History Main / CharacterDevelopment

8th Mar '18 4:01:03 PM system
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8th Mar '18 1:21:25 PM Wolfman-Mike
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Character Development is, by definition, the change in characterization of a DynamicCharacter, who changes over the course of a narrative. At its core, it shows a character changing. Most narrative fiction in any media will feature some display of this.

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Character Development Evolution is, by definition, the change in characterization of a DynamicCharacter, who changes over the course of a narrative. At its core, it shows a character changing. This is often mistaken for Character Development, which is the fleshing out of a character through the employment of a backstory, or of showing who and what the character is and does does your character have a job, is he or she good with kids, driven or unmotivated, etc. In other words, is the character fleshed out and therefore believable/likeable, as opposed to a mere concept on a page? Most narrative fiction in any media will feature some display of this.



There are many sub-tropes that take place due to this trope, some of which include:

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There are many sub-tropes that take place due to this trope, Character Evolution, some of which include:



These are hardly the only examples. The EvilTwin of Character Development is CharacterDerailment. Beware this trope. To see the opposite of this trope, see StaticCharacter. See also FlatCharacter and RoundedCharacter. Compare HiddenDepths, where something is revealed that was true all along, but would not have been visible before.

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These are hardly the only examples. The EvilTwin of By contrast, Character Development is CharacterDerailment. Beware this trope. To see will involve such things as:

* Showing
the opposite of this trope, see StaticCharacter. See also FlatCharacter audience what the character does for a living, and RoundedCharacter. Compare HiddenDepths, where something whether he or she is revealed good at the job.
* Does the character have a family? What is the character's relationship to his or her family (strained or good)? For example, in Ordinary People, Timothy Dutton's character has a strained relationship with his mother, played by Mary Tyler Moore, stemming from the death of his brother in a boating accident involving both siblings.
* Is the character a swell person or a jerk, life-in-order or a wreck? Example: in Sea of Love, Al Pacino's character lets a parole violator go because he's with his young son. Conversely, Paul Newman's character in The Verdict is a washed up trial attorney seeking redemption through a medical malpractice lawsuit, who comes across in a number of scenes as being kind of pathetic, earning the pity of the audience.
* The character has a backstory
that was true all along, but would explains his or her past.

It is important
not have been visible before.
to confuse Character Evolution, in which a character undergoes a change through the course of the story, and Character Development, which makes the character three-dimensional and believable.
12th Aug '17 8:47:03 AM PistolsAtDawn
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* A JerkToNiceGuyPlot is a specific form of character development where the character learns a lesson and [[TookALevelInKindness takes a level in kindness]].
27th May '17 11:02:10 PM 017Bluefield
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While the definition of "good" and "bad" character development is subjective, it's generally agreed upon that good character development is believable and rounds out a well-written character. Bad character development leads to the feeling that someone is manipulating the events to their own whims, or even reduces the character's believability (in some cases, {{chickification}}).

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While the definition of "good" and "bad" character development is subjective, it's generally agreed upon that good ''good'' character development is believable and rounds out a well-written character. Bad character development leads to the feeling that someone is manipulating the events to their own whims, or even reduces the character's believability (in some cases, {{chickification}}).



* {{Flanderization}} is when a character has a quirk or personality trait that slowly becomes their only defining characteristic.

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* {{Flanderization}} is when a character has a quirk or personality trait that slowly becomes their only ''only'' defining characteristic.
4th Feb '17 4:36:52 PM ANTMuddle
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There are many sub-tropes that take place due to this trope, some of which include

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There are many sub-tropes that take place due to this trope, some of which include
include:




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* When combat factors into their development, then they TookALevelInBadass.
22nd Oct '16 5:53:17 AM ANTMuddle
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While the definition of "good" and "bad" character development is subjective, it's generally agreed upon that good character development is believable and rounds out a well-written character. Bad character development leads to the feeling that someone is manipulating the events to their own whims, or even reduces the character's believability.

to:

While the definition of "good" and "bad" character development is subjective, it's generally agreed upon that good character development is believable and rounds out a well-written character. Bad character development leads to the feeling that someone is manipulating the events to their own whims, or even reduces the character's believability.
believability (in some cases, {{chickification}}).
28th Oct '15 6:11:15 PM eroock
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'''Character Development''' is, by definition, the change in characterization of a DynamicCharacter, who changes over the course of a narrative. At its core, it shows a character changing. Most narrative fiction in any media will feature some display of this.

to:

'''Character Development''' Character Development is, by definition, the change in characterization of a DynamicCharacter, who changes over the course of a narrative. At its core, it shows a character changing. Most narrative fiction in any media will feature some display of this.
28th Oct '15 6:10:41 PM eroock
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[[quoteright:230:[[Franchise/{{Halloween}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laurie_strode17.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:230:[[Franchise/{{Halloween}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laurie_strode17.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laurie_strode1.jpg]]]]
28th Oct '15 6:04:48 PM eroock
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[[quoteright:216:[[Franchise/{{Halloween}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/aaalaurieaaa_4881.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:216: From DamselInDistress to ActionGirl. [[Film/{{Halloween 1978}} A lot can change]] in [[Film/HalloweenH20TwentyYearsLater twenty years]].]]

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[[quoteright:216:[[Franchise/{{Halloween}} [[quoteright:230:[[Franchise/{{Halloween}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/aaalaurieaaa_4881.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laurie_strode17.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:216: [[caption-width-right:230: From DamselInDistress to ActionGirl. [[Film/{{Halloween 1978}} A lot can change]] in [[Film/HalloweenH20TwentyYearsLater twenty years]].]]
13th Jul '15 1:28:30 PM Vasha
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These are hardly the only examples. The EvilTwin of CharacterDevelopment is CharacterDerailment. Beware this trope. To see the opposite of this trope, see StaticCharacter. See also FlatCharacter and RoundedCharacter. Compare HiddenDepths, where something is revealed that was true all along, but would not have been visible before.

to:

These are hardly the only examples. The EvilTwin of CharacterDevelopment Character Development is CharacterDerailment. Beware this trope. To see the opposite of this trope, see StaticCharacter. See also FlatCharacter and RoundedCharacter. Compare HiddenDepths, where something is revealed that was true all along, but would not have been visible before.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CharacterDevelopment