History Main / CCGImportanceDissonance

13th Jul '17 12:31:38 PM MBG
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** An odd case of this is with attack-blocking Traps. In the game proper, one of the first attack-blockers made was Waboku (can be activated at any time, protects all monsters from being destroyed and reduces all damage to 0 for the turn), and there are many cards that arguably beat it out since then (Threatening Roar, which blocks all attacks for the turn, the Mirror Forces, which wipe out the opponent's monsters when they attack, and a mess of others). However, the RuleOfDrama dictates that it wouldn't be very interesting for the opponent's attacks to do absolutely nothing for a turn, so supposed masters of the game have an odd habit of using cards that are basically Waboku but worse, either [[Card_Defense only blocking one attack]], [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Half_Unbreak_(anime) not blocking all damage]], [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Hero_Spirit_(anime) not saving monsters from destruction]], or [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Soul_Shield possessing heavy costs]].

to:

** An odd case of this is with attack-blocking Traps. In the game proper, one of the first attack-blockers made was Waboku (can be activated at any time, protects all monsters from being destroyed and reduces all damage to 0 for the turn), and there are many cards that arguably beat it out since then (Threatening Roar, which blocks all attacks for the turn, the Mirror Forces, which wipe out the opponent's monsters when they attack, and a mess of others). However, the RuleOfDrama dictates that it wouldn't be very interesting for the opponent's attacks to do absolutely nothing for a turn, so supposed masters of the game have an odd habit of using cards that are basically Waboku but worse, either [[Card_Defense [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Card_Defense only blocking one attack]], [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Half_Unbreak_(anime) not blocking all damage]], [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Hero_Spirit_(anime) not saving monsters from destruction]], or [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Soul_Shield possessing heavy costs]].
13th Jul '17 12:30:52 PM MBG
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** An odd case of this is with attack-blocking Traps. In the game proper, one of the first attack-blockers made was Waboku (can be activated at any time, protects all monsters from being destroyed and reduces all damage to 0 for the turn), and there are many cards that arguably beat it out since then (Threatening Roar, which blocks all attacks for the turn, the Mirror Forces, which wipe out the opponent's monsters when they attack, and a mess of others). However, the RuleOfDrama dictates that it wouldn't be very interesting for the opponent's attacks to do absolutely nothing for a turn, so supposed masters of the game have an odd habit of using cards that are basically Waboku but worse, either [[Card_Defense only blocking one attack]], [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Half_Unbreak_(anime) not blocking all damage]], [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Hero_Spirit_(anime) not saving monsters from destruction, or [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Soul_Shield possessing heavy costs]].

to:

** An odd case of this is with attack-blocking Traps. In the game proper, one of the first attack-blockers made was Waboku (can be activated at any time, protects all monsters from being destroyed and reduces all damage to 0 for the turn), and there are many cards that arguably beat it out since then (Threatening Roar, which blocks all attacks for the turn, the Mirror Forces, which wipe out the opponent's monsters when they attack, and a mess of others). However, the RuleOfDrama dictates that it wouldn't be very interesting for the opponent's attacks to do absolutely nothing for a turn, so supposed masters of the game have an odd habit of using cards that are basically Waboku but worse, either [[Card_Defense only blocking one attack]], [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Half_Unbreak_(anime) not blocking all damage]], [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Hero_Spirit_(anime) not saving monsters from destruction, destruction]], or [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Soul_Shield possessing heavy costs]].
13th Jul '17 12:30:20 PM MBG
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Added DiffLines:

