History Main / BriefcaseFullOfMoney

10th Dec '16 10:47:13 AM thatother1dude
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--->'''Neal''': ''The bonds are transferable?''\\
'''Diana''': ''No title. Whoever holds ‘em owns ‘em.''\\
'''Jones''': ''Each certificate is worth two hundred grand.''\\
'''Neal''': ''So a stack of a hundred million dollars is '''this''' thick.''(holds finger and thumb less than an '''inch''' apart)

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--->'''Neal''': ''The The bonds are transferable?''\\
transferable?\\
'''Diana''': ''No No title. Whoever holds ‘em owns ‘em.''\\
\\
'''Jones''': ''Each Each certificate is worth two hundred grand.''\\
\\
'''Neal''': ''So So a stack of a hundred million dollars is '''this''' thick.''(holds \\
''(Neal holds his
finger and thumb less than an '''inch''' apart)apart)''
1st Dec '16 5:41:08 PM GhostOfAGeek
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* Spoofed in ''WebComic/EverydayHeroes'', when a multi-million dollar shipment of stolen cash is delivered in a bunch of [[http://www.webcomicsnation.com/eddurd/everydayheroes/series.php?view=single&ID=207991 ordinary cardboard boxes.]]

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* Spoofed in ''WebComic/EverydayHeroes'', when a multi-million dollar shipment of stolen cash is delivered in a bunch of [[http://www.webcomicsnation.com/eddurd/everydayheroes/series.php?view=single&ID=207991 [[http://eheroes.smackjeeves.com/comics/2133449/ch12-32/ ordinary cardboard boxes.]]
5th Nov '16 3:26:36 PM FordPrefect
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Interestingly, there exists a simple mechanism precisely designed for the impersonal transfer of arbitrarily large amounts of money: a handy little financial instrument called a ''bearer bond''. It weighs as much as the one sheet of paper it's printed on, it's completely negotiable -- in effect, currency -- at any major bank, it's untraceable for practical purposes, and it can carry a huge face value, even into the hundreds of millions.[[note]] Though anyone showing you a briefcase full of these denominated in US dollars is most likely lying - the Treasury, severely curtailed their printing in 1982 and has never issued bearer bonds greater than $1 million. You also still have to pay income taxes on the interest - normal bonds are exempt.[[/note]]Unfortunately, criminals outside the sort of movies in which Interpol might be a factor never seem to think of this and lug around heavy briefcases full of money through, say, Customs.

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Interestingly, there exists a simple mechanism precisely designed for the impersonal transfer of arbitrarily large amounts of money: a handy little financial instrument called a ''bearer bond''. It weighs as much as the one sheet of paper it's printed on, it's completely negotiable -- in effect, currency -- at any major bank, it's untraceable for practical purposes, and it can carry a huge face value, even into the hundreds of millions.[[note]] Though anyone showing you a briefcase full of these denominated in US dollars is most likely lying - the Treasury, Treasury severely curtailed their printing in 1982 and has never issued bearer bonds greater than $1 million. You also still have to pay income taxes on the interest - normal bonds are exempt.[[/note]]Unfortunately, criminals outside the sort of movies in which Interpol might be a factor never seem to think of this and lug around heavy briefcases full of money through, say, Customs.
6th Oct '16 7:02:42 PM gemmabeta2
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* A lot of banks have started making this trope hard to play straight by restricting the amount of cash private individuals can withdraw at once as well as imposing other restrictions. HSBC[[note]][[{{Irony}} Yeah, the bank who got caught laundering money for the Colombian mob a while back]][[/note]] were recently caught up in a minor brouhaha in the British press because they were asking people intrusive personal questions about why they needed £3,000[[note]]a little under US$5,000 at time of writing[[/note]] or more in cash.

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* A lot of banks have started making this trope hard to play straight by restricting the amount of cash private individuals can withdraw at once as well as imposing other restrictions.restrictions (the usual excuse was that it reduces the amount of money tellers have on hand, which reduces the amount of money bank robbers can steal at one time). HSBC[[note]][[{{Irony}} Yeah, the bank who got caught laundering money for the Colombian mob a while back]][[/note]] were recently caught up in a minor brouhaha in the British press because they were asking people intrusive personal questions about why they needed £3,000[[note]]a little under US$5,000 at time of writing[[/note]] or more in cash.
27th Sep '16 3:00:53 AM Morgenthaler
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* Parodied in an episode of ''StrokerAndHoop''. The briefcase itself isn't included in the deal; the middleman got it as a graduation present and it has a lot of sentimental value to him. Besides, the deal was "fifty thousand dollars", not "fifty thousand dollars ''and a briefcase.''" Stroker has to stuff all the money in his jacket and pockets -- and the money's all in five dollar bills so he wouldn't have to go to the trouble of making change. He ends up losing most of it in a chase.

