History Main / BondVillainStupidity

16th Jul '17 4:35:15 PM cybertoy0
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* During the Dressrosa Arc of ''Anime/OnePiece'', there's an example of this plus NiceJobFixingItVillain: the Straw Hats' plan to liberate the island required knocking Sugar out, thus undoing the effect of her Devil Fruit power on previous victims, which had turned them into toys and made them her slaves (a number that, over ten years, had amounted to thousands). The initial plan was to trick her into eating an incredibly spicy Tatababasco berry disguised as a grape, which would make her collapse. But the plan didn't work well, to say the least; Sugar's toys found out about it, and in the ensuing confrontation ended with Robin becoming a victim of the power in an attempt to restrain Sugar, Usopp beaten up by Sugar's bodyguard Trebol, and the Straw hats' Tontatta allies beaten senseless. It would seem the heroes were, well, doomed. Until Sugar decided that, rather than use her power on Usopp (which she ''usually'' did to captured prisoners, and really had no reason to stop now) she would make him suffer, and force fed him the Tatababasco. It made Usopp make a WildTake to end all Wild Takes, scaring Sugar into submission and, while not the way they planned, knocked her out, doing the job anyway.

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* During ''Anime/OnePiece':
** Played with in Alabasta; Crocodile traps most of the heroes in a cage, tosses the key to one of his giant pet crocodiles, and lets water slowly fill the room. After he leaves, it seems like he's just being overconfident that the good guys are doomed, but it turns out that he has the real key to the cage- the one he tossed was a fake. Nonetheless, the heroes escape thanks to a ChekhovsGun while he's gone.
**During
the Dressrosa Arc of ''Anime/OnePiece'', Arc, there's an example of this plus NiceJobFixingItVillain: the Straw Hats' plan to liberate the island required knocking Sugar out, thus undoing the effect of her Devil Fruit power on previous victims, which had turned them into toys and made them her slaves (a number that, over ten years, had amounted to thousands). The initial plan was to trick her into eating an incredibly spicy Tatababasco berry disguised as a grape, which would make her collapse. But the plan didn't work well, to say the least; Sugar's toys found out about it, and in the ensuing confrontation ended with Robin becoming a victim of the power in an attempt to restrain Sugar, Usopp beaten up by Sugar's bodyguard Trebol, and the Straw hats' Tontatta allies beaten senseless. It would seem the heroes were, well, doomed. Until Sugar decided that, rather than use her power on Usopp (which she ''usually'' did to captured prisoners, and really had no reason to stop now) she would make him suffer, and force fed him the Tatababasco. It made Usopp make a WildTake to end all Wild Takes, scaring Sugar into submission and, while not the way they planned, knocked her out, doing the job anyway.
15th Jul '17 9:52:50 AM cybertoy0
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* Felix of ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'' is exceptionally prone to this. A born sadist, if there's a way to twist the knife a little further, he'll do it. Naturally, this backfires on him several times; When he brags to the Reds and Blues on how he and Locus are manipulating the civil war on Chorus, this gives Agent Carolina time to come to the rescue. When he does it again to Tucker, he ends up falling into an EngineeredPublicConfession.
5th Jul '17 6:06:52 PM merotoker
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* Name ''any'' villain that Franchise/{{Batman}} has fought at least twice, and it's a sure bet that he or she has done something like this. The [[SanityHasAdvantages fact that his enemies tend to be insane]] is one of the biggest reasons he's survived so long. This gets deconstructed with The Riddler, who knows full well that leaving clues at his crime scenes and leaving a difficult-but-possible escape method in his deathtraps is just going to land him back in Arkham Asylum. By his own admission, he quite literally cannot help himself.

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* Name ''any'' villain that Franchise/{{Batman}} has fought at least twice, and it's a sure bet that he or she has done something like this. The [[SanityHasAdvantages fact that his enemies tend to be insane]] is one of the biggest reasons he's survived so long. This gets deconstructed with The Riddler, ComicBook/TheRiddler, who knows full well that leaving clues at his crime scenes and leaving a difficult-but-possible escape method in his deathtraps is just going to land him back in Arkham Asylum. By his own admission, he quite literally cannot help himself.