** An odd case of this is with attack-blocking Traps. In the game proper, one of the first attack-blockers made was Waboku (can be activated at any time, protects all monsters from being destroyed and reduces all damage to 0 for the turn), and there are many cards that arguably beat it out since then (Threatening Roar, which blocks all attacks for the turn, the Mirror Forces, which wipe out the opponent's monsters when they attack, and a mess of others). However, the RuleOfDrama dictates that it wouldn't be very interesting for the opponent's attacks to do absolutely nothing for a turn, so supposed masters of the game have an odd habit of using cards that are basically Waboku but worse, either [[Card_Defense only blocking one attack]], [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Half_Unbreak_(anime) not blocking all damage]], [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Hero_Spirit_(anime) not saving monsters from destruction, or [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Soul_Shield possessing heavy costs]].
24th Jun '17 7:31:50 PM nombretomado
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** Not to mention IRL, a stereo system is detrimental to racing, as it adds dead weight to the car and serves no useful purpose whatsoever. Unless you're trying [[TheFastAndTheFurious to attract females.....]]

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** Not to mention IRL, a stereo system is detrimental to racing, as it adds dead weight to the car and serves no useful purpose whatsoever. Unless you're trying [[TheFastAndTheFurious [[Film/TheFastAndTheFurious to attract females.....]]
5th Jun '17 1:57:26 AM PuddleFoot
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-->-- '''Aaron Forsythe''' (''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' Developer), [[http://www.wizards.com/magic/magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/af145 Preserving the Coolness of Legends]]

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-->-- '''Aaron Forsythe''' (''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' Developer), [[http://www.[[http://magic.wizards.com/magic/magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/af145 com/en/articles/archive/latest-developments/preserving-coolness-legends-2006-11-17 Preserving the Coolness of Legends]]
27th May '17 11:21:22 PM storyyeller
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** In the Video Game and Anime, Mewtwo is absurdly overpowered compared to most Pokemon. Its first card was ''terrible'', to the point its own real use was in a gimmick deck that tries to stall until your opponent runs out of cards.

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** In the Video Game and Anime, Mewtwo is was absurdly overpowered compared to most Pokemon. every other Pokemon at the time (apart from Mew). Its first card was ''terrible'', to the point its own only real use was in a gimmick deck that tries to stall until your opponent runs out of cards.
24th May '17 2:50:30 AM flamemario12
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** The famous [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Blue-Eyes_White_Dragon Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] is a 3000 ATK monster that requires two Tributes (monsters removed from the field) and has no effect; in the manga, it was powerful enough that [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney Seto Kaiba]] resorted to extortion and theft to collect every last one of them, but in the TCG that ensued, it's merely an expensive target. Likewise Yugi's signature card, the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Dark_Magician Dark Magician]], which requires two Tributes but has only 2500 ATK; arguably, it's received more support cards in later years than even the Blue-Eyes White Dragon could ever hope for, but it too is a white (black?) elephant, even if you're dedicated enough to theme an entire deck around him. Not that ''all'' famous cards get this treatment, however; the very first duel featured in the manga included [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Summoned_Skull Summoned Skull]], a powerful and incredibly playable card for many years (2500 ATK, like the Dark Magician, but it only needs ''one'' Tribute), and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Monster_Reborn Monster Reborn]], a powerful card that spent some time on the [[TooAwesomeToUse Forbidden List]]: it allows the player who uses it to bring back a monster from the Graveyard. ''Either player's'' Graveyard. Many of the most powerful cards, in fact, have either never appeared on the show or appeared only briefly. Nowadays it's not uncommon for each new expansion set to feature cards for an entire new deck archetype, which typically dominates the field for about 3-6 months before a new expansion renders it utterly moot: these archetypes are often based off of the decks of one-shot characters, or minor recurring ones, rather than the main protagonists.

to:

