History Main / BossRush

26th Jul '16 2:44:27 PM VampireBuddha
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* The {{final| battle}} {{boss battle}} of ''Videogame/{{Hand of Fate}}'' is this - the Dealer will in turn summon the Jack, Queen, and King of each of the four suits, and when each wave is defeated, the player has the chance to attack the Dealer directly.
12th Jul '16 6:42:49 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''[[DigimonWorldDawnDusk Digimon World Dawn/Dusk]]'' features a post-final-boss quest where you have to go through a new area featuring stronger wild encounters than any you have faced before, only to end up with a boss rush involving SEVEN back-to-back battles, of which two are against a pair of Digimon, while the rest are against only one (tellingly, most of them are either {{final boss}}es or {{eleventh hour superpower}}s from the anime or manga). [[spoiler: Omegamon was nasty thanks to Royal Slash, and the fact he was not alone, then there's Dukemon Crimson Mode at the end who not only hits like a truck, but takes quite a while to bring down too]]. If THAT wasn't enough, there's another boss rush quest after you've done several other things, including the boss rush just mentioned. This time, it's 5 battles, each against 1-3 digimon, the last one being against a digimon that has obscenely high defences and resistances to most things, leading to what is a MarathonBoss (called [[spoiler: Chronomon Holy Mode, a bonus boss who is the more powerful version of Digimon World DS's final boss, in which he also turns up as a bonus boss]]) if you don't have [[spoiler: darkness attacks to exploit its weakest resistance]].
** ''DigimonWorldDS'' does this with the final quest. First, you have to beat six bosses scattered across the game's later dungeons. Following that, you can finally travel to the final dungeon and encounter the TrueFinalBoss, at which point [[spoiler:the other six bosses, or superpowered versions of them, arrive and you fight them, one after the other, and the final boss]].
** The final boss battle of ''DigimonWorld3'' is essentially one of these, as it's [[spoiler: [[GlassCannon Nanomon]], [[ThatOneBoss Valvemon]] and [[GiantSpider Armagemon]] under the command of a Tamer]].

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* ''[[DigimonWorldDawnDusk Digimon World Dawn/Dusk]]'' ''VideoGame/DigimonWorldDawnDusk'' features a post-final-boss quest where you have to go through a new area featuring stronger wild encounters than any you have faced before, only to end up with a boss rush involving SEVEN back-to-back battles, of which two are against a pair of Digimon, while the rest are against only one (tellingly, most of them are either {{final boss}}es or {{eleventh hour superpower}}s from the anime or manga). [[spoiler: Omegamon was nasty thanks to Royal Slash, and the fact he was not alone, then there's Dukemon Crimson Mode at the end who not only hits like a truck, but takes quite a while to bring down too]]. If THAT wasn't enough, there's another boss rush quest after you've done several other things, including the boss rush just mentioned. This time, it's 5 battles, each against 1-3 digimon, the last one being against a digimon that has obscenely high defences and resistances to most things, leading to what is a MarathonBoss (called [[spoiler: Chronomon Holy Mode, a bonus boss who is the more powerful version of Digimon World DS's final boss, in which he also turns up as a bonus boss]]) if you don't have [[spoiler: darkness attacks to exploit its weakest resistance]].
** ''DigimonWorldDS'' * ''VideoGame/DigimonWorldDS'' does this with the final quest. First, you have to beat six bosses scattered across the game's later dungeons. Following that, you can finally travel to the final dungeon and encounter the TrueFinalBoss, at which point [[spoiler:the other six bosses, or superpowered versions of them, arrive and you fight them, one after the other, and the final boss]].
** * The final boss battle of ''DigimonWorld3'' ''VideoGame/DigimonWorld3'' is essentially one of these, as it's [[spoiler: [[GlassCannon Nanomon]], [[ThatOneBoss Valvemon]] and [[GiantSpider Armagemon]] under the command of a Tamer]].
9th Jul '16 5:28:36 PM nombretomado
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** As part of the ''Citadel'' DLC, {{BioWare}} had to create boss-level hostile versions of all six player classes for the showdown with [[spoiler: Shepard's evil clone]]. For [[MirrorBoss obvious reasons]] the storyline only uses one of them, which would be something of a waste, so they added the 'Mirror Match' option to the [[GladiatorSubquest Armax Arena]] which sends three each of all of them at you over three rounds.

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** As part of the ''Citadel'' DLC, {{BioWare}} Creator/BioWare had to create boss-level hostile versions of all six player classes for the showdown with [[spoiler: Shepard's evil clone]]. For [[MirrorBoss obvious reasons]] the storyline only uses one of them, which would be something of a waste, so they added the 'Mirror Match' option to the [[GladiatorSubquest Armax Arena]] which sends three each of all of them at you over three rounds.
15th Jun '16 4:35:24 PM Doug86
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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'':

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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'':''VideoGame/FireEmblem'':
13th Jun '16 12:10:14 AM jormis29
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* In the third-to-last level of ''VideoGame/{{Prey}}'', just before you fight the DiscOneFinalBoss, you're pitted in an arena fight against practically every enemy type in the game, including the game's previous two boss characters.

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* In the third-to-last level of ''VideoGame/{{Prey}}'', ''VideoGame/Prey2006'', just before you fight the DiscOneFinalBoss, you're pitted in an arena fight against practically every enemy type in the game, including the game's previous two boss characters.
11th Jun '16 12:22:08 PM Prfnoff
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* The penultimate area of ''Holy Umbrella'' has a roulette wheel of six previous bosses, followed after a cutscene by a rematch with [[TheDragon Donderasaurus]].