** One of the biggest examples of this trope in Creator/MarvelComics was done by the Frightful Four. Well, three of them; the Wizard, Trapster, and Sandman were, as usual, in need of a fourth member, something they never seemed able to hang onto. They managed to invade the Baxter Building, ambush the team and take the heroes hostage. So what do they do now that they have their foes at their mercy? Dispose of them? Engage in sadistic torture? Maybe hack into Reed's files? Nope. They use the Baxter Building to hold auditions for a fourth member, and force the heroes to watch. Unfortunately for them, most of the folks who showed up were {{Harmless Villain}}s and a few folks who were trying to decide between this and something more legit including Texas Twister (who rejected their offer because SHIELD had offered better), and [[FunPersonified Captain Ultra]] (making his first appearance here, likely what made the issue stand out most) but it ''really'' turned bad for the villains when Tigra - who was friends with the FF - showed up and saw the situation. She got them out, and when the Wizard announced over the intercom to everyone waiting that whoever helped them fight the heroes could join them, they proved smarter than he was - [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere they ran for the exit.]] (One villain, the Brute remained, and he ended up the fourth member, but like all other fourth members of the Frightful Four, he didn't last long.)

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** One of the biggest examples of this trope in Creator/MarvelComics was done by the Frightful Four. Well, three of them; the Wizard, Trapster, and Sandman were, as usual, in need of a fourth member, something they never seemed able to hang onto. They managed to invade the Baxter Building, ambush the team and take the heroes hostage. So what do they do now that they have their foes at their mercy? Dispose of them? Engage in sadistic torture? Maybe hack into Reed's files? Nope. They use the Baxter Building to hold auditions for a fourth member, and force the heroes to watch. Unfortunately for them, most of the folks who showed up were {{Harmless Villain}}s and a few folks who were trying to decide between this and something more legit including Texas Twister (who rejected their offer because SHIELD ComicBook/{{SHIELD}} had offered better), and [[FunPersonified Captain Ultra]] (making his first appearance here, likely what made the issue stand out most) but it ''really'' turned bad for the villains when Tigra - who was friends with the FF - showed up and saw the situation. She got them out, and when the Wizard announced over the intercom to everyone waiting that whoever helped them fight the heroes could join them, they proved smarter than he was - [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere they ran for the exit.]] (One villain, the Brute remained, and he ended up the fourth member, but like all other fourth members of the Frightful Four, he didn't last long.)



** ''Film/TheForceAwakens'': For some reason, Kylo thinks leaving Rey in a room with one stormtrooper is a great idea, despite the fact that he just learn she can use the force and her powers are rapidly growing.

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** ''Film/TheForceAwakens'': For some reason, Kylo thinks leaving Rey in a room with one stormtrooper is a great idea, despite the fact that he just learn learned she can use the force and her powers are rapidly growing.



* In ''Film/SpiderMan1'', Green Goblin knocks out and captures Spiderman, but neither kills him nor takes his mask off to see who he really is. Instead he asks Spiderman to join him, and amazingly, he just leaves him alone to "think it over" after Spiderman turns down the offer.

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* In ''Film/SpiderMan1'', Green Goblin knocks out and captures Spiderman, Spider-Man, but neither kills him nor takes his mask off to see who he really is. Instead he asks Spiderman Spider-Man to join him, and amazingly, he just leaves him alone to "think it over" after Spiderman Spider-Man turns down the offer.



* Uncharacteristically occurs with [[Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy Grand Admiral Thrawn]], usually one of the smarter people in the ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse''. He has just betrayed Mara Jade by tricking her into revealing Talon Karrde's location, leading to his arrest by Imperials who will torture him if he doesn't hand over important intel, and then smugly mouths off to her face about it. Mara predictably goes [[BerserkButton berserk]] and attempts to attack Thrawn, at first physically then through the Force. Both of these fail, leaving Thrawn with the question of what to do with a still visibly enraged and always emotionally unstable Jade. Instead of killing her, he allows her to live, and lets her out of his sight aboard his ship before letting her go. Jade then predictably hacks into the computer network of Thrawn's ship, uses it to find Luke Skywalker, and saves him. The next one-and-a-half books can be accurately described as Jade [[MistreatmentInducedBetrayal sticking it to Thrawn]] which eventually leads to his plans collapsing and his death.