** The famous [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Blue-Eyes_White_Dragon Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] is a 3000 ATK monster that requires two Tributes (monsters removed from the field) and has no effect; in the manga, it was powerful enough that [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney Seto Kaiba]] resorted to extortion and theft to collect every last one of them, but in the TCG that ensued, it's merely an expensive target. Likewise Likewise, Yugi's signature card, the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Dark_Magician Dark Magician]], which requires two Tributes but has only 2500 ATK; arguably, it's received more support cards in later years than even the Blue-Eyes White Dragon could ever hope for, but it too is a white (black?) elephant, even if you're dedicated enough to theme an entire deck around him. Not that ''all'' famous cards get this treatment, however; the very first duel featured in the manga included [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Summoned_Skull Summoned Skull]], a powerful and incredibly playable card for many years (2500 ATK, like the Dark Magician, but it only needs ''one'' Tribute), and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Monster_Reborn Monster Reborn]], a powerful card that spent some time on the [[TooAwesomeToUse Forbidden List]]: it allows the player who uses it to bring back a monster from the Graveyard. ''Either player's'' Graveyard. Many of the most powerful cards, in fact, have either never appeared on the show or appeared only briefly. Nowadays it's not uncommon for each new expansion set to feature cards for an entire new deck archetype, which typically dominates the field for about 3-6 months before a new expansion renders it utterly moot: these archetypes are often based off of the decks of one-shot characters, or minor recurring ones, rather than the main protagonists.



** There is also something to be said about the lore of rarity in the comic. Originally, stars indicated levels of rarity, in a very obvert PowerEqualsRarity way. Blue-Eyes White Dragon, for instance, is a level 8 monster, and only FOUR COPIES existed in the entire game. Level 7s were presumably also extremely rare, with probably only a handful existing in their own right (Kaiba was notably shocked when Yugi played Summoned Skull, at the time a Level 7 monster). This would explain why completing Exodia had "never been done before!" - if there were literally only a dozen or so "Exodia the Forbidden One" cards, and all the other pieces were equally as rare, the chances of ANYONE actually owning all four, let alone drawing them in a single game, was astronomically low. And, as most players were shown to only control level 1 through 4 monsters (which were presumably topped out at around 1200 attack, given the star levels originally shown), most would have only heard RUMORS of unbelievably rare cards like Red-Eyes Black Dragon, Summoned Skull, Dark Magician, and Blue-Eyes White Dragon, which could end the game in one attack (remember players originally had only 2000 LP, so one hit from a Blue-Eyes if you had a face-up 1000 Attack monster - a presumably otherwise-decent monster), and only a tiny cabal of people even knowing that something as gamebreakingly-powerful as Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon even existed. However, it's an ''abysmal'' business model. If there really ''were'' only four Blue-Eyes White Dragon cards in existence AND they were legal, they would each cost thousands upon thousands of dollars, because someone who had even one in their deck would have a monster that literally no-one else could actually beat in a head-to-head battle, which would quickly kill the allure of the game. Instead, in real-life, such iconic and powerful cards were made commonplace, and as such became immediately nerfed.
** Cards that make cameos from other Konami franchises, which in their respective series are usually the BigBad or the hero, often find themselves dramatically underpowered. As an example, the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Victory_Viper_XX03 Victory Viper XX03]] from VideoGame/{{Gradius}} and its counterparts, each of which is capable in-game of taking down an entire army including several nigh-invincible warships IN A ROW, are reduced to poor to mediocre monsters with decent effects that require them to have been powered up in the first place to use. Given that the game also includes an archetype capable of dropping monsters just as powerful as the aforementioned Blue-Eyes White Dragon, which are also an insta-nuke to the rest of the field...
** However, it's also double-subverted with the Signer Dragons. In the series, they're treated as legendary divine servants, one of a kind and an ace in their own right. The in-game Signer Dragons vary quite a bit in power (Blackfeather Dragon and Ancient Fairy Dragon are pretty lame, Red Demon's Dragon is a decent beatstick, Power Tool Dragon is an alright card [[PowerUpLetdown until it evolves]], Black Rose Dragon is a very nasty surprise, and Stardust Dragon is a near-staple), but none of them are quite the insane legendary cards they're usually hyped up to be. Their main advantages are [[BoringButPractical splashability and ease of Summoning]]; none of them have super-high stats, and none of them really have the firepower to win a Duel on their own (unless you count the [[SuperMode upgraded versions]] of Stardust and Red Demon's).
** [[FusionDance Polymerization]] was an interesting case in the early days of the card game. Fusion Monsters(monsters that were Special Summoned by using Polymerization and the appropriate fusion material monsters) were a part of the game's mechanics since the beginning. They were in the anime since the beginning - Yugi had Gaia the Dragon Champion, Kaiba had Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and Pegasus had Thousand Eyes Restrict. all important monsters in Duelist Kingdom. Some of the first sets included a large number of Fusion monsters that were easy to obtain, but Polymerization itself was a Super Rare card - not terribly to get a hold of, but it meant that using Fusions were not an option unless you got lucky with your pulls. This was later rectified when Polymerization was made a Common card in subsequent sets, making Fusions at least slightly easier to use. And then Metamorphosis was introduced...
** The Egyptian God Cards from the original series were eventually made into tournament-legal cards for the game. All of their effects were {{Nerf}}ed in some way, but the nerfing was done more than proportionately to the cards' power in the manga and anime, meaning that Obelisk the Tormentor, which was the ''weakest'' of the Gods originally, became the most useful in the real game, whereas the Winged Dragon of Ra, which was the most powerful originally, became the hardest to use effectively. Nerfing happens regularly between the anime and the game. The Eye of Timaeus is another infamous example; in the anime, it could potentially fuse with ''any'' Monster to create a game-winning super-dragon, though it was mostly used in tandem with Dark Magician and Dark Magician Girl. When its real-game counterpart finally came out, it could ''only'' fuse with those two cards, turning it from a universal support card to a pretty weak one for a single archetype. (Then again, expressing its anime effect in the real game would be completely impossible.)

