History Main / CardBoardPrison

9th Sep '16 10:41:22 AM timotaka
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* {{ComicBook/Iznogoud}} once wanted to hire the services of a master thief. He did not have to go looking far, as the thief was already in the Caliph's prison! ...some of the time. A nearby guard informed him that the thief is ''so good'' he comes and goes as he pleases, and nothing the jailers have done has managed to hinder him in the slightest. He basically treated his jail cell as a place where he could stay and eat for free and where people can contact him if they need to.
7th Sep '16 9:45:32 AM GoblinCipher
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* Oflag IV-C in Colditz Castle during World War II was a strange case of being both this and an ''[[TheAlcatraz inescapable prison]]''. This is because, despite the fact that the castle itself was meant to keep prisoners in, the attitude of the guards were that it was the POW's duty to try to escape. They had a gentleman's agreement that the guards would not go rough on the prisoners and in turn the prisoners would not harm any guards in their escape attempts. This, combined with the fact that most of the prisoners here were sent here because they had previously tried to escape other POW camps meant that Colditz had one of the highest records of successful escape attempts for a Nazi POW camp. And, there were plenty who escaped from their original POW camps, but were caught before they could get out of Germany itself. Getting out of a prison barracks unnoticed is one thing, getting across an entire ''country'' or ''continent'' unnoticed is another.

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* Oflag IV-C in Colditz Castle during World War II was a strange case of being both this and an ''[[TheAlcatraz inescapable prison]]''. This is because, despite the fact that the castle itself was meant to keep prisoners in, the attitude of the guards were was that it was the POW's duty to try to escape. They had a gentleman's agreement that the guards would not go rough on the prisoners and in turn the prisoners would not harm any guards in their escape attempts. This, combined with the fact that most of the prisoners here were sent here because they had previously tried to escape other POW camps meant that Colditz had one of the highest records of successful escape attempts for a Nazi POW camp. And, there were plenty who escaped from their original POW camps, but were caught before they could get out of Germany itself. Getting out of a prison barracks unnoticed is one thing, getting across an entire ''country'' or ''continent'' unnoticed is another.
7th Sep '16 9:39:13 AM GoblinCipher
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* ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'' captures his ghostly enemies and then ... returns them to the Ghost Zone. Which is accessed by a completely uncontrolled portal that opens whenever it feels like it. As well as a basically unlimited number of other portals that randomly connect the Zone to various points in time and space. This isn't even to mention that some ghosts, like Johnny 13, can open portals whenever they feel like it! It's small wonder that "caught" ghosts often return in ''the very next episode''.
22nd Aug '16 7:23:00 AM SilverSupernova
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* "Prison 42", nicknamed "Fantasy Island" by its inmates, debuted in ''ComicBook/CivilWar''. It's located in another dimension, accessible only by certain teleporter systems, secure and heavily coded. Many superheroes unwilling to register with the government were locked up there, and were indeed its first inmates. It was supposed to be the final answer to this trope. Naturally, the anti-registration heroes on the outside engineered a mass jailbreak. Likewise it serves to be a sort of {{deconstruction}} of [[IDidWhatIHadToDo what steps you would have to take]] to actually make a prison immune to the kind of crazy shit filling the Marvel Universe. And as [[IKnewIt predicted]] by some annoyed fans, it later got taken over by the ''residents'' of the Negative Zone. Because it just would've made too much sense to place the prison in a pocket dimension that ''wasn't'' already occupied by various fanatically xenophobic aliens.

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* "Prison 42", nicknamed "Fantasy Island" by its inmates, debuted in ''ComicBook/CivilWar''. It's located in another dimension, accessible only by certain teleporter systems, secure and heavily coded. Many superheroes unwilling to register with the government were locked up there, and were indeed its first inmates. It was supposed to be the final answer to this trope. Naturally, the anti-registration heroes on the outside engineered a mass jailbreak. Likewise it serves to be a sort of {{deconstruction}} of [[IDidWhatIHadToDo what steps you would have to take]] to actually make a prison immune to the kind of crazy shit filling the Marvel Universe. And as [[IKnewIt predicted]] by some annoyed fans, it later got taken over by the ''residents'' of the Negative Zone. Because it just would've made too much sense to place the prison in a pocket dimension that ''wasn't'' already occupied by various fanatically xenophobic aliens. Ironically, this ended up being what ultimately subverted this trope for 42. With Blastaar's invasion and takeover of the prison, the remaining prisoners (who at this point were mostly villains) were trapped in the facility, the portal back to Earth permanently shut down due to a warning to Reed Richards from the Guardians of the Galaxy about Blastaar's invasion force, and any attempts to escape the facility itself would cause Blastaar or one of his minions to kill them on sight.
20th Aug '16 7:01:27 PM dmcreif
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* In ''Disney/WreckItRalph'', Fix-It Felix Jr. is locked up in the [[LevelAte Sugar Rush]] [[{{Pun}} Fungeon]][[note]]as in, a dungeon made entirely out of candy. Seriously.[[/note]]. As he laments, he notices that the bars on his window are loose. [[WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer He whips out his hammer, and strikes the bars.]] [[SubvertedTrope They become]] [[MrFixIt twice as]] [[BlessedWithSuck thick.]]

