History Main / CanonDisContinuity

15th Sep '17 6:32:08 PM Dere
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** ''VideoGame/SonicMania'' holds something of a mission statement of outright ignoring the existence of ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4''. ''Mania'' bills itself as canonically taking place shortly after ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'', which was when ''Sonic 4'' was stated to have been set; and the game's marketing materials have stated it as the first Genesis-styled Sonic game made in the 23 years since the release of ''Sonic 3 & Knuckles''. Both the game's pre-order trailer and opening animation also feature a elevator that represent the previous Genesis Sonic installments and ''Mania'' itself as elevator floors ([[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog1 1]] [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2 2]] 3 K M), and the game's zones featured remixed levels from the aforementioned Genesis Sonic games as well as ''VideoGame/SonicCD'' on the Sega CD add-on; in both cases, ''Sonic 4'' is absent in representation. Within the game, [[spoiler: Sonic and co. are transported to Little Planet's Stardust Speedway, shown in the Past/Present timeline; and features an active and functional Metal Sonic as the zone's boss. This clearly overwrites ''Sonic 4: Episode Metal'', a midquel backstory episode that is supposed to connect ''Sonic CD'' as a distant prequel to ''Sonic 4'', which features a dormant and damaged Metal Sonic being reactivated in a Bad Future timeline of Stardust Speedway, and then proceeding to leave Little Planet for Sonic's world and being repaired for the subsequent ''Episode II''.]] It doesn't help that ''Sonic 4'' itself tried to retcon Sonic and Knuckles' stories of ''Sonic 3 & Knuckles'' as having happened at the same time, a statement that was not taken seriously by fans [[CriticalResearchFailure due to it contradicting the actual implied sequence of events in the game]]; or that the game ended on a cliffhanger with ''Episode II'' and never got a third episode to wrap things up. With all things said, [[{{Sequelitis}} given the reaction to]] ''Sonic 4'' as it is, [[FanonDiscontinuity the majority of people aren't complaining either way]].
15th Sep '17 2:21:17 PM comicwriter
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* The marriage of ComicBook/BlackPanther and ComicBook/{{Storm}} can be considered this in-universe and out. During ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'', the estranged couple face off against each other and he tells her that he annulled their marriage. Whereas a divorce still acknowledges that the former couple was once married, an annulment ''completely'' strikes the marriage from legal records as if it never happened at all. In most countries it's only allowed in cases of incest, fraud, or lack of proper consent; T'Challa filing for annulment may be a case of ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem, but it reflects how the marriage was received by fans and writers alike. The story arc where they married was seen at best as an {{anvilicious}} love letter to black superheroes, and at worst it was a TokenMinorityCouple. The writer of Black Panther at the time, Reginald Hudlin, simply wanted Marvel's two most famous black supers together, regardless of if or how it fit into their respective series, and subsequent writers of BP and X-Men tried their best to get back to how things were before.
15th Sep '17 12:59:01 PM comicwriter
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** The 2018 ''Halloween'' reboot follows in ''H20'''s footsteps, being a direct follow-up to ''Halloween II'' that ignores all the other installments.
14th Sep '17 6:01:51 PM BoxerAndCrewSocks
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* ''Film/DumbAndDumberTo'' completely ignores the existence of ''Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd'', most notably with Harry's parents and Freida Felcher being completely different characters.

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* ''Film/DumbAndDumberTo'' completely ignores the existence of ''Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd'', most notably with Harry's parents and Freida Felcher being completely different characters. Since the film was made without the involvement of Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels or the Farrelly brothers, and was roundly savaged by critics and fans; few have had problems with this.


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* As of the unveiling of the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, it seems that Creator/{{Nintendo}} has effectively rendered the UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy this; due to the console being absent from the previous Nintendo systems up to that point during the conference that unveiled the system.
13th Sep '17 9:06:49 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* Played with in regards to ''Batman: Son of the Bat'': The story was originally canonical and suggested the origin of Ibn al Xu'ffasch, son of Batman and Talia al Ghul from ''ComicBooks/KingdomCome''. Then the story was declared an {{Elseworld}}s story, removing it from continuity. Then it was brought back to canonicity, but {{retcon}}ned so that Batman and Talia's consensual encounter was changed to Bruce being drugged and raped by Talia, in order to produce a son, Damian.