to:

** There is also something to be said about the lore of rarity in the comic. Originally, stars indicated levels of rarity, in a very obvert PowerEqualsRarity way. Blue-Eyes White Dragon, for instance, is a level 8 monster, and only FOUR COPIES existed in the entire game. Level 7s were presumably also extremely rare, with probably only a handful existing in their own right (Kaiba was notably shocked when Yugi played Summoned Skull, at the time a Level 7 monster). This would explain why completing Exodia had "never been done before!" - if there were literally only a dozen or so "Exodia the Forbidden One" cards, and all the other pieces were equally as rare, the chances of ANYONE actually owning all four, let alone drawing them in a single game, was astronomically low. And, as most players were shown to only control level 1 through 4 monsters (which were presumably topped out at around 1200 attack, given the star levels originally shown), most would have only heard RUMORS of unbelievably rare cards like Red-Eyes Black Dragon, Summoned Skull, Dark Magician, and Blue-Eyes White Dragon, which could end the game in one attack (remember players originally had only 2000 LP, so one hit from a Blue-Eyes if you had a face-up 1000 Attack monster - a presumably otherwise-decent monster), and only a tiny cabal of people even knowing that something as gamebreakingly-powerful as Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon even existed. However, it's an ''abysmal'' business model. If there really ''were'' only four Blue-Eyes White Dragon cards in existence AND they were legal, they would each cost thousands upon thousands of dollars, because someone who had even one in their deck would have a monster that literally no-one else could actually beat in a head-to-head battle, which would quickly kill the allure of the game. Instead, in real-life, such iconic and powerful cards were made commonplace, and as such became immediately nerfed.
commonplace.
** Cards that make cameos from other Konami franchises, which in their respective series are usually the BigBad or the hero, often find themselves dramatically underpowered. As an example, the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Victory_Viper_XX03 Victory Viper XX03]] from VideoGame/{{Gradius}} and its counterparts, each of which is capable in-game of taking down an entire army including several nigh-invincible warships IN A ROW, are reduced to poor to mediocre monsters with decent effects that require them to have been powered up in the first place to use. Given that the game also includes an archetype capable of dropping monsters just as powerful as the aforementioned Blue-Eyes White Dragon, which are also an insta-nuke to the rest of the field...
field.
** However, In Anime/YuGiOh5Ds, it's also double-subverted with the Signer Dragons. In the series, they're treated as legendary divine servants, one of a kind and an ace in their own right. The in-game Signer Dragons vary quite a bit in power (Blackfeather Dragon and Ancient Fairy Dragon are pretty lame, Red Demon's Dragon is a decent beatstick, Power Tool Dragon is an alright card [[PowerUpLetdown until it evolves]], Black Rose Dragon is a very nasty surprise, and Stardust Dragon is a near-staple), but none of them are quite the insane legendary cards they're usually hyped up to be. Their main advantages are [[BoringButPractical splashability and ease of Summoning]]; none of them have super-high stats, and none of them really have the firepower to win a Duel on their own (unless you count the [[SuperMode upgraded versions]] of Stardust and Red Demon's).
