History Main / BondVillainStupidity

12th Apr '16 8:20:34 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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'''Scott:''' [[NoMrBondIExpectYouToDine What? Are you feeding him?]] Why don't you just kill him?\\

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'''Scott:''' [[NoMrBondIExpectYouToDine What? Are you feeding him?]] him? Why don't you just kill him?\\
12th Apr '16 8:16:21 PM PaulA
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* OlderThanTelevision: In John Buchan's 1919 UsefulNotes/WorldWarI spy thriller ''Mr. Standfast'', the villain, having finally captured the hero [[Literature/TheThirtyNineSteps Richard Hannay]], explains his evil plans at great length. Buchan was arguably the first writer of modern spy thrillers.

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* OlderThanTelevision: In John Buchan's 1919 UsefulNotes/WorldWarI spy thriller ''Mr. Standfast'', ''Literature/MrStandfast'', the villain, having finally captured the hero [[Literature/TheThirtyNineSteps Richard Hannay]], Hannay, explains his evil plans at great length. Buchan was arguably the first writer of modern spy thrillers.
11th Apr '16 9:31:48 AM Hanz
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'''Scott:''' What? Are you feeding him? Why don't you just kill him?\\

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'''Scott:''' [[NoMrBondIExpectYouToDine What? Are you feeding him? him?]] Why don't you just kill him?\\
10th Apr '16 6:33:07 PM FordPrefect
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** Crops up twice in ''Film/{{Spectre}}''. First, when Oberhauser has Bond at his mercy in his secret base, he then decided to go all EvilMonologue, BreakTheBadass on both Bond and his girl, and then he'd get to killing Bond after the ColdBloodedTorture. This gave Bond time enough to make his escape. The second time, he constructs an elaborate DeathTrap, giving Bond a choice: escape now on your own, or try to rescue [[spoiler:Swann]] and die together. In the latter case, he was playing on Bond's feelings to get him to fall, but since he was more interested in tormenting Bond rather than killing him, this gave Bond plenty of time to find [[spoiler:Swann]] and then escape. His henchmen aren't too bright either. When they kidnap Bond, they tie his hands in front of him, with plastic zip ties. Sure enough, Bond's able to grab one of their guns and shoot them both, then break free.

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** Crops up twice in ''Film/{{Spectre}}''. First, when Oberhauser has Bond at his mercy in his secret base, he then decided to go all EvilMonologue, EvilGloating, BreakTheBadass on both Bond and his girl, and then he'd get to killing Bond after the ColdBloodedTorture. This gave Bond time enough to make his escape. The second time, he constructs an elaborate DeathTrap, giving Bond a choice: escape now on your own, or try to rescue [[spoiler:Swann]] and die together. In the latter case, he was playing on Bond's feelings to get him to fall, but since he was more interested in tormenting Bond rather than killing him, this gave Bond plenty of time to find [[spoiler:Swann]] and then escape. His henchmen aren't too bright either. When they kidnap Bond, they tie his hands in front of him, with plastic zip ties. Sure enough, Bond's able to grab one of their guns and shoot them both, then break free.
8th Apr '16 9:19:00 PM SirVancelot131
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* In ''Disney/TheLionKing'', Scar really should have known better than to trust [[CoDragons the Hyenas]] to kill Simba.
2nd Apr '16 9:02:57 AM OlfinBedwere
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* In ''FanFic/TintinAndAlphArtYvesRodier'', returning BigBad Rastapopoulos has several ways in which he could easily dispose of Tintin and Captain Haddock, before escaping. However, his sadistic need to give Tintin a slow, painful death for all the times his plans have been foiled ends up instead resulting in his ''own'' death, as he tries to hang them both, but the attempt goes horribly wrong and leads to him being thrown off a cliff.
22nd Mar '16 5:24:49 PM merotoker
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Often includes {{Monologuing}}, accompanied by stock quotes such as "YouHaveNoChanceToSurvive! I ''don't'' think we'll meet again... Goodbye!"

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Often includes {{Monologuing}}, EvilGloating, accompanied by stock quotes such as "YouHaveNoChanceToSurvive! I ''don't'' think we'll meet again... Goodbye!"



* Done quite deliberately by Jeremiah Gottwald in the GrandFinale of ''Anime/CodeGeass'', when he [[spoiler:calls off Lelouch's Knightmare Royal Guard and duels the attacking Zero/Suzaku by himself, so as to allow Suzaku to convincingly kill Lelouch for world peace.]]
** In episode 4, Jeremiah does this NOT on purpose when [[spoiler:Clovis' personal car -- hijacked by Zero and company -- make their way towards Suzaku's execution. When asked by his subordinates in security if they should blow up the car, Jeremiah replies "No! I shall take them myself!" If it hadn't been for Jeremiah's arrogance, the whole show would've ended right then and there.]]
** Lelouch himself does this several times, such as when he [[spoiler:taunts Euphemia during the hostage situation about his hatred of the royal family (planting the seeds in her mind that Zero might be Lelouch). He also reveals to Suzaku that he knows Suzaku's deepest secret -- that Suzaku killed his own father -- in order to appear omniscient. Not only does this fail to recruit him, but Suzaku begins to suspect Zero's identity, as Lelouch is one of the few who knows Suzaku is a patricide.]]

