History Main / CartoonBomb

20th Nov '16 2:15:06 PM TheKaizerreich
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This is a subtrope of IncrediblyObviousBomb, but that also includes more realistic but still blatantly obvious bombs like the classic digital timer (often ticking to make it even more incredibly obvious) attached to a bundle of explosives (which is fairly common in cartoons). Compare PlungerDetonator, which is the standard cartoon way of setting off explosives from a distance. [[ShapedLikeItself Often thrown by]] the BombThrowingAnarchist.

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This is a subtrope of IncrediblyObviousBomb, but that also includes more realistic but still blatantly obvious bombs like the classic digital timer (often ticking to make it even more incredibly obvious) attached to a bundle of explosives (which is fairly common in cartoons). Compare PlungerDetonator, which is the standard cartoon way of setting off explosives from a distance. [[ShapedLikeItself Often thrown by]] the BombThrowingAnarchist.thrown]] by BombThrowingAnarchists.
13th Nov '16 3:54:37 PM REV6Pilot
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This actually has a basis in history: Before the mid-19th century, contact or proximity fuses for detonating explosive payloads had yet to be developed. The only means by which an explosive shell or bomb could be feasibly detonated from a distance was by a slow-burning match cord. In Western militaries, these weapons often took the shape of an iron sphere with a match cord sticking out of one end, and the CartoonBomb actually ''is'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic a realistic representation of such ammunition]]. The resemblance to cannonballs is not coincidence; they were often designed to be fired out of cannons, or rather carronades, mortars or howitzers. (The "bombs bursting in air" from the traditional US song "[[NationalAnthem The Star-Spangled Banner]]" were of this variety.) A skilled bombardier could estimate how long it would take for the bomb to fly to the assumed target and cut the fuse to appropriate length so that the bomb would explode exactly at the desired moment.

to:

This actually has a basis in history: Before the mid-19th century, contact or proximity fuses for detonating explosive payloads had yet to be developed. The only means by which an explosive shell or bomb could be feasibly detonated from a distance was by a slow-burning match cord. In Western militaries, these weapons often took the shape of an iron sphere with a match cord sticking out of one end, and the CartoonBomb actually ''is'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic [[AluminumChristmasTrees a realistic representation of such ammunition]]. The resemblance to cannonballs is not coincidence; they were often designed to be fired out of cannons, or rather carronades, mortars or howitzers. (The "bombs bursting in air" from the traditional US song "[[NationalAnthem The Star-Spangled Banner]]" were of this variety.) A skilled bombardier could estimate how long it would take for the bomb to fly to the assumed target and cut the fuse to appropriate length so that the bomb would explode exactly at the desired moment.


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* Brigand Vvulf, one of the toughest bosses from ''VideoGame/DarkestDungeon'', makes use of these. The trope is played like modeling clay: it's justified given the early Modern Age period of the game, and subverted in that the bombs' effects are ''anything'' but cartoony each bomb can deal up to '''45 points of damage''' in a game where the flimsier classes struggle to be above 40 at their strongest.
28th Oct '16 2:01:02 PM nombretomado
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* One of the first, if not ''the'' first, video arcade game to use this imagery was the [[TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames Golden Age]] arcade game ''VideoGame/KickMan''. You had to catch falling balloons on your head, but you had to avoid the similar-looking falling bombs. (During development, the dropped-things-to-avoid were [[AnvilOnHead anvils]], but the game's designers didn't think the average player would recognize anvils.)

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* One of the first, if not ''the'' first, video arcade game to use this imagery was the [[TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfVideoGames Golden Age]] arcade game ''VideoGame/KickMan''. You had to catch falling balloons on your head, but you had to avoid the similar-looking falling bombs. (During development, the dropped-things-to-avoid were [[AnvilOnHead anvils]], but the game's designers didn't think the average player would recognize anvils.)
4th Sep '16 4:46:29 AM erforce
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* In ''Revenge of Franchise/{{the Pink Panther}}'', members of the French Connection use one of these on Clouseau.

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* In ''Revenge of Franchise/{{the Pink Panther}}'', ''Film/RevengeofThePinkPanther'', members of the French Connection use one of these on Clouseau.



* In the second ''Film/LordOfTheRings'' movie, one of Saruman's orcs uses one of these to blow open Helm's Deep. This is somewhat justified as it's the first bomb ever in Middle Earth, or at least since the First Age. Worst. Olympics. Ever.

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* In the second ''Film/LordOfTheRings'' movie, ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings: The Two Towers'', one of Saruman's orcs uses one of these to blow open Helm's Deep. This is somewhat justified as it's the first bomb ever in Middle Earth, or at least since the First Age. Worst. Olympics. Ever.



* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'': Grenades shaped like this were used, which was likely a historically accurate depiction.