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* Played with in regards to ''Batman: Son of the Bat'': The story was originally canonical and suggested the origin of Ibn al Xu'ffasch, son of Batman and Talia al Ghul from ''ComicBooks/KingdomCome''.''ComicBook/KingdomCome''. Then the story was declared an {{Elseworld}}s story, removing it from continuity. Then it was brought back to canonicity, but {{retcon}}ned so that Batman and Talia's consensual encounter was changed to Bruce being drugged and raped by Talia, in order to produce a son, Damian.
13th Sep '17 4:45:39 PM DesertDragon
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* ''ComicBook/ShazamTheNewBeginning'' by Roy Thomas was DC Comics' first official ComicBook/PostCrisis reboot of the origin of [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] until years later when it was replaced by ''The Power Of Shazam!'' by Jerry Ordway.]]
* The marriage of ComicBook/BlackPanther and ComicBook/{{Storm}} can be considered this in-universe and out. During ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'', the couple (who had been estranged beforehand) face off against each other and he tells her that the High Priest of the Panther Clan has declared their marriage annulled (note: ''he'' is the High Priest of the Panther Clan). The difference between an annulment and a divorce is that a divorce still acknowledges that the former couple was once married. An annulment ''completely'' strikes the marriage from all legal records as if it never happened at all, and in most countries it's only allowed if the marriage was fraudulent, coerced, performed under the influence, revealed to be incestuous, or some other circumstance indicating that it was invalid from the start. T'Challa filing for annulment may be a case of ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem, but it reflects how the marriage was received by fans and writers alike. Their first meeting as teenagers had been retconned into him saving her...multiple times, rather than vice-versa, and this served as the basis of him proposing to her as adults even though they hadn't interacted romantically in close to twenty years. And the issue where they married was seen at best as an {{anvilicious}} love letter to black superheroes, and at worst it was a TokenMinorityCouple. The writer of Black Panther at the time, Reginald Hudlin, simply wanted Marvel's two most famous black supers to be together, regardless of if or how it fit into the overall story, and subsequent writers of BP and X-Men tried their best to get back to how things were before.

to:

* ''ComicBook/ShazamTheNewBeginning'' by Roy Thomas was DC Comics' first official ComicBook/PostCrisis reboot of the origin of [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] until years later when it was replaced by ''The Power Of Shazam!'' by Jerry Ordway.]]
Ordway.
* The marriage of ComicBook/BlackPanther and ComicBook/{{Storm}} can be considered this in-universe and out. During ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'', the couple (who had been estranged beforehand) couple face off against each other and he tells her that the High Priest of the Panther Clan has declared their marriage he annulled (note: ''he'' is the High Priest of the Panther Clan). The difference between an annulment and a divorce is that their marriage. Whereas a divorce still acknowledges that the former couple was once married. An married, an annulment ''completely'' strikes the marriage from all legal records as if it never happened at all, and in all. In most countries it's only allowed if the marriage was fraudulent, coerced, performed under the influence, revealed to be incestuous, in cases of incest, fraud, or some other circumstance indicating that it was invalid from the start. lack of proper consent; T'Challa filing for annulment may be a case of ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem, but it reflects how the marriage was received by fans and writers alike. Their first meeting as teenagers had been retconned into him saving her...multiple times, rather than vice-versa, and this served as the basis of him proposing to her as adults even though they hadn't interacted romantically in close to twenty years. And the issue The story arc where they married was seen at best as an {{anvilicious}} love letter to black superheroes, and at worst it was a TokenMinorityCouple. The writer of Black Panther at the time, Reginald Hudlin, simply wanted Marvel's two most famous black supers to be together, regardless of if or how it fit into the overall story, their respective series, and subsequent writers of BP and X-Men tried their best to get back to how things were before.
13th Sep '17 9:53:58 AM MagiMecha
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* There is an obscure UK-exclusive ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' comic called "The Beast Within", wherein the Dinobots merge to form a combiner simply called [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the Beast]], which proceeds to slaughter most of the Decepticons and a number of Autobots before being destroyed. When asked about a Dinobot combiner, Hasbro tends to deny all knowledge of such a thing, indicating they've either forgotten the comic or like to pretend it doesn't exist, something most fans are happy to agree with.

