History Main / CCGImportanceDissonance

12th Feb '18 5:20:30 PM nombretomado
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** The same goes for the ''Star Wars Miniatures'' game; for a while, the best character in the game was Aurra Sing, a BountyHunter who only made a brief cameo appearance in ''ThePhantomMenace''. Booster packs often tended to frustrate buyers because each pack only contains one rare figure, and ''all'' named characters are rare or very rare regardless of importance. You were very likely to get some random cantina alien rather than fan-favorite characters from the movies.

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** The same goes for the ''Star Wars Miniatures'' game; for a while, the best character in the game was Aurra Sing, a BountyHunter who only made a brief cameo appearance in ''ThePhantomMenace''.''Film/ThePhantomMenace''. Booster packs often tended to frustrate buyers because each pack only contains one rare figure, and ''all'' named characters are rare or very rare regardless of importance. You were very likely to get some random cantina alien rather than fan-favorite characters from the movies.
17th Jan '18 1:05:58 AM drac0blade
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* The short-lived AvatarTheLastAirbender trading card game did this by flat out ''inventing'' four different characters and then basing whole decks around them. Afiko, who betrayed the Airbenders in Aang's time, Malu, one of the last survivors of the Airbender purge, Kinto, a Waterbender who was banished for cruel pranks, and an earthbending Bandit named Jojo were all created by Upper Deck and never appeared in any other media, despite early promotional material hinting they would show up in the TV series. All four have since been considered non-cannon. In Upper Deck's defense, the card game was developed in the show's infancy and never went past season one, meaning some of the most popular characters never got introduced in time to make it into card form.

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* The short-lived AvatarTheLastAirbender trading card game did this by flat out ''inventing'' four different characters and then basing whole decks around them. Afiko, who betrayed the Airbenders in Aang's time, Malu, one of the last survivors of the Airbender purge, Kinto, a Waterbender who was banished for cruel pranks, and an earthbending Bandit bandit named Jojo were all created by Upper Deck and never appeared in any other media, despite early promotional material hinting they would show up in the TV series. All four have since been considered non-cannon. In Upper Deck's defense, the card game was developed in the show's infancy and never went past season one, meaning some of the most popular characters never got introduced in time to make it into card form.
15th Jan '18 3:20:27 PM drac0blade
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* The short-lived Avatar: The Last Airbender trading card game did this by flat out inventing four different characters and then basing whole decks around them. Afiko, who betrayed the Airbenders in Aang's time, Malu, one of the last survivors of the Airbender purge, Kinto, a Waterbender who was banished for cruel pranks, and an earthbending Bandit named Jojo were all created by Upper Deck and never appeared in any other media, despite early promotional material hinting they would show up in the TV series. All four have since been considered non-cannon. In Upper Deck's defense, the card game was developed in the show's infancy and never went past season one, meaning some of the most popular characters never got introduced in time to make it into card form.

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* The short-lived Avatar: The Last Airbender AvatarTheLastAirbender trading card game did this by flat out inventing ''inventing'' four different characters and then basing whole decks around them. Afiko, who betrayed the Airbenders in Aang's time, Malu, one of the last survivors of the Airbender purge, Kinto, a Waterbender who was banished for cruel pranks, and an earthbending Bandit named Jojo were all created by Upper Deck and never appeared in any other media, despite early promotional material hinting they would show up in the TV series. All four have since been considered non-cannon. In Upper Deck's defense, the card game was developed in the show's infancy and never went past season one, meaning some of the most popular characters never got introduced in time to make it into card form.
15th Jan '18 3:19:18 PM drac0blade
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* The short-lived AvatarTheLastAirbender trading card game did this by flat out ''inventing'' four different characters and then basing whole decks around them. Afiko, who betrayed the Airbenders in Aang's time, Malu, one of the last survivors of the Airbender purge, Kinto, a Waterbender who was banished for cruel pranks, and an earthbending Bandit named Jojo were all created by Upper Deck and never appeared in any other media, despite early promotional material hinting they would show up in the TV series. All four have since been considered non-cannon. In Upper Deck's defense, the card game was developed in the show's infancy and never went past season one, meaning some of the most popular characters never got introduced in time to make it into card form.


