History Main / CameBackWrong

11th Feb '16 12:11:20 AM SSJMagus
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* ''[[Comicbook/{{XMen}}]]'' villain Trevor Fitzroy (a time traveler who hails from one of the Marvel Universe's many possible {{Bad Future}}s) eventually had this retconned into his origin story. He was once a heroic freedom fighter in his own time, but when he was killed and his specific powers were needed, Layla Miller user her own powers to bring him back to life. But Layla can only revive bodies, not souls. So the Fitzroy that caused so much carnage in his other appearances turns out to have been evil because he was literally soulless.
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* ''[[Comicbook/{{XMen}}]]'' ''Comicbook/XMen'' villain Trevor Fitzroy (a time traveler who hails from one of the Marvel Universe's many possible {{Bad Future}}s) eventually had this retconned into his origin story. He was once a heroic freedom fighter in his own time, but when he was killed and his specific powers were needed, Layla Miller user her own powers to bring him back to life. But Layla can only revive bodies, not souls. So the Fitzroy that caused so much carnage in his other appearances turns out to have been evil because he was literally soulless.
11th Feb '16 12:10:49 AM SSJMagus
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* ''[[Comicbook/XMen]]'' villain Trevor Fitzroy (a time traveler who hails from one of the Marvel Universe's many possible {{Bad Future}}s) eventually had this retconned into his origin story. He was once a heroic freedom fighter in his own time, but when he was killed and his specific powers were needed, Layla Miller user her own powers to bring him back to life. But Layla can only revive bodies, not souls. So the Fitzroy that caused so much carnage in his other appearances turns out to have been evil because he was literally soulless.
to:
* ''[[Comicbook/XMen]]'' ''[[Comicbook/{{XMen}}]]'' villain Trevor Fitzroy (a time traveler who hails from one of the Marvel Universe's many possible {{Bad Future}}s) eventually had this retconned into his origin story. He was once a heroic freedom fighter in his own time, but when he was killed and his specific powers were needed, Layla Miller user her own powers to bring him back to life. But Layla can only revive bodies, not souls. So the Fitzroy that caused so much carnage in his other appearances turns out to have been evil because he was literally soulless.
10th Feb '16 11:59:02 PM SSJMagus
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* ''[[Comicbook/XMen]]'' villain Trevor Fitzroy (a time traveler who hails from one of the Marvel Universe's many possible {{Bad Future}}s) eventually had this retconned into his origin story. He was once a heroic freedom fighter in his own time, but when he was killed and his specific powers were needed, Layla Miller user her own powers to bring him back to life. But Layla can only revive bodies, not souls. So the Fitzroy that caused so much carnage in his other appearances turns out to have been evil because he was literally soulless.
4th Feb '16 11:55:57 AM Sapphirea2
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** A key character in the Series 9 StoryArc is Ashildr (Creator/MaisieWilliams), whose situation is compared to that of Captain Jack. A sweet Viking girl in "The Girl Who Died", her storytelling skills and imagination are used by the Doctor to defeat the alien Mire that threaten her village, but having her use their own technology against them drains her energy and leaves her dead. The brokenhearted Doctor, tired of losing people, decides ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight and defies his usual reluctance to disturb the web of time by saving her. But the only way he can is by adapting a Mire medkit to revive her, which won't stop healing her and will turn her into TheAgeless, a functional immortal. He leaves a second medkit behind in case she finds someone else she wants to spend eternity with. He keeps track of her goings-on over the years, but in "The Woman Who Lived" (set a few centuries later) finds her personality ''faded'' and she risks turning into TheSociopath: Her human mind can't hold all the memories of her life (left to journals she occasionally references) and she's withdrawn from close relationships with others because she inevitably loses them. She goes by the name of "Me", never finds a companion, and resents the Doctor for "trapping" her in life and not taking her with him. (As a functional immortal himself, he feels they would only grow detached and villainous without mortal perspective.) He brings her back to goodness and she decides to look after those he leaves behind, but by 2015 ("Face the Raven") she is the ruthless mayor of an alien refugee hideaway who strikes up a deal with the Time Lords to capture him...and the trap she sets for him accidentally leads to the death of his companion Clara, starting a ProtagonistJourneyToVillain as he risks destroying time to save ''her''. The Doctor and the now-OnlyMostlyDead Clara encounter her again at ''the end of time itself'' in "Hell Bent", and though he never realizes it due to a MindWipe of memories of Clara that helps him return to his best self, Clara makes Ashildr/Me a companion -- they have a TARDIS of their own and head back to Gallifrey (and Clara's death) "the long way 'round", ''both'' functionally immortal for the time being and [[AndTheAdventureContinues free to have their own adventures]] (assuming they don't grow detached; maybe they'll get their own companions?).