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* In ''Disney/WreckItRalph'', Fix-It Felix Jr. is locked up in the [[LevelAte Sugar Rush]] [[{{Pun}} Fungeon]][[note]]as in, a dungeon made entirely out of candy. Seriously.[[/note]]. As he laments, he notices that the bars on his window are loose. [[WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer He whips out his Fix-It hammer, and strikes the bars.]] [[SubvertedTrope They become]] [[MrFixIt twice as]] [[BlessedWithSuck thick.]]]]
-->WHY DO I FIX EVERYTHING I TOUCH?!



* In ''Film/PublicEnemies'' John Dillinger twice escapes prison the same day he is admitted, and fully expects to every time he faces the possibility of arrest.

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* In ''Film/PublicEnemies'' shows off John Dillinger twice escapes prison the same day he is admitted, and fully expects to every time he faces the possibility of arrest.Dillinger's escape from Crown Point.



* In the remake of ''Film/ThreeTenToYuma'', the titular prison fits this trope. It is established late in the film that wanted gang leader Ben Wade (Creator/RussellCrowe) has already escaped from the prison Yuma at least twice before the events of the movie. After [[spoiler:Dan Evans and Wade's posse die]], Wade willingly steps onto the train and sets off on his trip towards the prison -- but ''not'' before he calls his faithful horse to ride alongside the train, proving that as soon as the film ends, he'll simply escape again.

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* In the remake of ''Film/ThreeTenToYuma'', the titular prison fits this trope. It is established late in the film that wanted gang leader [[Creator/RussellCrowe Ben Wade (Creator/RussellCrowe) Wade]] has already escaped from the prison Yuma at least twice before the events of the movie. After [[spoiler:Dan Evans and Wade's posse die]], Wade willingly steps onto the train and sets off on his trip towards the prison -- but ''not'' before he calls his faithful horse to ride alongside the train, proving that as soon as the film ends, he'll simply escape again.



* ''Series/TheWire'' sees Bodie easily escape a boys' village home.



* John Dillinger escaped from the Crown Point Jail (at the time it probably ''was'' the highest-security prison in the country, certainly in the state of Indiana) by carving a fake gun out of wood (or soap) and bluffed the guard into giving him his (real) which he used to take two men hostage, lock the entire staff in his cell, ''[[CrowningMomentOfAwesome stole the sheriff's car]]'' and drove away. According to another aversion of the story he bribed a guard to give him a gun, and made up the story in order to cover for him. In ''Literature/{{Illuminatus}}''-trilogy he claims that he walked through the walls.
* This trope is largely averted in real life. There's a great number of people that based their assumptions that any "especially dangerous" criminal could easily get out of any prison, when [[RealityIsUnrealistic it's really quite far from the truth]]. All it takes is a few high profile escapes, and that security is based on the assumption that it can fail, and putting in as many safeguards in to prevent it. Guards must go through an exhaustive background check, and their training has a high attrition rate for a reason. Also, some, such as military corrections officers, have a way of minimizing the risk of an inside job through simply reassigning them to a different facility every few years.

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* John Dillinger escaped from the Crown Point Jail (at the time it probably ''was'' the highest-security prison in the country, certainly in the state of Indiana) by carving a fake gun out of wood (or soap) and bluffed the guard into giving him his (real) which he used to take two men hostage, lock the entire staff in his cell, ''[[CrowningMomentOfAwesome stole the sheriff's car]]'' and drove away. According to another aversion version of the story he bribed a guard to give him a gun, and made up the story in order to cover for him. In ''Literature/{{Illuminatus}}''-trilogy he claims that he walked through the walls.
* This trope is largely averted in real life. There's a great number of people that based their assumptions that any "especially dangerous" criminal could easily get out of any prison, when [[RealityIsUnrealistic it's really quite far from the truth]]. All it takes is a few high profile escapes, and that security is based on the assumption that it can fail, and putting in as many safeguards in to prevent it. Guards must go through an exhaustive background check, and their training has a high attrition rate for a reason. Also, some, such as military corrections officers, have a way of minimizing the risk of an inside job through simply reassigning rotating them to a different facility every few years.
13th Aug '16 4:15:13 PM SmoCro
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** Not as surprising as it first appears. Most camps for French PoWs and forced labour where small affairs somewhere out in the country close to the farms they worked. The camps themselves were guarded by the (newly-drafted) farmers from these farms who were too old or too sick for frontline duty. So you have gaurds who often shared their meals and always their work with those they guarded (and rumours suggest there were also quite a few 'family matters' binding them together). Under such circumstances it is not too hard to see how such a thing could happen.
11th Aug '16 10:39:36 PM jamespolk
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* ''Film/TheScarOfShame'': It's bad enough that Alvin got ahold of a file to hack at the bars to his cell. But when he hacks through said bars, and then bends them apart like they were made of rubber, this trope is in in full effect.
9th Aug '16 12:51:53 PM Averagemoe
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* Literature/ThePhantomTollbooth: When Milo and Tock get put in the prison in Dictionopolis, the Witch (who stays there of her own free will) shows them the secret escape passage. Officer Shrift doesn't even try to recapture them once they're out, he just assumes they served their sentence and he lost track of time.
6th Aug '16 3:31:56 PM Kartoonkid95
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheLoudHouse'': In "Get the Message", Lola and Lana play "hall monitor" and put Luan in a literal cardboard prison.
4th Aug '16 2:05:08 PM Josef5678
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* ''Film/{{Idiocracy}}'': The prison Joe is sent to has tons of security, but Joe easily tricks the guards into letting him leave. [[spoiler: Averted when he gets sent back to prison, and they [[CrazyPrepared chain him to a big rock]] so he can't possibly escape]].
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