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* The penultimate area of ''Holy Umbrella'' ''VideoGame/HolyUmbrella'' has a roulette wheel of six previous bosses, followed after a cutscene by a rematch with [[TheDragon Donderasaurus]].
10th Jun '16 12:07:34 AM MyFinalEdits
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** In a lesser example, a hidden dungeon in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' allows you to fight a series of {{Mini Boss}}es you had already defeated in order to gain a HeartContainer.

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** In a lesser example, a hidden dungeon cave from Ikana Canyon in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' allows you to fight a series of {{Mini Boss}}es you had already defeated in order to gain a HeartContainer.[[HeartContainer Piece of Heart]]. The Ikana route in the hide-and-seek area of the Moon does this as well, and not only has a Piece of Heart as a reward, but like all other routes it's also necessary to complete it if the player wants to obtain the Fierce Deity's Mask before facing the FinalBoss.
7th Jun '16 9:51:20 PM MyFinalEdits
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* In ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiBowsersInsideStory'' and ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiDreamTeam'', within the Challenge Node and the Battle's Gauntlet you can fight powered-up versions of bosses Mario & Luigi defeated. The final boss encountered in both games is an incredibly powered up version of Bowser known as "Bowser X" and [[spoiler:Bowser Jr.]], respectively. The latter game also has the option of battling all the giant bosses found in the game. In ''Bowser's Inside Story'' this area is optional, but in ''Dream Team'' it is visited as part of the plot.
* ''Franchise/MegaMan'':
** All of the ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' games aside from the first and fourth, despite being [=RPGs=], have a boss rush towards the end of the main story that is split into multiple sections.
*** The sixth game in particular has two, with the second being a repeatable straight boss rush in the BonusDungeon that is required in order to challenge the BonusBoss again. Similarly, the fourth and fifth games have the same setup, where the six bosses you gained Double Souls have dark counterparts that must be defeated to reach the BonusBoss. In the fourth game, it's one-time-only fights, which eventually lead to a battle with Mega Man's Dark Soul. In the fifth game, going off to face the Chaos Lord warrants a rematch with the Dark Soul Navis each time you return to fight again -- though depending on the average time it takes to defeat the Navis, Chaos Lord will assume the form of Nebula Grey, Bass, or Mega Man's Dark Soul.
*** The ''Battle Network'' games also had a habit of throwing waves of viruses at you in gauntlet-style battles, the circumstances depending on the situation involved. Sometimes, the virus fights could be as lengthy as ''20'' battles in a row! Yes, that's right -- '''''TWENTY!'''''
*** The third ''Battle Network'' had two unique situations of boss-rushing. One involved earning ranks to rise up in status in the Undernet, where Beastman shows up suddenly for a rematch, getting deleted again earlier than the other enemy Navis and not during the final stages of the game. To prevent a third fight, Wily terminates his operator, Inukai. The other instance of boss-rush beyond the norm is a series of battles against 15 Omega Navis, the strongest forms of all the Navis in the game, including post-game bosses (save for BonusBoss Punk), accessed by a secret code when you have surmounted five stars. These fights are punctuated with 3 battles against Omega-level viruses, then a battle against the Omega Navis. To find them, you have to stumble upon their hidden data on the Net. Beating them and earning seven stars causes FinalBoss Alpha to morph into a respective Omega form.
*** Although the first game made the player go through similar dungeons from earlier in the game. The only thing that was missing was a boss at the end of them. And the 4th game only had only 2 non-final bosses you were guaranteed to face, with one of those bosses not really counting as a boss fight (until the post-endgame anyways) and the other boss isn't ever faced until the room before the final boss.
** The picture at the top of this trope's page + Mega Man 2 = [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQBU4ZfA_qY Rockman 2 (Ippatsu) Neta]]. And yes, it is beatable. (Another E-tank, onii-chan? Maybe that's bad to say, for reasons.)
** ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce'' has all the FM-ians revived to face off with you as you progress through to get to BigBad Cepheus -- save for Gemini, who shows up earlier for a rematch. How they can assume the forms they took when merging with a human by themselves is {{handwave}}d by the fact they can copy the memory of these forms in their bodies, then mimic them perfectly.
** In ''Star Force 2'', there are two boss rushes of sorts. The first is the normal one where you fight all the bosses who aren't your friends (the usual type,) while the second is in the [[BadFuture Bonus]] [[BonusDungeon Dungeon]], where you fight heavily upgraded versions of nearly every boss, (friends included,) as well as some new ones, ending with the BonusBoss.
** ''Star Force 3'' also does the same thing.
** ''VideoGame/MegaManXCommandMission'' has these as well, despite being an RPG, like the above examples. It's handwaved into the Robots' "DNA" having been absorbed by the BigBad and the BossRush versions not being the original bosses.