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* Uncharacteristically occurs with [[Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy Grand Admiral Thrawn]], usually one of the smarter people in the ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse''. He has just betrayed Mara Jade by tricking her into revealing Talon Karrde's location, leading to his arrest by Imperials who will torture him if he doesn't hand over important intel, and then smugly mouths off to her face about it. Mara predictably goes [[BerserkButton berserk]] {{berserk|Button}} and attempts to attack Thrawn, at first physically then through the Force. Both of these fail, leaving Thrawn with the question of what to do with a still visibly enraged and always emotionally unstable Jade. Instead of killing her, he allows her to live, and lets her out of his sight aboard his ship before letting her go. Jade then predictably hacks into the computer network of Thrawn's ship, uses it to find Luke Skywalker, and saves him. The next one-and-a-half books can be accurately described as Jade [[MistreatmentInducedBetrayal sticking it to Thrawn]] which eventually leads to his plans collapsing and his death.



* [[Wrestling/KevinNash Diesel]] Vs. Wrestling/TheUndertaker at ''Wrestling/WrestleMania XII''. Near the end, Diesel refused to immediately Pin 'Taker post-[[FinishingMove Jackknife Powerbomb]], instead choosing to engage in some lengthy and premature EvilGloating while the Match was still in progress -- against someone whom Diesel clearly knew had a knack for MyNameIsInigoMontoya-style recoveries. Oh, and the kicker? After 'Taker indeed rose back up, Diesel quickly managed to Jackknife him once again... and then actually '''''continued''''' said Gloating. Unsurprisingly, as LaserGuidedKarma for such foolishness, Diesel ultimately proceeded to become the fifth Streak-victim.

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* [[Wrestling/KevinNash Diesel]] Vs. Wrestling/TheUndertaker at ''Wrestling/WrestleMania XII''. Near the end, Diesel refused to immediately Pin pin 'Taker post-[[FinishingMove Jackknife Powerbomb]], instead choosing to engage in some lengthy and premature EvilGloating while the Match match was still in progress -- against someone whom Diesel clearly knew had a knack for MyNameIsInigoMontoya-style recoveries. Oh, and the kicker? After 'Taker indeed rose back up, Diesel quickly managed to Jackknife him once again... and then actually '''''continued''''' said Gloating. Unsurprisingly, as LaserGuidedKarma for such foolishness, Diesel ultimately proceeded to become the fifth Streak-victim.



* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV'': The BigBad Zinyak does this to the Boss. Even though the Boss has shown how dangerous he can be to Zinyak's forces, and Zinyak has shown he can easily defeat the Boss in one-to-one combat. He decides that it's better to "break" the boss through a simulation. Considering the Boss's and the other Saint's fierce [[{{Determinator}} determination]], you can see where this is going. Doesn't stop Zinyak from making the struggle as difficult as possible though.

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* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV'': The BigBad Zinyak does this to the Boss. Even though the Boss has shown how dangerous he can be to Zinyak's forces, and Zinyak has shown he can easily defeat the Boss in one-to-one combat. He decides that it's better to "break" the boss through a simulation. Considering the Boss's and the other Saint's fierce [[{{Determinator}} determination]], {{determinat|or}}ion, you can see where this is going. Doesn't stop Zinyak from making the struggle as difficult as possible though.



* In ''RiseOfTheTombRaider'', Lara is captured by Trinity soldiers, who proceed to lock her in an ancient crumbling prison and leave her there without posting any guards. As if that wasn't dumb enough, they also leave her equipment right outside her cell (along with a set of jail keys), which ultimately results in one of the quickest jail cell escapes in video game history.

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* In ''RiseOfTheTombRaider'', ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTombRaider'', Lara is captured by Trinity soldiers, who proceed to lock her in an ancient crumbling prison and leave her there without posting any guards. As if that wasn't dumb enough, they also leave her equipment right outside her cell (along with a set of jail keys), which ultimately results in one of the quickest jail cell escapes in video game history.



