History Main / BriefcaseFullOfMoney

1st Feb '16 12:33:09 AM Ereiam
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Walter White and Jesse Pinkman in ''Series/BreakingBad'' sometimes have sums of money that would warrant a briefcase, but partly because they're inept (at least at the beginning) and partly because the sight of Pinkman, at least, carrying a briefcase would ''scream'' "drug money" to everyone who saw him, they usually use backpacks and duffle bags instead. Later, the amount of money becomes so large that it requires first a ''shipping pallet'' and then ''eleven giant barrels''. By that point, Walt has given up counting the extent of his fortune. By the time it reached shipping pallet levels even Skyler, who as a bookkeeper one might expect to be inclined to precision in such matters, has started estimating the total based on ''weight'' instead of attempting to actually count it.
to:
* Walter White and Jesse Pinkman in ''Series/BreakingBad'' sometimes have sums of money that would warrant a briefcase, but partly because they're inept (at least at the beginning) and partly because the sight of Pinkman, at least, carrying a briefcase would ''scream'' "drug money" to everyone who saw him, they usually use backpacks and duffle bags instead. Later, the amount of money becomes so large that it requires first a ''shipping pallet'' and then ''eleven ''seven giant barrels''. By that point, Walt has given up counting the extent of his fortune. By the time it reached shipping pallet levels even Skyler, who as a bookkeeper one might expect to be inclined to precision in such matters, has started estimating the total based on ''weight'' instead of attempting to actually count it.
21st Jan '16 10:20:13 AM Willbyr
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In {{Ultimo}}, Iruma Tonomitsu, a shady politician (falsely) offers Present!Yamato a briefcase that contains $100 million in order to buy Ultimo. [[spoiler:After Iruma ends up getting stabbed by his own Karakuri douji, Yamato's mother apparently takes the money to get a nice apartment]].
to:
* In {{Ultimo}}, ''Manga/KarakuridoujiUltimo'', Iruma Tonomitsu, a shady politician (falsely) offers Present!Yamato a briefcase that contains $100 million in order to buy Ultimo. [[spoiler:After Iruma ends up getting stabbed by his own Karakuri douji, Yamato's mother apparently takes the money to get a nice apartment]].
12th Dec '15 4:36:27 AM Adept
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''PayDay2'' has its criminals stuff packs of money (or jewelry, or gold, or...) into duffel bags when liberating them from banks, mob hideouts, and such. Notably, weight is accounted for as well - while carrying a bag of jewelry barely slows the thieves down, carrying money slows them down considerably and removes their ability to jump. Carrying gold practically turns a thief into a slug.
to:
* ''PayDay2'' ''VideoGame/PayDay2'' has its criminals stuff packs of money (or jewelry, or gold, or...) into duffel bags when liberating them from banks, mob hideouts, and such. Notably, weight is accounted for as well - while carrying a bag of jewelry barely slows the thieves down, carrying money slows them down considerably and removes their ability to jump. Carrying gold practically turns a thief into a slug.
27th Nov '15 6:52:07 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Referenced in ''{{Scott Pilgrim}} VS the World: The Game'', where they can be picked up and used as weapons in a stage based on a filming studio.
to:
* Referenced in ''{{Scott ''VideoGame/{{Scott Pilgrim}} VS the World: The Game'', where they can be picked up and used as weapons in a stage based on a filming studio.
17th Oct '15 10:16:43 AM Smeagol17
Is there an issue? Send a Message
A full briefcase isn't really an obscene amount these days, relatively speaking. Assuming all US$100 bills, an average sized briefcase (25" x 18" x 4") could theoretically fit about US$2,400,000. An average attache case (18" x 12" x 4.5") is good for about US$1,000,000. That's obviously a lot of money, enough to make for a plausible bribe in most circumstances, but not generally enough in the modern developed world to live on like a king, sufficient to fund a significant enterprise. That's precisely the reason why the US Treasury doesn't make any bills bigger than $100. Notice, however, that if you fly across the Atlantic it ''is'' possible to cram in a briefcase an obscene amount of euros: using 500 € bills and assuming each bill has a thickness of 0.16 mm, a briefcase as described above can hold €6,350,000 (US$8,550,275), whereas an attaché case can hold up to €3,213,000 (US$4,326,304). In fact, euros have become popular with organised crime. A briefcase full of money would also weigh quite a lot: In the above examples the suitcase would be over fifty pounds and the attaché case over twenty. [[HollywoodDensity However, you never see anyone struggling to lift the suitcase.]]