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** A key character in the Series 9 StoryArc is Ashildr (Creator/MaisieWilliams), whose situation is compared to that of Captain Jack. A sweet Viking girl in "The Girl Who Died", her storytelling skills and imagination are used by the Doctor to defeat the alien Mire that threaten her village, but having her use their own technology against them drains her energy and leaves her dead. The brokenhearted Doctor, tired of losing people, decides ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight and defies his usual reluctance to disturb the web of time by saving her. But the only way he can is by adapting a Mire medkit to revive her, which won't stop healing her and will turn her into TheAgeless, a functional immortal. He leaves a second medkit behind in case she finds someone else she wants to spend eternity with. He keeps track of her goings-on over the years, but in "The Woman Who Lived" (set a few centuries later) finds her personality ''faded'' and she risks turning into TheSociopath: Her human mind can't hold all the memories of her life (left to journals she occasionally references) and she's withdrawn from close relationships with others because she inevitably loses them. She goes by the name of "Me", never finds a companion, and resents the Doctor for "trapping" her in life and not taking her with him. (As a functional immortal himself, he feels they would only grow detached and villainous without mortal perspective.) He brings her back to goodness and she decides to look after those he leaves behind, but by 2015 ("Face the Raven") she is the ruthless mayor of an alien refugee hideaway who strikes up a deal with the Time Lords to capture him...and the trap she sets for him accidentally leads to the death of his companion Clara, starting a ProtagonistJourneyToVillain as he risks destroying time to save ''her''. The Doctor and the now-OnlyMostlyDead Clara encounter her again at ''the end of time itself'' in "Hell Bent", and though he never realizes it due to a MindWipe of memories of Clara that helps him return to his best self, Clara makes Ashildr/Me a companion -- they have a TARDIS of their own and head back to Gallifrey (and Clara's death) "the long way 'round", ''both'' functionally immortal for the time being and [[AndTheAdventureContinues free to have their own adventures]] (assuming they don't grow detached; maybe they'll get their own companions?). So, a SurprisinglyHappyEnding for her.
4th Feb '16 11:53:39 AM Sapphirea2
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** Also, Jack. After he gets exterminated by the Daleks, Rose uses her temporary god-powers to resurrect him, but she overdoes it, bringing him back ''permanently''. While automatic resurrection doesn't sound like the worst side effect ever, he's effectively doomed to a lifespan of thousands of years (at least), knowing for a fact that he will outlive every human that becomes his friend or lover as well as any child he has, and at one point [[AndIMustScream gets buried alive and spends the next couple thousand years or so repeatedly suffocating and reviving]]. It's implied that he's the Face of Boe. Making him billions of years old when he dies.
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** Also, Jack. Captain Jack Harkness. After he gets exterminated by the Daleks, Daleks in the Series 1 finale, Rose uses her temporary god-powers to resurrect him, but she overdoes it, bringing him back ''permanently''. While automatic resurrection doesn't sound like the worst side effect ever, he's effectively doomed to a lifespan of thousands of years (at least), knowing for a fact that he will outlive every human that becomes his friend or lover as well as any child he has, and at one point [[AndIMustScream gets buried alive and spends the next couple thousand years or so repeatedly suffocating and reviving]]. It's implied that he's the Face of Boe. Making him billions of years old when he dies.