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* Done quite deliberately by Jeremiah Gottwald in the GrandFinale of ''Anime/CodeGeass'', when he [[spoiler:calls off Lelouch's Knightmare Royal Guard and duels the attacking Zero/Suzaku by himself, so as to allow Suzaku to convincingly kill Lelouch for world peace.]]
peace]].
** In episode 4, Jeremiah does this NOT on purpose when [[spoiler:Clovis' personal car -- hijacked by Zero and company -- make their way towards Suzaku's execution. When asked by his subordinates in security if they should blow up the car, Jeremiah replies "No! I shall take them myself!" If it hadn't been for Jeremiah's arrogance, the whole show would've ended right then and there.]]
there]].
** Lelouch himself does this several times, such as when he [[spoiler:taunts Euphemia during the hostage situation about his hatred of the royal family (planting the seeds in her mind that Zero might be Lelouch). He also reveals to Suzaku that he knows Suzaku's deepest secret -- that Suzaku killed his own father -- in order to appear omniscient. Not only does this fail to recruit him, but Suzaku begins to suspect Zero's identity, as Lelouch is one of the few who knows Suzaku is a patricide.]] patricide]].



* In ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'', Lust stabs [[spoiler:Mustang and Havoc]] and leaves them to bleed to death on the floor and doesn't actually watch them die. Cue her surprise when [[spoiler:Mustang comes back to kill her, having cauterized his own wound with fire.]]
** Wrath takes it a step further. Having observed [[spoiler:Mustang brutally burn his sister to death]], he determines that the currently extremely vulnerable [[spoiler:Mustang]] should be left alive, on the logic that [[spoiler:Mustang is too valuable to kill, as his alchemical skill is likely good enough to open the Gate.]] While this does make sense, Wrath has still made the decision ''not'' to kill the one person who, besides being smart and having a [[ItsPersonal personal vendetta]] against them, is ''exceptionally'' good at [[spoiler:killing homunculi.]] This ends... poorly for the bad guys.
*** Of course, had Wrath decided otherwise he would've had to clear the room of witnesses before [[spoiler: Mustang added the most vulnerable homunculus (due to not having a Philosopher's Stone) to his kill list.]]

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* In ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'', Lust stabs [[spoiler:Mustang and Havoc]] and leaves them to bleed to death on the floor and doesn't actually watch them die. Cue her surprise when [[spoiler:Mustang comes back to kill her, having cauterized his own wound with fire.]]
fire]].
** Wrath takes it a step further. Having observed [[spoiler:Mustang brutally burn his sister to death]], he determines that the currently extremely vulnerable [[spoiler:Mustang]] should be left alive, on the logic that [[spoiler:Mustang is too valuable to kill, as his alchemical skill is likely good enough to open the Gate.]] Gate]]. While this does make sense, Wrath has still made the decision ''not'' to kill the one person who, besides being smart and having a [[ItsPersonal personal vendetta]] against them, is ''exceptionally'' good at [[spoiler:killing homunculi.]] This ends... poorly for the bad guys.
*** Of course, had Wrath decided otherwise he would've had to clear the room of witnesses before [[spoiler: Mustang added the most vulnerable homunculus (due to not having a Philosopher's Stone) to his kill list.]]list]].



* Name ''any'' villain that Franchise/{{Batman}} has fought at least twice, and it's a sure bet that he or she has done something like this. The [[SanityHasAdvantages fact that his enemies tend to be insane]] is one of the biggest reasons he's survived so long.
** This gets deconstructed with The Riddler, who knows full well that leaving clues at his crime scenes and leaving a difficult-but-possible escape method in his deathtraps is just going to land him back in Arkham Asylum. By his own admission, he quite literally cannot help himself.
* In the ''ComicBook/UltimateSpiderMan'' series, one villain, Hammerhead, tries to avoid this trope by pulling out a gun and shooting a troublemaker; unfortunately, said troublemaker manages to catch the bullet unharmed, much to Hammerhead's surprise.
* ''Comicbook/TheUmbrellaAcademy'' StoryArc ''The Apocalypse Suite'' [[spoiler:averts this, as the WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds White Violin gets shot by her brother before she causes the EndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt]]. Equally, it ''doesn't'' avert it earlier when [[spoiler:Kraken (one of the White Violin's other brothers) fails, for some reason, to destroy her violin or bow when he had the chance]].
* Justified in the classic Disney comic story "MickeyMouse Outwits the Phantom Blot." In the story, the villainous Blot puts Mickey in death traps time and time again, but Mickey always escapes. It turns out that The Blot does this because, despite being evil, he can't stand to actually see anyone get hurt, let alone die. So he constructs elaborate traps to kill Mickey for him, then always leaves because he can't bear to watch. That is, until ''[[VideoGame/EpicMickey now]]''.