to:
A full briefcase isn't really an obscene amount these days, relatively speaking. Assuming all US$100 bills, an average sized briefcase (25" x 18" x 4") could theoretically fit about US$2,400,000. An average attache case (18" x 12" x 4.5") is good for about US$1,000,000. That's obviously a lot of money, enough to make for a plausible bribe in most circumstances, but not generally enough in the modern developed world to live on like a king, or sufficient to fund a significant enterprise. That's precisely the reason why the US Treasury doesn't make any bills bigger than $100. Notice, however, that if you fly across the Atlantic it ''is'' possible to cram in a briefcase an obscene amount of euros: using 500 € bills and assuming each bill has a thickness of 0.16 mm, a briefcase as described above can hold €6,350,000 (US$8,550,275), whereas an attaché case can hold up to €3,213,000 (US$4,326,304). In fact, euros have become popular with organised crime. A briefcase full of money would also weigh quite a lot: In the above examples the suitcase would be over fifty pounds and the attaché case over twenty. [[HollywoodDensity However, you never see anyone struggling to lift the suitcase.]]
17th Oct '15 10:14:23 AM Smeagol17
Is there an issue? Send a Message
A briefcase full isn't really an obscene amount these days, relatively speaking. Assuming all US$100 bills, an average sized briefcase (25" x 18" x 4") could theoretically fit about US$2,400,000. An average attache case (18" x 12" x 4.5") is good for about US$1,000,000. That's obviously a lot of money, enough to make for a plausible bribe in most circumstances, but not generally enough in the modern developed world to live on like a king, sufficient to fund a significant enterprise. That's precisely the reason why the US Treasury doesn't make any bills bigger than $100. Notice, however, that if you fly across the Atlantic it ''is'' possible to cram in a briefcase an obscene amount of euros: using 500 € bills and assuming each bill has a thickness of 0.16 mm, a briefcase as described above can hold €6,350,000 (US$8,550,275), whereas an attaché case can hold up to €3,213,000 (US$4,326,304). In fact, euros have become popular with organised crime. A briefcase full of money would also weigh quite a lot: In the above examples the suitcase would be over fifty pounds and the attaché case over twenty. [[HollywoodDensity However, you never see anyone struggling to lift the suitcase.]]
to:
A full briefcase full isn't really an obscene amount these days, relatively speaking. Assuming all US$100 bills, an average sized briefcase (25" x 18" x 4") could theoretically fit about US$2,400,000. An average attache case (18" x 12" x 4.5") is good for about US$1,000,000. That's obviously a lot of money, enough to make for a plausible bribe in most circumstances, but not generally enough in the modern developed world to live on like a king, sufficient to fund a significant enterprise. That's precisely the reason why the US Treasury doesn't make any bills bigger than $100. Notice, however, that if you fly across the Atlantic it ''is'' possible to cram in a briefcase an obscene amount of euros: using 500 € bills and assuming each bill has a thickness of 0.16 mm, a briefcase as described above can hold €6,350,000 (US$8,550,275), whereas an attaché case can hold up to €3,213,000 (US$4,326,304). In fact, euros have become popular with organised crime. A briefcase full of money would also weigh quite a lot: In the above examples the suitcase would be over fifty pounds and the attaché case over twenty. [[HollywoodDensity However, you never see anyone struggling to lift the suitcase.]]