[[folder:Party Game]]
* ''VideoGame/MarioParty'' has one in two games, both of which require story mode to be completed at least once to prevent spoilers:
** ''Mario Party DS'' has this as a "Boss Bash" Minigame, where you get to fight the bosses in order as a TimeTrial. You don't have to worry about restocking or having to fight the bosses on reduced health -- but you DO have to beat them all in a row or you'll fail the entire minigame.
** ''Mario Party 9'' allows the player to choose between fighting only minibosses, only main bosses or all of them. Since bosses can't kill characters (their attacks only reduce scores), the challenge is based on which of the 2-4 challengers deals the most damage in each battle. The character with the highest overall rank is declared victor.
[[/folder]]



** The level Boss Blitz in ''VideoGame/SuperMario3DWorld'', located at the end of World Flower, is this. Ever boss except Prince Bully (who's a MiniBoss) and Bowser will challenge Mario and his friends here.
* ''[[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4 Sonic the Hedgehog 4: Episode I]]'' has the game's final zone, E.G.G. Station Zone. It consists of fighting the game's previous bosses before fighting the final boss.
* Previously, ''[[VideoGame/SonicAdvanceTrilogy Sonic Advance 2]]'s'' XX Zone had the player having to deal with all the bosses in the game prior to the regular final boss.
* The [[NightmareSequence Nightmare Zone]] of ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld'' has Sonic fighting all members of the Deadly Six together with various boss Nightmarens from the ''VideoGame/NiGHTSIntoDreams'' series.

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** The level Boss Blitz in ''VideoGame/SuperMario3DWorld'', located at the end of World Flower, is this. Ever boss except Prince Bully (who's a MiniBoss) and both Bowser forms will challenge Mario and his friends here.
* Used in several ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' games:
** The Sonic/Tails version of Sky Sanctuary in ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'', which gave you versions of the Green Hill and Metropolis bosses from the [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog first]] [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2 two]] games, before the level boss, Mecha Sonic. Interestingly, due to slight alterations of sprite proportions and JumpPhysics between the Sonic games, the difficulty of the two nostalgia bosses here is inverted from their original difficulty.
** The first ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' featured a boss rush for the regular six characters that you can access in Trial Mode after beating their stories. Amy and Big's "rushes" consist of only one boss since that's all they have, and Gamma's rush only has his first and last bosses since his other boss fights are actually part of levels. Also, none of the battles against other playable characters were included in the boss rushes.
** ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'' had an optional extra three {{Boss Rush}}es: a rush of all the boss battles in the Hero Story when that story is complete; a rush of all the boss battles in the Dark Story when that story is complete; and a rush of all the boss battles in the game when Last Story is complete. Beating each rush is worth one Emblem.
** The final level of ''VideoGame/SonicAdvance'' is a miniature BossRush of classics -- specifically, the first bosses of ''Sonic 1'' and ''Sonic 2'', before the real final boss shows up.
** The final level of ''VideoGame/SonicAdvance 2'' is a BossRush of all the prior bosses from the game, although they take half the hits to beat. After all that you reach the final boss. This is also [[GetBackHereBoss a literal example]] as all the bosses in the game are rushing away from you and you have to run to it.
** The GameMod ''VideoGame/RobotniksRevenge'' is essentially a Boss Rush (and BossGame) of all the bosses from ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' and ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''. There are two modes in this boss rush: "Time Attack", which gives you infinite lives and checkpoints and rings between the bosses, and "Survival" which gives you three lives and no checkpoints or rings.
**
''[[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4 Sonic the Hedgehog 4: Episode I]]'' has the game's final zone, E.G.G. Station Zone. It consists of fighting the game's previous bosses before fighting the final boss.
* Previously, ''[[VideoGame/SonicAdvanceTrilogy Sonic Advance 2]]'s'' XX Zone had the player having to deal with all the bosses in the game prior to the regular final boss.
*
** The [[NightmareSequence Nightmare Zone]] of ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld'' has Sonic fighting all members of the Deadly Six together with various boss Nightmarens from the ''VideoGame/NiGHTSIntoDreams'' series.