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* Name ''any'' villain that Franchise/{{Batman}} has fought at least twice, and it's a sure bet that he or she has done something like this. The [[SanityHasAdvantages fact that his enemies tend to be insane]] is one of the biggest reasons he's survived so long. \n** This gets deconstructed with The Riddler, who knows full well that leaving clues at his crime scenes and leaving a difficult-but-possible escape method in his deathtraps is just going to land him back in Arkham Asylum. By his own admission, he quite literally cannot help himself.
* In the ''ComicBook/UltimateSpiderMan'' series, one villain, Hammerhead, tries to avoid this trope by pulling out a gun and shooting a troublemaker; unfortunately, said troublemaker manages to [[BulletCatch catch the bullet bullet]] unharmed, much to Hammerhead's surprise.
* ''Comicbook/TheUmbrellaAcademy'' StoryArc ''The Apocalypse Suite'' [[spoiler:averts this, as the WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds White Violin gets shot by her brother before she causes the EndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt]].TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt]]. Equally, it ''doesn't'' avert it earlier when [[spoiler:Kraken (one of the White Violin's other brothers) fails, for some reason, to destroy her violin or bow when he had the chance]].
* Justified in the classic Disney comic story "MickeyMouse "ComicBook/{{Mickey Mouse|ComicUniverse}} Outwits the Phantom Blot." In the story, the villainous Blot puts Mickey in death traps time and time again, but Mickey always escapes. It turns out that The Blot does this because, despite being evil, he can't stand to actually see anyone get hurt, let alone die. So he constructs elaborate traps to kill Mickey for him, then always leaves because he can't bear to watch. That is, until ''[[VideoGame/EpicMickey now]]''.



* Averted in ''Comicbook/BlackOrchid'' half the tropes on that page are related to that single moment.

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* Averted in ''Comicbook/BlackOrchid'' ''Comicbook/BlackOrchid''; half the tropes on that page are related to that single moment.



* ''ComicStrip/ThePhantom'': The Phantom wouldn't have lasted for one generation, let alone [[LegacyImmortality the twenty-one he's currently at]], without practically ''every'' enemy he's ever met falling for this trope. All Phantoms eventually get killed in the line of duty, but so far it's never been due to a villain having the foresight to [[NoNonsenseNemesis Just Shoot Him]] when they have him captured. To put it in perspective, more Phantoms have died from fighting {{mook}}s than from being captured by the BigBad.

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* ''ComicStrip/ThePhantom'': The Phantom wouldn't have lasted for one generation, let alone [[LegacyImmortality the twenty-one he's currently at]], without practically ''every'' enemy he's ever met falling for this trope. All Phantoms eventually get killed in the line of duty, but so far it's never been due to a villain having the foresight to [[NoNonsenseNemesis Just Shoot Him]] when they have him captured. To put it in perspective, more Phantoms have died from fighting {{mook}}s {{mooks}} than from being captured by the BigBad.



* Subverted in the 1997 movie version of ''Film/LeBossu''. After a long sword fight, the hero gets cornered by some soldiers and the PsychoForHire. From what we have seen earlier, it will be difficult, but possible for him to escape. At this moment, the villain, exasperated by the long fight, steps up to the Psycho for Hire, draws his gun, asks why they can't do it "quick, modern and effective" and shoots the hero, who only survives because of his {{Character Shield}}s.

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* Subverted in the 1997 movie version of ''Film/LeBossu''. After a long sword fight, the hero gets cornered by some soldiers and the PsychoForHire. From what we have seen earlier, it will be difficult, but possible for him to escape. At this moment, the villain, exasperated by the long fight, steps up to the Psycho for Hire, draws his gun, asks why they can't do it "quick, modern and effective" and shoots the hero, who only survives because of his {{Character Shield}}s.PlotArmor.



** [[spoiler:Unlike Valentine, who refuses to abide by the cliches of classic TuxedoAndMartini villains, Arthur does not appear to have paid much attention to them, as he [[JustBetweenYouAndMe explains]] the EvilPlan shortly before his death and falls for a PoisonedChaliceSwitcheroo. The victory of the heroes largely relied upon Arthur's lack of foresight]].

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** [[spoiler:Unlike Valentine, who refuses to abide by the cliches of classic TuxedoAndMartini villains, Arthur does not appear to have paid much attention to them, as he [[JustBetweenYouAndMe explains]] the EvilPlan shortly before his death and falls for a PoisonedChaliceSwitcheroo. The victory of the heroes largely relied upon Arthur's lack of foresight]].foresight.]]



** In Vol. 2, she is injured and disabled relatively easily, but rather than kill her on the spot, [[spoiler: Budd]] chooses to bury her alive, giving her the chance to dig her way out and come back for seconds. Subverted in that [[spoiler: Budd is already dead by the time she gets to him, as Elle took advantage of her apparent death to kill him.]]

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** In Vol. 2, she is injured and disabled relatively easily, but rather than kill her on the spot, [[spoiler: Budd]] chooses to bury her alive, giving her the chance to dig her way out and come back for seconds. Subverted in that [[spoiler: Budd is already dead by the time she gets to him, as Elle took advantage of her apparent death to kill him.]]him]].



* [[Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe The White Witch]] could have saved herself a lot of trouble if she'd just killed Edmund as soon as she met him. But in this case it's justified, since Edmund did not appear to represent any sort of threat personally, and she had a reasonable-seeming plan to use him to destroy her other enemies. She was in fact undone not by a flaw in her plan per se but but by Divine mercy. As Aslan points out, her knowledge went only back to the beginning of Time. She was unaware of key things that happened before that. At one point she ''is'' about to kill him, realizing that he's no longer necessary to her plans, and in the middle of sharpening her knife when Edmund (currently tied to a tree) is rescued. The only reason the Witch initially kept Edmund alive was because she learned he had two sisters and a brother, fitting the prophecy that two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve would reclaim Narnia, and thus hoped to get all four dead or [[TakenForGranite petrified]] and be done with it. Her plan almost did work at one point, when the other three Pevensie siblings seriously gave thought to breaking into the Witch's castle to save Edmund, but were talked out of it by the Beavers. She finally gives up on the plan when the three Pevensie siblings reach Caer Paravel thus making their capture impossible, and realizes that simply killing Edmund would stop the prophecy from being fulfilled. By ''that'' point, the other assassins she'd sent to kill the children failed, and were used to track down and save Edmund.