** [[FusionDance Polymerization]] was an interesting case in the early days of the card game. Fusion Monsters(monsters Monsters (monsters that were Special Summoned by using Polymerization and the appropriate fusion material monsters) were a part of the game's mechanics since the beginning. They were It is in the anime since the beginning - Yugi had Gaia the Dragon Champion, Kaiba had Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and Pegasus had Thousand Eyes Restrict. all important monsters in Duelist Kingdom. Some of the first sets included a large number of Fusion monsters that were easy to obtain, but Polymerization itself was a Super Rare card - not terribly to get a hold of, but it meant that using Fusions were not an option unless you got lucky with your pulls. This was later rectified when Polymerization was made a Common card in subsequent sets, making Fusions at least slightly easier to use. And then Metamorphosis was introduced...
use.
** The Egyptian God Cards from the original series were eventually made into tournament-legal cards for the game. All of their effects were {{Nerf}}ed in some way, but the nerfing was done more than proportionately to the cards' power in the manga and anime, meaning that Obelisk the Tormentor, which was the ''weakest'' of the Gods originally, became the most useful in the real game, whereas the Winged Dragon of Ra, which was the most powerful originally, became the hardest to use effectively. effectively.
**
Nerfing happens regularly between the anime and the game. The Eye of Timaeus is another infamous example; in the anime, it could potentially fuse with ''any'' Monster to create a game-winning super-dragon, though it was mostly used in tandem with Dark Magician and Dark Magician Girl. When its real-game counterpart finally came out, it could ''only'' fuse with those two cards, turning it from a universal support card to a pretty weak one for a single archetype. (Then again, expressing its anime effect in the real game would be completely impossible.)
29th Apr '17 11:51:42 PM xoriak
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* ''HearthstoneHeroesOfWarcraft'' both uses and averts this trope. Many of the most powerful cards in the game are very well-known characters such as Sylvanas Windrunner, Alexstrasza and Tirion Fordring. Many of the most powerful and famous characters aren't represented on a card, but instead represent a character class (Medivh, Garrosh Hellscream, Anduin Wrynn, etc.) However, there are several cards that have power way above or below the level that lore would appoint them. Some examples:

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* ''HearthstoneHeroesOfWarcraft'' ''VideoGame/HearthstoneHeroesOfWarcraft'' both uses and averts this trope. Many of the most powerful cards in the game are very well-known characters such as Sylvanas Windrunner, Alexstrasza and Tirion Fordring. Many of the most powerful and famous characters aren't represented on a card, but instead represent a character class (Medivh, Garrosh Hellscream, Anduin Wrynn, etc.) However, there are several cards that have power way above or below the level that lore would appoint them. Some examples:
14th Mar '17 2:24:32 PM N.Harmonik
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** And we go back full circle--the card to beat in the 2011-12 season was Mewtwo-EX. The VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite expansions seems to have made most Legendary Pokémon deliberately stronger and tougher, and the ones who didn't have been given competitive utility. For better or for worse, this means the Pokémon Trading Card Game, in the 5th generation, an aversion to this trope.