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* The short-lived Avatar: The Last Airbender trading card game did this by flat out inventing four different characters and then basing whole decks around them. Afiko, who betrayed the Airbenders in Aang's time, Malu, one of the last survivors of the Airbender purge, Kinto, a Waterbender who was banished for cruel pranks, and an earthbending Bandit named Jojo were all created by Upper Deck and never appeared in any other media, despite early promotional material hinting they would show up in the TV series. All four have since been considered non-cannon. In Upper Deck's defense, the card game was developed in the show's infancy and never went past season one, meaning some of the most popular characters never got introduced in time to make it into card form.
15th Jan '18 3:16:40 PM drac0blade
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Added DiffLines:

* The short-lived AvatarTheLastAirbender trading card game did this by flat out ''inventing'' four different characters and then basing whole decks around them. Afiko, who betrayed the Airbenders in Aang's time, Malu, one of the last survivors of the Airbender purge, Kinto, a Waterbender who was banished for cruel pranks, and an earthbending Bandit named Jojo were all created by Upper Deck and never appeared in any other media, despite early promotional material hinting they would show up in the TV series. All four have since been considered non-cannon. In Upper Deck's defense, the card game was developed in the show's infancy and never went past season one, meaning some of the most popular characters never got introduced in time to make it into card form.
2nd Jan '18 6:16:18 PM nombretomado
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* ''HeroClix'' has produced very many figures in various combinations of usefulness. Contrary to PopularityPower though, quite a few A tier heroes aren't as powerful as you'd hope, while a few B and C list heroes are pretty darn powerful and useful. Examples are first generation Controller, a no-name villain who starts out super strong, but rather than get weak when damaged gains mind control, and Fire Lord, a minor herald of Galactus who was super powerful and insanely cheap to play. At one point it was common to see teams composed of several big-name superheroes and a nameless Hydra Medic, or other cheap healer.

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* ''HeroClix'' ''TabletopGame/HeroClix'' has produced very many figures in various combinations of usefulness. Contrary to PopularityPower though, quite a few A tier heroes aren't as powerful as you'd hope, while a few B and C list heroes are pretty darn powerful and useful. Examples are first generation Controller, a no-name villain who starts out super strong, but rather than get weak when damaged gains mind control, and Fire Lord, a minor herald of Galactus who was super powerful and insanely cheap to play. At one point it was common to see teams composed of several big-name superheroes and a nameless Hydra Medic, or other cheap healer.



** Cthulhu is also available in [[{{Heroclix}} Horrorclix]] as a chase "scenario" figure. A decent team can defeat him without too much trouble, yet still have trouble with a bunch of random serial killers.

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** Cthulhu is also available in [[{{Heroclix}} [[TabletopGame/HeroClix Horrorclix]] as a chase "scenario" figure. A decent team can defeat him without too much trouble, yet still have trouble with a bunch of random serial killers.
27th Dec '17 3:16:33 PM Tropetastic1995
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** The famous [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Blue-Eyes_White_Dragon Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] is a 3000 ATK monster that requires two Tributes (monsters removed from the field) and has no effect; in the manga, it was powerful enough that [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney Seto Kaiba]] resorted to extortion and theft to collect every last one of them, but in the TCG that ensued, it's merely an expensive target. Likewise, Yugi's signature card, the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Dark_Magician Dark Magician]], which requires two Tributes but has only 2500 ATK; arguably, it's received more support cards in later years than even the Blue-Eyes White Dragon could ever hope for, but it too is a white (black?) elephant, even if you're dedicated enough to theme an entire deck around him. Not that ''all'' famous cards get this treatment, however; the very first duel featured in the manga included [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Summoned_Skull Summoned Skull]], a powerful and incredibly playable card for many years (2500 ATK, like the Dark Magician, but it only needs ''one'' Tribute), and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Monster_Reborn Monster Reborn]], a powerful card that spent some time on the [[TooAwesomeToUse Forbidden List]]: it allows the player who uses it to bring back a monster from the Graveyard. ''Either player's'' Graveyard. Many of the most powerful cards, in fact, have either never appeared on the show or appeared only briefly. Nowadays it's not uncommon for each new expansion set to feature cards for an entire new deck archetype, which typically dominates the field for about 3-6 months before a new expansion renders it utterly moot: these archetypes are often based off of the decks of one-shot characters, or minor recurring ones, rather than the main protagonists. Although Blue-Eyes' case is subverted with the release of new Blue-Eyes support in 2016, which manages to make the deck strong enough to win the [[TournamentPlay WCS]].