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* [[Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'': The White Witch]] Witch could have saved herself a lot of trouble if she'd just killed Edmund as soon as she met him. But in this case it's justified, since Edmund did not appear to represent any sort of threat personally, and she had a reasonable-seeming plan to use him to destroy her other enemies. She was in fact undone not by a flaw in her plan per se but but by Divine mercy. As Aslan points out, her knowledge went only back to the beginning of Time. She was unaware of key things that happened before that. At one point she ''is'' about to kill him, realizing that he's no longer necessary to her plans, and in the middle of sharpening her knife when Edmund (currently tied to a tree) is rescued. The only reason the Witch initially kept Edmund alive was because she learned he had two sisters and a brother, fitting the prophecy that two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve would reclaim Narnia, and thus hoped to get all four dead or [[TakenForGranite petrified]] and be done with it. Her plan almost did work at one point, when the other three Pevensie siblings seriously gave thought to breaking into the Witch's castle to save Edmund, but were talked out of it by the Beavers. She finally gives up on the plan when the three Pevensie siblings reach Caer Paravel thus making their capture impossible, and realizes that simply killing Edmund would stop the prophecy from being fulfilled. By ''that'' point, the other assassins she'd sent to kill the children failed, and were used to track down and save Edmund.



* Morgana in the BBC series ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' is guilty of so many examples of this that the only way the series manages to work is an equal amount of [[ForgotAboutHisPowers Plot-Induced Stupidity]] for the good guys to balance her out.
* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003''. During TheMutiny [[spoiler:Zarek tries to convince Gaeta he needs to kill Commander Adama and stop screwing around with a KangarooCourt, as alive he's a rallying point for the loyalists. Gaeta, being less ruthless, and more interested in making Adam acknowledge what he's put them through with his command decisions, doesn't listen.]]

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* Morgana in the BBC series ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'' is guilty of so many examples of this that the only way the series manages to work is an equal amount of [[ForgotAboutHisPowers Plot-Induced Stupidity]] for the good guys to balance her out.
* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003''. During TheMutiny [[spoiler:Zarek tries to convince Gaeta he needs to kill Commander Adama and stop screwing around with a KangarooCourt, as alive he's a rallying point for the loyalists. Gaeta, being less ruthless, and more interested in making Adam acknowledge what he's put them through with his command decisions, doesn't listen.]]listen]].



** In ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', near the end [[spoiler: the main character [[StupidityIsTheOnlyOption willingly climbs into a transport]] within the alien citadel that immobilizes him. Naturally, its a trap and it carries him helplessly right to the Big Bad, who does not take the opportunity to shoot him. Justified later when the main villain tries to recruit him.]]

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** In ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', near the end [[spoiler: the main character [[StupidityIsTheOnlyOption willingly climbs into a transport]] within the alien citadel that immobilizes him. Naturally, its a trap and it carries him helplessly right to the Big Bad, who does not take the opportunity to shoot him. Justified later when the main villain tries to recruit him.]]him]].



* In the original ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' [[spoiler: this actually is all part of the villains' plans. Because the DARPA chief was "accidentally" killed by Ocelot, the terrorist didn't have the second part of the code to activate Metal Gear, so they needed Snake to progress through his mission and use an alternate means of activating Metal Gear (by making him think they'd already activated it, and that inputting the code would disable it). So locking Snake in a cell patrolled by an inept guard was all part of the plan.]]

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* In the original ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' [[spoiler: this actually is all part of the villains' plans. Because the DARPA chief was "accidentally" killed by Ocelot, the terrorist didn't have the second part of the code to activate Metal Gear, so they needed Snake to progress through his mission and use an alternate means of activating Metal Gear (by making him think they'd already activated it, and that inputting the code would disable it). So locking Snake in a cell patrolled by an inept guard was all part of the plan.]]plan]].



* In ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry 3'', Mission 13 has [[spoiler: Arkham detailing his plan in manipulating the twins and his daughter into spilling their blood to undo the seal. He undid the final part of the seal by stabbing Lady with her bayonet through the leg, but it was just as easy to stab her somewhere vital and kill her, which would have prevented her from getting up and turning her weapon on him. ... It also would have stopped her from killing him at the end, too.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry 3'', Mission 13 has [[spoiler: Arkham detailing his plan in manipulating the twins and his daughter into spilling their blood to undo the seal. He undid the final part of the seal by stabbing Lady with her bayonet through the leg, but it was just as easy to stab her somewhere vital and kill her, which would have prevented her from getting up and turning her weapon on him. ... It also would have stopped her from killing him at the end, too.]]too]].



* [[VideoGame/BaldursGateII Jon Irenicus]] stands out from the norm by averting this trope; not only does he feel no need to explain his plans to you at any point, he also make good use of sedatives to take you out rather than give you a chance to escape, and he makes sure to have you killed off properly after he no longer need you. Unfortunately (for him, at least) he decided to let his sister Bodhi deal with that. She played the trope straight, and had this interesting maze she wanted to test...

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* [[VideoGame/BaldursGateII ''VideoGame/BaldursGateII'': Jon Irenicus]] Irenicus stands out from the norm by averting this trope; not only does he feel no need to explain his plans to you at any point, he also make good use of sedatives to take you out rather than give you a chance to escape, and he makes sure to have you killed off properly after he no longer need you. Unfortunately (for him, at least) he decided to let his sister Bodhi deal with that. She played the trope straight, and had this interesting maze she wanted to test...