to:

** And we go back full circle--the card to beat in the 2011-12 season was Mewtwo-EX. The VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite expansions seems to have made most Legendary Pokémon deliberately stronger and tougher, and the ones who didn't have been given competitive utility. For better or for worse, this means the Pokémon Trading Card Game, Game is, in the 5th generation, an aversion to this trope.
10th Mar '17 5:38:42 PM flamemario12
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* ''TabletopGame/YuGiOh'' has countless examples of this trope. The famous [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Blue-Eyes_White_Dragon Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] is a 3000 ATK monster that requires two Tributes (monsters removed from the field) and has no effect; in the manga, it was powerful enough that [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney Seto Kaiba]] resorted to extortion and theft to collect every last one of them, but in the TCG that ensued, it's merely an expensive target. Likewise Yugi's signature card, the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Dark_Magician Dark Magician]], which requires two Tributes but has only 2500 ATK; arguably, it's received more support cards in later years than even the Blue-Eyes White Dragon could ever hope for, but it too is a white (black?) elephant, even if you're dedicated enough to theme an entire deck around him. Not that ''all'' famous cards get this treatment, however; the very first duel featured in the manga included [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Summoned_Skull Summoned Skull]], a powerful and incredibly playable card for many years (2500 ATK, like the Dark Magician, but it only needs ''one'' Tribute), and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Monster_Reborn Monster Reborn]], a powerful card that spent some time on the [[TooAwesomeToUse Forbidden List]]: it allows the player who uses it to bring back a monster from the Graveyard. ''Either player's'' Graveyard. Many of the most powerful cards, in fact, have either never appeared on the show or appeared only briefly. Nowadays it's not uncommon for each new expansion set to feature cards for an entire new deck archetype, which typically dominates the field for about 3-6 months before a new expansion renders it utterly moot: these archetypes are often based off of the decks of one-shot characters, or minor recurring ones, rather than the main protagonists.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/YuGiOh'' has countless examples of this trope.
**
The famous [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Blue-Eyes_White_Dragon Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] is a 3000 ATK monster that requires two Tributes (monsters removed from the field) and has no effect; in the manga, it was powerful enough that [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney Seto Kaiba]] resorted to extortion and theft to collect every last one of them, but in the TCG that ensued, it's merely an expensive target. Likewise Yugi's signature card, the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Dark_Magician Dark Magician]], which requires two Tributes but has only 2500 ATK; arguably, it's received more support cards in later years than even the Blue-Eyes White Dragon could ever hope for, but it too is a white (black?) elephant, even if you're dedicated enough to theme an entire deck around him. Not that ''all'' famous cards get this treatment, however; the very first duel featured in the manga included [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Summoned_Skull Summoned Skull]], a powerful and incredibly playable card for many years (2500 ATK, like the Dark Magician, but it only needs ''one'' Tribute), and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Monster_Reborn Monster Reborn]], a powerful card that spent some time on the [[TooAwesomeToUse Forbidden List]]: it allows the player who uses it to bring back a monster from the Graveyard. ''Either player's'' Graveyard. Many of the most powerful cards, in fact, have either never appeared on the show or appeared only briefly. Nowadays it's not uncommon for each new expansion set to feature cards for an entire new deck archetype, which typically dominates the field for about 3-6 months before a new expansion renders it utterly moot: these archetypes are often based off of the decks of one-shot characters, or minor recurring ones, rather than the main protagonists.