* The entire ''Franchise/MegaMan'' series uses this, albeit not always executed the same way.
** A BossRush is typically placed in the second-to-last or last level in the game, although the initial game in the first two series dispersed the BossRush throughout the last few levels. It's somewhat bearable thanks to the ElementalRockPaperScissors weakness to each boss, meaning you'll likely own them in no time flat with little to no damage. Another bonus is the fact that the game typically gives you health powerups after each battle, so you fight each boss on more even terms. In fact, it's so ingrained into the ''Mega Man'' identity that they continue to do it even when, for most games, [[GrandfatherClause most gamers do not like the Boss Rush as part of the main game anymore]].
** ROMHack ''VideoGame/RockmanNoConstancy'' gave the boss rooms slippery floors.
** ''VideoGame/MegaManZero'' skews the boss rush out of focus, picking out the four strongest of the Neo Arcadian Reploids in the final stage for a rematch, then pulls a [[SubvertedTrope Subversion]] by having rematches with the [[QuirkyMinibossSquad Four Guardians]] themselves, who actually ''haven't'' been destroyed yet. Then the trope is [[DownplayedTrope downplayed]], when Hidden Phantom decides to pull a suicide attack. The return of the bosses is {{handwave}}d in retrospect -- being a technological Mecca, Neo Arcadia can rebuild their Mutos Reploid warriors with ease.
** ''VideoGame/MegaMan3'' had the Doc Robot, an enemy who copied the attack patterns of the bosses from the ''previous'' game.
** ''Zero 2'' throws the player for a loop by changing the attack patterns of one of the bosses in the boss rush entirely, by throwing in the brother you killed in the previous game. It's like they were feeling spiteful and wanted you to lose. Also, the return of these bosses is {{handwave}}d by the fact Elpizo used the power of the Dark Elf to bring them back -- though with heavy brainwashing in effect. One of those bosses also has an attack that invokes this, where he lifts Zero into the air and attacks him with phantom images of previous ''X''-series bosses ([[VideoGame/MegaManX1 Vile]], [[VideoGame/MegaManX2 Agile]], [[VideoGame/MegaManX3 Bit]], and [[VideoGame/MegaManX4 Colonel]]).
** ''Zero 3'' {{handwave}}s this, with the BigBad specializing in Reploid "revival". Even more stunning -- no less than ''four'' bosses return to fight you from the first game, all with brand new powers! If that wasn't enough for you, Copy X, the BigBad of the first title, is one of them! However, he's now stuck with a VerbalTic, and to prevent him from using his Seraph form and rebelling against Dr. Weil (and effectively becoming a case of final boss deja vu), Weil's rigged him with a self-destruct mechanism that goes off when he tries to transform.
** In ''Zero 4'', not only is there a regular BossRush, but the FinalBoss has an attack that is effectively a Boss ''Bum Rush''. He can summon the eight bosses from ''the previous game'' to quickly perform their signature attack before vanishing. Luckily, they don't have to be destroyed.
** ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork 2'', where Gospel attacks using images of three enemy Navis (Air Man, Quick Man, and Cut Man if you were curious) that the player fought ''just previously'' in the actual boss rush.
** And so does ''VideoGame/MegaManX8'', where the "revived" bosses are actually Reploids who have shapeshifted into them.
** And in ''VideoGame/MegaManZX'' and ''Advent'', the bosses are rebuilt in new bodies [[spoiler:thanks to the usage of [[ArtifactOfDoom Model W]]]].
*** ''ZX'', in addition to a normal mandatory BossRush, has optional rushes through eight select bosses of ''Zero 3'' and ''4'' (the first 4 fought in the final stage of ''3'', and the upper floor of boss teleporation chambers in the final stage of ''4''), in order to get the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Model O]][[note]]Omega[[/note]]. Instead of beating those 8 bosses[[note]]Or due to not having [=MMZ3&4=] games or playing the game on a [=DSi=] or 3DS, which lack the GBA cartridge port[[/note]], the player can opt to beating a single BonusBoss -- an ultra-pumped up version of Omega Zero (technically, residual data), which is HarderThanHard. Enjoy using up the subtanks.
*** Also in ''VideoGame/MegaManZX Advent'', there is a Boss Battles Mode, where you go through every boss of the game, without breaks in between. You are given all A-Trans and 2 full Subtanks, but you are not given any Heart Tanks or Biometal Upgrades. Good luck!
** This is [[UpToEleven upped]] in ''VideoGame/MegaMan10'' with the [[spoiler:Wily/[[SpellMyNameWithAnS Weapons]] Archive; essentially, you're up against three sets of three floating pods who imitate the attack patterns of nine Robot Masters, ''one from each of the previous games, including 7 and 8''.]] And ''then'' you have the classic BossRush expected from the game, later on.
** In ''[[VideoGame/MegaManV V]]'' for GameBoy there are two boss rushes: the first one is a sequential one with the Mega Man Killers and Quint, and the other one is a typical teleport one for the 8 Stardroids.
** ''VideoGame/MegaManUnlimited'', true to Mega Man tradition, has one of these in the fourth endgame stage. However, there is an added twist: [[spoiler: Before you fight each boss again, you have to traverse a mini-stage based on the obstacles and enemies in that boss's original stage.]]
** While Wily 3 is more of a {{Metroidvania}}, the Mechanical Arena unlocked in ''VideoGame/Rockman4MinusInfinity'' by beating the game is a straighter version (a homage to the Arena in ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar''). It even has refills in the resting area and a method of travelling to the boss arena.
* The SpiritualSuccessor to ''Mega Man'', ''VideoGame/MightyNo9'', has this as well, in addition to ''VideoGame/AzureStrikerGunvolt'', which is justified in the latter because one of the bosses has the ability to [[BackFromTheDead bring dead people back]]. [[spoiler:It turns out she also had the ability to create a SplitPersonality, and while Gunvolt kills two originally, a third was still alive...]]



* ''VideoGame/ParappaTheRapper'' offers a bizarre example: You're [[PottyEmergency desparately standing in line for the bathroom]] with all the previous stages' bosses, and you have to out-rap them to get past them in line, otherwise you'll [[PottyFailure poop yourself]].
** The sequel ''Parappa The Rapper 2'' does something similar to this, [[spoiler:in the form of a Food Court video game]] in a stage late in the game.

to:

* ''VideoGame/ParappaTheRapper'' offers a bizarre example: You're [[PottyEmergency desparately standing in line for the bathroom]] with all the previous stages' bosses, and you have to out-rap them to get past them in line, otherwise you'll [[PottyFailure poop yourself]].
**
yourself]]. The sequel ''Parappa The Rapper 2'' does something similar to this, [[spoiler:in the form of a Food Court video game]] in a stage late in the game.