** Mostly averted with the Empire ([[GrayAndGreyMorality though they are not technically "evil"]]). The Imperial Legion captured the rebel leader Ulfric Stormcloak and instead of taking him back to the capital and staging an elaborate trial, they immediately take him and the other captives to the next garrison where they are led to the chopping block right after getting of the cart. But even that turned out to be too much of a delay, as a dragon attacks and the prisoners escape in the chaos after just one of them had been beheaded.

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** Mostly averted with the Empire ([[GrayAndGreyMorality ([[GreyAndGrayMorality though they are not technically "evil"]]). The Imperial Legion captured the rebel leader Ulfric Stormcloak and instead of taking him back to the capital and staging an elaborate trial, they immediately take him and the other captives to the next garrison where they are led to the chopping block right after getting of the cart. But even that turned out to be too much of a delay, as a dragon attacks and the prisoners escape in the chaos after just one of them had been beheaded.



* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIII'': Charles Lee [[spoiler: refuses to kill you in the New York prison, instead explaining how he'll frame you for their own murder plot of George Washington so you are hanged. Connor escapes. When Connor is captured at Haytham's funeral, Lee again refuses to kill him, claiming he wants to break him first. Connor escapes again, this time forcing Lee to attempt to flee the colonies entirely.]]

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* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIII'': Charles Lee [[spoiler: refuses to kill you in the New York prison, instead explaining how he'll frame you for their own murder plot of George Washington so you are hanged. Connor escapes. When Connor is captured at Haytham's funeral, Lee again refuses to kill him, claiming he wants to break him first. Connor escapes again, this time forcing Lee to attempt to flee the colonies entirely.]]entirely]].



* In the 8-bit version of ''SonicTheHedgehog2,'' Dr. Robotnik actually ''rescues'' Sonic from falling to his death -- in order to try killing him his preferred way, in a [[ShoutOut Sarlacc pit]].
* Justified in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast''...possibly. The maidens are a major threat to Agahnim's plans, since they are the only ones capable of sealing Ganon or countering his evil magic. This obviously raises the question of why Agahnim only teleports the maidens to the Dark World instead of killing them. The first maiden explains that this is because [[spoiler:they are also the only ones who can ''unseal'' Ganon, so he has to hijack their powers to free himself from the Dark World]]. [[ZigZaggedTrope However]], one of the maidens implies that [[spoiler:Ganon already siphoned all the power he needed from them]], which does raise the question of why he's still keeping them around.

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* In the 8-bit version of ''SonicTheHedgehog2,'' ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2,'' Dr. Robotnik actually ''rescues'' Sonic from falling to his death -- in order to try killing him his preferred way, in a [[ShoutOut Sarlacc pit]].
* Justified in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast''...possibly. The maidens are a major threat to Agahnim's plans, since they are the only ones capable of sealing Ganon or countering his evil magic. This obviously raises the question of why Agahnim only teleports the maidens to the Dark World instead of killing them. The first maiden explains that this is because [[spoiler:they are also the only ones who can ''unseal'' Ganon, so he has to hijack their powers to free himself from the Dark World]]. [[ZigZaggedTrope [[ZigZaggingTrope However]], one of the maidens implies that [[spoiler:Ganon already siphoned all the power he needed from them]], which does raise the question of why he's still keeping them around.



** In "[[Recap/TheAdventuresOfBatmanAndRobinE3Trial Trial]]", Batman's enemies have captured and restrained him, but instead of just killing him decide to put him on trial. [[KangarooCourt With]] the Joker as the [[HangingJudge judge]] and [[JokerJury Mad Hatter, Harley, and Croc as the Jury]]. The DA who stated that Batman should be put on trail was defense, and if she got him acquitted they'd both be set free, if she failed they'd both be killed. But then, [[SanityHasAdvantages what else would you expect from Batman's enemies?]] Two-Face at least ''did'' want to [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim just shoot him]], but lost the coin toss.

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** In "[[Recap/TheAdventuresOfBatmanAndRobinE3Trial Trial]]", Batman's enemies have captured and restrained him, but instead of just killing him decide to put him on trial. [[KangarooCourt With]] the Joker as the [[HangingJudge judge]] and [[JokerJury Mad Hatter, Harley, and Croc as the Jury]]. The DA who stated that Batman should be put on trail trial was defense, and if she got him acquitted they'd both be set free, if she failed they'd both be killed. But then, [[SanityHasAdvantages what else would you expect from Batman's enemies?]] Two-Face at least ''did'' want to [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim just shoot him]], but lost the coin toss. They do try to kill him after the trial, but by then Batman and the DA manage to escape.
21st Mar '16 1:33:41 AM NozzDogg
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* Many a ''TabletopGame/RocketAge'' villain will happily allow heroes to escape unharmed, only for it to come back and bite them later in the adventure. However, this is nearly always [[JustifiedTrope justified]], as the villain may be playing some elaborate game with both the heroes and their own lives or using the heroes as a distraction to cover up their own escape.
19th Mar '16 1:04:34 PM Wyldchyld
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** Aizen, who is usually very savvy, manages to get two of his own.
*** He's so focused on defeating the power of the strongest offensive zanpakutou in Soul Society history that he fails to think of what will happen when it's removed from the picture. [[spoiler: He takes out Yamamoto's zanpakutou very quickly, but Yamamoto points out that shinigami aren't helpless without their zanpakutou and proceeds to prove it. Aizen fails to achieve his objective of killing Yamamoto and admits he underestimated the old man.]]
*** Aizen sets up an elaborate method of ensuring Ichigo can train for a power upgrade before they fight. [[spoiler:He was hoping Ichigo would achieve a level of power strong enough for Aizen to reach a new level of power. Unfortunately for Aizen, he completely underestimated Ichigo's growth potential and ended up being curbstomped.]]