*** Many people, mainly kids, played liked that when the cards first came out. And the result? Everyone buying out Kaiba decks to spam 3 blue eyes. So even if you used magic, traps, high attack monsters or some good strategy - heck, even if you cheated a bit more than normal with a few cards - if you wiped out one blue eyes, your opponent would bring out ''another'' the next turn or revive it, and that makes you out of the game.
*** There is also something to be said about the lore of rarity in the comic. Originally, stars indicated levels of rarity, in a very obvert PowerEqualsRarity way. Blue-Eyes White Dragon, for instance, is a level 8 monster, and only FOUR COPIES existed in the entire game. Level 7s were presumably also extremely rare, with probably only a handful existing in their own right (Kaiba was notably shocked when Yugi played Summoned Skull, at the time a Level 7 monster). This would explain why completing Exodia had "never been done before!" - if there were literally only a dozen or so "Exodia the Forbidden One" cards, and all the other pieces were equally as rare, the chances of ANYONE actually owning all four, let alone drawing them in a single game, was astronomically low. And, as most players were shown to only control level 1 through 4 monsters (which were presumably topped out at around 1200 attack, given the star levels originally shown), most would have only heard RUMORS of unbelievably-rare cards like Red-Eyes Black Dragon, Summoned Skull, Dark Magician, and Blue-Eyes White Dragon, which could end the game in one attack (remember players originally had only 2000 LP, so one hit from a Blue-Eyes if you had a face-up 1000 Attack monster - a presumably otherwise-decent monster), and only a tiny cabal of people even knowing that something as gamebreakingly-powerful as Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon even existed. However, while this idea makes for a great story in a comic, it's an ''abysmal'' business model. If there really ''were'' only four Blue-Eyes White Dragon cards in existence AND they were legal, they would each cost thousands upon thousands of dollars, because someone who had even one in their deck would have a monster that literally no-one else could actually beat in a head-to-head battle, which would quickly kill the allure of the game. Instead, in real-life, such iconic and powerful cards were made commonplace, and as such became immediately nerfed, since every Tom, Dick, and Harry who bought a Kaiba Starter Deck or three had their hands on a Blue-Eyes White Dragon and could contend with everyone else who did.

to:

*** Many people, mainly kids, played liked that when the cards first came out. And the result? Everyone buying out Kaiba decks to spam 3 blue eyes. So even if you used magic, traps, high attack monsters or some good strategy - heck, even if you cheated a bit more than normal with a few cards - if you wiped out one blue eyes, your opponent would bring out ''another'' the next turn or revive it, and that makes you out of the game.
***
** There is also something to be said about the lore of rarity in the comic. Originally, stars indicated levels of rarity, in a very obvert PowerEqualsRarity way. Blue-Eyes White Dragon, for instance, is a level 8 monster, and only FOUR COPIES existed in the entire game. Level 7s were presumably also extremely rare, with probably only a handful existing in their own right (Kaiba was notably shocked when Yugi played Summoned Skull, at the time a Level 7 monster). This would explain why completing Exodia had "never been done before!" - if there were literally only a dozen or so "Exodia the Forbidden One" cards, and all the other pieces were equally as rare, the chances of ANYONE actually owning all four, let alone drawing them in a single game, was astronomically low. And, as most players were shown to only control level 1 through 4 monsters (which were presumably topped out at around 1200 attack, given the star levels originally shown), most would have only heard RUMORS of unbelievably-rare unbelievably rare cards like Red-Eyes Black Dragon, Summoned Skull, Dark Magician, and Blue-Eyes White Dragon, which could end the game in one attack (remember players originally had only 2000 LP, so one hit from a Blue-Eyes if you had a face-up 1000 Attack monster - a presumably otherwise-decent monster), and only a tiny cabal of people even knowing that something as gamebreakingly-powerful as Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon even existed. However, while this idea makes for a great story in a comic, it's an ''abysmal'' business model. If there really ''were'' only four Blue-Eyes White Dragon cards in existence AND they were legal, they would each cost thousands upon thousands of dollars, because someone who had even one in their deck would have a monster that literally no-one else could actually beat in a head-to-head battle, which would quickly kill the allure of the game. Instead, in real-life, such iconic and powerful cards were made commonplace, and as such became immediately nerfed, since every Tom, Dick, and Harry who bought a Kaiba Starter Deck or three had their hands on a Blue-Eyes White Dragon and could contend with everyone else who did.nerfed.