* In ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'', The Chest, [[TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon the final level of the game]], every room contains at least one of the game's bosses, which leads up to the final boss: [[spoiler:??? (AKA Blue Baby)]]

to:

* In ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'', ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'':
**
The Chest, [[TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon the final level of the game]], every room contains at least one of the game's bosses, which leads up to the final boss: [[spoiler:??? (AKA Blue Baby)]]



* The entire ''Franchise/MegaMan'' series uses this, albeit not always executed the same way.
** A BossRush is typically placed in the second-to-last or last level in the game, although the initial game in the first two series dispersed the BossRush throughout the last few levels. It's somewhat bearable thanks to the ElementalRockPaperScissors weakness to each boss, meaning you'll likely own them in no time flat with little to no damage. Another bonus is the fact that the game typically gives you health powerups after each battle, so you fight each boss on more even terms. In fact, it's so ingrained into the ''Mega Man'' identity that they continue to do it even when, for most games, [[GrandfatherClause most gamers do not like the Boss Rush as part of the main game anymore]].
** ROMHack ''VideoGame/RockmanNoConstancy'' gave the boss rooms slippery floors.
** ''VideoGame/MegaManZero'' skews the boss rush out of focus, picking out the four strongest of the Neo Arcadian Reploids in the final stage for a rematch, then pulls a [[SubvertedTrope Subversion]] by having rematches with the [[QuirkyMinibossSquad Four Guardians]] themselves, who actually ''haven't'' been destroyed yet. Then the trope is [[DownplayedTrope downplayed]], when Hidden Phantom decides to pull a suicide attack. The return of the bosses is {{handwave}}d in retrospect -- being a technological Mecca, Neo Arcadia can rebuild their Mutos Reploid warriors with ease.
** ''VideoGame/MegaMan3'' had the Doc Robot, an enemy who copied the attack patterns of the bosses from the ''previous'' game.
** ''Zero 2'' throws the player for a loop by changing the attack patterns of one of the bosses in the boss rush entirely, by throwing in the brother you killed in the previous game. It's like they were feeling spiteful and wanted you to lose. Also, the return of these bosses is {{handwave}}d by the fact Elpizo used the power of the Dark Elf to bring them back -- though with heavy brainwashing in effect. One of those bosses also has an attack that invokes this, where he lifts Zero into the air and attacks him with phantom images of previous ''X''-series bosses ([[VideoGame/MegaManX1 Vile]], [[VideoGame/MegaManX2 Agile]], [[VideoGame/MegaManX3 Bit]], and [[VideoGame/MegaManX4 Colonel]]).
** ''Zero 3'' {{handwave}}s this, with the BigBad specializing in Reploid "revival". Even more stunning -- no less than ''four'' bosses return to fight you from the first game, all with brand new powers! If that wasn't enough for you, Copy X, the BigBad of the first title, is one of them! However, he's now stuck with a VerbalTic, and to prevent him from using his Seraph form and rebelling against Dr. Weil (and effectively becoming a case of final boss deja vu), Weil's rigged him with a self-destruct mechanism that goes off when he tries to transform.
** In ''Zero 4'', not only is there a regular BossRush, but the FinalBoss has an attack that is effectively a Boss ''Bum Rush''. He can summon the eight bosses from ''the previous game'' to quickly perform their signature attack before vanishing. Luckily, they don't have to be destroyed.
** ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork 2'', where Gospel attacks using images of three enemy Navis (Air Man, Quick Man, and Cut Man if you were curious) that the player fought ''just previously'' in the actual boss rush.
** And so does ''VideoGame/MegaManX8'', where the "revived" bosses are actually Reploids who have shapeshifted into them.
** And in ''VideoGame/MegaManZX'' and ''Advent'', the bosses are rebuilt in new bodies [[spoiler:thanks to the usage of [[ArtifactOfDoom Model W]]]].
*** ''ZX'', in addition to a normal mandatory BossRush, has optional rushes through eight select bosses of ''Zero 3'' and ''4'' (the first 4 fought in the final stage of ''3'', and the upper floor of boss teleporation chambers in the final stage of ''4''), in order to get the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Model O]][[note]]Omega[[/note]]. Instead of beating those 8 bosses[[note]]Or due to not having [=MMZ3&4=] games or playing the game on a [=DSi=] or 3DS, which lack the GBA cartridge port[[/note]], the player can opt to beating a single BonusBoss -- an ultra-pumped up version of Omega Zero (technically, residual data), which is HarderThanHard. Enjoy using up the subtanks.
*** Also in ''VideoGame/MegaManZX Advent'', there is a Boss Battles Mode, where you go through every boss of the game, without breaks in between. You are given all A-Trans and 2 full Subtanks, but you are not given any Heart Tanks or Biometal Upgrades. Good luck!
** This is [[UpToEleven upped]] in ''VideoGame/MegaMan10'' with the [[spoiler:Wily/[[SpellMyNameWithAnS Weapons]] Archive; essentially, you're up against three sets of three floating pods who imitate the attack patterns of nine Robot Masters, ''one from each of the previous games, including 7 and 8''.]] And ''then'' you have the classic BossRush expected from the game, later on.
** In ''[[VideoGame/MegaManV V]]'' for GameBoy there are two boss rushes: the first one is a sequential one with the Mega Man Killers and Quint, and the other one is a typical teleport one for the 8 Stardroids.
** All of the ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' games aside from the first and fourth, despite being [=RPGs=], have a boss rush towards the end of the main story that is split into multiple sections.
*** The sixth game in particular has two, with the second being a repeatable straight boss rush in the BonusDungeon that is required in order to challenge the BonusBoss again. Similarly, the fourth and fifth games have the same setup, where the six bosses you gained Double Souls have dark counterparts that must be defeated to reach the BonusBoss. In the fourth game, it's one-time-only fights, which eventually lead to a battle with Mega Man's Dark Soul. In the fifth game, going off to face the Chaos Lord warrants a rematch with the Dark Soul Navis each time you return to fight again -- though depending on the average time it takes to defeat the Navis, Chaos Lord will assume the form of Nebula Grey, Bass, or Mega Man's Dark Soul.
*** The ''Battle Network'' games also had a habit of throwing waves of viruses at you in gauntlet-style battles, the circumstances depending on the situation involved. Sometimes, the virus fights could be as lengthy as ''20'' battles in a row! Yes, that's right -- '''''TWENTY!'''''
*** The third ''Battle Network'' had two unique situations of boss-rushing. One involved earning ranks to rise up in status in the Undernet, where Beastman shows up suddenly for a rematch, getting deleted again earlier than the other enemy Navis and not during the final stages of the game. To prevent a third fight, Wily terminates his operator, Inukai. The other instance of boss-rush beyond the norm is a series of battles against 15 Omega Navis, the strongest forms of all the Navis in the game, including post-game bosses (save for BonusBoss Punk), accessed by a secret code when you have surmounted five stars. These fights are punctuated with 3 battles against Omega-level viruses, then a battle against the Omega Navis. To find them, you have to stumble upon their hidden data on the Net. Beating them and earning seven stars causes FinalBoss Alpha to morph into a respective Omega form.
*** Although the first game made the player go through similar dungeons from earlier in the game. The only thing that was missing was a boss at the end of them. And the 4th game only had only 2 non-final bosses you were guaranteed to face, with one of those bosses not really counting as a boss fight (until the post-endgame anyways) and the other boss isn't ever faced until the room before the final boss.
** The picture at the top of this trope's page + Mega Man 2 = [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQBU4ZfA_qY Rockman 2 (Ippatsu) Neta]]. And yes, it is beatable. (Another E-tank, onii-chan? Maybe that's bad to say, for reasons.)
** ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce'' has all the FM-ians revived to face off with you as you progress through to get to BigBad Cepheus -- save for Gemini, who shows up earlier for a rematch. How they can assume the forms they took when merging with a human by themselves is {{handwave}}d by the fact they can copy the memory of these forms in their bodies, then mimic them perfectly.
** In ''Star Force 2'', there are two boss rushes of sorts. The first is the normal one where you fight all the bosses who aren't your friends (the usual type,) while the second is in the [[BadFuture Bonus]] [[BonusDungeon Dungeon]], where you fight heavily upgraded versions of nearly every boss, (friends included,) as well as some new ones, ending with the BonusBoss.
** ''Star Force 3'' also does the same thing.
** ''VideoGame/MegaManXCommandMission'' has these as well, despite being an RPG, like the above examples. It's handwaved into the Robots' "DNA" having been absorbed by the BigBad and the BossRush versions not being the original bosses.
** ''VideoGame/MegaManUnlimited'', true to Mega Man tradition, has one of these in the fourth endgame stage. However, there is an added twist: [[spoiler: Before you fight each boss again, you have to traverse a mini-stage based on the obstacles and enemies in that boss's original stage.]]
** While Wily 3 is more of a {{Metroidvania}}, the Mechanical Arena unlocked in ''VideoGame/Rockman4MinusInfinity'' by beating the game is a straighter version (a homage to the Arena in ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar''). It even has refills in the resting area and a method of travelling to the boss arena.
** The SpiritualSuccessor ''VideoGame/MightyNo9'' has this as well, in addition to ''VideoGame/AzureStrikerGunvolt'', which is justified in the latter because one of the bosses has the ability to [[BackFromTheDead bring dead people back]]. [[spoiler:It turns out she also had the ability to create a SplitPersonality, and while Gunvolt kills two originally, a third was still alive...]]