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** Aizen, who is usually very savvy, manages to get two of his own.
*** He's so focused on defeating the power of the strongest offensive zanpakutou in Soul Society history that he fails to think of what will happen when it's removed from the picture. [[spoiler: He takes out Yamamoto's zanpakutou very quickly, but Yamamoto points out that shinigami aren't helpless without their zanpakutou and proceeds to prove it. Aizen fails to achieve his objective of killing Yamamoto and admits he underestimated the old man.]]
***
Aizen sets up an elaborate method of ensuring Ichigo can train for a power upgrade before they fight. [[spoiler:He was hoping Ichigo would achieve a level of power strong enough for Aizen to reach a new level of power. Unfortunately for Aizen, he completely underestimated Ichigo's growth potential and ended up being curbstomped.]]
17th Mar '16 6:03:40 PM ObsidianFire
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Bond Villain Stupidity is a form of GenreBlindness commonly exhibited by villains. It occurs when a villain fails to kill the hero when he has him cornered, incapacitated, or otherwise defenseless, thus giving the hero a chance to escape and later come back to defeat the villain. It is so named because it occurs frequently in ''Film/JamesBond'' movies. A common form of Bond Villain Stupidity is to place the hero in an elaborate DeathTrap from which he can escape (slow dipping mechanisms over [[SharkPool pits of sharks, alligators]], [[LavaPit or lava]] are perennial favorites). If you ever asked why the villains [[StatingTheSimpleSolution don't just shoot him]] then use their pets/lava to dispose of the body, then congratulations, you are smarter than the average megalomaniac. Also common is the inability to resist a JustBetweenYouAndMe moment before putting the hero in said death trap. Several variants of this one made the EvilOverlordList.

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Bond Villain Stupidity is a form of GenreBlindness ignorance commonly exhibited by villains. It occurs when a villain fails to kill the hero when he has him cornered, incapacitated, or otherwise defenseless, thus giving the hero a chance to escape and later come back to defeat the villain. It is so named because it occurs frequently in ''Film/JamesBond'' movies. A common form of Bond Villain Stupidity is to place the hero in an elaborate DeathTrap from which he can escape (slow dipping mechanisms over [[SharkPool pits of sharks, alligators]], [[LavaPit or lava]] are perennial favorites). If you ever asked why the villains [[StatingTheSimpleSolution don't just shoot him]] then use their pets/lava to dispose of the body, then congratulations, you are smarter than the average megalomaniac. Also common is the inability to resist a JustBetweenYouAndMe moment before putting the hero in said death trap. Several variants of this one made the EvilOverlordList.



This is so common that the HypercompetentSidekick [[LampshadeHanging pointing out the inherent flaws]] in this trope and suggesting a more pragmatic solution has become a trope on its own: StatingTheSimpleSolution. For more generalized villainous incompetence, see VillainBall. For those villains that avert this trope, see DangerouslyGenreSavvy.

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This is so common that the HypercompetentSidekick [[LampshadeHanging pointing out the inherent flaws]] in this trope and suggesting a more pragmatic solution has become a trope on its own: StatingTheSimpleSolution. For more generalized villainous incompetence, see VillainBall. For those villains that avert this trope, see DangerouslyGenreSavvy.
VillainBall.



* Throughout ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirlsRainbowRocks'' the Dazzlings have Canterlot High in the palm of their hands due to how DangerouslyGenreSavvy they were, and ultimately manages to regain their lost power. Victory really is within their grasp but after they knocked down the Rainbooms during the final showdown, they suddenly stop and stand still floating above their foes instead of trying to finish them off while they are down, which gives the Rainbooms the opportunity to get back up and counterattack with the aid of Sunset Shimmer. By the time they do decide to attack it is already too late and the heroes' counterspell is cast, freeing everyone from their control and summoning their alicorn avatar to destroy their magic pendants.

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* Throughout ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirlsRainbowRocks'' the Dazzlings have Canterlot High in the palm of their hands due to how DangerouslyGenreSavvy smart they were, and ultimately manages to regain their lost power. Victory really is within their grasp but after they knocked down the Rainbooms during the final showdown, they suddenly stop and stand still floating above their foes instead of trying to finish them off while they are down, which gives the Rainbooms the opportunity to get back up and counterattack with the aid of Sunset Shimmer. By the time they do decide to attack it is already too late and the heroes' counterspell is cast, freeing everyone from their control and summoning their alicorn avatar to destroy their magic pendants.



** In ''Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice'', Blofeld's guilty of it at least twice; first, he sends an assassin to kill Bond with an elaborate poison trick while he sleeps… you know, instead of shooting him or dropping a grenade on him or any of another ways to kill a sleeping guy from roughly the same distance. Later, he catches Bond in his base, and keeps him alive because he wants Bond to witness his success [[GenreBlind even though he really ought to know better than that by now.]] He even pulls an elaborate fakeout where [[BlofeldPloy he seems like he's about to shoot Bond, but shoots his own henchman instead at the last second]]. A little while after that, he finally tries to shoot Bond for real, but of course by then it's too late.