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** The famous [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Blue-Eyes_White_Dragon Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] is a 3000 ATK monster that requires two Tributes (monsters removed from the field) and has no effect; in the manga, it was powerful enough that [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney Seto Kaiba]] resorted to extortion and theft to collect every last one of them, but in the TCG that ensued, it's merely an expensive target. Likewise, Yugi's signature card, the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Dark_Magician Dark Magician]], which requires two Tributes but has only 2500 ATK; arguably, it's received more support cards in later years than even the Blue-Eyes White Dragon could ever hope for, but it too is a white (black?) elephant, even if you're dedicated enough to theme an entire deck around him. Not that ''all'' famous cards get this treatment, however; the very first duel featured in the manga included [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Summoned_Skull Summoned Skull]], a powerful and incredibly playable card for many years (2500 ATK, like the Dark Magician, but it only needs ''one'' Tribute), and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Monster_Reborn Monster Reborn]], a powerful card that spent some time on the [[TooAwesomeToUse Forbidden List]]: it allows the player who uses it to bring back a monster from the Graveyard. ''Either player's'' Graveyard. Many of the most powerful cards, in fact, have either never appeared on the show or appeared only briefly. Nowadays it's not uncommon for each new expansion set to feature cards for an entire new deck archetype, which typically dominates the field for about 3-6 months before a new expansion renders it utterly moot: these archetypes are often based off of the decks of one-shot characters, or minor recurring ones, rather than the main protagonists. Although Blue-Eyes' case is subverted
*** Many of the more popular cards of the early anime, however, have instead become centerpieces to decently viable to near-staple level archetypes, meaning that while fairly weak on their own, they work well in a dedicated deck. Blue-Eyes, Red-Eyes, and to a lesser extent Dark Magician being the primary examples of this. A dedicated Blue-Eyes deck (
with the release of new Blue-Eyes support in 2016, which manages to make the deck strong enough 2016),managed to win the [[TournamentPlay WCS]].
10th Dec '17 2:01:20 PM nombretomado
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* ''DragonBooster'' had a CCG, among a ton of other merchandise which sunk. Every character was named-but only a few were ones from the actual show. The rest were mainly crew members who were made up to fill out the ranks of the various racing crews.

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\n* ''DragonBooster'' ''WesternAnimation/DragonBooster'' had a CCG, among a ton of other merchandise which sunk. Every character was named-but only a few were ones from the actual show. The rest were mainly crew members who were made up to fill out the ranks of the various racing crews.
8th Dec '17 1:23:45 AM HeatEdgeSword
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** The famous [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Blue-Eyes_White_Dragon Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] is a 3000 ATK monster that requires two Tributes (monsters removed from the field) and has no effect; in the manga, it was powerful enough that [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney Seto Kaiba]] resorted to extortion and theft to collect every last one of them, but in the TCG that ensued, it's merely an expensive target. Likewise, Yugi's signature card, the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Dark_Magician Dark Magician]], which requires two Tributes but has only 2500 ATK; arguably, it's received more support cards in later years than even the Blue-Eyes White Dragon could ever hope for, but it too is a white (black?) elephant, even if you're dedicated enough to theme an entire deck around him. Not that ''all'' famous cards get this treatment, however; the very first duel featured in the manga included [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Summoned_Skull Summoned Skull]], a powerful and incredibly playable card for many years (2500 ATK, like the Dark Magician, but it only needs ''one'' Tribute), and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Monster_Reborn Monster Reborn]], a powerful card that spent some time on the [[TooAwesomeToUse Forbidden List]]: it allows the player who uses it to bring back a monster from the Graveyard. ''Either player's'' Graveyard. Many of the most powerful cards, in fact, have either never appeared on the show or appeared only briefly. Nowadays it's not uncommon for each new expansion set to feature cards for an entire new deck archetype, which typically dominates the field for about 3-6 months before a new expansion renders it utterly moot: these archetypes are often based off of the decks of one-shot characters, or minor recurring ones, rather than the main protagonists.
*** Although Blue-Eyes case is subverted with the release of new Blue-Eyes support in 2016, which manages to make the deck strong enough to win the [[TournamentPlay WCS ]]