** Arguably subverted in recent years, as the star monsters of 5D's and ZEXAL tend to be incredibly powerful monsters even in the IRL game.
*** However, it's also double-subverted with the Signer Dragons. In the series, they're treated as legendary divine servants, one of a kind and an ace in their own right. The in-game Signer Dragons vary quite a bit in power (Blackfeather Dragon and Ancient Fairy Dragon are pretty lame, Red Demon's Dragon is a decent beatstick, Power Tool Dragon is an alright card [[PowerUpLetdown until it evolves]], Black Rose Dragon is a very nasty surprise, and Stardust Dragon is a near-staple), but none of them are quite the insane legendary cards they're usually hyped up to be. Their main advantages are [[BoringButPractical splashability and ease of Summoning]]; none of them have super-high stats, and none of them really have the firepower to win a Duel on their own (unless you count the [[SuperMode upgraded versions]] of Stardust and Red Demon's).

to:

** Arguably subverted in recent years, as the star monsters of 5D's and ZEXAL tend to be incredibly powerful monsters even in the IRL game.
***
However, it's also double-subverted with the Signer Dragons. In the series, they're treated as legendary divine servants, one of a kind and an ace in their own right. The in-game Signer Dragons vary quite a bit in power (Blackfeather Dragon and Ancient Fairy Dragon are pretty lame, Red Demon's Dragon is a decent beatstick, Power Tool Dragon is an alright card [[PowerUpLetdown until it evolves]], Black Rose Dragon is a very nasty surprise, and Stardust Dragon is a near-staple), but none of them are quite the insane legendary cards they're usually hyped up to be. Their main advantages are [[BoringButPractical splashability and ease of Summoning]]; none of them have super-high stats, and none of them really have the firepower to win a Duel on their own (unless you count the [[SuperMode upgraded versions]] of Stardust and Red Demon's).



** The Egyptian God Cards from the original series were eventually made into tournament-legal cards for the game. All of their effects were {{Nerf}}ed in some way, but the nerfing was done more than proportionately to the cards' power in the manga and anime, meaning that Obelisk the Tormentor, which was the ''weakest'' of the Gods originally, became the most useful in the real game, whereas the Winged Dragon of Ra, which was the most powerful originally, became the hardest to use effectively.
*** Nerfing happens regularly between the anime and the game. The Eye of Timaeus is another infamous example; in the anime, it could potentially fuse with ''any'' Monster to create a game-winning super-dragon, though it was mostly used in tandem with Dark Magician and Dark Magician Girl. When its real-game counterpart finally came out, it could ''only'' fuse with those two cards, turning it from a universal support card to a pretty weak one for a single archetype. (Then again, expressing its anime effect in the real game would be completely impossible.)

to:

** The Egyptian God Cards from the original series were eventually made into tournament-legal cards for the game. All of their effects were {{Nerf}}ed in some way, but the nerfing was done more than proportionately to the cards' power in the manga and anime, meaning that Obelisk the Tormentor, which was the ''weakest'' of the Gods originally, became the most useful in the real game, whereas the Winged Dragon of Ra, which was the most powerful originally, became the hardest to use effectively.
***
effectively. Nerfing happens regularly between the anime and the game. The Eye of Timaeus is another infamous example; in the anime, it could potentially fuse with ''any'' Monster to create a game-winning super-dragon, though it was mostly used in tandem with Dark Magician and Dark Magician Girl. When its real-game counterpart finally came out, it could ''only'' fuse with those two cards, turning it from a universal support card to a pretty weak one for a single archetype. (Then again, expressing its anime effect in the real game would be completely impossible.)
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