History Main / ButNotTooBlack

19th Aug '16 1:38:23 PM DrOO7
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* In ''Film/TheSapphires'', the story of an Aboriginal girls quartet that toured Vietnam entertaining the troops, one of the group members, Kay, is a member of the stolen generation, and her time spent in Melbourne passing as a white girl (after being taken away by an agency and put into a mission as a child) is a source of tension between her and Gail, the darkest member of the group who deals with whatever insecurities she has about her complexion by almost relentlessly bullying Kay. And rather than lording her light complexion over the others, Kay has her own insecurities about it (probably due to Gail's ill treatment)--in the course of developing a relationship with a black GI, she feels it necessary to point out that even though she's "pale black", she's still black.
24th Jul '16 2:13:25 PM TheBigBopper
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* ''Manga/{{Berserk}}'', Dark-skinned and AmbiguouslyBrown Casca is portrayed with significantly lighter skin and hair in the later animated adaptations. The film trilogy makes her more of a light tan compared to the medium brown she was in the manga and the '97 show, which some of fans who appreciated the unique appearance Miura originally gave her were ''very'' unhappy about. At first it seemed like ''Anime/Berserk2016'' made her skin almost as white as the European-looking main character Guts, which created a similar uproar, but this turned out to be largely caused by the high contrast visual effects applied to the flashbacks. In normal lighting she looks about the same shade as in the ''Golden Age'' movies, albeit with more reddish-brown hair as opposed to dark brown hair in the movies and black hair in the manga and '97 anime.

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* ''Manga/{{Berserk}}'', ''Manga/{{Berserk}}'': Dark-skinned and AmbiguouslyBrown Casca is portrayed with significantly lighter skin and hair in the later animated adaptations. The film trilogy makes her more of a light tan compared to the medium brown she was in the manga and the '97 show, which some of fans who appreciated the unique appearance Miura originally gave her were ''very'' unhappy about. At first it seemed like ''Anime/Berserk2016'' made her skin almost as white as the European-looking main character Guts, which created a similar uproar, but this turned out to be largely caused by the high contrast visual effects applied to the flashbacks. In normal lighting she looks about the same shade as in the ''Golden Age'' movies, albeit with more reddish-brown hair as opposed to dark brown hair in the movies and black hair in the manga and '97 anime.
24th Jul '16 2:12:31 PM TheBigBopper
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* In ''Manga/{{Berserk}}'', Casca is the resident AmbiguouslyBrown character, suggested to be of [[SimSimSalabim Kushan heritage]], so she is depicted to be fairly dark-skinned in both the manga AND the first anime adaptation. However, previews of the newer anime series shows her to be considerably more light-skinned. [[InternetBackdraft And the fanbase has responded.]]

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* In ''Manga/{{Berserk}}'', Casca is the resident Dark-skinned and AmbiguouslyBrown character, suggested Casca is portrayed with significantly lighter skin and hair in the later animated adaptations. The film trilogy makes her more of a light tan compared to be of [[SimSimSalabim Kushan heritage]], so the medium brown she is depicted to be fairly dark-skinned was in both the manga AND and the '97 show, which some of fans who appreciated the unique appearance Miura originally gave her were ''very'' unhappy about. At first anime adaptation. However, previews of it seemed like ''Anime/Berserk2016'' made her skin almost as white as the newer anime series shows her European-looking main character Guts, which created a similar uproar, but this turned out to be considerably largely caused by the high contrast visual effects applied to the flashbacks. In normal lighting she looks about the same shade as in the ''Golden Age'' movies, albeit with more light-skinned. [[InternetBackdraft And reddish-brown hair as opposed to dark brown hair in the fanbase has responded.]]movies and black hair in the manga and '97 anime.
14th Jul '16 4:03:19 PM DesertDragon
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** Interestingly enough, TheMerch related to Tiana portrays her as darker than she is in the film. Interpret as you will.
** There was also some debate as whether to make her prince, Naveen, black ("[[TokenMinorityCouple Disney hates interracial relationships!]]") or not-black ("All the other ones had princes of their own race! Disney hates black men!") The plot calls for the JerkWithAHeartOfGold prince to be something of a [[PrettyFreeloader gigolo]] who's trying to seduce a blonde southern debutante for her money, which would certainly earn it a place on the UnfortunateImplications page if he were to be black. Disney ended up making him AmbiguouslyBrown, so that people see him as their own race, or more likely, [[UnpleasableFanbase whatever race offends them the most]].
** Dr. Facilier, however, has lighter skin than both the prince and the main protagonist, but he's the villain. And his reason for villainy seems to come from the inability of climb higher in the social ladder of the time. Food for thought people.
** Facilier's good counterpart is a dark-skinned voodoo woman who lives in a swamp.