* [[DefiedTrope Refusing to fall into this trope]] is a non-insignifant focus of the EvilOverlordList.
-->''4. [[WhyDontYaJustShootHim Shooting is]] ''[[WhyDontYaJustShootHim not]]'' [[WhyDontYaJustShootHim too good for my enemies]].''\\

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* [[DefiedTrope Refusing to fall into this trope]] is a non-insignifant non-insignificant focus of the EvilOverlordList.
-->''4. [[WhyDontYaJustShootHim [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim Shooting is]] ''[[WhyDontYaJustShootHim ''[[WhyDontYouJustShootHim not]]'' [[WhyDontYaJustShootHim [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim too good for my enemies]].''\\



* Possibly the biggest case of NearVillainVictory in ''WesternAnimation/HeManAndTheMastersOfTheUniverse2002'' was the three-part "Council of Evil" episode. Skeletor's plan had worked almost perfectly, had most of the heroes at his mercy and bringing Eternia to its DarkestHour to date. But his overconfidence and ego did him in. He specifically said that the reason he wasn't killing them right away was so they could ''witness'' his true victory, seizing Greayskull and the Elders' power. Not only did this mistake cost him, it served as a serious "wake up call" to the heroes, and paved the way for the plot of second [[ExecutiveMeddling (and unfortunately, last)]] season.

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* Possibly the biggest case of NearVillainVictory in ''WesternAnimation/HeManAndTheMastersOfTheUniverse2002'' was the three-part "Council of Evil" episode. Skeletor's plan had worked almost perfectly, had most of the heroes at his mercy and bringing Eternia to its DarkestHour to date. But his overconfidence and ego did him in. He specifically said that the reason he wasn't killing them right away was so they could ''witness'' his true victory, seizing Greayskull Grayskull and the Elders' power. Not only did this mistake cost him, it served as a serious "wake up call" to the heroes, and paved the way for the plot of second [[ExecutiveMeddling (and unfortunately, last)]] season.



* Aku in ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'', has acted in a StupidEvil manner a lot, so it stands to reason that his stupidest involves this Trope, which[[spoiler: comes in the GrandFinale. He has Jack at his mercy and seems ready to kill him [[PublicExecution before the entire world via broadcast...]] only to waste time deciding what weapon to use. Jack's sword, the single instrument capable of killing Aku, is also still sitting in plain sight instead of being taken away or destroyed, meaning that even if Jack was killed, someone could still take it and finish the job for him.]]

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* Aku in ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'', has acted in a StupidEvil manner a lot, so it stands to reason that his stupidest involves this Trope, which[[spoiler: comes in the GrandFinale. He has Jack at his mercy and seems ready to kill him [[PublicExecution before the entire world via broadcast...]] only to waste time deciding what weapon to use. Jack's sword, the single instrument capable of killing Aku, is also still sitting in plain sight instead of being taken away or destroyed, meaning that even if Jack was killed, someone could still take it and finish the job for him.]]him]].



* In ''WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop'', the villain Hooded Claw constantly tries to murder the eponymous heroine(ish) so that he inherits her fortune instead of her. The entire episodes are devised of the heroes foiling his extremely elaborate and overly complex homicide attempts. Probably the biggest reason he never succeeded was his [[BigHam enjoyment at explaining every little detail of each plan to Penelope herself]]; it always took at least three minutes, and it would either reveal a flaw in the design to her or give her some time to either free herself or get saved by the Ant Hill Mob.
** Subverted in several episodes, in which [[WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop the Hooded Claw]] admits he enjoys setting up and explaining his death traps so much that he really isn't very interested in whether or not [[WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop Penelope]] manages to escape: if she dies, he inherits the fortune, and if she escapes, he gets to set up another death trap, so for him, it's a win-win situation.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop'', the ''WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop'',
** The
villain the Hooded Claw constantly tries to murder the eponymous heroine(ish) so that he inherits her fortune instead of her. The entire episodes are devised of the heroes foiling his extremely elaborate and overly complex homicide attempts. Probably the biggest reason he never succeeded was his [[BigHam enjoyment at explaining every little detail of each plan to Penelope herself]]; it always took at least three minutes, and it would either reveal a flaw in the design to her or give her some time to either free herself or get saved by the Ant Hill Mob.
**
Mob. Subverted in several episodes, in which [[WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop the Hooded Claw]] Claw admits he enjoys setting up and explaining his death traps so much that he really isn't very interested in whether or not [[WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop Penelope]] Penelope manages to escape: if she dies, he inherits the fortune, and if she escapes, he gets to set up another death trap, so for him, it's a win-win situation.