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* There is an obscure UK-exclusive ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' comic called "The Beast Within", wherein the Dinobots merge to form a combiner simply called [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the Beast]], which proceeds to slaughter most of the Decepticons and a number of Autobots before being destroyed. When asked about a Dinobot combiner, Hasbro tends to deny all knowledge of such a thing, indicating they've either forgotten the comic or like to pretend it doesn't exist, something most fans are happy to agree with. This was finally made this trope when the true Dinobot Combiner, Volcanicus, was introduced for the mobile phone game ''VideoGame/TransformersEarthWars''
13th Sep '17 5:42:29 AM DesertDragon
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* The marriage of ComicBook/BlackPanther and ComicBook/{{Storm}} can be considered this in-universe and out. During ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'', the couple (who had been estranged beforehand) face off against each other and he tells her that the High Priest of the Panther Clan has declared their marriage annulled (note: ''he'' is the High Priest of the Panther Clan). The difference between an annulment and a divorce is that a divorce still acknowledges that the former couple was once married. An annulment ''completely'' strikes the marriage from all legal records as if it never happened at all, and in most countries it's only allowed if the marriage was fraudulent, coerced, performed under the influence, revealed to be incestuous, or some other circumstance indicating that it was invalid from the start. T'Challa filing for annulment rather than divorce may be a spiteful version of ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem, but it reflects how the marriage was received by fans and writers alike. Their first meeting as teenagers had been retconned into him saving her...multiple times, rather than vice-versa, and this served as the basis of him proposing to her as adults even though they hadn't interacted romantically in close to twenty years. And the issue where they married was seen at best as an {{anvilicious}} love letter to black superheroes, and at worst it was a TokenMinorityCouple. The writer of Black Panther at the time, Reginald Hudlin, simply wanted Marvel's two most famous black supers to be together, regardless of if or how it fit into the overall story, and subsequent writers of BP and X-Men tried their best to get back to how things were before.

to:

* The marriage of ComicBook/BlackPanther and ComicBook/{{Storm}} can be considered this in-universe and out. During ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'', the couple (who had been estranged beforehand) face off against each other and he tells her that the High Priest of the Panther Clan has declared their marriage annulled (note: ''he'' is the High Priest of the Panther Clan). The difference between an annulment and a divorce is that a divorce still acknowledges that the former couple was once married. An annulment ''completely'' strikes the marriage from all legal records as if it never happened at all, and in most countries it's only allowed if the marriage was fraudulent, coerced, performed under the influence, revealed to be incestuous, or some other circumstance indicating that it was invalid from the start. T'Challa filing for annulment rather than divorce may be a spiteful version case of ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem, but it reflects how the marriage was received by fans and writers alike. Their first meeting as teenagers had been retconned into him saving her...multiple times, rather than vice-versa, and this served as the basis of him proposing to her as adults even though they hadn't interacted romantically in close to twenty years. And the issue where they married was seen at best as an {{anvilicious}} love letter to black superheroes, and at worst it was a TokenMinorityCouple. The writer of Black Panther at the time, Reginald Hudlin, simply wanted Marvel's two most famous black supers to be together, regardless of if or how it fit into the overall story, and subsequent writers of BP and X-Men tried their best to get back to how things were before.
13th Sep '17 5:38:01 AM DesertDragon
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* At one point in ''Comicbook/XMen'', the lineup at the time were killed and resurrected, making them invisible to cameras, and this is treated almost as a second mutant power in the next few dozen issues. When Creator/ChrisClaremont left, however, this was completely forgotten, and the lineup at the time - which includes ''Wolverine'', of all people - are seen on camera without comment from then on. His run in 2000 makes a brief mention of this fact with Rogue, but this only serves to muddy the waters further - where it's been mentioned at all, it's explained as a side effect of the Siege Perilous, except that Wolverine and Longshot never went through it, and Rogue ''did''. Common fan explanation is that Roma quietly revoked the "invisibility" gift around the time of the Xtinction Agenda (which is where Claremont actively stopped referencing it) and that the gift itself may have been contingent on the X-Men both possessing and going through the Siege Perilous.