17th Oct '15 10:13:05 AM mrincodi
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''Film/TheBigLebowski'' features a BriefcaseFullOfMoney as the MacGuffin; [[spoiler:Or is it? The Dude deduces that the eponymous false millionaire has planted a False MacGuffin in an attempt to rid himself of his unfaithful Trophy Wife.]]
to:
* ''Film/TheBigLebowski'' features a BriefcaseFullOfMoney as the MacGuffin; [[AMacGuffinFullOfMoney McGuffin]]; [[spoiler:Or is it? The Dude deduces that the eponymous false millionaire has planted a False MacGuffin in an attempt to rid himself of his unfaithful Trophy Wife.]]
16th Oct '15 3:48:52 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In ''PinkyAndTheBrain,'' a doctor with the conclusive proof that would have made Brain's insurance fraud scheme successful is bribed with a briefcase that will "change [his] mind." It contains lingerie. (Make your own conclusion what it will be used for...)
to:
* In ''PinkyAndTheBrain,'' ''WesternAnimation/PinkyAndTheBrain,'' a doctor with the conclusive proof that would have made Brain's insurance fraud scheme successful is bribed with a briefcase that will "change [his] mind." It contains lingerie. (Make your own conclusion what it will be used for...)
14th Oct '15 4:01:41 PM Kalaong
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* At the beginning of one episode of ''Series/PersonOfInterest'' Finch goes to a morgue with a critically wounded Reese (he had been shot at the end of the previous episode) and tells the coroner that he knows that the man is a brilliant surgeon who hadn't practiced medicine since immigrating to the US because he couldn't afford the fees involved in getting certified to practice in the US (he was sending most of his money to his family overseas). Finch then produces a large handbag full of cash and says "Stitch him [Reese] up, and you can be a doctor again."
to:
* At the beginning of one episode of ''Series/PersonOfInterest'' Finch goes to a morgue with a critically wounded Reese (he had been shot at the end of the previous episode) and tells the coroner that he knows that the man is a brilliant surgeon who hadn't practiced medicine since immigrating to the US because he couldn't afford the fees involved in getting certified to practice in the US (he was sending most of his money to his family overseas). Finch then produces a large handbag full of cash and says "Stitch him [Reese] up, no questions asked, and you can be a doctor again."
10th Oct '15 7:16:03 PM Kalaong
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** In "Unfinished Business", the MacGuffin is a set of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samurai_bond "Samurai Bonds"]] - '''''Extremely''''' high-value non-government Japanese bearer bonds: --->'''Neal''': ''The bonds are transferable?''\\ '''Diana''': ''No title. Whoever holds ‘em owns ‘em.''\\ '''Jones''': ''Each certificate is worth two hundred grand.''\\ '''Neal''': ''So a stack of a hundred million dollars is '''this''' thick.''(holds finger and thumb less than an '''inch''' apart)

* ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' has the "portable money transfer device" ''standardized''. Everyone uses sturdy USB drive-like devices called "[[WeWillSpendCreditsInTheFuture credsticks]]" for money, and these come in two flavors. "Personal" credsticks are basically just biometric debit cards. "Certified" credsticks (also known as "checksticks") can be used by whoever picks them up, and have ''absolutely no limit'' on how much currency they can store - essentially 21st century bearer bonds, as described above. These are what {{Mega Corp}}s regularly use to pay player characters for deniable operations, and demonstrate fairly well why bearer bonds are so rare and regulated in RealLife.
to:
* ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' has the "portable money transfer device" ''standardized''. Everyone uses sturdy USB drive-like devices called "[[WeWillSpendCreditsInTheFuture credsticks]]" for money, and these come in two flavors. "Personal" credsticks are basically just biometric debit cards. "Certified" credsticks (also known as "checksticks") can be used by whoever picks them up, and have ''absolutely no limit'' on how much currency they can store - essentially 21st century cyberpunk bearer bonds, as described above.bonds. These are what {{Mega Corp}}s regularly use to pay player characters for deniable operations, and demonstrate fairly well why bearer bonds are so rare and regulated in RealLife.
This list shows the last 10 events of 105. Show all.