** COBRA does this a lot, but one that stands out as ''especially'' stupid was the ChristmasEpisode. It started out like a good idea; Cobra Commander thought he'd attack the Joes' headquarters on Christmas Eve (worked for UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, right?) and it actually worked - he and his men took the whole team of Joes hostage. Then the Commander got a good idea, ''maybe''. He had his men handcuff the prisoners and lock them up in their own meat locker, suspended from the hooks by their cuffs, then decided to take the Joes' vehicles for a joyride and attack a nearby city, maybe get the Joes in trouble. Then, however, Cobra Commander's last attempt at EvilGloating ruins the plan royally. He tells his prisoners he's leaving them a "Christmas present" and ''puts the keys to their handcuffs on a hook by the door'' before he leaves to taunt them, confident they can't possibly reach it. Unbeknownst to him, Shipwreck has already partially freed himself, getting down from the hook (he leaps up and grabs hold of it when they hear the Commander coming) so when the villain leaves again, freeing himself and the others is a simple matter. Even worse, when the villains leave with the Joes' vehicles, they ''leave their own vehicles behind'' (and apparently leave the keys in the ignitions, for that matter). Did the villains think the Joes wouldn't shoot down their own crafts? Wild Bill ''did'' say he felt "like [he] shot his own horse" when he did, but he still did, and so did the others. (So all this botched plan accomplished was to prove that C.O.B.R.A. can't claim that the Joes have better equipment as an excuse for their failures...)
** Ironically, during the five-part "Arise Serpentor Arise", when the villains took Sergeant Slaughter (likely one of the biggest thorns in their side) hostage, Cobra Commander was the smart on, wanting to kill him right away. Unfortunately for him, he had little control of the organization at the time, and Dr. Mindbender wanted to use Slaughter's DNA to supply the fighting expertise of his creation. It turned out ''very'' bad for them, and would be the biggest factor in the experiment creating just another failure of a leader.

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** COBRA does this a lot, but one that stands out as ''especially'' stupid was the ChristmasEpisode. It started out like a good idea; Cobra Commander thought he'd attack the Joes' headquarters on Christmas Eve (worked for UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, right?) and it actually worked - he and his men took the whole team of Joes hostage. Then the Commander got a good idea, ''maybe''. He had his men handcuff the prisoners and lock them up in their own meat locker, suspended from the hooks by their cuffs, then decided to take the Joes' vehicles for a joyride and attack a nearby city, maybe get the Joes in trouble. Then, however, Cobra Commander's last attempt at EvilGloating ruins the plan royally. He tells his prisoners he's leaving them a "Christmas present" and ''puts the keys to their handcuffs on a hook by the door'' before he leaves to taunt them, confident they can't possibly reach it. Unbeknownst to him, Shipwreck has already partially freed himself, getting down from the hook (he leaps up and grabs hold of it when they hear the Commander coming) so when the villain leaves again, freeing himself and the others other is a simple matter. Even worse, when the villains leave with the Joes' vehicles, they ''leave their own vehicles behind'' (and apparently leave the keys in the ignitions, for that matter). Did the villains think the Joes wouldn't shoot down their own crafts? Wild Bill ''did'' say he felt "like [he] shot his own horse" when he did, but he still did, and so did the others. (So all this botched plan accomplished was to prove that C.O.B.R.A. can't claim that the Joes have better equipment as an excuse for their failures...)
** Ironically, during the five-part "Arise Serpentor Arise", when the villains took Sergeant Slaughter (likely one of the biggest thorns in their side) hostage, Cobra Commander was the smart on, one, wanting to kill him right away. Unfortunately for him, he had little control of the organization at the time, and Dr. Mindbender wanted to use Slaughter's DNA to supply the fighting expertise of his creation. It turned out ''very'' bad for them, and would be the biggest factor in the experiment creating just another failure of a leader.



** A particularly ridiculous offender with [[KnightTemplar the Rooters]], seeing how [[spoiler:their whole goal focuses around killing Ben to begin with]]. They had [[spoiler:him as their prisonner, in human form and unconcious]] ''right in their first episode'', but Proctor Servantis decides to still [[spoiler:let him go]] and stick with his ridiculously convoluted plan (which by the way [[spoiler:[[VillainForgotToLevelGrind was developped to kill Ben ''five years ago'', and Ben has become much more powerful since then]]]]) on the argument that "he is tougher than he looks".