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* ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'': ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl'': Grenades shaped like this were used, which was likely a historically accurate depiction.
7th Aug '16 6:42:23 PM Morgenthaler
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** JonStewart had an appropriately [[HollywoodMagnetism cartoony]] [[http://thedailyshow.cc.com/videos/vkw7yr/bore-games solution]] (at ~5:20).

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** JonStewart Creator/JonStewart had an appropriately [[HollywoodMagnetism cartoony]] [[http://thedailyshow.cc.com/videos/vkw7yr/bore-games solution]] (at ~5:20).
9th Jul '16 1:59:43 PM Sputnikovsky
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* ''VideoGame/ConkersBadFurDay'' features a level where you have to deliver a live bomb to a certain location before it blows up on you.
10th Jun '16 11:32:01 PM nombretomado
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* Used occasionally on ''Series/TheMuppetShow''. The Swedish Chef finds one in a coconut; a chicken being cooked by the chef lays one; one is used in Rowlf's version of "The Cat Came Back", and one is even used as a joke by StatlerAndWaldorf.

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* Used occasionally on ''Series/TheMuppetShow''. The Swedish Chef finds one in a coconut; a chicken being cooked by the chef lays one; one is used in Rowlf's version of "The Cat Came Back", and one is even used as a joke by StatlerAndWaldorf.JustForFun/StatlerAndWaldorf.
13th May '16 4:54:01 AM MAI742
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* Reflecting its real life origins, a stylized cartoon bomb appears in insignia of several real life military units, including several elite ones (Grenadiers were an elite force, since it took real guts and much training to throw round bombs with lit fuses for much distance after all) Examples include, but are not limited to, the British Grenadier Guards, the French Foreign Legion, the Italian Carabinieri, the artillery troops of Finland, Norway, and Portugal, and the Danish Royal Guards.

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* Reflecting its real life origins, a stylized cartoon bomb appears in insignia of several real life ethnic-Europeans' military units, including several elite ones (Grenadiers ones. Grenadiers were an elite force, since it took real guts and much training before the 20th century most people were too weak (as a result of poverty-induced childhood malnutrition) to throw round bombs with lit fuses for much distance after all) them (repeatedly). Examples include, but are not limited to, the British Grenadier Guards, the French Foreign Legion, the Italian Carabinieri, the artillery troops of Finland, Norway, and Portugal, and the Danish Royal Guards.
13th May '16 4:50:49 AM MAI742
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Early hand grenades also took this shape, as did mortar bombs. In fact, the "pineapple" grenades used by American and British soldiers during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII were variations on this type of bomb. There were only three major differences. They included a built-in fuse lighter for convenience. (That's the handle-and-pin assembly made famous by the PinPullingTeeth trope.) They were oblong, and they had grooved skin so that they would fragment more easily and disperse shrapnel. (That's why they're called "frag" grenades.)

to:

Early hand grenades also took this shape, as did mortar bombs. In fact, the "pineapple" grenades used by American and British Soviet, Franco-British Commonwealth, American, etc soldiers during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII were variations on this type of bomb. There were only three major differences. They included a built-in fuse lighter for convenience. (That's the handle-and-pin assembly made famous by the PinPullingTeeth trope.) They were oblong, and they had grooved skin so that they would fragment more easily and disperse shrapnel. (That's why they're called "frag" grenades.)
13th May '16 4:48:31 AM MAI742
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This actually has a basis in history: Before the mid-19th century, contact or proximity fuses for detonating explosive payloads had yet to be developed. The only means by which an explosive shell or bomb could be feasibly detonated from a distance was by a slow-burning match cord. In Western militaries, these weapons often took the shape of an iron sphere with a match cord sticking out of one end, and the CartoonBomb actually ''is'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic a realistic representation of such ammunition]]. The resemblance to cannonballs is not coincidence; they were often designed to be fired out of cannons, or rather carronades, mortars or howitzers. (The "bombs bursting in air" from "[[NationalAnthem The Star-Spangled Banner]]" were of this variety.) A skilled bombardier could estimate how long it would take for the bomb to fly to the assumed target and cut the fuse to appropriate length so that the bomb would explode exactly at the desired moment.

to:

This actually has a basis in history: Before the mid-19th century, contact or proximity fuses for detonating explosive payloads had yet to be developed. The only means by which an explosive shell or bomb could be feasibly detonated from a distance was by a slow-burning match cord. In Western militaries, these weapons often took the shape of an iron sphere with a match cord sticking out of one end, and the CartoonBomb actually ''is'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic a realistic representation of such ammunition]]. The resemblance to cannonballs is not coincidence; they were often designed to be fired out of cannons, or rather carronades, mortars or howitzers. (The "bombs bursting in air" from the traditional US song "[[NationalAnthem The Star-Spangled Banner]]" were of this variety.) A skilled bombardier could estimate how long it would take for the bomb to fly to the assumed target and cut the fuse to appropriate length so that the bomb would explode exactly at the desired moment.
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