to:

** The famous [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Blue-Eyes_White_Dragon Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] is a 3000 ATK monster that requires two Tributes (monsters removed from the field) and has no effect; in the manga, it was powerful enough that [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney Seto Kaiba]] resorted to extortion and theft to collect every last one of them, but in the TCG that ensued, it's merely an expensive target. Likewise, Yugi's signature card, the [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Dark_Magician Dark Magician]], which requires two Tributes but has only 2500 ATK; arguably, it's received more support cards in later years than even the Blue-Eyes White Dragon could ever hope for, but it too is a white (black?) elephant, even if you're dedicated enough to theme an entire deck around him. Not that ''all'' famous cards get this treatment, however; the very first duel featured in the manga included [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Summoned_Skull Summoned Skull]], a powerful and incredibly playable card for many years (2500 ATK, like the Dark Magician, but it only needs ''one'' Tribute), and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Monster_Reborn Monster Reborn]], a powerful card that spent some time on the [[TooAwesomeToUse Forbidden List]]: it allows the player who uses it to bring back a monster from the Graveyard. ''Either player's'' Graveyard. Many of the most powerful cards, in fact, have either never appeared on the show or appeared only briefly. Nowadays it's not uncommon for each new expansion set to feature cards for an entire new deck archetype, which typically dominates the field for about 3-6 months before a new expansion renders it utterly moot: these archetypes are often based off of the decks of one-shot characters, or minor recurring ones, rather than the main protagonists.
***
protagonists. Although Blue-Eyes Blue-Eyes' case is subverted with the release of new Blue-Eyes support in 2016, which manages to make the deck strong enough to win the [[TournamentPlay WCS ]]WCS]].
11th Oct '17 9:31:45 AM MBG
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** The Egyptian God Cards from the original series were eventually made into tournament-legal cards for the game. All of their effects were {{Nerf}}ed in some way, but the nerfing was done more than proportionately to the cards' power in the manga and anime, meaning that Obelisk the Tormentor, which was the ''weakest'' of the Gods originally, became the most useful in the real game, whereas the Winged Dragon of Ra, which was the most powerful originally, became the hardest to use effectively.

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** The Egyptian God Cards from the original series were eventually made into tournament-legal cards for the game. All of their effects were {{Nerf}}ed in some way, but the nerfing was done more than proportionately to the cards' power in the manga and anime, meaning that Obelisk the Tormentor, which was the ''weakest'' of the Gods originally, became the most useful in the real game, whereas the Winged Dragon of Ra, which was the most powerful originally, became the hardest to use effectively. Taken UpToEleven when Ra Sphere Mode was released as a separate card to support it. In the anime, Ra Sphere Mode was literally worse than useless, consisting of Ra being stuck in half-shift in the hands of an unworthy user and unable to do anything. On the other hand, the real Ra Sphere Mode is considered to be the only reason that the standard Ra is worth playing, since it initially summons itself to the opponent's field (eating up three of their monsters in the process), then switches control to you and turns into the standard Ra with a free attack boost.
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