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* Parodied in an episode of ''StrokerAndHoop''.''WesternAnimation/StrokerAndHoop''. The briefcase itself isn't included in the deal; the middleman got it as a graduation present and it has a lot of sentimental value to him. Besides, the deal was "fifty thousand dollars", not "fifty thousand dollars ''and a briefcase.''" Stroker has to stuff all the money in his jacket and pockets -- and the money's all in five dollar bills so he wouldn't have to go to the trouble of making change. He ends up losing most of it in a chase.
26th Sep '16 9:35:56 AM Kalaong
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* A briefcase full, not of banknotes, but of bearer bonds (which are as good as money) was the subject of the world's biggest mugging; in 1992 a bank messenger carrying it between banks in the City of London was mugged; the briefcase contained anything between 6 million and 66 million pounds sterling; the thief had no idea what he was carrying, but it was the financial equivalent of a live atomic bomb; the news that it was in the wind brought every criminal syndicate in the world to London in search of the briefcase; the thief was eventually found dead in a bedsit in a slum district, chopped into a million pieces; since then the bonds have been surfacing in every third-world country, starting with Nigeria and most recently in the Cook Islands (in the Pacific, somewhere); the search for the case was allegedly the inspiration for the film "Ronin".

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* A briefcase full, not of banknotes, but of bearer bonds (which are as good as money) was the subject of the world's biggest mugging; in 1992 At 9.30am on 2 May 1990, John Goddard, a bank 58-year-old messenger with money broker Sheppards, was mugged at knifepoint on a quiet side street in the city of London. Mr Goddard was taking Bank of England Treasury bills and certificates of deposit from banks and building societies. In total, he was carrying it between banks in the City of London was mugged; the briefcase contained anything between 6 ''292 million'' pounds sterling, or '''378 million and 66 million pounds sterling; dollars.''' Best part? At the time of the mugging, '''''[[UnintentionallyNotoriousCrime the thief had absolutely no idea what he was carrying, but it he'd stolen!]]''''' It was the financial equivalent of a live atomic bomb; an EmptyQuiver; the news that it was in the wind brought every criminal syndicate in the world to London in search of the briefcase; the thief was eventually found dead in a bedsit in a slum district, chopped into a million pieces; since then the bonds have been surfacing in every third-world country, starting with Nigeria and most recently in the Cook Islands (in the Pacific, somewhere); the search for the case was allegedly the inspiration for the film "Ronin"."Film/{{Ronin}}".
31st Aug '16 6:32:42 AM JackG
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* Spoofed in the opening credits of ''Film/{{Zombieland}}'', which shows a 'businessman' fleeing from a burning car chased by two zombies, heedlessly throwing away his briefcase of money.

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* Spoofed in the opening credits of ''Film/{{Zombieland}}'', which shows a 'businessman' fleeing from a burning car chased by two zombies, [[MoneyIsNotPower heedlessly throwing away his briefcase of money.money]].
5th Aug '16 7:49:17 AM Ripburger
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* In ''VideoGame/XCom'', an agent holding an open briefcase full of money is the [[http://ufopaedia.org/index.php?title=File:BACK13SCR.png background screen]] for financial transactions like buying or selling equipment and hiring or firing personnel.

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* In ''VideoGame/XCom'', ''VideoGame/XCOMUFODefense'', an agent holding an open briefcase full of money is the [[http://ufopaedia.org/index.php?title=File:BACK13SCR.png background screen]] for financial transactions like buying or selling equipment and hiring or firing personnel.
22nd Jul '16 1:44:51 PM Eddy1215
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* Trainspotting features a briefcase of cash in the final heroin deal sequence. The filmmakers discuss this trope in the DVD commentary.

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* Trainspotting ''Film/{{Trainspotting}}'' features a briefcase of cash in the final heroin deal sequence. The filmmakers discuss this trope in the DVD commentary.
22nd Jul '16 1:43:17 PM Eddy1215
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* Subverted in the ''WhiteCollar'' episode "Front Man," in which Neal and Mozzie run a scam to obtain a titanium briefcase filled not with cash, but high-limit credit cards.

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* Subverted in the ''WhiteCollar'' ''Series/WhiteCollar'' episode "Front Man," in which Neal and Mozzie run a scam to obtain a titanium briefcase filled not with cash, but high-limit credit cards.
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