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** A particularly ridiculous offender with [[KnightTemplar the Rooters]], seeing how [[spoiler:their whole goal focuses around killing Ben to begin with]]. They had [[spoiler:him as their prisonner, in human form and unconcious]] unconscious]] ''right in their first episode'', but Proctor Servantis decides to still [[spoiler:let him go]] and stick with his ridiculously convoluted plan (which by the way [[spoiler:[[VillainForgotToLevelGrind was developped to kill Ben ''five years ago'', and Ben has become much more powerful since then]]]]) on the argument that "he is tougher than he looks".



* Deconstructed in ''WesternAnimation/WanderOverYonder''. Wander realizes that the reason Lord Dominator keeps succumbing to Bond Villain Stupidity and letting the heroes escape is because [[spoiler: she's suffering from [[LonelyAtTheTop crippling loneliness]] and [[NoSocialSkills an inability to connect with others]]. She desperately seeks companionship but doesn't understand how to make it work, so she goes around bullying and dominating people as a supervillain, desperate to feel a connection. When her victims inevitably flee or fight back [[ILetYouWin she lets them do so]] because that means she'll get to fight them more later.]]

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* Deconstructed in ''WesternAnimation/WanderOverYonder''. Wander realizes that the reason Lord Dominator keeps succumbing to Bond Villain Stupidity and letting the heroes escape is because [[spoiler: she's suffering from [[LonelyAtTheTop crippling loneliness]] and [[NoSocialSkills an inability to connect with others]]. She desperately seeks companionship but doesn't understand how to make it work, so she goes around bullying and dominating people as a supervillain, desperate to feel a connection. When her victims inevitably flee or fight back [[ILetYouWin she lets them do so]] because that means she'll get to fight them more later.]] later]].
4th Jul '17 5:51:27 PM name_already_chosen
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* In ''WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop'', the villain Hooded Claw constantly tries to murder the eponymous heroine(ish) so that he inherits her fortune instead of her. The entire episodes are devised of the heroes foiling his extremely elaborate and overly complex homicide attempts. Probably the biggest reason he never succeeded was his need to explain every little detail of each plan to Penelope herself; it always took at least three minutes, and it would either reveal a flaw in the design to her or give her some time to either free herself or get saved by the Ant Hill Mob.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop'', the villain Hooded Claw constantly tries to murder the eponymous heroine(ish) so that he inherits her fortune instead of her. The entire episodes are devised of the heroes foiling his extremely elaborate and overly complex homicide attempts. Probably the biggest reason he never succeeded was his need to explain [[BigHam enjoyment at explaining every little detail of each plan to Penelope herself; herself]]; it always took at least three minutes, and it would either reveal a flaw in the design to her or give her some time to either free herself or get saved by the Ant Hill Mob.
4th Jul '17 5:49:44 PM name_already_chosen
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* In ''WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop'', the villain Hooded Claw constantly tries to murder the eponymous heroine(ish). The entire episodes are devised of the heroes foiling his extremely elaborate and overly complex homicide attempts. Probably the biggest reason he never succeeded was his need to explain every little detail of each plan to Penelope herself; it always took at least three minutes, and it would either reveal a flaw in the design to her or give her some time to either free herself or get saved by the Ant Hill Mob.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop'', the villain Hooded Claw constantly tries to murder the eponymous heroine(ish).heroine(ish) so that he inherits her fortune instead of her. The entire episodes are devised of the heroes foiling his extremely elaborate and overly complex homicide attempts. Probably the biggest reason he never succeeded was his need to explain every little detail of each plan to Penelope herself; it always took at least three minutes, and it would either reveal a flaw in the design to her or give her some time to either free herself or get saved by the Ant Hill Mob.Mob.
** Subverted in several episodes, in which [[WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop the Hooded Claw]] admits he enjoys setting up and explaining his death traps so much that he really isn't very interested in whether or not [[WesternAnimation/ThePerilsOfPenelopePitstop Penelope]] manages to escape: if she dies, he inherits the fortune, and if she escapes, he gets to set up another death trap, so for him, it's a win-win situation.
26th Jun '17 12:54:08 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* A few ''Series/TwentyFour'' fans weren't too attached to the AffablyEvil Jonas Hodges in season 7, because of this trope. At one point in the season, Jones Hodges manages to frame Jack Bauer for the death of a man he tortured by tasering, but could've just as easily killed Jack Bauer in the process. A bit of context: the incapacitated man was lying in the hospital bed recovering from the aforementioned torture when Jack Bauer sneaked back into the room (Bauer wasn't allowed to see him, but had to [[JackBauerInterrogationTechnique interrogate him...again]]). When this happened, Jonas Hodges deployed knockout gas into the room to knock them out for a few brief minutes, which he then sends some men to kill the tortured man, and then leave. This makes the more GenreSavvy fans think, "why didn't he kill Jack while he had the upper hand?" (Answer: because that would be bad for ratings).