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** Interestingly enough, TheMerch related to Tiana portrays her as darker than she is in the film. Interpret as you will.
** There was also some debate as whether to make her prince, Naveen, black ("[[TokenMinorityCouple Disney hates interracial relationships!]]") or not-black ("All the other ones had princes of their own race! Disney hates black men!") The plot calls for the JerkWithAHeartOfGold prince to be something of a [[PrettyFreeloader gigolo]] who's trying to seduce a blonde southern debutante for her money, which would certainly earn it a place on the UnfortunateImplications page if he were to be black. Disney ended up making him AmbiguouslyBrown, AmbiguouslyBrown and from a fictional Mediterranean country, so that people see him as their own race, or more likely, [[UnpleasableFanbase whatever race offends them the most]].
** Dr. Facilier, however, has lighter skin than both the prince and the main protagonist, but he's the villain. And his reason for villainy seems to come from the inability of climb higher in the social ladder of the time. Food for thought people.
** Facilier's good counterpart is a dark-skinned voodoo woman who lives in a swamp.
most]].
14th Jul '16 3:58:57 PM DesertDragon
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* Janet Hubert-Whitten, who originally played Vivian Banks on the ''Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir'', was replaced by the lighter-complexioned Daphne Maxwell Reid in the last few seasons. This was {{lampshade|Hanging}}d on her first appearance. However only the change in actress was lampshaded. No mention was made of [[http://i50.tinypic.com/adc1e1.jpg the half-shade difference in color]]. Even worse, the change in actress (and, with that, skin tone) also corresponded with a change in personality from an assertive outspoken career woman who was every bit her husband's equal to a [[UnfortunateImplications docile, permissive housewife who appears much less]].

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* Janet Hubert-Whitten, who originally played Vivian Banks on the ''Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir'', was replaced by the lighter-complexioned Daphne Maxwell Reid in the last few seasons. This was {{lampshade|Hanging}}d on her first appearance. However only the change in actress was lampshaded. No mention was made of [[http://i50.tinypic.com/adc1e1.jpg the half-shade difference in color]]. Even worse, the change in actress (and, with that, skin tone) also corresponded with a change in personality from an assertive outspoken career woman who woman--more specifically a professor--who was every bit her husband's equal professional equal, to a [[UnfortunateImplications docile, permissive housewife who appears appeared much less]].less often]].
13th Jul '16 5:32:17 PM Adept
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-->''"I asked if my skin pale, would I then sell like Music/{{Eminem}} or {{Adele}}?"''