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** In ''Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice'', Blofeld's guilty of it at least twice; first, he sends an assassin to kill Bond with an elaborate poison trick while he sleeps… you know, instead of shooting him or dropping a grenade on him or any of another ways to kill a sleeping guy from roughly the same distance. Later, he catches Bond in his base, and keeps him alive because he wants Bond to witness his success [[GenreBlind even though he really ought to know better than that by now.]] now. He even pulls an elaborate fakeout where [[BlofeldPloy he seems like he's about to shoot Bond, but shoots his own henchman instead at the last second]]. A little while after that, he finally tries to shoot Bond for real, but of course by then it's too late.



** Classic example in ''Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough''. Elektra King drops a loaded pistol for Bond to collect, before she runs up a set of stairs -- unarmed. In her case, she thought she was GenreSavvy enough to believe that [[ChivalrousPervert Bond]] [[WouldntHitAGirl wouldn't shoot a woman]]. [[WouldHitAGirl She was wrong]]. Elektra seems pretty reticent to kill Bond generally; she seems to be waiting for him to give in to his affection for her and become her new Renard -- which is still nonsensical, but no longer this trope (as she doesn't actually want him dead).

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** Classic example in ''Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough''. Elektra King drops a loaded pistol for Bond to collect, before she runs up a set of stairs -- unarmed. In her case, she thought she was GenreSavvy smart enough to believe that [[ChivalrousPervert Bond]] [[WouldntHitAGirl wouldn't shoot a woman]]. [[WouldHitAGirl She was wrong]]. Elektra seems pretty reticent to kill Bond generally; she seems to be waiting for him to give in to his affection for her and become her new Renard -- which is still nonsensical, but no longer this trope (as she doesn't actually want him dead).



** Oddly averted in ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix The Order of the Phoenix]]'', where Voldemort apparently has [[GenreSavvy learned]] his lesson and tries to kill Harry quickly, only to be stopped by [[TheCavalry Dumbledore]]. However, [[spoiler:Umbridge]] plays this straight several chapters into the same book ([[HoistByHisOwnPetard as revealed later on]]) with one word: [[spoiler:"DETENTION!"]]

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** Oddly averted in ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix The Order of the Phoenix]]'', where Voldemort apparently has [[GenreSavvy learned]] learned his lesson and tries to kill Harry quickly, only to be stopped by [[TheCavalry Dumbledore]]. However, [[spoiler:Umbridge]] plays this straight several chapters into the same book ([[HoistByHisOwnPetard as revealed later on]]) with one word: [[spoiler:"DETENTION!"]]



* Uncharacteristically occurs with [[Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy Grand Admiral Thrawn]], usually one of the more GenreSavvy people in the ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse''. He has just betrayed Mara Jade by tricking her into revealing Talon Karrde's location, leading to his arrest by Imperials who will torture him if he doesn't hand over important intel, and then smugly mouths off to her face about it. Mara predictably goes [[BerserkButton berserk]] and attempts to attack Thrawn, at first physically then through the Force. Both of these fail, leaving Thrawn with the question of what to do with a still visibly enraged and always emotionally unstable Jade. Instead of killing her, he allows her to live, and lets her out of his sight aboard his ship before letting her go. Jade then predictably hacks into the computer network of Thrawn's ship, uses it to find Luke Skywalker, and saves him. The next one-and-a-half books can be accurately described as Jade [[MistreatmentInducedBetrayal sticking it to Thrawn]] which eventually leads to his plans collapsing and his death.

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* Uncharacteristically occurs with [[Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy Grand Admiral Thrawn]], usually one of the more GenreSavvy smarter people in the ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse''. He has just betrayed Mara Jade by tricking her into revealing Talon Karrde's location, leading to his arrest by Imperials who will torture him if he doesn't hand over important intel, and then smugly mouths off to her face about it. Mara predictably goes [[BerserkButton berserk]] and attempts to attack Thrawn, at first physically then through the Force. Both of these fail, leaving Thrawn with the question of what to do with a still visibly enraged and always emotionally unstable Jade. Instead of killing her, he allows her to live, and lets her out of his sight aboard his ship before letting her go. Jade then predictably hacks into the computer network of Thrawn's ship, uses it to find Luke Skywalker, and saves him. The next one-and-a-half books can be accurately described as Jade [[MistreatmentInducedBetrayal sticking it to Thrawn]] which eventually leads to his plans collapsing and his death.



* Played straight for most of the ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' series, with [=LeChuck=] dreaming up more ludicrous ways of dealing with Guybrush. In ''VideoGame/TalesOfMonkeyIsland'', however, [[spoiler:it gets subverted ''twice''. When [=LeChuck=] reveals he was the HeelFaceMole, he kill Guybrush by simply skewering him with a sword. When Guybrush returns in zombie form, [=LeChuck=] goes for a NoHoldsBarredBeatdown to try and kill him. When Guybrush asks why [=LeChuck=] isn't going for his usual overcomplicated plan, [=LeChuck=] informs him [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy he's learned from his mistakes]]]]. In ''VideoGame/EscapeFromMonkeyIsland''. [=LeChuck=] points out to his villainous cohort that leaving Guybrush alive has always cost him in the past... then they do it anyway. By dumping him on an "inescapable" island that he's escaped from several times.