* A bonus BossRush mode is a common unlockable feature in later ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' games. Notably ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance Harmony of Dissonance]]'', the ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaChroniclesOfSorrow Sorrow]]'' duology, ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin Portrait of Ruin]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia Order of Ecclesia.]]'' You battle all the bosses in a row, aiming for the quickest time, often to unlock special weapons and equipment for the main game. Quite often given a bit of extra replay value though allowing you to use the bonus characters from the game as well.

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* ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'':
**
A bonus BossRush mode is a common unlockable feature in later ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' games. Notably ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDissonance Harmony of Dissonance]]'', the ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaChroniclesOfSorrow Sorrow]]'' duology, ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin Portrait of Ruin]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia Order of Ecclesia.]]'' You battle all the bosses in a row, aiming for the quickest time, often to unlock special weapons and equipment for the main game. Quite often given a bit of extra replay value though allowing you to use the bonus characters from the game as well.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'' series, similar to ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' also tends to feature an unlockable bonus BossRush mode. ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar [[VideoGameRemake Ultra]]'' takes this to absolutely ridiculous levels, containing ''three'' independent BossRush modes: The Arena, the standard rush from the original ''Kirby Super Star'' for the SNES; Helper to Hero, where you play as one of Kirby's numerous sidekicks through a shortened Boss Rush with the bosses fought in the same pre-set order every time; and [[NintendoHard The "True" Arena]], where you fight stronger versions of the Spring Breeze bosses, a new boss ported from ''Kirby's Dream Land'', a rush of mini-bosses from ''Kirby's Adventure'' and finally, much harder versions of four [[FinalBoss final bosses]] of earlier game levels - which, combined with less effective healing items between matches - healing about 20% of the health bar, as opposed to the full bar in the earlier two modes - and the fact that Kirby bosses are already plenty hard before getting powered up, makes for one of the [[NintendoHard most frustratingly difficult levels]] in the entire series.