** PlayedForLaughs in the episode "The Snowmen"; Strax is said to have been revived under unknown circumstances from the Battle of Demon's Run by an unnamed friend of the Doctor. However, The Doctor speculates that something went wrong in the process, as Strax is much more of [[TheDitz a ditz]] than before. *** [[spoiler: Turns out? Strax didn't even die in the first place. So, serious subversion.]]
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** PlayedForLaughs in the episode "The Snowmen"; Strax is said to have been revived under unknown circumstances from the Battle of Demon's Run by an unnamed friend of the Doctor. However, The Doctor speculates that something went wrong in the process, as Strax is much more of [[TheDitz a ditz]] than before. \n*** [[spoiler: Turns out? Strax didn't even die in the first place. So, serious subversion.]]]] ** A key character in the Series 9 StoryArc is Ashildr (Creator/MaisieWilliams), whose situation is compared to that of Captain Jack. A sweet Viking girl in "The Girl Who Died", her storytelling skills and imagination are used by the Doctor to defeat the alien Mire that threaten her village, but having her use their own technology against them drains her energy and leaves her dead. The brokenhearted Doctor, tired of losing people, decides ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight and defies his usual reluctance to disturb the web of time by saving her. But the only way he can is by adapting a Mire medkit to revive her, which won't stop healing her and will turn her into TheAgeless, a functional immortal. He leaves a second medkit behind in case she finds someone else she wants to spend eternity with. He keeps track of her goings-on over the years, but in "The Woman Who Lived" (set a few centuries later) finds her personality ''faded'' and she risks turning into TheSociopath: Her human mind can't hold all the memories of her life (left to journals she occasionally references) and she's withdrawn from close relationships with others because she inevitably loses them. She goes by the name of "Me", never finds a companion, and resents the Doctor for "trapping" her in life and not taking her with him. (As a functional immortal himself, he feels they would only grow detached and villainous without mortal perspective.) He brings her back to goodness and she decides to look after those he leaves behind, but by 2015 ("Face the Raven") she is the ruthless mayor of an alien refugee hideaway who strikes up a deal with the Time Lords to capture him...and the trap she sets for him accidentally leads to the death of his companion Clara, starting a ProtagonistJourneyToVillain as he risks destroying time to save ''her''. The Doctor and the now-OnlyMostlyDead Clara encounter her again at ''the end of time itself'' in "Hell Bent", and though he never realizes it due to a MindWipe of memories of Clara that helps him return to his best self, Clara makes Ashildr/Me a companion -- they have a TARDIS of their own and head back to Gallifrey (and Clara's death) "the long way 'round", ''both'' functionally immortal for the time being and [[AndTheAdventureContinues free to have their own adventures]] (assuming they don't grow detached; maybe they'll get their own companions?).
24th Jan '16 10:12:59 PM Vios
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* In ''[[ComicBook/AthenaVoltaire Athena Voltaire and the Isle of the Dead]]'', this is what happens when people who are already dead are exposed to the waters of the Fountain of Life; the crew of Fontenda's ship were killed in a pirate attack, but then brought back as zombies when barrels of Fountain water which were on board burst.
23rd Jan '16 8:02:54 AM Kakai
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* In ''Webcomic/{{Plume}}'', the side effect of Aricon's BlackMagic is that his and Corrick's older brother comes back to life... as an undead humanoid ''creature'' gleefully causing and enjoying destruction.
20th Jan '16 6:38:53 PM DarkMask
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* The plot of the first ''{{VideoGame/Bayonetta}}'' game centered around [[BigBad Father Balder]] wanting to resurrect the Creator-God of [[{{Heaven}} Paradiso]], Jubileus, by using the combined powers of the Eyes of the Overseer himself and his daughter, Bayonetta, held domain over. Things were going well, too, until [[HeelFaceTurn Jeanne]] yanked Bayonetta, and thus her Overseer power, out of Jubileus's body right before she reformed, thus leading to Jubileus being brought into being at only 50% power and basically completely insane, screeching at the top of her lungs and attempting to bring about Armageddon.