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* At one point in ''Comicbook/XMen'', the lineup at the time were killed and resurrected, making them invisible to cameras, and this is treated almost as a second mutant power in the next few dozen issues. When Creator/ChrisClaremont left, however, this was completely forgotten, and the lineup at the time - which includes ''Wolverine'', of all people - are seen on camera without comment from then on. His run in 2000 makes a brief mention of this fact with Rogue, but this only serves to muddy the waters further - where it's been mentioned at all, it's explained as a side effect of the Siege Perilous, except that Wolverine and Longshot never went through it, and Rogue ''did''. Common fan explanation is that Roma quietly revoked the "invisibility" gift around the time of the Xtinction Agenda ''Xtinction Agenda'' crossover (which is where Claremont actively stopped referencing it) and that the gift itself may have been contingent on the X-Men both possessing and going through the Siege Perilous.Perilous. Another possibility is in ''ComicBook/{{Excalibur}}'' when Meggan destroyed the Lighthouse, which was considered the "Lynchpin of the Multiverse", and its destruction may have disrupted Roma's powers. It happened shortly before ''Xtinction Agenda'', which would explain the X-Men being able to be seen on tv during the storyline and afterwards.



* ''ComicBook/ShazamTheNewBeginning'' by Roy Thomas was DC Comics' first official ComicBook/PostCrisis reboot of the origin of [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] until years later when it was replaced by ''The Power Of Shazam!'' by Jerry Ordway.

to:

* ''ComicBook/ShazamTheNewBeginning'' by Roy Thomas was DC Comics' first official ComicBook/PostCrisis reboot of the origin of [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] until years later when it was replaced by ''The Power Of Shazam!'' by Jerry Ordway.]]
* The marriage of ComicBook/BlackPanther and ComicBook/{{Storm}} can be considered this in-universe and out. During ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'', the couple (who had been estranged beforehand) face off against each other and he tells her that the High Priest of the Panther Clan has declared their marriage annulled (note: ''he'' is the High Priest of the Panther Clan). The difference between an annulment and a divorce is that a divorce still acknowledges that the former couple was once married. An annulment ''completely'' strikes the marriage from all legal records as if it never happened at all, and in most countries it's only allowed if the marriage was fraudulent, coerced, performed under the influence, revealed to be incestuous, or some other circumstance indicating that it was invalid from the start. T'Challa filing for annulment rather than divorce may be a spiteful version of ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem, but it reflects how the marriage was received by fans and writers alike. Their first meeting as teenagers had been retconned into him saving her...multiple times, rather than vice-versa, and this served as the basis of him proposing to her as adults even though they hadn't interacted romantically in close to twenty years. And the issue where they married was seen at best as an {{anvilicious}} love letter to black superheroes, and at worst it was a TokenMinorityCouple. The writer of Black Panther at the time, Reginald Hudlin, simply wanted Marvel's two most famous black supers to be together, regardless of if or how it fit into the overall story, and subsequent writers of BP and X-Men tried their best to get back to how things were before.
12th Sep '17 3:53:11 PM MagBas
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* Model railroading generally ignores the fact of segregation in a large portion of the United States during the first six decades or so of the 20th century; drawings of stations with separate "colored" waiting rooms understandably do not label them as such, but the reason for multiple waiting rooms is not given; and while "Jim Crow" coaches and combines (passenger cars with a section for baggage or freight) with separate sections for "white" and "colored" passengers are sometimes mentioned and seen in photographs, plans for such cars rarely appear and the cars are not commonly modeled. Also, if you want people of color on your layout, you'll probably have to paint the figures yourself (it's a blind spot but not really, not prejudice, since manufacturers have to keep costs in mind). This despite the current passion for realism in the hobby.
** That last point splits some groups of Table Top gamers as well. One side doesn't really care about ethnicity/skin colour or simply prefers a more uniform look (and if all else fails just to save on paint cost), while other groups are angry about companies not producing alternate kits that better fit to certain ethnicities. Again it's a blind spot but not really, since at the given scales of the models, such fine features as to show distinct ethnicities would be almost impossible to model, especially once some paint is applied. Relatedly, even some historical wargamers are not that fond of drawing iconography of genocidal and/or tyrannical regimes (Nazis, Soviets etc) and thus use alternative/altered symbols instead -- now one could try collecting the "good guys" only, but that would be somewhat beside the point.
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