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* Played straight for most of the ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' series, with [=LeChuck=] dreaming up more ludicrous ways of dealing with Guybrush. In ''VideoGame/TalesOfMonkeyIsland'', however, [[spoiler:it gets subverted ''twice''. When [=LeChuck=] reveals he was the HeelFaceMole, he kill Guybrush by simply skewering him with a sword. When Guybrush returns in zombie form, [=LeChuck=] goes for a NoHoldsBarredBeatdown to try and kill him. When Guybrush asks why [=LeChuck=] isn't going for his usual overcomplicated plan, [=LeChuck=] informs him [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy he's learned from his mistakes]]]].mistakes]]. In ''VideoGame/EscapeFromMonkeyIsland''. [=LeChuck=] points out to his villainous cohort that leaving Guybrush alive has always cost him in the past... then they do it anyway. By dumping him on an "inescapable" island that he's escaped from several times.



** Said dragon also averts this trope in this specific scene in that he actually is ''Alduin'', the [[OmnicidalManiac World Eater]], and the reason of his attack was that he was looking for the [[PlayerCharacter Dragonborn]] so he could kill him before he unlocked his powers and became a threat- you read right: the game's FinalBoss ''[[DangerouslyGenreSavvy actually comes to try and kill you while you still are level 1]]'', and you only escape alive because it takes him time to find you among all these puny mortals. He does, however, play this trope straight later in the game, where he will just leave a recently raised dragon deal with you whenever you encounter him before the boss fight.

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** Said dragon also averts this trope in this specific scene in that he actually is ''Alduin'', the [[OmnicidalManiac World Eater]], and the reason of his attack was that he was looking for the [[PlayerCharacter Dragonborn]] so he could kill him before he unlocked his powers and became a threat- you read right: the game's FinalBoss ''[[DangerouslyGenreSavvy actually ''actually comes to try and kill you while you still are level 1]]'', 1'', and you only escape alive because it takes him time to find you among all these puny mortals. He does, however, play this trope straight later in the game, where he will just leave a recently raised dragon deal with you whenever you encounter him before the boss fight.



* In ''Webcomic/SluggyFreelance'' Dr. Steve originally ''was'' [[GenreSavvy just going to shoot Torg]], but [[http://sluggy.com/daily.php?date=991001 got talked out of it]].

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* In ''Webcomic/SluggyFreelance'' Dr. Steve originally ''was'' [[GenreSavvy just going to shoot Torg]], Torg, but [[http://sluggy.com/daily.php?date=991001 got talked out of it]].



** DoubleSubversion with Roland Daggett when he had Batgirl and Catwoman at his mercy. When Batgirl taunted him with the suggestion that he leave them trussed up over one of his vats of deadly chemicals with acid burning through the rope, [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy he pointed out how often this method had failed him before]], and announced he was just going to [[StatingTheSimpleSolution have his men shoot them and toss their bodies into those vats instead.]] In the end, however, his stopping to tell them this gave them just enough time to get loose and take him down anyway.

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** DoubleSubversion with Roland Daggett when he had Batgirl and Catwoman at his mercy. When Batgirl taunted him with the suggestion that he leave them trussed up over one of his vats of deadly chemicals with acid burning through the rope, [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy he pointed out how often this method had failed him before]], before, and announced he was just going to [[StatingTheSimpleSolution have his men shoot them and toss their bodies into those vats instead.]] In the end, however, his stopping to tell them this gave them just enough time to get loose and take him down anyway.



* Played straight in the ''WesternAnimation/SWATKats'' episode "Night of the Dark Kat", where Dark Kat and Hard Drive have managed to capture the eponymous heroes, but instead of summarily executing them, set them on the end of a long ConveyorBeltODoom that leads to a rock crushing machine, a machine which is wired to blow up the warehouse if shut down, leading to predictable consequences. Dark Kat usually proves more GenreSavvy than that, too. Hard Drive even {{lampshade|Hanging}}s it: "[[StatingTheSimpleSolution I still say you should have let me fry those two!]]"

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* Played straight in the ''WesternAnimation/SWATKats'' episode "Night of the Dark Kat", where Dark Kat and Hard Drive have managed to capture the eponymous heroes, but instead of summarily executing them, set them on the end of a long ConveyorBeltODoom that leads to a rock crushing machine, a machine which is wired to blow up the warehouse if shut down, leading to predictable consequences. Dark Kat usually proves more GenreSavvy smarter than that, too. Hard Drive even {{lampshade|Hanging}}s it: "[[StatingTheSimpleSolution I still say you should have let me fry those two!]]"



* In ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'', Amon has Korra completely at his mercy with about two dozen of his [[EliteMooks chi-blockers]] restraining her and looks like he's about to take her bending away and...doesn't. However, he justifies it and only comes across as even more DangerouslyGenreSavvy because of it. He needs support for his plan to succeed and this early in the game, taking her bending away would only turn her into a martyr banding everyone not already on his side against him.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'', Amon has Korra completely at his mercy with about two dozen of his [[EliteMooks chi-blockers]] restraining her and looks like he's about to take her bending away and...doesn't. However, he justifies it and only comes across as even more DangerouslyGenreSavvy smarter because of it. He needs support for his plan to succeed and this early in the game, taking her bending away would only turn her into a martyr banding everyone not already on his side against him.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BondVillainStupidity