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* The plot of the first ''{{VideoGame/Bayonetta}}'' game centered around [[BigBad Father Balder]] wanting to resurrect the Creator-God of [[{{Heaven}} Paradiso]], Jubileus, by using the combined powers of the Eyes of the Overseer himself and his daughter, Bayonetta, held domain over. Things were going well, too, until [[HeelFaceTurn Jeanne]] yanked Bayonetta, and thus her Overseer power, out of Jubileus's body right before she the Dea reformed, thus leading to Jubileus being brought into being at only 50% power and basically completely insane, screeching at the top of her lungs and attempting to bring about Armageddon.
20th Jan '16 6:29:58 PM DarkMask
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to:
* The plot of the first ''{{VideoGame/Bayonetta}}'' game centered around [[BigBad Father Balder]] wanting to resurrect the Creator-God of [[{{Heaven}} Paradiso]], Jubileus, by using the combined powers of the Eyes of the Overseer himself and his daughter, Bayonetta, held domain over. Things were going well, too, until [[HeelFaceTurn Jeanne]] yanked Bayonetta, and thus her Overseer power, out of Jubileus's body right before she reformed, thus leading to Jubileus being brought into being at only 50% power and basically completely insane, screeching at the top of her lungs and attempting to bring about Armageddon.
19th Jan '16 7:57:06 PM bobwolf
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* This happens to an entire species in ''{{VideoGame/Halo}}''. [[spoiler: After the [[{{Precursors}} Forerunner]] - [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Precursor]] war, the few remaining Precursors who weren't taken prisoner by the Forerunner devolved themselves into a dust that was designed to reform them when the time was right. [[{{Understatement}} It went badly]], with the dust mutating into a disease. The increasingly angry and insane Precursor [[HiveMind hive mind]] turned this disease into a weapon and the once galaxy spanning intelligence of the Precursors became the Flood. A virus so hideous and unstoppable that the Forerunner decided it would be safer to [[GodzillaThreshold destroy all multi-cellular life in the galaxy than let it carry on]]]].
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* ''{{VideoGame/Halo}}'' ** This happens to an entire species in ''{{VideoGame/Halo}}''.species. [[spoiler: After the [[{{Precursors}} Forerunner]] - [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Precursor]] war, the few remaining Precursors who weren't taken prisoner by the Forerunner devolved themselves into a dust that was designed to reform them when the time was right. [[{{Understatement}} It went badly]], with the dust mutating into a disease. The increasingly angry and insane Precursor [[HiveMind hive mind]] turned this disease into a weapon and the once galaxy spanning intelligence of the Precursors became the Flood. A virus so hideous and unstoppable that the Forerunner decided it would be safer to [[GodzillaThreshold destroy all multi-cellular life in the galaxy than let it carry on]]]].

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* This happens to an entire species in ''{{VideoGame/Halo}}''. ** [[spoiler:Cortana]] was strictly speaking only dying but since Master Chief assumed they had died, [[spoiler: After the [[{{Precursors}} Forerunner]] - [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Precursor]] war, the few remaining Precursors who weren't taken prisoner by the Forerunner devolved themselves into a dust that was designed to reform them when the time was right. [[{{Understatement}} It went badly]], her going mad with the dust mutating into power at being immortal]] has a disease. The increasingly angry and insane Precursor [[HiveMind hive mind]] turned this disease into a weapon and the once galaxy spanning intelligence of the Precursors became the Flood. A virus so hideous and unstoppable that the Forerunner decided it would be safer to [[GodzillaThreshold destroy all multi-cellular life in the galaxy than let it carry on]]]].similar effect on him.
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