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'' series, similar to ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' also series tends to feature an unlockable bonus BossRush mode. mode.
**
''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar [[VideoGameRemake Ultra]]'' takes this to absolutely ridiculous levels, containing ''three'' independent BossRush modes: The Arena, the standard rush from the original ''Kirby Super Star'' for the SNES; Helper to Hero, where you play as one of Kirby's numerous sidekicks through a shortened Boss Rush with the bosses fought in the same pre-set order every time; and [[NintendoHard The "True" Arena]], where you fight stronger versions of the Spring Breeze bosses, a new boss ported from ''Kirby's Dream Land'', a rush of mini-bosses from ''Kirby's Adventure'' and finally, much harder versions of four [[FinalBoss final bosses]] of earlier game levels - which, combined with less effective healing items between matches - healing about 20% of the health bar, as opposed to the full bar in the earlier two modes - and the fact that Kirby bosses are already plenty hard before getting powered up, makes for one of the [[NintendoHard most frustratingly difficult levels]] in the entire series.



* The ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' series is another game with an unlockable Boss Rush.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'' has a one section where you fight clones of the bosses you've previously defeated right before fighting the de facto head of Desperado Inc.. Interestingly enough however, this happens [[spoiler: just a little over halfway through the game and not at the end, there are a few more chapters and bosses after this]].

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* The ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' series is another game with an unlockable Boss Rush.
**
Rush. ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'' has a one section where you fight clones of the bosses you've previously defeated right before fighting the de facto head of Desperado Inc.. Interestingly enough however, this happens [[spoiler: just a little over halfway through the game and not at the end, there are a few more chapters and bosses after this]].



** In ''VideoGame/HouseOfTheDead 2'', you have ''two'' types of {{Boss Rush}}es in the game. You battle the first three bosses of the game again, as well as the final boss of the ''first'' game, throughout the last two levels, with some variations. Finally, when fighting the last boss, Emperor, his second attack strategy is actually to summon up transparent clones of the first four bosses, who attack once before fading away.

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** * In ''VideoGame/HouseOfTheDead 2'', you have ''two'' types of {{Boss Rush}}es in the game. You battle the first three bosses of the game again, as well as the final boss of the ''first'' game, throughout the last two levels, with some variations. Finally, when fighting the last boss, Emperor, his second attack strategy is actually to summon up transparent clones of the first four bosses, who attack once before fading away.



** Also in ''Brawl'', during the final level of the Subspace Emissary, The Great Maze, there's a Boss Rush which is a combination of the All-Star and BossRush modes, seeing as you have to not only fight all characters gained in the story but all the bosses as well. The Great Maze is also a ''Game'' Rush, since not only you have to fight all the other characters and the bosses gained and beaten previously but you also go through bits of most of the levels previously cleared in a single {{Metroidvania}} level. It's essentially the game up to that point revisited. [[http://www.smashbros.com/en_us/gamemode/modea/modea17.html This page]] actually explains this part of the game, saying that the Great Maze is assembled with the pieces of the world taken to Subspace with the Subspace Bombs, and that the revived bosses and shadowy clones are the result of the Subspace Army's extensive analysis.

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** Also in ''Brawl'', during the final level of the Subspace Emissary, The Great Maze, there's a Boss Rush which is a combination of the All-Star and BossRush modes, seeing as you have to not only fight all characters gained in the story but all the bosses as well. The Great Maze is also a ''Game'' Rush, since not only you have to fight all the other characters and the bosses gained and beaten previously but you also go through bits of most of the levels previously cleared in a single {{Metroidvania}} level. It's essentially the game up to that point revisited. [[http://www.smashbros.com/en_us/gamemode/modea/modea17.html This page]] actually explains this part of the game, saying that the Great Maze is assembled with the pieces of the world taken to Subspace with the Subspace Bombs, and that the revived bosses and shadowy clones are the result of the Subspace Army's extensive analysis.



* The Hole of Heroes in ''VideoGame/{{Pikmin}} 2'' is a Boss ''Dungeon,'' with some regular floors, some rest floors, and some boss floors, pitting you against a Burrowing Snagret and Pileated Snagret first, then a Ranging Bloyster [[FlunkyBoss and some Armored Cannon Beetle Larva]], then some Emperor Bulblaxes, then an Empress Bulblax, then a Man-at-Legs fightable with only Blues and Bulbmin, then a Beady Long Legs, then one original boss: the Raging Long Legs. Luckily, you DO get to save between levels.

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* The Hole of Heroes in ''VideoGame/{{Pikmin}} 2'' is a Boss ''Dungeon,'' ''Dungeon'', with some regular floors, some rest floors, and some boss floors, pitting you against a Burrowing Snagret and Pileated Snagret first, then a Ranging Bloyster [[FlunkyBoss and some Armored Cannon Beetle Larva]], then some Emperor Bulblaxes, then an Empress Bulblax, then a Man-at-Legs fightable with only Blues and Bulbmin, then a Beady Long Legs, then one original boss: the Raging Long Legs. Luckily, you DO get to save between levels.



* ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'':
** In ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiBowsersInsideStory'' and ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiDreamTeam'', within the Challenge Node and the Battle's Gauntlet you can fight powered-up versions of bosses Mario & Luigi defeated. The final boss encountered in both games is an incredibly powered up version of Bowser known as "Bowser X" and [[spoiler:Bowser Jr.]], respectively. The latter game also has the option of battling all the giant bosses found in the game. In ''Bowser's Inside Story'' this area is optional, but in ''Dream Team'' it is visited as part of the plot.
** ''VideoGame/MarioParty'' has one in two games, both of which require story mode to be completed at least once to prevent spoilers:
*** ''[[VideoGame/MarioParty Mario Party DS]]'' has this as a "Boss Bash" Minigame, where you get to fight the bosses in order as a TimeTrial. You don't have to worry about restocking or having to fight the bosses on reduced health -- but you DO have to beat them all in a row or you'll fail the entire minigame.
*** ''Mario Party 9'' allows the player to choose between fighting only minibosses, only main bosses or all of them. Since bosses can't kill characters (their attacks only reduce scores), the challenge is based on which of the 2-4 challengers deals the most damage in each battle. The character with the highest overall rank is declared victor.



* Used in several ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' games:
** The Sonic/Tails version of Sky Sanctuary in ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'', which gave you versions of the Green Hill and Metropolis bosses from the [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog first]] [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2 two]] games, before the level boss, Mecha Sonic. Interestingly, due to slight alterations of sprite proportions and JumpPhysics between the Sonic games, the difficulty of the two nostalgia bosses here is inverted from their original difficulty.
** The first ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' featured a boss rush for the regular six characters that you can access in Trial Mode after beating their stories. Amy and Big's "rushes" consist of only one boss since that's all they have, and Gamma's rush only has his first and last bosses since his other boss fights are actually part of levels. Also, none of the battles against other playable characters were included in the boss rushes.
** ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'' had an optional extra three {{Boss Rush}}es: a rush of all the boss battles in the Hero Story when that story is complete; a rush of all the boss battles in the Dark Story when that story is complete; and a rush of all the boss battles in the game when Last Story is complete. Beating each rush is worth one Emblem.
** The final level of ''SonicAdvance'' is a miniature BossRush of classics -- specifically, the first bosses of ''Sonic 1'' and ''Sonic 2'', before the real final boss shows up.
** The final level of ''SonicAdvance 2'' is a BossRush of all the prior bosses from the game, although they take half the hits to beat. After all that you reach the final boss. This is also [[GetBackHereBoss a literal example]] as all the bosses in the game are rushing away from you and you have to run to it.
*** ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4: Episode 1'' does something similar for E.G.G. Station Zone.
** The GameMod ''VideoGame/RobotniksRevenge'' is essentially a Boss Rush (and BossGame) of all the bosses from ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' and ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''. There are two modes in this boss rush: "Time Attack", which gives you infinite lives and checkpoints and rings between the bosses, and "Survival" which gives you three lives and no checkpoints or rings.



* The ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' games have the "Epic/Marathon" Hunting Quests. Made particularly difficult because you can't change your weapon mid-hunt and each monster is easier/harder to deal with using certain weapons more than others (e.g Dual swords on a Plesioth is pain incarnate; a bow or bowgun with Pierce shots will make sashimi out of one). In ''Tri Ultimate'', these missions become the largest part of the final rank chapter (9 stars). To ease the pain, large monsters in multi-monster quests typically tend to have less health; a monster that typically takes you 15 minutes to slay normally can take only 10 minutes or even five.

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* The ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' games have the "Epic/Marathon" Hunting Quests. Made particularly difficult because you can't change your weapon mid-hunt and each monster is easier/harder to deal with using certain weapons more than others (e.g Dual swords on a Plesioth is pain incarnate; a bow or bowgun with Pierce shots will make sashimi out of one). In ''Tri Ultimate'', these missions become the largest part of the final rank High Rank chapter (9 stars).stars) in the Village route, and the most ''common'' in all of G Rank in the Guild route. To ease the pain, large monsters in multi-monster quests typically tend to have less health; a monster that typically takes you 15 minutes to slay normally can take only 10 minutes or even five.
7th Jun '16 7:08:18 PM WillKeaton
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*** VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4: Episode 1 does something similar for E.G.G. Station Zone.

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*** VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4: ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4: Episode 1 1'' does something similar for E.G.G. Station Zone.
7th Jun '16 7:06:35 PM WillKeaton
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* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' has one in the form of Phantasmagoria of Flower View's extra stage, in which you have to defeat every character in the game in succession. Additionally, the fans have composed a couple of amazing boss theme compilations, known as [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESA63E6SzgE Last Boss Rush]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxJavbRAo-0 Extra Boss Rush]], which covers the {{Leitmotif}} every FinalBoss and BonusBoss through the 12th game, respectively.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' has one in the form of Phantasmagoria of Flower View's extra stage, in which you have to defeat every character in the game in succession. Additionally, the fans have composed a couple of amazing boss theme compilations, known as [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESA63E6SzgE Last Boss Rush]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxJavbRAo-0 Extra Boss Rush]], Rush,]] which covers the {{Leitmotif}} every FinalBoss and BonusBoss through the 12th game, respectively.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BossRush