions. His inversion of moral decay goes from an intention to get rich by exploiting slave labor, to grieving over not saving one more person.

to:

The oldest form of this is [[ProtagonistJourneyToVillain the moral decay]] of the AntiHero, as in Shakespeare's ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' or ''Coriolanus'', or the modern equivalent of Walter White in Breaking Bad.''Series/BreakingBad''. In each case the protagonist's growing vices are timidly concealed at first but then openly displayed. A fascinating reversal of this occurs in ''SchindlersList'' - at first Schindler claims he is only saving people because he needs them for his business. By the end he is openly losing millions. His inversion of moral decay goes from an intention to get rich by exploiting slave labor, to grieving over not saving one more person.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CharacterDevelopment