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-->''"I asked if my skin pale, would I then sell like Music/{{Eminem}} or {{Adele}}?"''Music/{{Adele}}?"''
13th Jul '16 5:05:12 PM MegaJ
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- Actually, many basic facial proportions are consistent regardless of race or ethnicity.
Case in point: the one eye-length between eyes rule, which is demonstrated by this very tropes image.
Second, the "nose width rule" would never be used by anyone with half a brain, as it is easily disproven by observation, as large noses occur across many races and ethnicities, not to mention elderly people often end up with quite prodigious noses, as noses grow with age.
Third, similar faulty drawings formulas rarely make it into published drawing guides or curriculum, and those that do can easily be disproven through observation and/or by comparing the supposed average proportion to a sampling of average humans- and there are multiple videos on youtube that do just that.
Fourth, the tutorial [[http://www.drawing-factory.com/nose-drawing.html linked above]] could easily be adapted to create a wider nose just by making the initial nose shape wider than it is in the tutorial. They're teaching how to construct a nose from basic shapes- not "this is the only size a nose could ever be."
Further, any proper drawing guide would state that the basic proportions are just that- basic. They're a basic set of guidelines so that an artist can get a reasonable human likeness as opposed to something that looks like a deformed monkey with a head of hair.
Proportions give one a guideline to work with, but figuring out the details is on the artist.




-On the other hand, rabid fans and rabid SJWs will happily accuse people for accidental or even nonexistent examples of this trope.
One artist even attempted suicide as a direct result of the abuse she received for her Steven Universe fanart because someone accused her of "white washing" Connie. Adding insult to injury, the work in question was a watercolor, a medium which is fussy to work with and tends to result in lighter colors by default, in both cases due to its translucency.
(Story here:[[http://www.dailydot.com/parsec/steven-universe-fanartist-bullied-controversy/]])
As bad as whitewashing purposefully could be, this kind of behavior is arguably much worse.


13th Jul '16 12:12:11 AM PaulA
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* In the ''Hudson'' books by Creator/VCAndrews, heroine Rain is praised for her beauty including being lighter-skinned than the rest of her family. This turns out to be because [[spoiler:she's actually biracial and her biological mother is white.]]

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* In the ''Hudson'' ''[[Literature/HudsonSeries Hudson]]'' books by Creator/VCAndrews, heroine Rain is praised for her beauty including being lighter-skinned than the rest of her family. This turns out to be because [[spoiler:she's actually biracial and her biological mother is white.]]white]].
12th Jul '16 5:41:06 PM Griffonmender
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Added DiffLines:

- Actually, many basic facial proportions are consistent regardless of race or ethnicity.
Case in point: the one eye-length between eyes rule, which is demonstrated by this very tropes image.
Second, the "nose width rule" would never be used by anyone with half a brain, as it is easily disproven by observation, as large noses occur across many races and ethnicities, not to mention elderly people often end up with quite prodigious noses, as noses grow with age.
Third, similar faulty drawings formulas rarely make it into published drawing guides or curriculum, and those that do can easily be disproven through observation and/or by comparing the supposed average proportion to a sampling of average humans- and there are multiple videos on youtube that do just that.
Fourth, the tutorial [[http://www.drawing-factory.com/nose-drawing.html linked above]] could easily be adapted to create a wider nose just by making the initial nose shape wider than it is in the tutorial. They're teaching how to construct a nose from basic shapes- not "this is the only size a nose could ever be."
Further, any proper drawing guide would state that the basic proportions are just that- basic. They're a basic set of guidelines so that an artist can get a reasonable human likeness as opposed to something that looks like a deformed monkey with a head of hair.
Proportions give one a guideline to work with, but figuring out the details is on the artist.



Added DiffLines:

-On the other hand, rabid fans and rabid SJWs will happily accuse people for accidental or even nonexistent examples of this trope.
One artist even attempted suicide as a direct result of the abuse she received for her Steven Universe fanart because someone accused her of "white washing" Connie. Adding insult to injury, the work in question was a watercolor, a medium which is fussy to work with and tends to result in lighter colors by default, in both cases due to its translucency.
(Story here:[[http://www.dailydot.com/parsec/steven-universe-fanartist-bullied-controversy/]])
As bad as whitewashing purposefully could be, this kind of behavior is arguably much worse.


10th Jul '16 9:21:51 AM TheViolentTomboy
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Added DiffLines:

** In Viz's colorings for the XY mini-volume covers, both Shauna and Emma are considerably lightened. In Emma's case, it's extra egregious considering an earlier, original colored image of her had her even darker than her game counterpart.
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