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* A few ''Series/TwentyFour'' fans weren't too attached to the AffablyEvil Jonas Hodges in season 7, because of this trope. At one point in the season, Jones Hodges manages to frame Jack Bauer for the death of a man he tortured by tasering, but could've just as easily killed Jack Bauer in the process. A bit of context: the incapacitated man was lying in the hospital bed recovering from the aforementioned torture when Jack Bauer sneaked back into the room (Bauer wasn't allowed to see him, but had to [[JackBauerInterrogationTechnique interrogate him...again]]). When this happened, Jonas Hodges deployed knockout gas into the room to knock them out for a few brief minutes, which he then sends some men to kill the tortured man, and then leave. This makes the more GenreSavvy fans think, "why didn't he kill Jack while he had the upper hand?" (Answer: because that would be bad for ratings).
14th Jun '17 2:59:30 AM Sinister_Sandwich
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** In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince'', [[spoiler:Draco Malfoy]] gloats triumphantly when [[spoiler:Albus Dumbledore]] lies in a weakened state completely at his mercy, but fails to kill him despite having been ordered to do so on pain of death as he can't bring himself to do it. This leads to [[spoiler:Severus Snape having to step in for Draco and finish off Dumbledore]].
14th Jun '17 2:57:33 AM Sinister_Sandwich
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** ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'': In the opening sequence on the Trade Federation battleship, Nute Gunray tries to kill Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan using a rather simple [[DeadlyGas poison gas]] vent in a locked room. But instead of just letting the gas do its job and waiting for the Jedi to drop dead, he drops the ball by sending a squad of [[MechaMooks battle droids]] to check on them. The battle droids proceed to unlock the door--''letting the gas out''--and are promptly mowed down by Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan, who managed to survive using the advanced Jedi maneuver of...holding their breath. Note that in the same sequence, Gunray makes use of security cameras to kill the crew of the Jedi's spaceship while in another room; why he didn't just switch on another security camera to make sure the Jedi were actually ''dead'' is anyone's guess.
5th Jun '17 10:32:35 PM Loekman3
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* Aku in ''SamuraiJack'', has acted in a StupidEvil manner a lot, so it stands to reason that his stupidest involves this Trope, which[[spoiler: comes in the GrandFinale. He has Jack at his mercy and seems ready to kill him [[PublicExecution before the entire world via broadcast...]] only to waste time deciding what weapon to use. Jack's sword, the single instrument capable of killing Aku, is also still sitting in plain sight instead of being taken away or destroyed, meaning that even if Jack was killed, someone could still take it and finish the job for him.]]

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* Aku in ''SamuraiJack'', ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'', has acted in a StupidEvil manner a lot, so it stands to reason that his stupidest involves this Trope, which[[spoiler: comes in the GrandFinale. He has Jack at his mercy and seems ready to kill him [[PublicExecution before the entire world via broadcast...]] only to waste time deciding what weapon to use. Jack's sword, the single instrument capable of killing Aku, is also still sitting in plain sight instead of being taken away or destroyed, meaning that even if Jack was killed, someone could still take it and finish the job for him.]]
29th May '17 9:09:23 PM Daedalis
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* Near the end of ''ComicBook/{{Revival}}'' our heroes are surrounded at gunpoint by US military. The commanding officer clarifies to ''his own troops'' that they have orders to kill, listens to and rebuts protests by the heroes, and counts down to coordinate the execution. The heroes' backup has plenty of time to show up and save the day.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BondVillainStupidity